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Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

October 31, 2014, 6:30 AM EDT



Two Special Fish during Our First Ultra Marathon

The pictures above show special fish and the anglers who caught them taken during the July 8, 2014 ultra marathon. The shot on the left is a digital image of Jeff Philbrick with his 36 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the largest fish of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. It is also one of only ten white hake that have been landed on the Bunny Clark this season so far. Needless to say, Jeff won the boat pool handily with this fish. The shot on the right is a digital image of Bryan Lewer (FL) holding up his first Atlantic halibut. He snagged the fish in the side but knew right away what it was as he had never had a fish that fought quite like it. Well, actually, he did last year but lost the fish because his drag was too tight. But we won't talk about that episode! Bryan was very pleased with his catch as you can see in the shot. We caught three halibut on that trip, all of which were too small to keep and were released very much alive.




Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the weather was perfect. The air temperature reached a high (that I saw) of 64F. We had very little wind along the shore. The sky was nearly cloudless all day. The visibility was very good to excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east northeast at ten to five knots. Seas were about a foot most of the day, less near the end, over long sea swells of two to three feet. The sky was clear with few clouds. The air temperature was mild. The visibility was close to excellent with a range of at least twenty-five miles. The tide was strong to moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 42F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 66F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 39F).

The fishing/catching and landings were good overall. It was just a good day. There were blue sharks today (unlike yesterday). But they weren't so bad as make the boat have to move from a spot (like the other day). Probably three or four jigs were lost to sharks. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-seven redfish, two cusk and one whiting. One dogfish was caught and released. Twenty haddock were caught and released including two that were over twenty-one inches. There were also twenty-four cod caught that were over twenty-one inches, all released (of course). They drift fished and anchored. No bait was used. Only jigs and flies today.

Jimmy Walker (NJ) was probably high hook with the most legal fish today. Ed Werner (PA) might have been there too if you include the cod he caught. Jimmy won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 27 pound Maine state trophy pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's largest pollock of the last two seasons and Jimmy's largest pollock ever. Captain Ian took a picture of Jimmy with his prize. The digital image appears on the left. Jimmy's second largest fish was a 12 pound pollock. Ed caught the second and third largest fish of the trip. His largest (the second largest on the boat) was a 21.5 pound pollock, a tie for the sixth largest pollock caught on the Bunny Clark this season to date. His second largest fish was an 18 pound cod, the third largest cod caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. This was promptly released back to the ocean very much alive. Some of Ed's other good fish included a 14 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound cusk.

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Smith caught a 10.5 pound cod, his largest fish and the first fish of the day big enough to weigh. John Pacitti (NJ) caught a 16.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. John Grochi (CT) landed a 12 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. Bill Otto (PA) landed the largest double keeper catch of the day. His double included a 13 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! John Baker (ME) caught a 12.5 pound cod (released) and an 11 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. He also landed the hard luck award for losing three jigs, two to blue sharks and one to the bottom!

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 44F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light out of the south and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The ocean was flat glassy calm on the ride to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind and sea state were the same. There was no wind and the ocean was flat calm - all day long, including the ride back to Perkins Cove! It was the calmest day of the year today. The sky was overcast for the trip. The air temperature was mild. The visibility ranged to over thirty miles - excellent. The tide was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 42F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 62F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 63F (with a low of 42F).

The fishing and catching of cod and haddock was excellent. I spent most of the day trying to avoid the cod and haddock while still targeting pollock. I found plenty of pollock but no pollock bite. What we did catch were lots of haddock (one-hundred forty) and twenty cod from 5 to 11.5 pounds, all released. We might have had twenty haddock that would have been big enough to keep if today's month was August. In our attempt to get away from the haddock we ran into some hake. We had a nice drift on them for about an hour. There were over forty dogfish released today. We only saw one blue shark (It mauled a haddock). Landings were fair and included fourteen pollock, eight redfish, five cusk, twenty-one hake and six butter mullet. We drift fished and anchored. Most anglers used bait rigs and cod flies. Not a single rig was lost today.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. It would be purely a guess. Dennis Reissig (NY) caught the most cod over twenty-one inches. His cod count was eight or nine out of twelve total. His largest cod weighed 11.5 pounds, the largest cod of the trip. And he caught a double keeper catch of cod that included an 8 pound cod and an 8.5 pound cod, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Some of Dennis' other good fish included a 9 pound pollock and an 11 pound white hake.

Ryan Kilgore (NH) won the boat pool for largest fish with the largest fish, a 29 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Kirk Counter (VT) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 27 pound Maine state trophy white hake. What was most impressive to me was that Kirk caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch with another white hake of 22 pounds! Both of these fish were caught on the same line at the same time! This is the largest double keeper catch of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. I took a picture of Kirk holding up both fish. This picture appears in this entry on the right. The third largest fish was a 26 pound Maine state trophy white hake caught by George Hallock (VT).

Other Angler Highlights: Mark Carter (CT) caught the largest pollock of the trip at 15 pounds. His largest fish was a 21 pound white hake. Jeff Gellatly (ME) also caught a 21 pound white hake as his largest fish. One other of Jeff's great fish included an 18 pound barndoor skate. This is only the Bunny Clark's seventh barndoor skate that has ever been caught since she was launched in 1983! Of course, it's Jeff's first barndoor skate. He also caught a 10 pound cod and another white hake of 15.75 pounds. Bob Crane (NY) landed a 23.5 pound white hake, his largest fish. Bob also released a 10 pound cod. Rob Cormier (VT) landed a 25 pound Maine state trophy white hake, his biggest fish and largest hake of his life. He also caught another white hake of 18 pounds. Russell Trieller (NY) caught a 15.25 pound white hake, his best. Ryan Drapeau (NH) boated an 18 pound white hake and another white hake of 18.25 pounds. Ron Ciotti (NH) caught a 19 pound white hake, his largest fish. Dan Dorr (ME) boated a 17.5 pound white hake. Suzanne Counter (VT) landed the hard luck award for being the only angler not to land a single Internet worthy fish! She did catch plenty of fish though!

Friday, September 26, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. It was a beautiful late summer day overall. At least, that was what it felt like. The sky was sunny all day, almost cloudless. The air temperature got up into the lower 70s. There was very little wind and not enough wind to lift a flag. The ocean along the coast was flat calm with chest high waves rolling on to Ogunquit Beach. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at five to eight knots. The ocean was calm over long rolling sea swells of three feet or so. The sky was clear and sunny for the trip. The air temperature was mild. The visibility ranged to twenty miles or so. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59.2F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 43F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 69F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 44F).

The fishing was very much like yesterdays marathon trip, very good. The catching was good or slightly better than that. Landings were fair. There was no pollock bite whatsoever, despite the fact many big schools could be found. Haddock were abundant, as they were yesterday, with sixty-nine caught total, four over twenty-one inches. Sixteen cod could have been kept has summer rules applied. No good sized cod were caught. Legal landings included five pollock, twenty-seven cusk and three whiting. Twenty-six dogfish were released along with one wolffish. Anchoring and drifting were the boating methods. All terminal gear worked about the same.

Ian didn't give me a name for high hook. Dennis Reissig (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 8.5 pound pollock caught by Matt Sams (NY). Rodney Koistinen (SD) caught the third largest fish, an 8.25 pound cod that was promptly weighed and released. Tom Perry (NY) landed the hard luck award for losing the only jig of the trip after a dogfish cut his line off!

Dennis Reissig did me the greatest of favors by supporting my cancer cause with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. I appreciate this support very much. Thanks, Dennis! Great to have you aboard this week.

Saturday, September 27, 2014

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine hosted the Clive Roberts (NH) full day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was clear, there was no wind to speak of and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. There was a very insignificant amount of wind along the shore. In fact, there really was no wind. And when there was wind it was a whisper from the northwest. The ocean along the shore was flat calm all day. The salient weather feature today was the air temperature which soared to 82F in Ogunquit. It was very warm all day. The sky was cloudless. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at barely five knots. The ocean's surface was calm all day over rolling long sea swells of two to three feet. The sky was cloudless all day. The air temperature was mild/warm (ocean water influence). The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was unlimited. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58.6F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 50F). The high of 84F registered in Portland, Maine today breaks the previous record high temperature of 80F set on this date in 1948. In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 81F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 43F).

The fishing was very good. The calm weather, the clear skies, the slight current and the mild temperatures all combined to make it easy to keep your line where you wanted it. No blue sharks were seen. There were, however, quite a few dogfish caught. Without the dogfish (forty-three total released), the fishing might have been excellent except for the higher frequency of tangles. The catching was good to very good. Landings were on the fair side. Over forty-eight haddock were caught and released, twelve of which they could have taken home had this trip been sometime this late summer. There were about fourteen cod that would have been kept as well that were released instead. Legal landings included twenty-two pollock, two redfish, fifteen cusk, one white hake and two whiting. Drifting was the method used all day today. Everyone used bait and cod flies. No jigs today.

Clive Roberts won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound cod that was weighed promptly and then released alive. The second largest fish was a 10 pound white hake caught by Danny Carignan (NH). Paul Bolton (MA) and Dennis Fournier (NH) tied for third. Both anglers caught a 9 pound pollock each. Owen Sanborn (NH) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler today. Or so I was told!

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Happy Birthday: Meg Tower, Paul Haseltine & Rosie Geer!!

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, it was another beautiful summer day in vacationland. The air temperature rose to 85F in Ogunquit, the most salient weather feature of the day. There was very little wind. The ocean along the shore was calm. The sky was cloudless from 7:00 AM until well after sunset. The visibility was good in some haze. When I checked the air temperature at 10:00 PM, it had only dropped to 68F. It felt like a warm summer night with no wind and very clear skies.

On the fishing grounds, the wind was very light from the southwest. The ocean was calm. After noon, the southwest wind picked up to five and ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot in height. The sky was clear all day. The air temperature was mild with the light wind. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility was about ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59.2F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 87F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 50F).

The fishing was very good. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included seven cusk, six redfish and two whiting. Twenty-four dogfish were released. And about thirty haddock were released, five of which were over twenty-one inches. Twelve cod were released that were over twenty-one inches. Drifting and anchoring were the methods. The jig and fly combination worked the best for catching fish today.

