www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

June 24, 2016, 11:00 AM EDT



Special Fish Caught on a June Marathon Trip

The digital images above were taken during the marathon trip of June 14, 2016. The angler is Mark Jolin (MA). In the digital image on the left, Mark is shown holding a double keeper catch (both fish caught on the same line at the same time) of big redfish. One weighed 1.95 pounds (just a hair shy of a Maine state trophy) and the other weighed 1.5 pounds. Both fish were over sixteen inches caliper fork length. As of this writing the bigger of the two redfish is the fourth largest redfish that has been caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. In the digital image on the right, Mark is shown holding the largest wolffish of his life. He snagged this wolffish just under the jaw with a bait hook. The wolffish weighed 18 pounds exactly, the largest wolffish that has been caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. I weighed the fish, took two quick pictures and released it back to the ocean very much alive. This marathon trip wasn't the most productive trip we have had this season . But we did catch quite a few special fish.




Sunday, May 22, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Micah Tower ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was mostly clouds, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in some haze. The morning sky remained mostly cloudy with many clouds that looked like they carried rain. No rain fell. In fact, by early afternoon, the clouds cleared and the sky became sunny! The air temperature warmed to 67F after getting up over 60F during the late morning. The wind was light and variable all day. The ocean was calm. The visibility was good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 62F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 54F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at eight to ten knots or less. Seas were chops of a foot or so with a moderate ground swell. The sky was sunny all day, unlike it was ashore. The visibility ranged to twelve miles in haze. The air temperature reached a high of 52F. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 50F.

The fishing/catching was excellent overall. Legal landings were good to very good. Most fish caught were haddock followed by cod. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The cull was one legal haddock for every four caught. So there were many haddock that had to be returned. There were also quite a few cod that had to be returned. Legal landings also included three pollock, six mackerel, a halibut and one whiting. There were fifteen dogfish that were released. Drifting was the method. It was a perfect drift. Cod flies caught the most fish by far.

Again, I did not inquire as to who was high hook. It was probably Bethanie Johnson (MA). But I really don't know for sure. T. J. Jarvais (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 66 pound halibut. This is the second largest halibut that has ever been landed on the Bunny Clark. It as also TJ's first deep sea fishing trip and his first halibut, of course. Captain Jared took a picture with him and his halibut. This digital image appears on the left. TJ also caught the second largest fish, a 12 pound cod. The third largest fish was a 10.5 pound cod caught by Tyler Rondeau (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Bethanie caught a 10 pound cod, her largest fish. Adam Quimby (ME) caught a 7.5 pound cod and an 8 pound cod, his two largest fish. Rusty Force (ME) caught a 6.5 pound cod. Don Johnson (MA) released a 10 pound cod and a 9 pound cod. Ken Bonang (ME) released a 9 pound cod. Dan Payne (ME) caught two cod of 10 pounds each and one 8 pound cod, his three largest fish. Khris Gerrish (ME) caught a cod of 9.5 pounds. Danis Mendoza (ME) lost one of our jigs sticks overboard. It was never recovered. Needless to say, Danis got the hard luck award but I had to wear it!

I received two wonderful donations sponsoring me in my Pan-Mass Challenge cycling event to find a cure for cancer. Don & Bethanie Johnson donated $50.00 while Dan Payne donated a generous $100.00. Thank you all very much for your support and help. I do very much appreciate this!

Monday, May 23, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 51F, the sky was smurry clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze. In fact, there was no wind all day. The ocean was flat calm over a big swell that yielded perfect surfing waves along the coast. And the surfers were out. The sky was mostly clear and sunny all morning. The early part of the afternoon was the same. By 4:30 PM, the clouds were starting to move in. The sky was overcast by 5:30 PM. There was rain by 6:00 PM. Light intermittent rain showers went on into the night. The air temperature got up over 70F by noon. I saw a high of 75F. It was probably warmer than that. It certainly felt warmer. The visibility was good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 46F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 44F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind started out from the northeast at five to eight knots. Eight knots may have been an exaggeration as the ocean was calm all day. There was a long rolling sea swell of four feet (more or less). The sky was sunny all day. They never saw much for cloud cover until they were ten miles from shore headed home. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to over twelve miles in haze. The air temperature reached a high of 61F in the shade. The surface water temperature reached the highest value of the year so far at 52F.

