www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

February 20, 2017, 6:30 AM EST



Valentine's Day in Perkins Cove

The shot above was taken in the morning on the town dock in Perkins Cove on Valentine's Day, February 14, 2017. The boat on the dock in the foreground is the Town's ice breaker. We had twenty inches of snow the day before from a storm that was out to sea more than it was ashore, thankfully.




Expected Regulations for the 2017 Bunny Clark Fishing Season

What this means for us in 2017 is that the bag limit for haddock will still be 15 fish per person with a minimum size of 17" starting on April 15, 2017. On May 1, 2017, the beginning of the 2017 Federal fiscal fishing year, the haddock bag limit will go down to 12 fish per person with the same minimum size limit. There will be a haddock prohibition starting on September 17, 2017 and extend until the end of October. We will be able to keep haddock again (12 fish bag limit & the 17" minimum size) starting November 1, 2017 until March 1, 2018, at which time it will close again to haddock until April 15, 2018. Cod will not be allowed to be landed (kept) from May 1, 2017 until May 1, 2018. If they make any changes at the Committee or Council level, I will let you know. After it goes out from the Council, National Marine Fisheries Service has to approve it. But, there again, I don't see any reason why they wouldn't approve these measures. I did not want to see any more restrictions in our fishery. But, by law, we (the Recreational Advisory Panel) had to work with the numbers we were given and the models that follow.

Also, see the January 25, 2017 entry below for a further explanation.

Thursday, January 19, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 28F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light out of the north and the visibility over the ocean was very good, at least. By sunrise, the sky was starting to clear. By 9:00 AM, it was clear. The air temperature started to warm up as well. By noon, the air temperature on was on the brink of breaking the 40F barrier. This was accomplished an hour later. The visibility was excellent. And there was zero wind with a flat calm ocean along the shore. Except for the melting mess and salt on the roads, it was a beautiful day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 40F (with a low of 25F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 46F with a low of 31F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 40F (with a low of 26F).

Today seemed more like a Monday. This, mainly, because I took all of yesterday off. So I was on the phone for a lot of it, on the email and at the offices. I met Bridges Electric at the restaurant at 10:00 AM in order to tie up some loose electrical ends. And I had about two hours of snow shoveling to do. The shoveling was the only outside activity I did today.

Along with everything else, I got word that our Recreational Advisory Panel (RAP) meeting yesterday was undermined somewhat. The RAP's choice of regulations for the 2017 fiscal fishing year went to the Council's Groundfish Committee for review and will be passed on from this committee to the full Council. But not as a recommendation of the Groundfish Committee. It will be forwarded as a recommendation of the RAP only! The Groundfish Committee looked at the models and suggestions from the Science Center and made a different choice. Their choice for recreational anglers would be a split season. For the for-hire fleet, a haddock bag limit of 10 fish per angler, a moratorium for keeping haddock from March 1, 2018 until April 14, 2018 but leaving the rest of the year open to the landing of haddock. For the private angler, a haddock bag limit of 12 fish per angler, a moratorium for keeping haddock from March 1, 2018 until April 14, 2018 and from September 17, 2017 until November 1, 2017 but leave the rest of the year open to the take of haddock. For both user groups there would be a moratorium on keeping cod for the 2017 fiscal fishing year (May 1, 2017 until April 30, 2018). So the Groundfish Committee will be recommending their choice of recreational Gulf of Maine fishing regulations but, also, moving the RAP's recommendation forward as well.

This new turn of events doesn't bother me at all. My main concern is that we (the RAP) don't have to meet again a year from now to make even deeper cuts in our groundfish take. Or, in other words, the stocks are in better shape next year when the RAP meets to decide on upcoming regulations. As far as a 10 haddock bag limit goes, I don't see much difference. That's still a lot of fish, particularly for a party boat. It's not as good for a six passenger charter boat (which is why I supported the RAP's recommendation initially). But it's much better that the 3 haddock limit we had in 2015, much better than having a three month moratorium on keeping haddock in the RAP's choice and maintaining the 17" minimum size will help the angler bring more fish home.

As far as having a separate limit for the private angler, I see no problems with it. The MRIP program of recreational data collecting tells us that the private angler catches more fish than the for-hire fleet. This isn't true, particularly as it pertains to the individual boat. This is because the data collection system is seriously flawed. And the new changes in the public survey system won't make it any better. They are restricted to a small sample size when questioning individual anglers, they are trusting the word of an angling public who could care less and they are extrapolating these results. All their other data collecting practices are fair at best. Which, in fact, they believe as well if you look at the error percentages they attach to the landings figures from different states that they, themselves, provide. But, as I said, if this brings us into a sustainable fishery, I'm all for it.

When the news hit the streets that the RAP's choice for regulatory recommendations was not embraced by the Groundfish Committee, members of the RAP were upset. Why even have the RAP if "they" aren't going to embrace our suggestions, was the reaction of most. I kind of feel that way. But the other part of me says that we never should have expected the Groundfish Committee to accept our results at a hundred percent to begin with. I was certainly surprised. But I can also see the merit in their choice. I'm interested to see if splitting the season with two user groups gives us some fish savings. It's also the first time that the recreational fishing fleet has been separated between the for-hire fleet and the private angler. So I'm surprised but not disappointed. And it won't make me believe that having the RAP is a bad thing. If for nothing else it informs those who are interested in getting a fair shake in representing our fishery with a voice. And, after all, if we were really so interested in getting our choice through we could have attended the Groundfish Committee to petition our cause with salient examples. We didn't do that. We let the Chair, Frank Blount, alone, do our bidding for us. And, after all, it's the rules of the game. This also means that attending the Council meetings will be important if you are interested in a particular choice of regulations going forward. And the Council could very well send both choices to the National Marine Fisheries Service and let them decide. I hope that doesn't happen because it delays timely information to the public on the new fishery regulations for the upcoming season.

I also had an interesting thing happen later in the morning. WCSH TV in Portland, Maine called me today to ask if I could make a short video as a message to former President George H. W. Bush and former First Lady Barbara Bush ("Tim, you can just call me Barbara, please."). Both had been in the hospital in Houston, Texas the last couple of days and WCSH wanted send a "get well" message to them from some of us in Maine who see and love the Bush Familiy when they are staying in Kennebunkport. So I got my sisters, Meg & Cathy, and my brother, Court, and had my wife, Deb, take a fifteen second video with my iPhone, a get well message of sorts. We did one take. I thought it came out terrible (for my part, the speaker in the video). But WCSH loved it as well as the three pictures they asked me to send them. One of the pictures I included was one with my father, George and Billy Busch sitting on the deck at Barnacle Billy's that I absolutely treasure as the best photo (shown below) I have ever taken. The video and the three pictures appeared on WCSH Channel 6 News at 5:00 PM and 6:00 PM today. It will also appear at 6:00 AM tomorrow. This is the WCSH link. Hope you enjoy it.