Dana Decormier (NH) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 24.5 pound pollock. This is the largest pollock that Dana has ever caught . And this pollock is the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the season to date. Ian took a picture of Dana and his son, Jack, with Dana's prize pollock. This digital image appears on the left. Dana is the one who looks like Papa Smurf. Dana also caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 19 pound pollock. Some of his other good fish included a 10 pound pollock, a 15 pound pollock and two pollock of 11.5 pounds each. Jack Decormier (NH) landed the third largest fish of the trip, a 16 pound pollock. Jack also caught pollock of 10 pounds and 10.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Dave Darnell (CA) boated a 14.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also caught a 10 pound pollock. Captain Ian caught a 14 pound pollock. Patrick Osborne (NY) boated an 8 pound pollock, his largest fish. Mark Landon (NY) landed the hard luck award for catching nary a single fish worth writing about.

Jack Decormier contributed $25.00 to my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thanks so much, Jack. Glad you and your bearded father had a good time today. I only wish I could have enjoyed it with you!

Monday, September 29, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was clear, the wind was very light from the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was good in some haze. By daylight, the clouds had started to move in. After 7:00 AM, the sky stayed mostly overcast with some infrequent sun shots. After noon, it remained overcast for the rest of the day. The ocean was flat calm until around 10:00 AM, when a northeast wind started to blow. At five knots to start, by noon the northeast wind was blowing ten knots. Early afternoon saw fifteen knots. By 2:00 PM, the wind was blowing a sustained twenty knots with higher gusts. These winds continued on into the night. It never rained, although it looked like it would. The air temperature hovered around the mid 60s before dropped below 60F at sunset. The visibility was good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at five knots or less most of the morning. The ocean was calm. By noon, the northeast wind had struck. By 2:00 PM, the wind velocity had reached twenty knots. Seas were chops of two to four feet, larger near the end of the trip. Seas average four or five feet an hour from Perkins Cove on the ride in. The air temperature was mild to cool. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from ten mile in the morning to a half mile in fog and haze during the later afternoon. The sky was overcast all for the trip. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60.9F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 74F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 53F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish - landings) was very good overall, our best fishing trip since last Tuesday. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. They were biting today. Legal landings also included a redfish and two cusk. Only a few cod and haddock were caught that might have been legal in August (now that you can't keep haddock for another month). There were no blue sharks or dogfish seen today. And on the pollock side of things, quite a few jigs were lost today because of the jig and fly combination. The fish were big enough and the bite good enough to see doubles that would break the jig and fly off on several occasions. Anchoring and drifting were both used. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish, by far.

Ken McLaughlin (ME) was a pound and a half shy of being fisherman of the day. He was far and away high hook with the most legal fish. And he boated four double keeper catches and one triple! His best double included a 15.5 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. His 15.5 pound pollock was the third largest fish of the trip. The double itself ties for the fourth largest double keeper catch of the Bunny Clark season to date. A couple other good fish that Ken landed included a 13.5 pound pollock and another 15 pound pollock. He lost three jigs to big doubles. Chris Urban won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock. He also caught a 14.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock as part of his catch. Jared Keniston caught the second largest fish, a 16 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Tricia Urban (PA) landed a 13 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock as her largest fish. P. J. Weber (VT) landed an 11 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock, his two largest. He might have caught larger fish but he busted off four times, losing four jigs, on doubles! For this he landed the hard luck award for the trip.

I received two donations today sponsoring me in my bicycle ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Chris & Tricia Urban donated $25.00 when they got off the boat today. Dave Nickerson (ME), with RUBB Building Systems, gave a very generous $250.00 to the cause. Thank you all so very much for your help in this project. I am humbled by your support.

Tim Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair in haze.

It was a fairly uncomfortable ride to the fishing grounds. But it wasn't horrible. Seas were eight feet but they were far enough apart that we felt them only as a heavy roll. The only problem for those so uninitiated was that there really was no rhythm to them. So you had to be prepared to hold on all the time. We had good visibility. The air temperature was mild/cool. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen to twenty knots in the morning and five to ten knots in the afternoon. The morning saw three foot chops over eight foot swells about eight or nine seconds apart. During the afternoon we saw the seas go down to three or four feet under a one foot chop. The tide (current) was strong until the last hour of the day. The sky remained overcast. We had short periods of light rain in the afternoon. The air temperature was mild to cool. The visibility ranged from ten miles in the morning to twenty miles in the afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 57F with a low of 56F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 55F).

The fishing was just fair today. We had a very strong current in the morning and most of the afternoon. You couldn't drift. Anchoring saw lines trailing well aft. You had to make sure that you let your terminal gear down slowly. Otherwise you risked tangling with the guy next to you. The catching and landings were fair overall. Most legal fish landed were redfish and pollock, in that order. Legal landings also included a cusk and a squirrel hake. We released ten cod between 5 & 8 pounds. We only caught seven haddock, four of which were over twenty-one inches. We lost seven rigs to blue sharks but were bothered by them all day. One blue shark was fought by three anglers for twenty minutes before we realized what species of fish it really was. We saw nary a single dogfish. We tried drifting a couple of times with no success. Anchoring seemed to be the only method that worked. But, regardless, the bite was well off the mark. We had no problem finding fish. Anglers were most successful when using cod flies.

I don't know who was high hook but whomever it was probably had seven legal - a guess. Jim Watson (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. Tom Lombardo (NY) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Dameon Barnhart (NY).

Other Angler Highlights: Jim Taylor (NY) caught the first fish I thought I should weigh, a 9.25 pound pollock. Dave Cuipylo (NY) caught four good sized pollock on the last stop of the day. The largest of the four weighed 10 pounds. Josh DeBerardinis (NC) landed the hard luck award for being the high hurler of the trip. He called for a bucket fifteen minutes outside the gate and had his head buried in it for most of the rest of the day. He never did wet a line!

I received a thoughtful $25.00 donation from "Smokey" Joe Dorsey (NC) today supporting my work on a cancer cure with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Thanks, Smokey. Your kindness is much appreciated by many.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen or more knots and the visibility over the ocean was good at least. The wind along the shore never got any higher than fifteen knots. In fact, all afternoon the wind was very light out of the northeast. Seas were much reduced from yesterdays trip with three to five footers seen along Ogunquit Beach. It rained very lightly occasionally. A large part of the day saw no rain at all. But later afternoon saw light rain at a steady rate. The air temperature got as high as 58F or more. The sky remained overcast even when it didn't rain. The visibility over the ocean was good, at least.

On the fishing grounds, the swell was gone. The ride out was good with a two foot chop. Three miles from their destination, the chop increased and was three to five feet. The sea state remained this way for the rest of the day. The tide was very strong so one might suspect that some of the bigness of the chops was due to the stronger than normal tide. They saw occasional light rain throughout the day. They did have heavier rain on the ride back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature was mild. The visibility ranged from one to five miles in occasional rain, haze, mist and light fog. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 57F with a low of 56F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 58F (with a low of 55F).

The fishing was fair to good with the tide and a few dogfish (nine total). But they did not have the blue shark problems we had yesterday. This allowed them to land more fish and spend less time playing with something on the line that could have been a bluefin tuna but always turned out to be a blue shark! So landings made it into the "good" category today. Almost every fish caught today was a legal pollock. No other fish were landed. One cod was caught that was over twenty-one inches. Fourteen haddock were caught that were all under twenty-one inches. The only other fish seen was the dogfish. They anchored for every stop. Ian had a hard time anchoring as I did yesterday. Actually, Ian's anchoring might have been a bit more challenging than mine. Where I had problems making the exact location drop, Ian had problems getting the anchor to hold! So the current was, I suspect, was quite a bit stronger. No bait was used today; just jigs and cod flies.

After his training on the marathon trip yesterday along with a change in venue, Dave Cuipylo (NY) capitalized on what he had learned and was the easy high hook today with the most legal fish. He ended up landing seven pollock of 10 pounds or better along with quite a few smaller ones. His better fish included three pollock of 10.5 pounds, two pollock of 10 pounds each, a 12 pound pollock and a pollock of 12.5 pounds. Dennis Pine (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 15 pound pollock caught by Dameon Barnhart (NY). Dameon also caught an 11.5 pound pollock. Tom Lombardo (NY) landed the third largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Ken McLaughlin (ME) caught the best double of the day. His catch included a 12.5 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Dave Vanatta (PA) landed an 11 pound pollock, his best. Randy Russell (NY) boated a 12 pound pollock, his largest. John Lombardo (NY) caught an 11.75 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Jim Watson (NY) rounded out the catch with a 10 pound pollock, his best fish of the trip. "Smokey" Joe Dorsey (NC) landed the hard luck award for not landing a single legal fish. Yesterday, Smokey caught the most cod, catching the three largest ones in the process. He also caught a few redfish. He caught no pollock. Today he must have had the same mojo with the pollock!

At the same time this trip was going on, the New England Fishery Management Council was meeting in Hyannis, Massachusetts to decide the fate of groundfishermen in the Gulf of Maine (GOM), both commercial and recreational. On the table (as a motion) were expanded rolling closures with recreational anglers excluded (this is new), the Western Gulf of Maine closed area (excluded to recreational anglers - also new) and a prohibition for recreational anglers to fish west of 070 longitude for groundfish (also new). This motion was defeated at the end of the day. So from here the regional office of the National Marine Fisheries Service has to come up with an Emergency Action that will keep landings of cod below 200 metric tons for both commercial and recreational fisherman. In fact, it makes cod a bycatch fishery only. It's unlikely that the recreational angler will be able to keep cod next year. And there will be no directed fishery for cod by commercial fishermen. An Emergency Action only lasts for six months, the details of which will be available on November 17, 2014. But EAs can be renewed. Also, since NMFS is making the rules, they can adjust the EA at any time. In the next six months after the EA has been in place, the Council is directed to come up with a plan in the form of a new amendment to take effect by the start of the fiscal fishing year on May 1, 2015. Personally, I don't think the Council has time to do this. So what might happen is that NMFS will roll the old EA into 2015 for another six months, perhaps with some adjustments. Will the new EA be as onerous to the recreational angler as the Council's motion that was defeated today? That is a good question and one that will be worked out in the next very few weeks before mid November. We shall see.