The fishing was excellent. The catching (and subsequent landing) of legal fish was good to very good overall. Most of the fish that were caught were released. There were many small fish again today. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far, and a good number for each angler. The haddock cull was about one legal haddock for every four caught. Everyone had plenty of haddock. Legal landings also included three pollock, two cusk, a whiting and four mackerel. They released about thirty-one cod over twenty-two inches, seventeen dogfish, one redfish, one cunner, eight sculpins and five mackerel. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

High hook? Don't ask. I didn't. Langdon Adams (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a cod weighing 11.75 pounds. It was caught and released by Jake Klosek (MA). Leo Lamoureux (VT) caught the third largest fish, an 11 pound cod. Leo also caught the first fish of the day to be weighed, an 8 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Bill Klosek (MA) landed the largest haddock of the trip. The haddock weighed 4 pounds. Shawn Kimball (NH) landed the hardest luck of the day award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.

The Maine Department of Marine Resources has a recreational program headed by Bruce Joule from the West Boothbay Harbor lab. Every year he sends out researchers to ride on various fishing boats to collect recreational data. It's a fact finding mission, of course. But it's also meant to improve data collection so important to regulations affecting recreational anglers and businesses that rely on recreational anglers. The Bunny Clark has it's share of visits from Bruce's people. Today we had our first of the year. Today's data collectors were Cassie Nixon and Chris Uraneck. Both have been with us many times. They are very nice and helpful. They were particularly helpful today where there were so many sub-legal fish that it would have been hard to count them all without them being there. We are hoping their good work leads the recreational fishery in the right direction. I must also add, as a person who holds a seat on the Recreational Advisory Panel to the New England Fishery Management Council, the data coming out of Maine is much more accurate than the same data coming out of the other states in New England. Now this may be true because there are less anglers in Maine. But I would like to believe that it's the good work of the DMR! After all, seeing their work first hand, would lend anyone to believe as I do.

Not So Tim Tuesday, May 24, 2016

We could not get enough warm bodies to pay the freight for a marathon trip today. So the wooden anchors went out again. We sail again tomorrow when Captain Ian Keniston is scheduled to make his return as skipper for the extreme day trip.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the sky was mostly overcast with a couple breaks, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze. At 6:00 AM, the visibility deteriorated as the fog moved in along the coast, the wind started to blow from the northeast and the cloud cover overhead was complete. It started to rain at 6:30 AM; just a light rain. We had intermittent rain for most of the morning, fog all day. And fog into the night. The rain had stopped by noon. We never did get another drop of rain for the rest of the day. But it was damp and drizzly with the northeast wind boiling over the shore and onto the Ogunquit coast. By sunrise, the northeast wind was blowing at fifteen knots or so. The seas, looking from the land, were about two to three feet. At 1:00 PM, the wind started to back off. By sunset, the wind was light again and barely blowing out of the northeast. The visibility, of course, was poor. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 59F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 66F (with a low of 56F).

I had desk work at both the restaurants and at the house, extra desk work I haven't been able to get to. So I got that done. Then I had three hours in engine maintenance I had been meaning to get to but never really had the time to complete. So that was next. I did change the oil and associated filters after the trip two days ago. But I still needed to change the gear oil, gear oil filter, fuel filters, change out the zincs (sacrificial anodes at the raw water side of the intercooler) and clean up the engine and engine room. The rest of the day was centered around procuring my bait for the rest of the summer season and putting it all away. I filled every freezer I had and listened to the whole Penguins/Lightning game on the satellite radio. Somewhere in there I took Deb out to dinner at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. A wonderful restaurant, the food was excellent! I believe it is my favorite restaurant.