The digital image above was a shot taken with my iPhone of a print I took over ten years ago. The image doesn't really do the print any justice.

Friday, January 20, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 34F, the sky was mostly overcast, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was very good, at least. The dawn broke with partly clear skies. The morning was a mix of sun and clouds early and then mostly clouds sometime before noon. From noon on the sky remained overcast. We had overcast skies on into the night. To my knowledge it never rained. The air temperature was mild all day with a high of 40F or more. The air temperature dropped to 35F by 6:00 PM. But I don't believe it ever dropped any lower than that through the night. There wasn't much for wind all day. The ocean along the shore was calm. The visibility remained very good, not quite excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 40F (with a low of 22F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 40F with a low of 34F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 37F (with a low of 20F).

I spent all morning and part of the afternoon working at the desk (both at home and Barnacle Billy's), paying bills at the Town office, on the phone, on email and visiting local vendors. I gave up at 2:00 PM. By 2:45 PM, I was on the bike and out the door. I rode up into the hills of Sanford, Maine around to South Berwick and home. The air temperature was 40F when I started, cold up in the Sanford area (above freezing) and 35F when I got back. That was my day.

Some of the emails today concerned the recreational fishing regulations. But there weren't as many as I expected. I would have expected more on the cod moratorium for the 2017 fishing season. But after 2015, I guess nothing surprises anyone anymore.

As I said, I did a lot of riding around today as well. Gill loves to ride in the truck. But today, for some reason, he chose to sit in the back. So the whole time he was in the back. I keep a pile of winter clothes there in case it's snowing and I have to get out of the truck and shovel, etc. And half the time he was lying on those. But the other half he was sitting, just like he does when he sits in the front seat. I wish dogs could talk.

You have probably gathered that I haven't been running on the beach with Gill lately. This is because I pulled something in my calf while doing so. It does't effect my cycling or walking. But it gets more and more painful when I run. This is nothing new. I have had this same exact injury before. I am very fit, breathing wise because of the cycling. But I have no running legs. So when I start to run I have to start out with short distances and work up. But I normally feel better running than I should, which prompts me further and faster. "I can do this!" No, I really can't.

I plan to start running with Gill again on Sunday.

Saturday, January 21, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 36F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind here at the house and the visibility over the ocean was good, I think, in haze. At dawn, the visibility was fair, I could tell, in mist, haze and fog. The wind was light from the southwest for most of the day. The air temperature rose to 45F in Ogunquit. The sky was overcast all day but not terribly so. It never rained nor did it seem like it would. The visibility was good in the afternoon. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 45F (with a low of 36F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 55F with a low of 37F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 45F (with a low of 32F).

We celebrated Christmas today with our immediate family. Both my kids were here with their significant others.

Sunday, January 22, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 35F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten to fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good. At dawn, I could see a patch of blue in the sky to the east. But that lasted about an hour. After that the sky remained overcast for the rest of the day. It looked like it was going to rain all day. And we did have a mist thing or a very light rain going on for a minute or two at noon and during the mid afternoon. It did rain after sunset but very very little. The air temperature hung around the 38F after 9:00 AM and seemed to settle in at that air temperature for the day. I did see lower values during the later part of the afternoon but I never did see the air temperature go any higher. The wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen knots at sunrise but increased to twenty knots sustained an hour or so later. This wind stayed around that velocity with higher gusts through the day and into the night. The visibility was no better than good over the ocean. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 38F (with a low of 33F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 48F with a low of 39F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 40F (with a low of 30F).

I took the day off today after riding up to the Maine Coast Cycling Club's ride and back. The rest of the day I watched the hockey and football games, going to bed before the Pats game started the second period. I love the Pats but that's too late for me. So much for the Super Bowl, right?

Monday, January 23, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 35F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten to fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good. By sunrise, the wind was already blowing out of the east northeast at twenty knots or more. And it didn't take too much longer to see the wind increase to twenty-five knots sustained at the house. Throughout the day the wind had gusts to thirty knots. And with that much wind I expected bigger seas. But what we got was big chops along the shore instead. The sky was overcast all day. And, for the most part, the visibility was good. The air temperature ranged from 32F to 33F, dawn to dusk. At 3:00 PM we had the occasional snowflake. But by 4:00 PM it was periodically snowing heavily and then stopping, like the snow storm just couldn't sink it's teeth into Ogunquit just yet. After sunset, the same for a while with slightly stronger winds. The rain started at 7:00 PM. The air temperature rose to 36F. It was still raining at 9:00 PM when I went to the Cove at high tide to observe the influence of the easterly wind on the tide. There was no threat. So I went home and went to bed. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 33F (with a low of 30F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 40F with a low of 35F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 34F (with a low of 30F).

Today was a typical Monday with much going on and not much planned getting done. Plus, I had to spend some time down at the Cove running storm lines to other boats before this Noreaster. There was much to do about orders, taxes and emails. I never did get to work on the Guestletter, as planned. And I need to start to build the Bunny Clark reservation book. That didn't happen today.

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 31F, the sky was overcast, it was sleeting, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at thirty-five to forty-five knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair to poor. Seas at the closest weather buoy (nine miles away) were reading at eighteen feet or more at 7:00 AM. The highest seas recorded today at that same weather buoy was 27 feet at 1:00 PM! There was also about two inches or more of hard packed snow/sleet on the ground. The air temperature hung around 32F after sunrise, creeping up to 33F later in the morning. But it never snowed. When we had precipitation, it was rain. Rained increased during the later part of the day but slowed down again after sunset. Wind speeds were thirty-five to forty-five knots. Even though we had an astronomical low run tide today, we had splash over into the parking lot at Perkins Cove at the time of high tide, 8:45 AM. The wind blew out of the northeast or east northeast all morning. By 1:00 PM, the wind direction was northeast or north northeast. Winds speeds after that might have gusted to forty knots but not very frequently. You could tell the wind was backing off a bit. At sunset, the wind increased as we had a shift out of the north but then backed off even more. When I went to bed at 9:00 PM, the wind was blowing from twenty-five to thirty knots. The highest air temperature I saw was 35F. But I suspect that the air temperature rose a bit after sunset. The visibility over the ocean remained poor. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 34F (with a low of 29F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 42F with a low of 35F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 36F (with a low of 29F).

I spent the day going back and forth from the house to Perkins Cove, checking on the sea water rolling over the parking lot. I had to make sure the street drains could handle it. And I was checking on the crew working on the ceiling at Barnacle Billy's. My time at home was spent working on the Guestletter and checking with contemporaries about the Council meeting tomorrow. At 2:00 PM, after lunch, I planted myself in the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. where I started to build the reservation book for the Bunny Clark season. That's an eight to ten hour process. I got home for dinner at 6:00 PM.