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Today was supposed to be an extreme day trip which I canceled yesterday morning when I saw the Army's UGRIB forecast and the NWS forecast. Tuesday's trip was rough enough for everyone. Today's would have been worse.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in precipitation, haze and light fog. It only rained for an hour or more after 5:00 AM, stopping for good by 7:00 AM. The sky remained overcast until 3:00 PM when the sun broke out. By 3:45 PM, there wasn't a cloud in the sky. The air temperature hovered around the high 50s all morning, finally breaking into the low 60s after noon. The wind blew out of the northeast all day, strong offshore but much less along the shore. Wind speeds were up to twenty knots in the morning and ten knots early afternoon. There was no wind by 6:00 PM but a big sea was crashing up along the shore and beaches. The visibility was very good by sunset.

The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 62F (with a low of 45F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 56F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 65F (with a low of 42F).

Friday, October 3, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots (after a night of light and variable winds only three hours earlier) and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northeast up to almost twenty knots during the late morning and early afternoon. Seas were very large along the shore, breaking at ten feet or more at Ogunquit Beach. There was also a light chop as well. The air temperature seemed cool because of the wind off the water and the moisture content in the air. However, the air temperature did get as high as 62F. The wind dropped to nothing in the mid to late afternoon. The visibility over the ocean was good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet over rolling sea swells that ranged from eight to twelve feet, with the occasional larger one. Ian told me that one measured on the sounding machine at anchor reached fifteen feet. There was quite a distance between them so it wasn't very rough on the boat. The visibility ranged from three to five miles in fog. The tide was moderate to strong. The air temperature was mild. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 62F (with a low of 42F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 55F with a low of 48F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 41F).

The fishing/catching was fair overall. The conditions were such that they weren't conducive to maintaining a specific movement with the equipment or the ability to keep the lines still. And the bite was off despite seeing plenty of fish on the sounding machine. Legal landings included twenty-one pollock, one redfish and two cusk. Very few haddock and cod were caught. Two cod might have been of legal size had we been able to keep cod. There was only one haddock over twenty-one inches that was released. Drifting and anchoring were the methods. All terminal gear was used but only jigs and cod flies were successful.

Chris King (NY) and Evan Olsen (VT) shared high hook status with six or seven legal fish each. Both anglers tied for the second largest fish of the trip. Each angler caught a 13 pound pollock. The 13 pounder was the only fish that Chris caught weighing 10 pounds or better. Evan also caught a 12 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. Chris Bates (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. Ben Olsen (VT) landed the hard luck award for being the day's high hurler.

I received two donations supporting my involvement in the cancer project with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Chris King gave $25.00 while Mark Randis (PA) donated a generous $100.00 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC website. Thank you both very much for your generosity and help. I very much appreciate it!

Saturday, October 4, 2014

We were supposed to be running the full day trip today. Alas, we had nobody to take! We had a few sign up only to cancel followed by others who did the same. Sunday is looking the same way. Most are talking about the weather. And I can't blame them in that regard. After a week of easterly wind like we have had it's hard to get the courage to go knowing, at the very least, you will get a little sore from just being there. Whatever. We will not be going today. And it looks like we won't be sailing tomorrow either.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was overcast, it was drizzling/light rain, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog and light precipitation. The wind was light out of the east for most of the day. Wind speeds rarely made it over ten knots. Well after sunset, the wind hauled out of the southeast. When I left Perkins Cove at 9:30 PM, the southeast wind was blowing at twelve knots or so. The afternoon saw the fog roll in and out. The fog was all in after sunset. The air temperature was mild. The evening saw rain, sometimes steading, after sunset and well into the night. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 63F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 60F (with a low of 51F).

Sunday, October 5, 2014

We had no anglers for the trip today on the Bunny Clark. The wooden anchors stayed out all day.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was good at least. Ashore, the wind blew out of the west or west northwest at twenty knots or more. The sky stayed clear all day with very few clouds and much sun. Temperatures rose into the lower to mid 60s. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 66F (with a low of 45F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 61F with a low of 49F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 61F (with a low of 35F).

I received a generous $50.00 donation a few days ago from Roger Hopkins (RI) supporting my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge. I'm sure Roger told me he was going to send the donation when he was up fishing with us a few weeks ago. But, alas, I didn't remember. So the check sat on the desk for a week until we figured it out. We weren't sure that I might be a tip for either Ian or Jared. Thank you so much, Roger, for your generosity and kindness. Of course you realize it's a great cause as I do. I appreciate your support in this project.

Monday, October 6, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 42F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The air temperature didn't take long to warm up. By 8:00 AM it was already 50F. The high today topped out around 65F. The wind blew out of the west at six or eight knots in the morning and out of the southwest at ten knots, at most, in the afternoon. The sky was sunny all day. The visibility was very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west to ten knots in the morning and out of the southwest to ten knots or twelve knots in the afternoon. Seas were chops of a foot or two over long rolling sea swells of two to three feet. The sky was sunny and clear all day. The visibility was just shy of excellent. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59.2F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 39F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 67F with a low of 43F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 65F (with a low of 31F).

The fishing/catching was very good today. Landings were very good as well. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. They were bothered by blue sharks enough so that they had to move from two spots because they could not get their fish aboard. Legal landings also included four redfish and three cusk. There were no dogfish caught. Quite a few haddock were caught and released. Only twelve cod would have made the legal mark had possession of cod been legal. Drifting was the method. No bait was used today, only jigs and cod flies were used.

Ian didn't tell me who was high hook. Ken McLaughlin (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. This is the fifth pool that Ken has won this season so far. His second largest fish was a 10 pound pollock. Chris King (NY) boated the second largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. He also caught a 12 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 12.5 pound pollock caught by Cory Fahey (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Joe Columbus (MA) caught a 10 pound pollock and a 10.25 pound pollock, his two largest fish. Mark Majewsky (MN) landed a pollock weighing 11.5 pounds, his biggest fish. Nine year old Jacob Oakes (ME) caught a 10.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Nicole King (NY) landed an 11 pound pollock, her largest fish. Chris King actually landed the hard luck award for losing two jigs. Ken McLaughlin should have won the award for losing three jigs but he won the boat pool! It's hard to give someone the hard luck award when he wins enough money to pay for the jigs he lost.

Joe Columbus did me a solid by sponsoring me in my cancer bike ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Joe always gives me something every year. Thanks, Joe. I always appreciate your support!

Tim Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was partly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the south at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was fairly good.

We had a bumpy ride to the fishing grounds. The wind was out of the south at speeds over fifteen knots with seas in chops of four feet average. And they were fairly steep chops as well. With the sea state and riding in the dark, I couldn't make any more than a ten knot cruising speed. So it seemed like it took forever to get there. On the grounds, the wind freshened to twenty and twenty-five knots. Seas increased to an average eight foot chop by 10:00 AM. The wind increased a bit more on the tide as did the chops. Seas increased to ten feet with the occasional twelve footer or better, this because the tide was running hard right directly into the wind in the area we were fishing. Once we left that area, the height and steepness decreased substantially. The ride home saw seas of seven to eight feet on average. The sky was sunny and mostly clear until we wrapped it up to head back to Perkins Cove. From that moment on, the sky was mostly cloudy with the occasional light rain sprinkle. The air temperature was warm sheltered from the wind and mild in the wind. The tide was moderate to strong. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 73F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 72F (with a low of 45F).

The fishing was good at best with the sea conditions that were prevalent for the day. Regardless, the catching was very good to excellent. In the morning, everything that was caught was legal, an excellent morning. After the tide at about 11:00 AM, the bite on legal fish dropped off but the dogfish bite accelerated to a point I hadn't seen this season yet. To say that we caught forty-eight dogfish in two hours might be understating how many we caught. In fact, we were so busy taking dogfish off the hooks I forgot to count what we released. In fact, I probably couldn't have counted the numbers of dogfish we caught. For the trip, most legal fish landed were redfish and pollock, in that order. The redfish were the largest in average size that we have seen this year, maybe the last three years. There was only one redfish that weighed under 1.25 pounds. All the rest were so close to 2 pounds (Maine state trophy redfish size) that, it seemed, I was weighing every one that came aboard. And we had so many pollock over 10 pounds, I stopped weighing the 10 pounders. Legal landings also included a cusk, twenty-two white hake (mostly small), seven whiting and a mackerel. We anchored for every stop in the morning. After 11:00 AM we couldn't anchor any more. The reason being, when anchored, the tide was keeping the bow pointed directly west which was allowing the particularly steep chops to dump on top of the anglers from the port side! This was too intimidating to pursue so we went to the sea anchor for the rest of the trip. The sea anchor kept the bow directly into the wind and the lines perfectly straight down. But this new dimension of boat attitude and function must have been something that really turned the dogfish on. We could never get away from the dogfish after that method shift, despite the many moves I made. It should also be noted that we saw not a single blue shark. And on one stop we caught four good sized haddock (two of about 4 pounds each) so quickly that I feared the worst (catching too many haddock) so I moved. We did manage to stay away from the cod and haddock pretty much and would have landed four cod and five haddock had the previous regulations still been in place. Jigs and cod flies were used mostly. The jig/fly combination created the most landings.

I would have to say that Kevin Luke (NJ) was, without a doubt, high hook. He caught fish non-stop (including the most dogfish) since we started fishing, throughout the trip and to the end. He won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 22 pound pollock. This ties the sixth largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Some of his other fish that I weighed (excluding redfish) included a 14 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Steve Brown (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 38 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the largest fish/hake of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far! I took a bad picture of Steve (the seas were having their way with me) with his prize. This digital image appears on the left. Steve is also a big man and makes any monster fish look small! Some of his other good fish that I weighed included a 10 pound pollock, a pollock of 11 pounds and a 12 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 21 pound white hake caught by Adam Gubich (NJ).