I received a very welcome and generous donation from Richard Payeur &, his daughter, Elinor Kostanski, sponsoring me in my Pan-Mass Challenge ride for a cancer cure today. They have been extremely helpful in supporting me every year since I started the ride ten years ago. Thank you very much, Dick & Elinor. Support like yours always cements my resolve to keep doing this ride every year.

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky appeared overcast, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was good for the first mile or two, then it looked like fog was preventing further visibility. Later, the fog moved in to prove the point. It was foggy along the shore for most of the morning. It was also overcast. We started to see some patches of blue right around 11:30 PM. The sky was partly cloudy for the rest of the day. We had no wind all morning. After noon, we had southerly winds up to ten knots, maybe more, along the coast. The visibility went from fair to good in the afternoon. The high air temperature in Perkins Cove was 76F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F? (with a low of 51F?). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was ?F (with a low of ?F).

On the fishing grounds, it was foggy all day. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to a mile in fog. The air temperature only got as high as 55F. The wind blew out of the southwest at about five knots in the morning. It was calm. After noon, the wind increased to about ten knots, just rolling over a white cap of about a foot in height. There was a sea swell that ran about two feet. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was overcast. The surface water temperature reached a high of 51.5F.

The catching was very good overall. Most of these fish were sub-legal. It was fair fishing for legal fish. Legal landings included fifty haddock, three pollock, a cusk and a porbeagle (mackerel) shark. The haddock cull was three to one, sub-legal haddock to legal haddock. The salient feature today was the number of dogfish that were caught and released. Captain Ian estimated that seventy-five dogfish were caught and released. But you really couldn't keep track. There were also thirty-four cod of 5 to 12.5 pounds released today. So there was a lot of action, too much for the yield. Drifting and anchoring worked well. All terminal gear worked well.

I didn't even inquire as to who was high hook. Mark Laroche (VT) landed a porbeagle shark of 135 pounds for an hour before landing it. He caught it on a bait rig. The bait rig broke. But, in the process, the fish got tail wrapped in the rest of the line. He brought the shark to the boat dead! Captain Ian took a picture of Mark and his big shark. The digital image appears on the right. This is the first mackerel shark that Mark has ever caught. It's the fifth largest porbeagle shark that has ever been landed off the Bunny Clark. Mark also released a 10.5 pound cod, the third largest fish of the trip.

The second largest fish was a 12.5 pound cod caught by Dan Perkins (VT).

Other Angler Highlights: Dan Wescom (VT) caught the largest pollock. The fish weighed 8.5 pounds. Debbie Burnor (VT) landed the hard luck award for reaching high hurler status. For this reason she hardly wet a line today. That certainly isn't fun!

Sean Devich (NH) has decided to go for the position of swing deck hand on the Bunny Clark this season. I have accepted his application for that position. He has held that position before and did very well at it. I really enjoyed having Sean aboard in the past. And I enjoyed him as a deck hand when we were lobstering. Not only is he an honest hard working guy, he has knowledge that is only attained by a keen interest in the ocean. He was certainly be an asset for me. I couldn't be happier that he decided to try it again!

My son, Micah Tower, became a Maine Guide today. I'm just another proud father.

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Maine Guide/Captain Micah Tower and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 2:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no wind to speak of and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least.

The ocean was flat calm from the moment we left Perkins Cove until we arrived on the fishing grounds, fished for the day and landed back at Perkins Cove, just a wonderful weather day. This was the second Thursday in a row just like it! On the fishing grounds, it was a perfect drift all day. The air temperature got up as high as 69F in the shade. The sky was mostly sunny with a mix of high thin cirrus clouds and some cumulus clouds, giving us soft lighting for the day. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The visibility was very good in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55.6F but we did go through a patch of water on the way in where the water temperature reached 59F, by far the warmest surface water of the season. The wind started off light from the north, dropped to zero wind and then hauled out of the south for the ride home. We never had more than three knots of wind, maybe less. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 54F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F? (with a low of 54F?).