I received a very generous donation from my mother, Bernice "Bunny" Clark Tower, sponsoring me in this year's Pan-Mass Challenge. The donation was $2,000.00, equal to my sister, Meg's, donation. My mother doesn't read my site; she doesn't have a computer. But I do so appreciate her still believing in what I do and the way I handle the restaurant business. Trying to do the right thing by her is priority one in my life. Thanks, Mom!

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 37F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, the wind was blowing out of the north at twenty knots or so and the visibility over the ocean was very good. By 9:00 AM, the sky was turning blue in places, the rain had stopped for at least an hour and the air temperature was climbing. I never did look at the air temperature today but I suspect it was up around 45F, by the feel. Maybe less. The sky cleared by 10:00 AM. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds for the rest of the day. The wind was west northwest after sunrise and then west after noon. Wind speeds were twenty knots with higher gusts all day. The visibility was very good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 42F (with a low of 28F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 44F with a low of 36F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 38F (with a low of 29F).

At 3:00 AM, I headed down to the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc., where I am building the reservation book. I spent two or more hours down there. Afterward, I went home and worked on posting this entry and ate some breakfast. I was out the door by 9:30 AM, on a bike ride to Kittery and back along the shore. When I got back, I took a shower and got ready to drive to Portsmouth for the New England Fishery Managment Council meeting at the Sheraton Hotel. I arrived there sometime after noon. I was there to see what the Council was going to choose for recreational regulations for the 2017 fishing season.

As I mentioned in the January 18th & 19th entries, the RAP chose one recommendation while the very next day the Groundfish Committee went a different route. The GC's choice would split the regulations up between the for-hire fleet and the private angler. And that was just the reason the Council needed to go with the RAP's recommendation. I am pretty sure the National Marine Fisheries Service will go with the RAP/NEFMC recommendation. So, when we start the season this year there will be:

Zero possession of cod for the season.
A minimum size limit of 17 inches for haddock.
There will be a 15 haddock bag limit starting on April 15, 2017 through until April 30, 2017 (Remember, we could not keep haddock during this same time period in 2015 and last season.).
Starting May 1, 2017, the haddock bag limit will drop to 12 fish per person.
The haddock season will be closed from September 17, 2017 to November 1, 2017, at which date the haddock season will open again.
All other groundfish regulations will remain the same.

Personally, I don't like the season for haddock closing in mid-September and all of October. It's not good for our business. But the recommendation the RAP chose, this one, is the best with regard to cod discards. And cod is the driver for what we can keep for haddock. If we go over on our cod sub-ACL (the total poundage of cod allowed to be caught by recreational anglers in the Gulf of Maine, this figure set by the NMFS) in 2017, we will be revisiting the regulations again at this time next year expecting deeper cuts in the take of cod and haddock. So as much as I dislike having the closed haddock season in the short term, long term it may help us keep cod in the future - or more haddock - or both.

I can see why the Council chose to go with this recommendation. The main reason was that it came in the form of a motion from the RAP. The RAP went over all the other possibilities and thought that, for everyone, this was the most fair for party, charter and the private angler. And the cod savings was the best with this recommendation, the reason I supported it in the RAP meeting. I think that most Council members could see the overall value in this recommendation. And I believe they thought that if a body of recreational anglers collectively wanted this form of regulations, and it met the requirements in the conservation of cod, then why shouldn't they accept it.

Driving home I was a little depressed to think that I was going to have to subject my customers to more prohibitions. And I couldn't help but think that the outcome would have been so much different if, first, the fishery were healthier than it is and, second, that the RAP, GC or the Council couldn't make a salient decision because MRIP method of angler data collection was so inaccurate. But we have been regulating the fishery using the "best available science" for decades now. I am just crossing my fingers that the for-hire fleet survives this most recent round of contentious regulations.

Thursday, January 26, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 36F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good at least. The sky remained overcast all morning and into the afternoon. By 2:00 PM, the sky cleared and the sun came out. There were almost no clouds for the rest of the afternoon. At 8:00 PM, the sky was still clear. The air temperature rose to a value of at least 48F. That was the highest air temperature I saw in Ogunquit today. The visibility was good to very good in some haze in the morning and very good in the afternoon. The wind blew out of the southwest all morning but was only ten knots along the shore by 10:00 AM. There was very little wind after that until sunset. After sunset, the wind hauled out of the west and blew up to twenty knots. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 47F (with a low of 28F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 51F with a low of 37F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 50F (with a low of 32F).

I spent three hours in the morning building the reservation book. I was back home by 7:30 AM. From there I almost completed this entry when I was called back down to the restaurant. From there I worked on the Guestletter in between business phone calls. I finally got back to this report in the afternoon and posted it. From there I went back to the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. and worked on the reservation book. I was back home for the day at 5:30 PM.

I had planned to take Gill down to the beach for a walk. But Deb had already done so earlier. In so doing, Gill hurt his right leg and was limping when I got home. So no beach in the dark with the Gill. The leg didn't look too bad and, upon inspection, it didn't hurt the dog when I felt around. It could be a sympathy limp. The dog has been known to limp if it gets him extra attention!

Friday, January 27, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 35F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at twenty knots with higher gusts and the visibility over the ocean was very good. By 7:00 AM, the air temperature had risen to 37F, there was black ice in places on the road (the radiational cooling under clear skies) and the visibility was excellent. The visibility stayed excellent all day. And the wind howled. Or it seemed to. The wind blew out of the west at twenty-five to thirty knots with higher gusts. The strongest wind occurred between 2:00 PM and 6:00 PM - when I was on my bike. The air temperature was slow to warm. In fact, I never saw an air temperature more than 40F. The sky was mostly cloudy with sun here and there. It never looked like it was going to rain or snow. But it never fully cleared either. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 43F (with a low of 34F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 44F with a low of 36F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 41F (with a low of 34F).

I landed down at the restaurant at 4:00 AM this morning where I ended up finishing the reservation book. I left there at 6:30 AM and went home to wait for our painter, Gary Charpentier, to call. Gary called at 7:15 AM. So I went back down to the Cove to let him in. And for most of the rest of the day I was either on the phone, working at the desk or knocking off items on the list that still had to be addressed.

Before noon, Estes Oil came by to take out the monitor heater in the work room. I could not get the small kerosine heater to work yesterday. So that will be gone for a few days.

I worked on the Guestletter through lunch until I got "mental fatigue", that condition I get when it takes me too long to complete a paragraph. So, since I had nothing pressing, I decided to go for a bike ride while it was still light out.

Saturday, January 28, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 33F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. It was two degrees warmer at 3:00 AM. The wind blew hard out of the west again all day. Wind speeds were twenty to thirty knots at times. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The air temperature might have reached 40F but the highest air temperature I saw was 39F. The visibility was very good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 40F (with a low of 30F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 40F with a low of 32F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 39F (with a low of 26F).

After posting this entry, I worked at home for the morning and part of the afternoon. There was nothing really exciting to tell. And there were no phone calls from restaurant vendors.