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Lenox (NY) caught the second largest redfish of the Bunny Clark fishing season today. It weighed 2.5 pounds exactly. We had seven fish that were so close to trophy size that all the fish had to do was to eat a shrimp and it would have qualified. Every redfish caught today was all spawned out, if you can call it that - redfish bare their young alive. So most had the frames of a trophy fish but only Steve's made the weight. I took a picture of Steve with his special fish. The digital image appears on the right. His largest fish was a 13 pound pollock. Liam Kennedy (NJ), whom I rely on heavily for all my biggest fish of the season did not disappoint. However, he never got the fish (two or three of them - two good ones) to the boat. One was huge. Maybe it was a hake or a big pollock but it could also have been a big cod - as unusual as that might seem. The best fish that he did land included a 12 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock and a 12.75 pound pollock. Howard Kaulfers (PA) caught an 11.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also caught one of the bigger hake at 11 pounds. Bob Devonmille (NJ) caught a 10 pound pollock, first thing. He caught the only good double keeper catch of the trip. His catch included a 10.5 pound pollock and a 9 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Gene Luke (NJ) caught a 13 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, his two largest fish. Mike Luke (NJ), sea sick for most of the day, fished for about an hour total and caught a 14.5 pound pollock, a 12.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. I believe these were the only fish he caught except for a few redfish. Roy Tutunjian (NJ) landed the fourth largest fish of the trip, an 18 pound white hake. Bert Kern (NJ) caught a 12 pound pollock. And Bill Luke (NJ) caught a 12 pound pollock. Bill landed the hard luck award for being the only person to lose a jig. He lost three! Ouch!

I received two donations sponsoring me and my efforts to fight cancer with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Liam Kennedy gave $30.00 while Vince DeBari (NJ) gave a generous $50.00. Thank you both so very much for your support. I appreciate it greatly.

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Today's trip was canceled before it even started. We didn't have any anglers to make a trip today. The weather wouldn't have been great anyway. And it seems the wind has blown since October started. That should get the fish biting along with this full moon.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was overcast, it had been raining earlier, the wind was blowing out of the south at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good. It rained lightly, periodically, for the next two hours and then stopped. By 10:30 AM, the sky was almost completely clear and the air temperature had risen to 65F. The wind blew out of the southwest most of the day at about fifteen knots along the shore, twenty knots on the fishing grounds. The sky cleared nicely before noon and remained clear and sunny for the rest of the daylight hours. The visibility was good at least. The air temperature reached over the 70F mark during the early afternoon.The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 73F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 52F).

Except for three different meetings and completing about an hour and a half of much needed engine work, I spent my day working at Barnacle Billy's restaurant.

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at seventeen knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

We had a fairly comfortable ride to the fishing grounds. The wind was still blowing about fifteen knots out of the west but the seas grew as we got further off shore and we were taking them on the starboard beam. The visibility was very good plus we had the advantage of the full moon which was still pretty high in the western sky. On the grounds, the westerly wind increased to twenty knots sustained with a few higher gusts. Seas were three to four feet, more or less, depending on the tide. By 3:00 PM, the wind had started to drop. We had ten knots of westerly wind with a two foot sea on the trip back to Perkins Cove. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The air temperature was mild/cool with the wind. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility maxed out at thirty miles in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 46F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 66F with a low of 50F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 63F (with a low of 39F).

The fishing was good all day. The catching was poor until 1:00 PM, good after that. Most legal fish landed were redfish and pollock. We had trouble with blue sharks all morning. And, except for the redfish, most fish were on the smaller than normal size range. We didn't catch a fish over 9 pounds until after 2:00 PM! Legal landings also included five butter mullet, one whiting and two cusk. Four cod and one haddock were caught that were over twenty-one inches. There were only five cod and four haddock for the trip, all released, of course. We found plenty of fish, pollock mostly, but the bite was really terrible. We drift fished, anchored and used the drogue continuously in hopes of finding a method that worked the best. In the end, one anchor stop and one drift did the trick. The sea anchor, although the most comfortable method, sucked, frankly. Cod flies caught the most fish by far.

Ray Westermann (MA) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with thirteen legal, including two good sized redfish. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 21 pound pollock. The pollock is Ray's largest this season so far and the Bunny Clark's tenth largest pollock this year to date. Ray caught an 8 pound pollock earlier in the day, his second largest fish. Chuck Lennon (MA) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 15 pound cod. This fish was weighed and promptly released. The third largest fish was a 12 pound pollock caught by Alex Ramirez (ME), his only legal fish of the trip.

Other Angler Highlights: Jon Griffin (MA) was second hook with ten legal pollock. His largest one weighed 8 pounds. Michael Bialer (NY) led the boat pool all morning and into the afternoon with a 9 pound pollock, his largest fish of the trip. Chris Porter (MA) was third hook just behind Griff. Three fish of his that I weighed included a 9 pound cod (released), an 8 pound pollock and an 8.25 pound pollock. Steve Lenox (NY) lost a really big fish. His two largest fish included a 10 pound cod and a 7.5 pound pollock. Ralph Nickerson (NH) landed an 8.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Joe Ramirez (ME) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the trip! He tried to fish but had to give it up early in the day.

I received a couple of donations helping with my fund raising for the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a $7.00 gift from Mike Bialer and the other was a $20.00 donation from Steve Lenox. Thank you both very much for your support. Many people appreciate this!

Friday, October 10, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 45F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west southwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The morning seemed to warm slowly. By 9:30 AM, the air temperature was still only 51F. I don't believe it every got to 60F but I could be wrong. It just felt cooler than it has been. The sky was clear all day. The westerly wind backed off by early afternoon. There was not much of any wind by sunset. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The sky was clear all day. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles (excellent). The surface water temperature reached a high of 56.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 41F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 63F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 30F).

The fishing was fair to good with the current and a few dogfish that bothered them. The catching was good to very good. Landings were good, better than yesterday by a few. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included four redfish and a butter mullet. Twenty-five dogfish were caught and released. Forty-three haddock were released. Eight haddock would have been keepers (over twenty-one inches). Eight cod were caught that were over twenty-one inches as well. Drifting and anchoring were the boating methods employed. Cod flies caught the most fish by far.

Mike Shebulka (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish. A number was not provided but it was probably more than the high hook of yesterday. Mike caught the second largest fish of the trip, an 11 pound pollock. Dave Cutter (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.5 pound pollock. He also caught the best double keeper catch. His catch included a 7.5 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The larger of the two fish was the third largest fish of the trip. Tim Twitchell (NH) landed the hard luck award for losing the most jigs, one!

Saturday, October 11, 2014

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 45F, the sky was partly cloudy, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. By daylight, the sky was overcast. It looked like it was going to rain all morning but it never started to rain (except for a spit here and there) until 10:45 AM. The rain alternated between steady and light until 2:00 PM when it stopped altogether. By 3:30 PM, the sky cleared, the sun came out, the wind was zero, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility was very good. The air temperature was cool all morning and early afternoon. I never saw an air temperature much above 50F until later in the afternoon. I never did see an air temperature higher than 52F. The wind blew out of the northeast starting at 7:00 AM but it never got any stronger than eight knots. After noon there was no wind.

On the fishing grounds, the day started out in fog and some precipitation. The wind was light out of the northeast (five to eight knots). The ocean was calm all day. When it wasn't raining, which was most of the time, the sky was overcast. The sky never cleared until they got close to shore on the ride back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature was mild. The tide started out stong and moderated later. The visibility ranged to five miles in haze and fog. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55.9F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 39F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 54F with a low of 47F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 56F (with a low of 35F).

The fishing was good. It could have been better but there were quite a few dogfish getting in the way and the current was a little much in the beginning. The catching was very good. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock of a larger average size than we have seen all week. Legal landings also included three redfish, two cusk and a butter mullet. Forty-three dogfish, sixteen small cod and thirty-three haddock were released. Drift fishing was the only method employed. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Jim Kirby (NH) was high hook with the most legal pollock. His largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught as a double keeper catch with another pollock of 10 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. He also caught an 11 pound pollock. Jared Stevens (ME) didn't catch a legal fish all day until the last stop. His fish, the last fish of the day, was the largest fish of the trip weighing in at 15.5 pounds. With this fish Jared won the boat pool for the largest fish! The second largest fish was a 14.5 pound pollock caught by Matt Peterson (ME). John Stevens (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 14 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Dean Harp (CA) caught a 10 pound pollock, one of the first two fish to be weighed in the morning. Richard Franke (NY) boated a pollock of 13.5 pounds. Hashim Alark (MD) landed a 10.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Ford Stevens (ME) caught a 12.5 pound pollock, his best. Paula Beaulieu (ME) caught a nice double that included a 10.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. John Russell (ME) landed a 13 pound pollock as his largest fish. John also caught an 11.5 pound pollock. Roland Beaulieu (ME) landed the hard luck award for catching nary a single legal fish and for getting involved in quite a few tangles. I'm not qualified at this time to tell you that he was the most tangled. He might have been the only angler aboard without a legal fish.

Don & Lisa Johnson (MA) stopped by today when the boat came in. I enjoyed seeing them and hearing about the recent war stories with their boat. All boats are similar in that regard. They also donated $25.00 to sponsor me in my cancer cure ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge. They have supported me every year since I started riding the PMC in 2007. Thank you very much for your help. You know I appreciate it very much.

Sunday, October 12, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 41F, the sky was crystal clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at seven knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. It was a beautiful fall day today. The wind blew out of the north at ten knots at most. The sky was clear and sunny. The visibility remained very good (some haze) all day. The air temperature got up to the lower 60s. The wind dropped to nothing by early afternoon. The ocean along the coast flattened out.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at ten knots or a bit more. Seas were chops of two feet. As the day progressed, the wind gradually dropped. By noon, there was less than five knots of wind with a calm ocean. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty miles in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56.7F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 36F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 59F with a low of 44F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 61F (with a low of 30F).

The fishing was very good all day. There were very few dogfish, the weather conditions were very nice and the current was light as compared to the last few days. The catching of legal fish (landings) was poor in the morning and excellent in the afternoon, making it a good day overall. It might have been better day than that overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far, of course. Legal landings also included two redfish, four cusk and a white hake. They released twenty-five dogfish, thirty-four haddock, one wolffish and nine cod. Only one cod and one haddock would have made the legal size limit had this been under August regulations. Drifting and anchoring were the boating methods employed. Cod flies caught the most fish by far.

Norm Herrick (MA/ME) was high hook with the most legal fish an angler has caught on a trip any day this week. His largest fish was a 10 pound pollock, a tie for the second largest fish of the trip. Lewis Hazelwood (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.5 pound pollock. Lee Kosiba (NY) tied with Norm for the second largest fish of the trip. Lee also caught a pollock weighing 10 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Saul Maldonado (MA) caught a 9.75 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Tim Rozan (ME) and Greg Johnson (NH) both took home the hard luck award. Greg made an errant cast and caught Tim in the lip with the treble hook of his 16 ounce jig! The hook went right through the lip! It was a minor wound but both were in shock thinking of the possibilities of what could have happened. Ian was thinking that both might pass out as both were a bit ashen in complexion. But all's well that ends well. I saw Tim when he got back to the dock. You would never have known it happened until you were told about it. Of course, Greg was still muttering about how sorry he was.