Sunday, January 29, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 29F, the sky was partly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. By 8:00 AM, the air temperature was 31F. The sky was mostly sunny in the morning and mostly cloudy in the afternoon. After 1:00 PM, we had snow squalls come through. There were very few of these and none of them produced enough snow to show on the ground. When they passed there was no significant difference on the roads. The wind blew hard again today. The wind blew out of the southwest until mid morning. Wind speeds of twenty knots were common, on average. During the later part of the morning, the wind hauled out of the west. Wind speeds were about twenty knots with higher gusts during the squalls in the afternoon. Near sunset, the sky cleared so that it was mostly clear. The highest air temperature I saw for the day was 39F in Ogunquit. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 42F (with a low of 26F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 43F with a low of 30F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 39F (with a low of 23F).

I took the whole day off today after posting this entry. I spent all morning and part of the afternoon on the bike.

We will be starting to take reservations for the upcoming 2017 Bunny Clark fishing season at 12:01 midnight, February 1. This will be the last time that we will be taking reservations that early in the morning on the first day. Next year we will be starting at 8:00 AM. So another year is upon us. I'm already looking forward to fishing again!

Monday, January 30, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 24F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The air temperature increased as the day progressed. I don't know how much it really did increase. I spent most of the whole day inside, working. At one point I saw 36F. The sky was mostly clear all day. The wind blew out of the west or northwest all day. Wind speeds were about ten knots, more or less. It was much less windy than the last few days. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 35F (with a low of 19F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 36F with a low of 24F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 34F (with a low of 14F).

I spent most of the morning and part of the afternoon working on cleaning up the work room. For the rest of the afternoon I worked on orders. Some of the time I spent down in the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. By the time I was done it was 6:30 PM.

Tuesday, Bunny Clark Reservations Eve, January 31, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 16F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at fifteen knots, more or less, and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. By dawn, the wind was about half of what it was the first time I looked. The air temperature was 15F. There was no wind by mid morning. The ocean along the shore was calm. The sky was clear all morning. After noon, the sky started to cloud over. By 2:00 PM, the sky was overcast and the wind was blowing out of the southeast at ten knots. To the south, it looked like it was going to snow. Indeed, towns in New Hampshire were reporting snow. However, by 7:00 PM, we still hadn't seen any snow. The wind was out of the east southeast at ten knots at 5:30 PM. The visibility was good to very good all day. The air temperature rose to 19F by 10:00 AM. At noon, the air temperature was 23F. The air temperature was 28F by 5:00 PM. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 25F (with a low of 12F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 28F with a low of 20F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 28F (with a low of 9F).

I stayed at home at the desk for the day with little forays to the outside world for one thing or another. I worked on this web site, putting up a new index page. I also worked on the Guestletter. And we spent time getting things ready to take reservations.

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 24F, the sky was overcast, a fine snow was falling, there was about an inch of the fluffy stuff on the ground, the wind was blowing lightly out of the east northeast and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in light snow. The snow kept up almost all morning. Mostly it was a fine snow. The snow stopped around noon, the sky cleared, the wind dropped to nothing and the air temperature warmed to 38F. We collected probably two or three inches of snow when it was all day, just enough to plow the driveway. There was a lot of melting on the roads. The sky stayed clear for the rest of the day. The visibility was excellent. The wind hauled out of the west during the later part of the afternoon. By sunset, the westerly wind was blowing at fifteen to twenty knots. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 34F (with a low of 20F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 43F with a low of 27F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 39F (with a low of 19F).

We started taking reservations after midnight. It was busy for the first hour. Not so busy after that. I took over at 1:30 AM. We had calls here and there. But nothing strenuous. I stayed by the phone watching TV (a years worth) until 6:30 AM, when Deb took over again. Calls came in, periodically, throughout the day.

I stayed in front of the computer for the day. Most of it, anyway. I worked on the Guestletter. I didn't do much else. I took the dog, Gill, to the Cove in the truck a couple of times. But, other than that, I was pounding the plastic.

Thursday, February 2, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 25F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was blowing out of the west at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind continued out of the west for most of the day. Near sunset, the wind hauled out of the northwest. After 1:00 PM, we had the occasional snow squall. With these squalls there was a lot of northwest wind, over twenty knots. These squalls were gone by 4:00 PM but they left us with a twenty knot northwest wind. The air temperature reached a high of 38F. At 1:00 PM the air temperature was 37F. By 5:00 PM, the air temperature had dropped to 32F. The sky was mostly clear in the morning, mostly cloudy in the early afternoon and mostly clear after 4:00 PM. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 38F (with a low of 21F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 40F with a low of 29F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 36F (with a low of 13F).

I spent most of the day on the road today. After working at the desk until 9:00 AM, I had to pick up some curtain straps that I had made at Canvasworks in Kennebunk. From there I spent the rest of the day working with Ocean Graphics in Wells. We had to resurrect an old t-shirt design. We started that process. Next was the new design for the largest fish stickers. That was completed by the end of the day. Designing the new PMC shirts was next. This year's theme is "Celebrate Success" with the DFCI. The shirt color will be a different kind of dark blue. We worked on sweat shirts. We also decided on what the tackle breakers shirts will look like. The color this year will be "sand". And I ordered embroidered caps.

I also spent some time on the phone with Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston throughout the day. They have been working on all the cosmetic work that happens to the Bunny Clark every winter. Lately, they have finding permanent solutions to some engine problems we fixed temporarily during the summer months, just to get by. We are having a couple of stainless steel pieces built which should be done tomorrow. So I was talking to them about that. Plus, I have to bring some parts over to them tomorrow.

Unfortunately, no work on the Guestletter today.

Friday, February 3, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 20F, the sky was cloudless, again, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten to fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind continued to blow out of the west, increasing in velocity after sunrise. Wind speeds stayed in the twenty knot category, more or less, for the whole day. After sunset, the wind backed off to about ten to fifteen knots. The air temperature never got above 31F in Ogunquit today. I looked at the thermometer quite often because I wanted to get twenty miles in on the bike when the air temperature got the warmest. The visibility remained excellent. The sky was mostly clear in the morning, mostly cloudy in the early part of the afternoon and overcast for the later part of the afternoon into the night. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 33F (with a low of 15F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 33F with a low of 25F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 31F (with a low of 16F).

Today was another day of running around. I had planned to pick up the stainless pump hinges I had contracted to be made for the hydraulic hauler on the Bunny Clark. But the welder, Mike Dumas, wanted to put them in place before he welded up the adjusting bolt to finish the job. But that also meant that I didn't have to wait until noon to go pick the piece up. So off I went in the truck. I had to check in to see how the single side band radio repair was coming along, the new track plotter we are putting in the Bunny Clark and doing errands that I had been waiting to do when the list I had got to the bottom of a sticky note.

Part of the morning involved a meeting with Dave Pease, Jared Keniston and Ian Keniston at the Bunny Clark. They are way ahead on the boat repairs and cosmetic work. I can tell you that Ian and Jared (and I!) are ready to go fishing. The meeting took no more than a half hour. I have a great crew; can't imagine any better, really.

After lunch I spent the afternoon putting new features in the work room. This will make it easier for anyone else to find what they need for fishing equipment. Before the last couple of weeks, I was the only one who could find anything there - it was such a mess. In fact, I worried that anyone going in there might not find their way back out! It's better now. Much better.

I completed one half of one paragraph in the Guestletter. Tomorrow!

Saturday, February 4, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 19F, the sky was cloudless, again (third morning in a row), the wind was blowing out of the west at twenty knots, more or less, and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Today was much like yesterday. The air temperature didn't get to the freezing mark. The highest air temperature I saw today was 31F, again, in Ogunquit. The wind blew out of the west at twenty or more knots all day. It was windy. The sky was mostly sunny all day with many fewer clouds than yesterday. The visibility was very good to excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 30F (with a low of 14F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 33F with a low of 21F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 31F (with a low of 13F).

I worked most of the day today. After putting this page up, I said goodbye to Deb. She was going to New Jersey to visit our daughter, Halley, who is an RN at one of the hospitals there. They were also going to see a show in New York - lucky them. I had to stay home (I had too much work to go anyway) and stay with the animals. So, after they left, Gill and I jumped in the truck and drove to Wells where I fueled the truck up and got a coffee. Coming back I noticed that the air temperature had risen to 22F.

For most of the rest of the day I worked on the Guestletter. I'm almost to the part where I can start talking about the fish sizes and the anglers who caught them. My favorite part is coming up; the part where I write about special angling circumstances and the anglers involved. I did do some work on Barnacle Billy's things. One was organizing a spur of the moment meeting with ten managers on Monday morning.

And, because Deb wasn't home to give the dog some exercise, I took Gill to the beach to find other dogs. I had pulled a calf muscle a couple of weeks ago running so I also wanted to see if I could test it with a jog for a half mile. It worked out pretty well, actually. Gill and I walked up to almost the first house, playing with every dog we could find on the way. About half way back I started to jog (9:43/mile pace). Gill stayed just behind me and finished when I did at the parking lot where we started. My calf felt fine. Now, if I can keep the distance and pace down for a while, I think I might be all right. We shall see.

Sunday, February 5, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 24F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at fifteen knots, more or less, and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind increased in velocity out of the southwest all morning. By noon, wind speeds were gusting to almost thirty knots. But, after noon, the wind started to back off. The wind continued backing off. By sunset, the southwest wind was only fifteen knots and steady. The sky was overcast all morning and only showed some sun in the afternoon. But there were still more clouds in the afternoon than there was sun. The air temperature warmed to levels that were certainly not predicted five days ago. The highest air temperature I saw was 41F at 3:00 PM in Ogunquit. The visibility was good in some haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 39F (with a low of 22F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 44F with a low of 26F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 40F (with a low of 21F).

I took the day off (after I posted this entry), as I normally do on Sundays during the winter, a luxury I don't have in the summer. So I completed 104 miles on the bike, only 30 miles of which was on my own. The rest of the time I rode with the Maine Coast Cycling Club and, afterward, Jonathan Cartwright (one of the top chefs in the world & one hell of a cyclist), from the ride in a long, roundabout way going home. Jonathan rode with my right to my door step and then rode back to Kennebunkport. Afterward, I took our dog, Gill, down to the beach for two miles of walking and playing and a mile run to test out my calf - which hasn't come back well enough yet, I'm afraid. Deb came back from visiting our daughter in New Jersey at 5:30 PM. From there we got ready for the Super Bowl. And I even watched part of it before heading off to bed. It's hard for me to watch a Super Bowl when the Pats are in it. I hate to be up late if they end up losing.

I was dead asleep when our daughter woke us up at 10:30 PM with a text that informed us that the Pats had won the Super Bowl. I got out of bed and watched the highlights and talk on TV until about 1:00 AM. It's very easy to sleep with a Pats win. Although, I have to say, had Matt Ryan's Falcons won, I wouldn't have been disappointed. He's the only quarterback I had enjoyed watching in college football (at Boston College) since Joe Namath was playing for Alabama. Ryan's team made some mistakes that a more seasoned team would not have allowed. And looking at the highlights it seemed like the whole team in that last quarter looked like a doe caught in the headlights of an approaching car. But that's sport. I'm just glad I'm from New England!

Monday, February 6, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 30F, the sky was clear, very clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at almost thirty knots with higher gusts and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The air temperature had dropped to 26F by 7:00 AM, no doubt brought about by the high pressure area sweeping in on strong northwest winds. The air temperature started a slow steady climb after that. The highest air temperature I saw was 33F. The sky remained clear for the morning. By noon, we had mostly clear skies with clouds moving in. Overcast skies were the rule after sunset. The wind blew out of the west at near thirty knots in the morning but backed off after noon. The wind hauled out of the northwest after sunset. By 7:00 PM, the northwest wind was blowing about fifteen knots with higher gusts. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 33F (with a low of 23F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 39F with a low of 32F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 35F (with a low of 22F).

I started out the day with watching Super Bowl highlights. It was a while before I got back up to the office to finish and post this entry. At 10:00 AM we had a full manager's meeting at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. That lasted until noon. I stayed an hour longer to tie up some loose ends in the office. It was more of the same when I got home. I was on the phone quite a bit. The new track plotter had come in so I was researching another antenna for it. I had to make a lubricating oil order for both boats. I ended finishing up around 5:00 PM. It seemed like a long day.

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 26F, the sky was overcast, it was snowing lightly (and had been for two and a half hours), there was a light covering of snow on the ground, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in snow. It had started snowing at 2:30 AM, the finest snow there is. By daylight, the snow was much bigger in size. It snowed all day long and into the night. I don't think it ever stopped snowing today. By sunset we had at least six inches of the white stuff on the ground. The wind blew out of the northeast at twenty to twenty-five knots. The wind came on just before high water after 5:30 AM. The visibility was fair to poor all day. The air temperature dropped to 19F by 7:00 AM. I never did see it climb any higher than 23F in Ogunquit. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 25F (with a low of 16F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 51F with a low of 33F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 27F (with a low of 18F).

After putting up this entry, I had to go back and forth to the Cove and back a few times. Jack Ladderbush, our carpenter who is working on the ceiling at Barnacle Billy's (original), called me at 7:00 AM when he started. So I went down there then. The electricians (Bridges Electric) were going to meet me at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. at 8:00 AM. They were tying up loose ends from the fire inspection we had a couple of weeks ago. But it was good they were there because I had lighting concerns with the new ceiling at Original. So we all met at Original for a while. I went back home from there. And with the exception of a few more trips to the Cove, I stayed at home working on the Guestletter all day.