Tim Rozan contributed $20.00 and Lewis Hazelwood gave $20.00 to support my cancer fund raising campaign with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Both have been continuous contributors since I mentioned my fund raising to them. Thank you both very much for your generosity and help. Much appreciated!

Monday, October 13, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 42F, the sky was crystal clear with half moon directly over head, the wind was blowing very lightly out of the west and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, it was a beautiful fall day with high temperatures in the mid 60s, sunny skies and light winds from the southwest. That all changed at 2:00 PM when the sky became overcast. Not having the sun made it seem cold. And the wind picked up off the water dropping the air temperature into the high 50s. The visibility was less clear than yesterday but still very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest in the morning from five to ten knots. Seas were chops of one to two feet. By noon, the southwest wind had increased to ten and fifteen knots. Seas increased to two to three feet, chops. The sky was a mix of sun and overcast, mostly sunny in the morning and mostly overcast in the afternoon. The air temperature was mild. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56.1F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 35F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 63F with a low of 45F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 30F).

The fishing was very good with only ten dogfish, one blue shark and a perfect drift. The catching of legal fish (landings) was excellent, our best day in the last two weeks. Most legal fish landed were pollock of all sizes, but there were many over 10 pounds. Legal landings also included six redfish, two cusk, three whiting and three butter mullets. Only three cod and four haddock would have been kept had it been August. [We are trying hard to stay away from the cod & haddock this fall. It's hard to stay away from the haddock. Cod, not so much.] Drifting was the boating method. Cod flies caught the most fish by far.

Fred Kunz (NH) was high hook with the most fish an individual angler has caught off the Bunny Clark for a single trip in over a month. Some of his better fish included three pollock of 13 pounds each, a double keeper catch that included a 13 pound pollock (one of the three previously mentioned) and a 10 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time, a 12.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Fred did everything but win the boat pool. Brian Tufts (VT) did that for him! In fact, Brian won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17 pound pollock. This day was his birthday today. So it was only fitting that he get the best present available. I know it doesn't always happen. But it did for Brian today. There was a tie for the second largest fish of the trip. Ken McLaughlin (ME) and Dave Stuart (KY) both caught a 15.5 pound pollock each. Ken caught his singly while Dave caught his as a double that also included a pollock of 8 pounds. Ken also caught a pollock of 11 pounds and several in the 10 pound range. Dave had a 12 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock as well.

Other Angler Highlights: Don Robichaud (NH) caught an 11 pound pollock, the first fish to be weighed today. His other good fish included a 10.5 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. Tracie Johnson (NH) landed a 13.5 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock, her best. Jimmy Brandenburg (KY) caught a 15 pound pollock, his largest fish and the fourth largest fish of the trip. Tony Melloni (MA) caught an 11 pound pollock as his largest fish. He also landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines.

Tim Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the Lighthouse Fishing Club trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the south at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

When we reached the one mile mark outside of Perkins Cove the wind was blowing fifteen knots or better out of the southwest. Seas were chops of two to three feet. It was a bit of a rolly ride. This wind had dropped substantially when we arrived on the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest and remained out of the south southwest all day. Wind speeds never got over ten knots while we were fishing. Seas were chops of one to two feet. On the ride home the wind picked up to fifteen knots with seas averaging about two feet, more or less, but then died out again about five miles from shore. The air temperature was mild in the morning, warm in the afternoon. The sky was overcast all morning but clear and sunny in the afternoon. The tide (current) ran into the wind or obliquely to the wind on every fishing spot. Current speed was moderate. The visibility maxed out at fifteen nautical miles in haze. We had no rain today. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 78F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 56F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was very good all day, bordering on excellent. We had very few dogfish to contend with, the lines tended very nicely, not a blue shark was seen and the weather was beautiful. We caught very few sub-legal fish (fourteen cod, twenty-one haddock and three redfish) and all the legal fish (pollock mostly) were larger on average than they have been. It was the best marathon for angler average in at least two and a half weeks, probably more. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far and of course. Legal landings also included three cusk and six redfish. Had we been able to keep cod under the summer regulations we would have brought home nine fish, haddock two fish. We drift fished for most of the day but anchored twice. Cod flies caught the most fish.

Al Hanson (MA) and Steve Wiater (MA) tied for high hook with a couple fish less than Fred Kunz (NH) had yesterday. Some of Steve's better fish included an 11 pound pollock, a 12.5 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock and two pollock of 12 pounds each. Al Hanson's three largest fish included a 10.5 pound pollock, a 12.75 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock.

George Sweet (MA) won the Club pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19 pound pollock. This fish was the last fish boated at the end of the fishing! Some of George's other good fish included an 11 pound pollock, a 13.25 pound pollock, a 10.5 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. Barry Juhasz (CT) won the Club pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, an 18 pound pollock. Some of Barry's better fish included a 15.25 pound pollock, a 12.25 pound pollock and two pollock of 12 pounds each. Dick Carpenter (MA) won the Club pool for the third largest fish with the third largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. Dick caught the most fish over 10 pounds with a total count of eleven! Some of his better fish included two pollock of 13 pounds each, a 13.5 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock, an 11.75 pound pollock and the largest cod of the trip at 11 pounds (released, of course). It was a good day to be a Dick on the Bunny Clark!

Other Angler Highlights: Phil Wicker (MA/FL) led the Club pool for the largest fish for most of the day with a 15.25 pound pollock. Some of his other good fish included a 14 pound pollock, a 12 pound pollock and a 13.75 pound pollock. Paul "Chico" Astorino (MA) caught only the second Bunny Clark Maine state trophy cusk of the season today. The cusk weighed exactly 12 pounds, our second largest cusk of the Bunny Clark season to date. Chico's biggest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock. He also caught an 11.5 pound pollock. Ben Barzousky (MA) caught our second best double keeper catch of the trip (I didn't weigh our biggest - although it was caught by Jim Geary (MA). Ben's double included a 9.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Some of Ben's other good fish included an 11 pound pollock, a 12.25 pound pollock, a 12 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. Jim Geary landed a 14 pound pollock, his largest fish. His second largest fish was a 13 pound pollock. And Jim also caught the second largest cod of the day (released alive), an 8 pounder. Gloria Gennari (MA) landed a 10 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, her two largest fish. And, for the record, Steve Wiater landed the hard luck award for losing two jigs!

Two anglers helped me in my fund raising machinations with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. These anglers were Steve Wiater with a generous $60.00 gift and Barry Juhasz with a donation of $25.00. Thank you both for your generosity, your kindness and putting up with me on the Bunny Clark. I've always enjoyed your crew. And, for the record, many of the anglers on this trip have supported my PMC event either earlier this season or in the past. I very much appreciate that. See you next season!

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was was clear with stars and a half moon almost directly overhead, the wind was very light out of the west and the visibility over the ocean was very good. By 8:00 AM, the air temperature had risen to a humid 64F, the ocean was flat calm with a few wind patches, there looked to be a fog bank about three or four miles off shore and the sky was clear and sunny. The day remained beautiful until well after sunset (although we did see some cloudiness around 8:00 PM). The sky remained clear and sunny all day. The air temperature reached 77F, the wind stayed light, the ocean remained calm and the visibility was good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five to ten knots with a one foot chop. There was also a long sea swell of two to three feet underneath. The sky remained sunny for the trip. The air temperature was warm/mild. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from eight to ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 62F). The high temperature of 76F in Portland today ties the record for the high temperature on this date in 1963. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 59F).

The fishing was very good. The bite was actually better than it was yesterday (Ian's and my collective opinion). The catching of legal fish was very good excellent. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included four redfish, six whiting and four cusk. Fifteen dogfish, twenty-one cod and twelve haddock were released. There were twelve cod that would have been landed had the size limit been the same as it was in the summer and the possession limit been lifted. No blue sharks were seen. Drifting was the method. Only jigs and cod flies were used today. No bait fishing was attempted.

Ray "Tangles" Valente (NH) was the fisherman of the day. He tied for high hook with Jordan Breault (CA). And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15.5 pound pollock. Some of Ray's other good fish included a 10.25 pound pollock, a 14 pound pollock and a double keeper catch that included two 10 pound pollock caught on the same line at the same time. Ray's 14 pound pollock was the second largest fish of the trip. Jordan also had a bunch of nice fish including a 13.5 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock, two pollock of 11.5 pounds each and a 12.25 pound pollock. Sebastian Jablonski (ME) and Henry Yeh (MA) tied for third. They both caught a 13.75 pound pollock each. Henry caught his singly while Sebastian caught his as part of a double keeper catch that also included a pollock of 11.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Lisa Yeh (ME) landed a 12 pound pollock, a 10.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock as her largest three fish. Jourdan Yeh (CA) and Henry Yeh tied for the hard luck award. Jourdan lost a jig and Henry was slightly ill from the adverse, although slight, motion of the ocean.

I received a very generous donation of $250.00 from Howard Goldenfarb (ME/FL) supporting me in my ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today, an event that raises money to fight cancer with the Jimmy Fund, the fund raising arm of the Dana-Farber Cancer Instituted in Boston, Massachusetts. Thanks so much, Howard. I very much appreciate your help.

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Today's marathon trip was canceled yesterday for lack of warm bodies and, I suspect, a lot of that having to do with the severe weather forecast.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was overcast, it had been raining a couple hours earlier, the wind was blowing out of the southeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was good at best. At sunrise, the fog rolling in along the coast, it became a bit muggy and the sky threatened rain. It didn't rain, however, until after noon. After 4:00 PM, the rain became more established. Rain was torrential between 5:00 PM and 6:00 PM. It rained continuous, but not continuously hard, throughout the night. The air temperature was mild/warm throughout the day with high 60s whenever I looked at a thermometer. We lost the fog by mid morning but the visibility remained fair to good for the day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 63F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 70F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 60F).