I had to be at the selectman's meeting at 6:00 PM. Liquor license renewal was on the agenda for both restaurants. If there is no representative from the restaurants, no liquor license is issued. Everything went smoothly as it normally does. I was back home by 7:00 PM to have dinner.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 19F, the sky was overcast, it was misting (like a rain?), there was seven inches of snow on the ground from the day before, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in snow. The roads were terrible in the morning, the Town not having plowed as expected. The sky remained overcast for part of the morning, clearing before noon. The rest of the day was mostly sunny. The air temperature warmed up to very mild values. I saw 43F but I know I didn't see the highest air temperature in Ogunquit today. The wind blew out of the west almost all day at fifteen knots or better ashore. After 3:00 PM, the wind hauled out of the northwest with the same velocity. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 50F (with a low of 15F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 52F with a low of 25F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 49F (with a low of 18F).

After putting this entry up, I worked in the office for a while and then went for a lawyer's meeting in Sanford. This to tie up loose ends for the future of the restaurants. The rest of the day I spent shoveling and riding my bike. I jumped on the bike for two hours anticipating a day in the house all day tomorrow with the snow storm coming. And I wanted to get everything shoveled while it was warm now, knowing that all this mush was going to freeze like cement overnight.

That was it for me. Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston worked at the Bunny Clark all day today. Almost all the painting has been completed on the boat including areas in the engine room we never got the chance to paint last winter. She should look a much prettier boat this season!

Thursday, February 9, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 33F, the sky was overcast, the wind was out of the north northeast at almost twenty-five knots sustained and the visibility over the ocean was good or better than that. At 2:30 AM, this morning, the sky was perfectly clear with stars throughout the sky. The snow prediction for today is eight to twelve inches. York County, our county, is supposed to be hit the hardest (with snow amounts). But the wind is supposed to be more northerly than northeast, making it less of a bad coastal event. And that's what it was; the wind blew out of the north most of the day and the snow amount was about twelve inches, maybe a little more. By 8:00 AM, the air temperature had dropped to 22F. By 9:30 AM, the air temperature was 19F. It snowed continuously all day long. And it was tough driving. On the back roads it was hard to tell where the road ended (on the sides) and where the fields began. And if it hadn't been for the mail boxes I might have gone off the road a couple of times. The nice thing, though, was that it was too cold to be wet on the roads. By 6:00 PM, the air temperature had dropped to 14F and the wind had hauled more out of the north northwest. Wind speeds all day were thirty knots or better. But because the wind was more out of the north we didn't even get any splash over down at the Cove - despite the fact that it was a full moon. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 32F (with a low of 10F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 39F with a low of 11F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 32F (with a low of 8F).

After I got all my office stuff done, I went to Ocean Graphics to pick up the new PMC shirts. They are an off navy blue this year, a different dark blue. I also had to get the mail, etc. When I brought the mail to my mother and dug out a PMC shirt of her size, I noticed that we were "Celebrating the Success of the DFIC" instead of the DFCI. So I had to take all the shirts back to have them changed. Bummer! I was given the proof before they did the work. But I was so enthralled with the color scheme (it's a great shirt this year), I forgot about looking at the wording. So I had to drive the back roads again to drop the shirts off and then get home and start working. I got home at noon, just in time for lunch! The rest of the day I worked on the Guestletter as the storm raged around us. I was done work at 6:00 PM.

I received two very generous donations sponsoring me the my eleventh ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was from Paul Kostopoulos (CT) for $500.00 and the other was from my old roommate in college, Tom Bruyere (NY). Both are excellent regular anglers on the Bunny Clark. Thank you both so very much for your generous support this year and every other year I have been involved in the PMC. I appreciate it so very much!

Friday, February 10, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 8F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at twenty knots or more and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in sea smoke near the ocean and excellent over the top of it. At 7:00 AM, the air temperature had dropped to 5F. The salient feature, or features, of the day were the wind and the cold. The wind hauled out of the northwest during the mid-morning and really started to crank. Wind gusts were up over forty knots at times. Before the wind struck, it looked like the air temperature was going to warm up to reasonable levels. I never did see the mercury go over 16F in Ogunquit. The wind continued to blow out of the northwest at thirty knots or more until the late afternoon. By 4:00 PM, it had started to back off. There was zero wind when I went to be at 9:00 PM. The visibility over the thousands of white caps marching off shore was very good. The sky was mostly clear all day with ragged cumulus clouds galore. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 14F (with a low of 3F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 25F with a low of 11F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 17F (with a low of -2F).

By 7:30 AM, I had completed almost two hours of shoveling snow. But the snow was light. So it wasn't too bad. I just had to keep changing gloves out as I worked through it. It was cold! During that time I was also preparing the truck to go to Exeter, New Hampshire for my annual dermatology review. I have had pre-cancerous growths removed from my body over the years. It just seems a good thing to do. My appointment was for 9:40 AM. They took me right on time. From there I drove to H & H Propeller Shop in Salem, Massachusetts. They had the Bunny Clark's wheel ready. I was already half way there being in Exeter. So I got my trusty iPhone out and let it direct me all the way to beautiful downtown Salem. And, yes, even with that I got lost. But that's me and driving on land. I got to Dave's Boat Shop in York, Maine at 12:30 PM where I dropped off the wheel and had a conference with Jared Keniston and Ian Keniston. Those two are doing very well.

After I got home and had lunch, I had to run off and sign some papers for our lawyer. From there I went back to Ocean Graphics where the new PMC shirts were completed. I think the shirts look better than ever. I took a couple pictures of one. They appear below. The digital images don't do the color of the shirts justice. The color is actually a navy-like color that looks like a navy blue that has been washed a hundred times giving it a slightly faded nature with new material. The color choices have a lot to do with the color theme on many Red Sox t-shirts without stealing anything. My PMC theme for this year is "Celebrating Success" of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI). It shows my signature fish/bike motif holding a glass of champagne as if the rider just finished the last stage as winner of the Tour de France.



Above is the front of the t-shirt.



The state of Massachusetts is on the back of the shirt.

When I got back home, worked on the Guestletter until about 7:00 PM.

Saturday, February 11, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 12F, the sky was overcast, it was snowing, there was a half an inch of new snow on the ground, the wind was blowing lightly out of the east and the visibility over the ocean was fair in falling snow. By 9:30 AM, there was a fine snow falling, we had two inches of new snow on the ground and the air temperature was 14F. The snow stopped falling before noon. We ended up with a little more than two inches of snow, not really enough to plow. The sky stayed overcast all day. The wind blew out of the north northeast all day at about fifteen knots or more. The air temperature never rose above 16F before 6:00 PM. I lost track of the air temperature after that. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 15F (with a low of 7F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 30F with a low of 15F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 18F (with a low of 4F).