Friday, October 17, 2014

Today's trip was canceled yesterday. We had not a single person booked for today nor a single inquiry about today's trip.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was overcast, it had been raining a couple hours earlier, the wind was light out of the south southeast and the visibility over the ocean was fair at best in some fog and haze. It rained a little bit more before stopping before 7:00 AM. It never rained again. At 9:00 AM, we had sun here and there among a mostly overcast sky. By 11:00 AM, the sky had cleared and the sun was out for the rest of the day. The air temperature was mild/warm for the rest of the day. The highest air temperature I saw was 69F but I heard that it got up to 72F. The wind stayed light out of the south. The ocean remained calm along the shore. During the late afternoon, seas were making up along the beaches. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 72F (with a low of 53F).

Saturday, October 18, 2014

Today's trip was canceled yesterday. We didn't have enough anglers (two) to make the trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the south on land but was blowing at fifteen knots or more at the closest weather buoy and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good over the ocean, or so it seemed in the dark. We are already seeing larger than normal seas from Hurricane Gonzalo well over 500 miles to the east southeast. Sea swells were already being recorded at 7 & 8 feet only nine miles from shore.

Clouds rolled in around 7:00 AM. This didn't created much of an overcast condition. Instead, we saw clouds and clear blue patches. Some of the clouds looked dark enough to produce rain. But this didn't happen in the morning. After 1:00 PM, we alternated between showers and clear conditions. From 3:00 PM until 6:00 PM, it was mostly raining. At 5:00 PM we had thunder showers and a summer-like rain. The air temperature hung around the mid 60s all day. The wind was generally light from the south. At times, the ocean was calm along the shore. Large seas were breaking all along the coast. A mist hung in the air along all the beaches from the pounding surf. After 6:00 PM, it never rained again. The sky didn't clear completely but there were plenty of clear looks at the sky. The visibility ended up in the "good" category. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 52F).

I spent the day working at the restaurant. It's the last weekend at Barnacle Billy's (original) of the season. Barnacle Billy's, Etc. will remain open daily for two more weeks. Many of the patrons eating at the restaurant today were regular customers of ours. It was like "old home" weekend.

I must say it was unnerving to see the Bunny Clark tied to the dock for the last three days. Never have we lost trips in October during good weather. And I'm so sorry that the state of the fishery has come to the point where regulations are imposed to slow our business down in the most prime month for catching fish of the season. But then maybe this will help us turn things around for the future. Stay tuned.

I received another donation helping my cancer cause with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Dave Haberl (MO), who drives out here every year to go on the Bunny Clark in October, was the donor. His donation was $20.00. Thank you so much, Dave, for seeking me out at the restaurant to help in the cause. Very thoughtful and generous of you and I appreciate it. Hope to see you next season!

Sunday, October 19, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 51F, the sky was mostly clear with a sliver of a moon hanging well over the eastern horizon, the wind was blowing out of the west northwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good, at least. The wind continued to blow out of the northwest or some variation of it all day. The sky clouded over before dawn and remained that way for a few hours. By mid morning, the sky was clear and the sun was bright. But it didn't do much for the air temperature as it stayed cool most of the day. Every time I looked at a thermometer the air temperature was in the low 50s. The sky clouded over again after noon. And we really never saw the sun again for the rest of the day. Seas were large along the shore. The visibility remained very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops over swells of three to five feet. The sky was a mix of sun and overcast conditions. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 44F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 56F with a low of 43F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 53F (with a low of 45F).

The fishing was very good. The conditions weren't perfect but they were certainly good enough. And only six dogfish were caught and released. The catching of legal fish was excellent. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included three redfish. Nine haddock were caught but none were over twenty-one inches. Only six cod were caught that would have made the twenty-one inch minimum had they been able to keep them. Both anchoring and drifting were the boating disciplines involved. Only cod flies and jigs were used.

Jeff Rounds (VT) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a 14.5 pound pollock, the second largest fish of the trip. He also caught a double keeper catch that included two pollock of exactly 11.5 pounds each. Some of his other weighable fish included a 12 pound pollock, a 12.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Cole Melendy (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. Two of his other good fish included a 10.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Jay Haggett (VT) boated the third largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. He also caught a 10 pound pollock that Ian weighed.

Other Angler Highlights: Frank Haggett (VT) caught several nice fish that were weighed. They included an 11 pound pollock, an 11.25 pound pollock, an 11.5 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. Jay & Frank Haggett landed the hard luck awards for never being able to out-fish Jeff Rounds, ever! Ouch.

Monday, October 20, 2014

Today's trip was canceled for lack of anglers.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 38F, the sky was crystal clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at almost twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The sky remained clear for the day, a welcome change after yesterday's mix of mostly clouds with some sun. The air temperature warmed to 48F by 11:30 AM. The air temperature remained cool for the day with the highest reading in Perkins Cove about 56F more or less. The wind blew out of the west at fifteen knots (more or less) with stronger gusts in the morning, less wind after noon and no wind a dusk. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 56F (with a low of 35F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 58F with a low of 39F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 55F (with a low of 34F).

Last night was the last hurrah for the season at Barnacle Billy's (original). It was a very generously warm crowd of patrons and a wonderful staff to work with all season to get to the end. My sister, Meg, was there to make it very special indeed. Everyone loves Meg, as do I. My brother, Court, closed the place, as he does every year. He's the number one guy there and, before I make any decision, I consult with him first. When I left, I knew the place was in good hands and I was a bit sad that "Billy's" was done for another season. I spent the day today writing about it on the Barnacle Billy's website.

This morning I spent time getting everything ready to go at the restaurants and getting the Bunny Clark ready for my trip tomorrow. I was excited about going. And I have "special" plans for tomorrow. Let's see how it all turns out. I waited until 8:00 AM to confir with Court about the clean-up plans. We went over a few things.

From there I went to get my old 87' Porshe I had in storage to start it up, get it registered and put an inspection sticker on it. As I was backing it up to put it back, I noticed black smoke coming out of the hood. Thinking it might be exhaust and worried that I might have no oil, I stopped the car, shut off the ignition and opened the hood. Smoke and fire billowed out. Here I was, all alone without a fire extinguisher at the end of a storage facility with the potential of burning my car and everything around me down! The only thing I could do was to take off my favorite Bunny Clark hoodie and try to smother the fire. This I did. I was covered in smoke and got minor burns on my fingers (and I enhaled a bunch of acrid smoke) but I did manage to put the fire out. I was shaking all over when I was done and covered in soot. An AC condenser had shorted out, started the fire and caught the synthetic covering blanket on fire. The engine is in the back (it's a 911) so no damage was done to the engine. But the smell was not good. And the burns I sustained were from the melting synthetic blankets. My hands were black from it. Needless to say, I was very wound up as well as running out the rest of my morning time on this car. And I ruined my good luck hoodie.

I worked at the restaurant (after I got showered and shaved) for the rest of the day and into the evening.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the sky was clear, the wind was very light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. We had to skin by a barge in the middle of the channel on the way out of Perkins Cove this morning. New floats and pilings were almost finished being placed after almost a week of work. There was no current or wind so it wasn't too big a deal. If the tide were any lower we couldn't have made it.

There was very little wind, partly cloudy skies, good visibility and mild temperatures on the ride to the fishing grounds. Once there, the wind jus started to air on out of the southeast. The wind blew out of the southeast all day. Wind speeds got up to a little bit over ten knots but then petered out to light after noon. Chops got as high as two feet for about an hour or less. The sky became overcast by 7:00 AM. Overcast skies were the rule (except for a half hour at 4:00 PM) of the day. We had just a little sprinkle of rain for ten minutes around 2:00 PM. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was very light. The visibility ranged from eight to twelve miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55.5F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 76F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 55F).

The fishing was excellent all day. There were very few dogfish (ten released), the lines tended perfectly, there was some drift (always a good thing) but not too much, the tangles were few and the drift was perfect. The catching of legal fish was good, or slightly better than that, overall. We had a couple of poor spots in the morning (trying a couple of new things). The last drift of the day was excellent, a fish a cast for an hour and a half. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included seven redfish, eighteen white hake (we were finally able to get off shore today), one butter mullet and twelve whiting. We were slightly bothered by one big shark which I never got a look at and never which really actually took a fish. I suspect it was a porbeagle but, like I said, I never saw it. We had five cod that would have been legal under summer rules and one haddock in the same boat. Very few sub-legal haddock were caught. We drift fished on every spot. Cod flies caught almost every fish.

I can't tell you who was high hook. Too many fish were caught and I couldn't have kept track. But I suspect it was Ken Fowler (PA). Ken did far better than any other angler on the pollock. He also had the most pollock over 11 pounds. His list of better fish included an 11 pound pollock, a 16 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. He also had the best double keeper catch of the trip. His double included a 10.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Ken also caught the two largest cod. One looked to have been 8 pounds and the other was a 6 or 7 pound cod. I didn't want to take the time to weigh the cod when it's survival was the top priority. Dave Baillargeon (MA) won the pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 32 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This ties the third largest hake of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Some of his other good fish included a 22.5 pound white hake and a 24.5 pound white hake. He never did land a pollock of 10 pounds or better. Bill Trudell (MA) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 30.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. I took a picture of Bill with his big trophy white hake. The digital image appears on the left of this entry. This comes in as a tie for the seventh largest hake caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. Bill's largest pollock weighed 13 pounds. The third largest fish was a 27 pound Maine state trophy white hake caught by Charlie Harris (MA). This is the largest fish that Charlie has ever caught. He's 33 years old now and has been fishing with me since his father brought him aboard when he was 7 years old! Charlie's second largest fish was an 18 pound white hake. Charlie caught a lot of fish today.

Other Angler Highlights: Ted Harris (PA) was in typical form today. He did very well. Some of his better fish included a 16.25 pound white hake, a 13 pound pollock, a 21.5 pound white hake, a 23.5 pound white hake, a 15.5 pound pollock and another white hake of 21.5 pounds. Dave "Digger" Harris (MA) landed a 21.5 pound white hake, his largest fish. Some of his other good fish included two pollock of 13 pounds each and a 17 pound pollock. Don Stancil (PA) caught the only haddock that might have been legal out of the fifteen or so haddock that were released today. His largest fish was a 20 pound white hake. His best pollock included two of 11.5 pounds each and a 15 pound pollock. Don landed the hard luck award for losing five jigs. Don't ask. He was also the "gregarious tangler". If you had a choice of who to be tangled with on the boat this day, most everyone would choose Don. He's just a likeable guy! Doug Caputo (MA) caught the largest pollock of the day. It weighed 17.5 pounds.