I never once stepped outdoors today except to get a bag of pellets from the garage. I spent the whole day at the computer working on the Guestletter, the largest period of time working on the Fisherman of the Year award (FY '16). I had had enough by 5:00 PM.

Sunday, February 12, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 18F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at twelve knots sustained and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good. The wind blew out of the northeast for most of the morning. After 10:00 AM, the wind hauled out of the east and blew twenty to twenty-five knots. The snow started falling at noon. And it just kept snowing through the night. When I went to bed we had about twelve to fifteen inches. It was hard to tell as I didn't actually go outside after 4:00 PM. The wind increased after sunset but it never blew much over thirty knots. The air temperature got up as high as 29F but dropped back down to 24F after sunset. The visibility, of course, was horrible. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 23F (with a low of 15F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 35F with a low of 19F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 25F (with a low of 4F).

I worked inside on the Guestletter all day. But as I worked I kept wondering if I should tie storm lines off the Petrel sitting on her mooring in the Cove. By 3:00 PM, my worries got the better of me. I called one of my lobstering friends who has a boat next to mine. He told me he had the same feelings and put storm lines out. So at 4:00 PM or a little later, I went down and did the same. The easterly wind had prevented ice from forming in the Cove so it was clear skulling, getting around the boats to tie lines. After I was done, I was glad I did it. Sometimes you can't put a price on piece of mind. I continued on with the Guestletter after I got back. I stopped at 6:30 PM.

Last year, on this date, I posted the annual Guestletter. It was slightly later than any previous posting. This year's will be a little later still. Hopefully, tomorrow, I will finish the first draft. I have all the digital images up and all but about ten paragraphs written.

A Not So Manic Monday, February 13, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 22F, the sky was overcast, it was snowing, the wind was out of the north at about twenty to twenty-five knots or less sustained and the visibility over the ocean was fair to poor in falling snow. The snow stopped falling at 8:15 AM but started up again a half hour later. It kept snowing lightly until about 2:00 PM, when it stopped completely. By 4:30 PM, the sky was clearing and patches of blue could be seen in the sky. When the snow stopped for that brief time, the wind picked up out of the north northwest with gusts to forty knots at times. We were lucky. We did not get the blizzard that the media said we were going to get. We got a lot of snow. But the wind wasn't nearly as strong. Nor was the wind as cold as it should be in a true blizzard. The National Weather Service was giving hurricane warnings offshore for today (I never saw anything close to that on any buoy report from the Gulf of Maine offshore to Nova Scotia). Had this storm been closer and the wind more out of the northeast, the coastal community would have had to deal with coastal flooding and wind damage. But that didn't happen. So the true blizzard stayed offshore, never getting close enough and only metering out a good snow fall. The high temperature in Ogunquit that I observed was 29F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 27F (with a low of 20F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 34F with a low of 24F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 30F (with a low of 20F).

I started shoveling snow at 6:00 AM. We had about twenty inches of snow, I would say. By the time I had finished the first session of shoveling, we had another inch or so of snow. I started working, again, on the Guestletter until the snow plow showed up at 10:00 AM. Afterward, I shoveled again for another hour and then took a ride down to the Cove to make sure we weren't getting any splash-over from the high seas and tide. High tide was a 12:50 PM. But it would have been over the normal height in the Cove at 11:00 AM if it were really going to be a problem. I did go down again at 12:30 PM. There was no need to worry. Actually, the closest it ever got to the Barnacle Billy's dock was about a half a foot.

Except for a little bit of shoveling here and there, I spent an hour or more on Barnacle Billy's stuff while the rest of the time was spent on the Guestletter. I was done work for the day by 6:30 PM. We always have to take a step back when a snow storm hits. It really takes you away from the things you really want to spend time on.

St. Valentine's Day, Tuesday, February 14, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 18F, the sky was clear, the wind was out of the northwest at about fifteen knots sustained and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The sky stayed clear all day. The air temperature got up to at least 33F. I didn't look at the thermometer much today. The viability was excellent. The wind blew out of the northwest until mid morning and then became light and variable in direction for the rest of the daylight hours. At sunset, the wind started blowing out of the south. The southerly wind was blowing ten knots or less when I went to bed. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 30F (with a low of 10F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 34F with a low of 22F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 37F (with a low of 5F).

I spent about ten hours today working on the Guestletter. I ended up finishing it up during the mid afternoon. But then I spent a couple hours proofing it. I had been proofing what I had written daily. But I had to go over it a couple more times before I put it up. I posted the Guestletter at 3:30 PM. The beauty of the internet is that if I find something wrong I can change it. In the old days, when it went to print, I had several proof people I depended on to get this done before it went to the presses. This is a big difference. Plus, of course, there is a big difference in cost.

I also did about an hour of shoveling, took the storm lines off the Petrel, brought boxes of glassware to the restaurant that had been delivered to our house and worked at the desk at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. for about an hour. It was a very full day with a very quick lunch and a quick dinner.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 23F, the sky was mostly clear with a partial moon overhead illuminating the few clouds underneath, the wind was out of the south at fifteen knots or less and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. By about 9:00 AM, the sky had become overcast with dark clouds to the west. It had started raining lightly by noon. The rain continued intermittently throughout the afternoon and into the night. The air temperature had risen to a value over the freezing mark by later mid morning. By 2:30 PM, the air temperature had risen to 45F. It started dropping afterward reaching 43F by 4:00 PM and 38F by 5:15 PM. The air temperature was still above the freezing mark at 9:00 PM. The wind blew out of the south at about fifteen knots or less before hauling out of the southeast by mid morning. At 11:00 AM, the southeast wind was blowing at twenty knots and white caps were evident on the ocean from shore. The visibility was still good at that point but turned to fair with the rain, haze and, what seemed like, fog. The wind was still blowing out of the southeast at sunset but only about ten knots. By 8:00 PM, the wind was just hauling out of the northwest. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 39F (with a low of 16F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 40F with a low of 27F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 35F (with a low of 24F).

After posting this entry, it was a day of tying up loose ends. I spent some time in the office at Barnacle Billy's. I spent two hours shoveling snow and chopping ice, the main thrust of which was opening pathways to the street drains at Barnacle Billy's. Between the snow, the warm temperatures and the rain, we were seeing quite a bit of water buildup in front of the restaurants. It took me quite a while to clear all that out. In fact, I had to call the Town for a loader to take care of the large pile of frozen snow/ice on the road between the two buildings. Had I been down there when the loader was actually there, I would have saved myself at least another hour of work.

I was on the computer on and off during the day correcting mistakes anglers found on the Guestletter. We had some trouble with the printing on some of the new beer glasses we got for Barnacle Billy's, Etc. So I was back and forth on that periodically as well. It was just one of those days where I did no moving forward but ended up getting a lot done.