Three anglers had a hand in making my day just a little more special than it already was by donating extra money to help me in my cancer fight with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those anglers and their donations included Don Stancil for a very generous $100.00, Ken Fowler for $25.00 and Ted Harris for a generous $50.00. Thank you all so very much for being, for making me better enjoy a day at sea and for all the support you have given me throughout the years, including this one! This is very much appreciated and will always be remembered - as long as I have the ability to remember! All the best!

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Today was supposed to be an extreme day trip run by Captain Ian Keniston and Captain/Deck Hand Jared Keniston. I canceled this trip yesterday because of the weather forecast and the inevitability of strong northeast winds and high seas.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was overcast, it was raining, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at twenty-five knots and the visibility over the ocean was not very good. The wind picked up steadily as the day progressed. By noon, we had wind gusts up to thirty-five knots. After dark, the wind increased to over forty knots at times. But because of the lower than normal tides we had no splash over at high tide. Tomorrow might show a different story around noon. The air temperature remained in the low 50s. The visibility over the ocean was not good. It rained hard at times and continuously but mostly the rain was light, unlike some of the surrounding towns that got over an inch of rain water today. The Cove held together very well. There was not as much surge as I had expected. Seas got up over twenty feet offshore. The largest recorded sea from our closest weather buoy was recorded at 22 feet every eleven second at 9:00 PM. That's a pretty steep wave. What a difference a day makes! The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 51F (with a low of 48F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International Airport) the high was 56F with a low of 50F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 50F (with a low of 47F).

I spent the morning going over the details of cleanup at Barnacle Billy's with my brother, Court, sculling around the Cove tying storm lines and generally making sure the storm was not going to bother us too badly. The rest of the day I worked at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. restaurant. Wednesday is a big order day but there were not many orders per vendor today. The work load was not much either. Although I was surprised how many patrons we did get.

Thursday, October 23, 2014

I canceled this marathon trip yesterday morning when I realized there was just no way we could make the trip with the wind and sea conditions we were going to have. Maybe Friday? Maybe not. We'll see what is going to happen later today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 48F, the sky was overcast, it was raining, the wind was blowing out of the north northeast at thirty-five knots, the seas at the closest weather buoy were sixteen feet every eleven seconds and the visibility over the ocean was not very good. The heavier than normal seas continued throughout the day with a wind more northerly than northeast as the storm that was creating this mess moved off Cape Cod and to the waters off Canada. Wind speeds were sometimes over forty knots in gusts during the morning hours. No gusts over forty knots were seen after noon. Seas were huge and the tide was higher than normal in the Cove. But the surge wasn't as bad as I thought it might be. All the boats were secure. It rained on and off all day, heavy at times but not for long. It seems like everyone else received more rain than we did in Ogunquit. That's a good thing. The air temperature remained in the low 50s all day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 53F (with a low of 48F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International Airport) the high was 54F with a low of 48F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 51F (with a low of 46F).

My morning was spent sharing time at the home office working on Bunny Clark stuff and at Barnacle Billy's in the office there. I spent the rest of the day (after noon) at Barnacle Billy's.

Friday, October 24, 2014

Today's extreme day trip was canceled due to heavy weather.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 48F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, the wind was blowing out of the north at twenty-five knots (more or less), the seas at the closest weather buoy had dropped to just over ten feet every eleven seconds and the visibility over the ocean was still not very good. Seas dropped from ten feet to seven feet by 6:00 PM. The wind blew out of the north to over twenty knots during the morning. By noon, the wind was dropping. By 5:00 PM, there was no wind along the shore but it was still blowing out of the northwest at ten knots at the closest weather buoy (nine miles away). It rained on and off for most of the morning. By noon, the rain was done for the day but it was still misting along the shore. The sky remained overcast until nightfall. The air temperature got up to the low 50s but I don't believe any higher than that. The visibility over the ocean improved during the day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 54F (with a low of 48F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International Airport) the high was 52F with a low of 46F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 50F (with a low of 46F).

I spent the morning working at both the restaurant and on Bunny Clark stuff. My son, Micah, was going to haul the Petrel, our lobster boat. So I was helping Micah to a very small degree. At high tide there was still too much surge to haul the boat out at the ways in the back of the Cove. So the Petrel was put back on her mooring. In the meantime, I took in the storm lines off the Bunny Clark. By noon, I was back in the restaurant.

I had to leave for a Perkins Cove Harbor Committee meeting at 1:00 PM. That was over by 2:15 PM. It was back to Barnacle Billy's until 7:00 PM.

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the Mike Schetter (NY) marathon trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 45F, the sky was clear with stars and no moon visible, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. The day seemed to warm up quickly. But I think this was because there was very little wind and the sky was clear and sunny. We had a little bit of wind in the morning before sunrise. After sunrise we saw no more wind the rest of the day. The ocean along the shore remained calm with waves chest high or better for surfing. The air temperature got up to 60F by noon and creeped into the mid 60s afterward. It was warm, perfect. The visibility was very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at ten to five knots. Seas in the morning were chops of a foot or more over seas of two to three feet. This was the roughest it got. By 10:00 AM, the ocean had flattened out considerably. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The air temperature was mild. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55.1F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 66F (with a low of 42F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 64F with a low of 46F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 66F (with a low of 34F).

The fishing was just good with the strong current and a lot of dogfish, particularly in one spot. The catching of legal fish was very good, excellent for some. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. The largest number of fish landed in a few weeks. Captain Ian had enough smaller pollock (5 pound fish) after the first couple hours to go exploring for larger fish. He was successful eventually but there was slower fishing and dogfish between times. Legal landings also included a monkfish, a redfish and three whiting. Over forty-five dogfish were released. Nine cod would have been kept had summer regulations applied. There were no haddock out of the twelve caught that would have made the summer legal measure. Drifting was the only boating method employed. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Mike Schetter (NY) was high hook with a large number of legal pollock. His largest fish was a pollock of 10 pounds. Ian didn't weigh a number of the 10 pounders caught today. So Mike may have had a slightly bigger one. Joe Sinkler (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17.25 pound pollock. Joe also caught a 12 pound pollock. Tony Giordano (NY) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 15 pound pollock caught by Bob Vogel (NY). Bob also caught a 12.25 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Dave DeGraw (NY) caught an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. Ralph Mills (NY) landed the hard luck award for getting involved with everyone else's lines.

Sunday, October 26, 2014

I canceled today's trip late yesterday due to a lack of human beings to enjoy the trip. This has become a familiar theme since October struck with the cod and haddock possession prohibition. This even though we tend not to catch as many cod and haddock in October. It's a perception thing.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 48F, the sky was clear with stars, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. The wind picked up to almost twenty knots out of the west by 7:00 AM. The wind blew out of the west for three or more hours and then hauled out of the northwest at fifteen knots or better. The wind stayed like this until sunset and then hauled out of the west northwest and blew up to almost twenty-five knots in gusts. The sky was clear all day with very few clouds. The air temperature broached the 60F mark today. The visibility was excellent. It was a perfect fall day ashore. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 42F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 59F with a low of 47F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 57F (with a low of 38F).

I spent my second 70+ mile ride in the saddle today (in as many days - 143 miles in two days), leaving early on the bike both days and spending four hours riding each one. This is what I do with my new spare time when the boat isn't sailing. Both days I worked in the restaurant from noon 'til close. And it was busy both today and yesterday.


My son, Micah, hauled the Petrel out today. The bottom was very dirty from disuse. In fact, it's the first time I have seen a growth of muscles all over the bottom. Yikes! Had I needed the Petrel to tow the Bunny Clark back to shore I would have probably over-heated the engine because there were so many muscles clogging the through hull fittings! I took a picture of Micah hosing the hull down. This digital image appears above.

Monday, October 27, 2014

We had not a single inquiry concerning a fishing trip on the Bunny Clark for this day, not a single one. Needless to say, I didn't have to cancel the trip; there was no chance the boat was going to leave the dock anyway!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 45F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at twenty knots (more or less) and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. It was a windy day ashore. By 9:00 AM, the wind was blowing out of the west northwest at speeds of twenty-five with gusts to thirty knots. The near shore coast was a froth of white caps marching offshore. And believe me it was an army! I managed to get thirty-three miles on my bike but I was all over the road the whole time. The air temperature managed to get up to 60F. The sky was mostly clear. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 61F (with a low of 42F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 63F with a low of 46F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 60F (with a low of 35F).

Micah launched the Petrel today as I worked in the restaurant. I had a lot of book keeping to do (end of the year stuff), orders, order sheets, patrons to greet and employees to talk to. I got a chance to tell some of our better people how much I appreciated their work this summer. It was a great day for someone who can't go fishing.

I received two donations supporting my work with the Jimmy Fund through the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a generous $200.00 donation in memory of my father, Billy Tower, from Higher Ground, garden care & design - our wonderful people who work on the garden and produce the flowers we display at the restaurant all year long. The other was a very generous $1,000.00 donation from Richie Carlson & Jean Massarone (both NY). They host a "BBQ for the Cure", a portion of the money generated they send to me to be used at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. It's so wonderful that they think of me and the Jimmy Fund in so doing. Thank you all so very much for your help and for supporting me in the cause. Noble, yes. But helpful, so much so! This is so very much appreciated!

Tim Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 45F, the sky was clear, there was no appreciable wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

The ocean was flat calm (there wasn't a breath of wind), the sky was clear, the visibility was excellent and the air temperature was mild on the ride to the fishing grounds. You could have floated a scallop shell on the surface of the ocean this morning. On the grounds, the ocean was flat calm as well without a ripple on the surface. That lasted for ten minutes. As soon as we started fishing wind ripples appeared out of the southeast. This wind gradually increased throughout the day. And I mean gradually. By noon, we had five knots of southeast wind. We saw our first one foot chop by 1:00 PM. We had twelve or thirteen knots of south southeast wind for the ride home. Seas then were chops of one to two feet. The sky started to cloud over by the time we arrived at our destination this morning. By 9:00 AM, the sky was mostly overcast. The sky stayed overcast for the rest of the day. But it never rained. The air temperature was mild for the trip. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The visibility ranged to thirty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 54.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 45F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 60F with a low of 45F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 66F (with a low of 35F).

The fishing was good to very good all day. The fishing could have been better but for the large number of dogfish we had to keep throwing back. And we caught larger than normal fish today so we saw more tangles than we normally see. Landings were very good overall today. Size was impressive on all the fish that were legal to keep. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-five white hake, three redfish, five cusk and six butter mullets. We released close to a hundred dogfish, six cod (four would have been legal in August) and twelve haddock (one would have been a legal one under the previous rules - it's estimated weight was 4 pounds or better). We drift fished and anchored. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook but I would guess that it was Chris Willy (VT). Chris landed the second largest fish of the trip, a 29 pound Maine state trophy white hake, the largest groundfish he has ever caught. However, he did not enter the boat pool for the second largest fish. Some of his other good fish included a 19 pound pollock, a 21 pound white hake, a 15.5 pound pollock and an 18 pound pollock. Bruno Rozen (NJ) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 33 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the Bunny Clark's third largest hake of the season so far. Bruno caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch that also included an 11.5 pound white hake, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! This is the second largest double keeper catch of the Bunny Clark season to date. Bruno also caught a hake of 17.5 pounds. The third largest fish was a 24 pound white hake caught by George Willy (VT). But he too was not in the boat pool for the second largest fish! Some of George's other good fish included our third largest redfish of the Bunny Clark season so far at 2.1 pounds, a Maine state trophy (Only the third trophy redfish of the B.C. fishing season.), a 22 pound white hake and a 12 pound pollock. Walter Palczewski (NJ) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the fourth largest fish, a 23.75 pound Maine state trophy white hake!

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Brown (ME) came close to winning the boat pool for the second largest fish with a 23.5 pound white hake. His other good fish worth writing about included a 15 pound white hake and a 12 pound pollock. Joseph Daszkiewicz (NY) caught a 20.25 pound white hake, his biggest fish by far. Richie Grziasak (NJ) caught the first pollock of the day weighing 16.5 pounds. Some of his other good fish included a 22 pound white hake and a 15 pound pollock. Mark Lenczewski (NJ) caught three of the would-be keeper cod today. The largest one of his that was released weighed 11 pounds. Some of the good fish he was able to keep included a 14 pound white hake, an 11.5 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock. John Gill (VT), another high hook contender, caught our largest cusk of the Bunny Clark fishing season today, so far. It was a Maine state trophy cusk of 19 pounds! Needless to say, I was very happy to see it! I took a picture of John and cusk with my iPhone. This digital image appears on the left. Some of his other great fish included a pollock double that included one pollock of 15 pounds with another pollock of 13 pounds, a 23 pound white hake, a 23.5 pound white hake, an 18 pound pollock and a 16.5 pound pollock. Tim Anthony (MA) caught a 12 pound pollock, his largest fish. Eric Hazard (VT) caught two pollock of 13 pounds each. These were his two best fish. John Manis (NY) caught the largest pollock of the trip at 23.5 pounds. This ties our fourth largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. He also caught a 15 pound pollock and another pollock of 14 pounds. Tom Kirley (VT) caught a 13 pound pollock as his largest fish. He had another pollock between 10 and 13 pounds that I did not weigh. John Scott (VT) landed the hard luck award for catching nary a significant fish and for getting in a few more tangles than he would have liked!

I received a $25.00 donation from John Gill sponsoring my in my Pan-Mass Challenge bike ride for cancer care and research today. Thank's, John. It was nice to have you aboard today. I very much appreciate your support on this cancer project.

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Today's trip was canceled for lack of anglers.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was overcast, it was misty, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog. The fog hung around until 9:00 AM and then backed offshore to hang like a wall outside the bell buoy. Later in the morning the fog disappeared altogether. The air temperature was mild most of the morning. The sky remained overcast all morning as well. After noon, the sky lightened up. By 2:30 PM, we had sun and clouds. It was mostly sunny until sunset. The air temperature after 1:00 PM climbed to almost 70F. It could have made it that high. It felt like it but I never did get a look at a thermometer to confirm it. The visibility was good or better than that at the end of the day. We didn't have enough wind during the daylight hours to lift a flag. Sometime around 8:00 PM, the wind came up out of the west to fifteen knots, overcast skies became the rule and the threat of rain was upon us. At that point I went to bed. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 48F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 74F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 58F (with a low of 41F).

My day was spent at the restaurant again. Every once and a while I would look out at the Bunny Clark tied to the dock.

Tim Thursday, October 30, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at ten to fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent as near as I could tell.

We cruised to leeward to get to the fishing grounds. The wind was out of the west northwest at about fifteen knots with seas of two feet or better once we got outside the fifteen mile mark. It might have been blowing harder at times. At the twenty mile mark the wind started to drop off. We had excellent visibility, mild temperatures and a very clear sky. On the grounds, the wind was just about eight knots, or just strong enough to turn over a chop. Seas were a foot or two at most. The wind hauled out of the northwest around noon and then died out altogether. We had flat calm seas and variable wind all the way back to Perkins Cove. The sky was partly sunny and partly cloudy, clear for the start. The air temperature was mild (high 50s), the visibility was thirty miles or better. The tide was light. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55.5F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 59F (with a low of 36F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 59F with a low of 46F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 56F (with a low of 30F).

The fishing was very good to excellent all day. The conditions were great and it was very easy to hold bottom. The catching of legal (desirable) fish was horrible for the first one third of the trip (only three fish in three hours), good to very good for the next third and excellent for the last three spots - almost a fish a cast on all three spots. Landings were good to very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. In fact, there were many pollock of 10 pounds I decided not to weigh today. Legal landings also included five redfish, three whiting, three butter mullets and one white hake. We released approximately forty dogfish (more or less), twenty-eight cod over twenty-one inches to 8 plus pounds and two haddock that would have been legal in August. We drifted fished all day except for two spots where there were bigger than normal pollock. Jigs and cod flies caught all the fish.

The great Race Westermann (MA) was high hook with more legal fish than any angler has caught on the Bunny Clark for a trip in October and, possibly, September of this season. His largest fish, an 18 pound pollock, was the third largest fish of the trip. A couple other good fish of Race's included a 14 pound pollock and a 14.5 pound pollock. Rob Wright (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20.5 pound pollock. He also won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 20 pound white hake.

Other Angler Highlights: Chris Porter (MA) caught largest whiting of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. It's weight was 4 pounds exactly. This is just under the IGFA all tackle world record and is tied for the second largest whiting (silver hake) ever caught on the Bunny Clark. I took a picture of Chris with his silver hake. This digital image appears on the right. His largest fish was a pollock over 10 pounds. Fred Kunz (NH) was probably second hook. He caught more cod over twenty-one inches than any other angler on the boat today with a count of eight fish. His two biggest were both probably 8 pounds or better. Fred's largest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock. Fred Ostrander (MA) caught a 13 pound pollock, his largest fish. Jon Griffin (MA) caught the best double keeper catch of the trip. His double included a 17 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! This is the Bunny Clark's seventh largest double of the season so far. Taras Melnik (NJ) boated a 13 pound pollock and a 13.5 pound pollock, his two largest fish. Chuck Lennon (MA) got off to a slow start but finished big. His three best fish were all pollock weighing 11 pounds, 15 pounds and 12 pounds. Buddah Hayes (MA) landed the fifth largest fish of the trip, a 15.25 pound pollock. Richard Stowe (NY) landed a 12 pound pollock, his largest fish. We really had no one with any hard luck today. So, thinking that this could be the last Bunny Clark trip of the season (weather forecast for the weekend), I gave out all the hard luck award shirts I had in my bag.

I received three donations from anglers/friends supporting me in my exploits with the Jimmy fund (fighting cancer) through the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those anglers and their donations are as follows: Chris & Paula Porter gave a very generous $1,000.00 in honor of John & Thelma Drury (MA). Thelma was lost to cancer this year and John is battling the disease now - with Dana-Farber's help. Wobby Barnes (MA) gave $20.00 and Fred Ostrander gave $25.00. Thank you all so very much for you kindness and thoughtfulness. So many appreciate what you do, most of whom will never know who made them better.

Friday, October 31, 2014

We had not a single human being interested in going fishing on the Bunny Clark today. So the wooden anchors are out for this day's trip. Tomorrow's trip is being canceled for the northeast weather event shaping up for that time period. And I doubt we will be able to sail on Sunday because of the heavy weather expected. Stay tuned.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 42F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten to fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good it seemed. More later.

On September 1, 2014, the possession of cod and haddock became prohibited while fishing in federal waters with rod & reel recreationally. That means that we can't bring cod or haddock fillets back to Perkins Cove. This moratorium on cod & haddock possession is supposed to last for September & October. On November 1, haddock retention returns but cod retention remains prohibited. And, in light of recent developments, I suspect cod retention might be prohibited further into the future. Much of these regulations are up in the air right now.

The Conservation Law Foundation came out with a short video about keeping the Cashes Ledge closed area closed instead of opening it up to commercial dragging as is the plan right now. I had a short part in the video. I am very supportive of keeping the Cashes Ledge area closed and keeping the status quo on the Georges Bank closed areas numbers 1 & 2. Some on the New England Fishery Management Council want to see Georges Bank, particularly, opened to dragging. This is where our haddock are coming from, the biggest groundfish success story of the modern era. And they want to open it up? It's selfish and crazy. The video on my browser starts as soon as you bring up the page but you have to scroll down to see it. Otherwise, all you hear is the narration. There is a petition to sign at the video link I just gave you after the video is completed. I would appreciate it if you signed your name in support of keeping the Cashes Ledge area closed. The closed areas have been a very important part of the rebuilding process of the groundfish stocks in New England. Without the closed areas I am certain you will be kissing your fish goodbye. This isn't the only thing that needs to be done, of course, but it's a good start. Thank you.

We have future fishing trips with openings. The extreme day trip of Sunday, November 2 has thirteen fishing spots available and the last marathon trip (the last trip of the season) on Monday, November 3 has sixteen fishing spots available. The weekend is looking iffy as strong northeast wind is being predicted for Saturday, strong northerly winds for Sunday and ? for Monday. I'll know more later. This is you last chance to go on the Bunny Clark this year. To make a reservation you can call 207-646-2214.









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