I had the dog (Gill) with me most of the day. When I park I usually have a cup of coffee on the console in back of the cup holders. On this newer truck, the cup holders are good for a coffee cup that you might buy from Dunkin Donuts but without the diameter for a mug. Obviously, I don't leave the mug in such a precarious place when I'm driving. Nor do I bring a mug when I'm driving more than a quarter of a mile from home. But Gill does not like the mug just sitting there. And when he jumps out of the truck, he jumps over the console, on to my seat and then out. Many times he has looked at the mug as if to say; "Hey, are you going to move the mug or what?" I usually move it. This time I left the mug there as I waited for him to get out of the truck. He hesitated. I told him; "Come on, Gill, you can jump over that mug.", at which point he put one paw on the console and, with the other, swatted the mug out of the way and jumped out of the truck. As you can imagine, the coffee went everywhere but mostly on the console and my seat! I wasn't too upset. Gill had been used to me moving the mug. And at home, I drink black coffee. So it wasn't hard to clean up. But I will certainly move the mug next time!

Thursday, February 16, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 28F, the sky was overcast, it was misting outside, the wind was out of the north at ten knots (more than that off shore) and the visibility over the ocean was fairly good in a misty haze. The sky stayed overcast all morning and into the afternoon, clearing up by mid afternoon. There was intermittant snow in the morning but really only enough to give us a dusting. We had five inches of snow when it was all said and done. But it was probably more because it was so heavy to shovel. The bottom layers of snow were wet slush. So I imagine that quite a bit of snow fell in partially freezing conditions before we got the first inch. After that the snow accumulated like normal almost insulating the bottom layer from freezing. Besides, the air temperature never really got much colder than freezing anyway. As the day progressed today, the visibility got very good after a slow start. The air temperature increased to a value above the feezing mark. But, honestly, I never really looked much at the thermometer. I did see 34F but it must have been warmer than that judging by the water on the roads. The wind blew out of the northwest all day with gusts to almost thirty knots by sunset. The wind died down after that. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 35F (with a low of 22F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 35F with a low of 27F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 32F (with a low of 24F).

Most of my day was spend shoveling snow, some of which was done knowing that all this mess would freeze solid overnight. But a lot of it was just cleaning up. It was just as if we had twelve inches of snow with the weight of it. So it took me the same amount of time to clear things up. I would have had to do more shoveling had not Micah, my son, shoveled off the Petrel and skiff.

The other important parts of the day involved renewing all the licensing for the boats. And I spent an hour at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. going over boxes of beer glasses that came in. We had to sort through the glasses to find the one where the logos did print correctly. Out of thirteen boxes we found a total of two and a half boxes of glasses that had to be returned.

I took some pictures during the day. One was a shot of the Cove with Micah finishing up the shoveling of the skiff, below.



The other, below, is a digital image of the eight foot bank of snow at our house. Most of this bank I created by shoveling. The plows add to the width of it every storm! The cat climbing down from the top of the bank is my cat, Ecco. Ecco was a birthday present to me from Deb and, my daughter, Halley ten years ago.



Friday, February 17, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 24F, the sky was clear with a half moon high in the arc of the southern edge, the wind was out of the north northwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. By 8:00 AM, the air temperature had warmed to 27F, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at twenty knots with higher gusts and the sun was bright off the white snow. The wind continued out of the northwest at twenty to twenty-five knots all morning. After noon, the wind hauled out of the west and tapered off a bit. Wind speeds averaged about fifteen to twenty knots. The sky was clear all day with zero clouds for most of the morning and a few clouds in the afternoon. The visibility was excellent. I saw a high air temperature in Ogunquit of 38F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 38F (with a low of 12F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 41F with a low of 23F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 36F (with a low of 22F).

At 7:30 AM, I met with the guy from Howes Flooring (in Wells) who is going to work in the stairs, rug and tile flooring in Barnacle Billy's, Etc. That took about a half hour. From there I went to check on the work that Jack Ladderbush was doing at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. I had a good talk with Jack. I went home and finished posting this entry. From there I went to Ocean Graphics where Kevin had some new printed t-shirts and caps. We talked about a few things and then I headed home. From there I went to Portsmouth to pick up the summer's supply of paper towels. I was back home by 1:00 PM, where I had lunch. After lunch I stowed all the paper towels. For the rest of the day I worked at the office.

I received a very generous donation sponsoring my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The donors were Mark & Maureen LaRocca (NY) for $750.00. I do so appreciate the support from such good people, like Mark & Maureen. Thank you so very much.

Saturday, February 18, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 28F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. After sunrise, the wind started to blow out of the west southwest and, pretty much, stayed out of that direction all day. Wind speeds ranged from light to almost twenty knots in the afternoon. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds but mostly cloudy for most of the morning. The visibility was good to very good in some haze. The air temperature rose to a value of at least 44F in Ogunquit, probably a couple of degrees higher. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 41F (with a low of 15F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 49F with a low of 26F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 51F (with a low of 22F).

After this posting, I met Bob Rasche at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. Bob is an artist from the area who's paintings I want hung in Barnacle Billy's, Etc. He paints local scenes including very accurate period pieces that depict the old days of schooners sailing out of Wells, etc. I love his stuff. I thought it might be nice for us and a venue for him to sell some of his art.

I spent the rest of the morning in the office printing out daily sheets and check lists we use on the Bunny Clark during the season. These include trip logs, passenger manifest sheets, cleanup check lists, stocking orders, etc. The afternoon was spent on the phone with the U. S. Coast Guard about checking on items of correction after the fall's hull inspection on the Bunny Clark, orders and conversation with Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston.

I received another very generous donation sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event that raises money to fight cancer with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. The donors were Dave & Joanne Miller (MA) and their gift was $250.00, in memory of my father, Billy Tower, and Christine Keniston, the mother of both Jared & Ian. They have supported me in this event since I started riding in it over ten years ago. Thank you both so very much for your support and help. I certainly do appreciate it!

Sunday, February 19, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was a mild 40F, the sky was mostly cloudy, the wind was out of the west southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The morning had a feeling of Spring. And, like Spring, air temperatures started to rise. The air temperature was 50F before the morning was out. But, by 2:00 PM, the air temperature was 57F, what I suspect was the high air temperature in Ogunquit for the day. The wind was light or ten to fifteen knots out of the southwest all day. After sunset, the wind hauled out of the northwest. The sky was partly sunny with a changing cloud-scape all day. The visibility was good to very good in some haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 55F (with a low of 28F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 59F with a low of 39F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 56F (with a low of 24F).

The only work I did today was an hour's worth of shoveling and clearing street drains in front of Barnacle Billy's restaurants.

Monday, February 20, 2017

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 34F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was blowing out of the north at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. More later.

At this time I am looking for another deck hand to take five trips a week this summer. Sean Devich was nice enough to help me last year as he was between jobs. But he will not be available this year. If anyone is interested you can call the Bunny Clark line at 207-646-2214.









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