The fishing/catching was excellent all day, our best day, for landings, of the season so far. It was also our best day for legal haddock. I counted only eighteen haddock that were sub-legal. And because the haddock size was so large, we released anything under twenty-one inches. So there really was no cull today. But had we kept everything that was legal, we would have been trying to get away from the haddock at 10:00 AM. The boat's bag limit would have been reached. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included quite a few pollock. Most pollock were in the 5 to 7 pound range. But we did get a few over 10 pounds. We didn't see as many market cod as we have seen on previous trips. But we did see a handful of cod over 10 pounds. Released fish included twenty-one dogfish. We had many opportunities to bait, gaff or harpoon porbeagle sharks. They were everywhere. We had five major hookups without getting the sharks hooked (they were targeting the groundfish hooked on the line). We had one of these sharks stay so long around a hooked cod that I ended up rubbing his back with the turn of the gaff hook. And we had another that had to be at least 400 pounds stick his nose so far out of water at the waist of the Bunny Clark that, had I been there with a meat hook, I could have put it in his mouth and slid him aboard! I've truly never seen anything like it. It was like they were begging me to take them on, in some fashion. I just figured that with two cracked ribs and such good haddock fishing, I would be wasting everyone's and potentially hurting myself in the process. So we waved to the mackerel sharks and kept fishing. Drifting was the boating method employed. All terminal gear worked well. Bait caught the most haddock.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. I couldn't even guess. Rick Lemieux (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.75 pound pollock. Some of his other fish that I weighed included a 6 pound haddock and an 11 pound pollock. Neil Chamberlin (VT) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 14 pound cod. He wanted a picture but he wasn't quick enough with the camera so I released it very much alive after weighing it. His largest pollock weighed 10 pounds. His largest haddock was 5 pounds. Brian Kett (MA) landed the third largest fish, a 13.75 pound pollock. Brian got an interesting double keeper catch that included a 9.5 pound pollock and a 5.75 pound haddock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. He also caught another pollock that weighed in at 10 pounds, the last fish of the trip.

Other Angler Highlights: Mark Lemieux (ME) caught our largest haddock of the season today, a 7.25 pound Maine state trophy. It's also the first trophy haddock of the season for the Bunny Clark as well. He also might have had the most haddock double keeper catches. I'll probably kick myself for not taking a few pictures of him with a few of his doubles. And he seemed to be involved in a few more tangles than was necessary (I'm kidding, of course) so I presented him with the hard luck award at the end of the trip. It was more a case of not being able to find anyone that would fit the bill for hard luck! And really, a perfect weather day with unlimited legal haddock, a perfect drift and perfectly flat calm, warm weather, it would be hard task to find someone unless I invented something - which I did!

Chris Cote (ME) caught the first good haddock I could weigh, a 5.5 pounder. Mark Cote (ME) landed a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Fred Kunz (NH) caught a 10.5 pound cod and a 13.5 pound cod, his two biggest fish. He fished with a jig all day and didn't have a single problem catching haddock. In fact, he broke his old record of legal haddock caught on a jig. This might also be a Bunny Clark record as well. I did take a picture of one of his double keeper haddock catches. This digital image appears on the left. The bigger of the two haddock weighs 5 pounds. Fred will do anything it takes to get the job done, including getting a good picture while holding his rod in his teeth! He also lost a porbeagle shark when the shark straightened his tube hook! Bill Harding (ME) caught a 5 pound haddock, one of the many big haddock he seemed to catch all day long. Russell Winann (MA) also caught a 5 pound haddock, his biggest haddock of the trip. Mark Coleman (NY) boated a double that included a 13 pound cod and a 10 pound pollock. Mark's second biggest cod weighed 10 pounds. His largest haddock weighed 6 pounds. John Baker (ME) caught a 6 pound haddock and a 5.5 pound haddock. Brett Blank (MA) landed a 5 pound haddock. Greg Douglass (ME) caught a 6 pound haddock that I thought for sure was a trophy. It certainly had a frame that would support the weight and more. Jim Grard (ME) boated a 10 pound pollock, one of his last fish of the trip.

I received several donations from people interested in curing cancer by sponsoring me in my bike ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those people and their donations included: Sharon Clark (MA) for $75.00, Mark Lemieux for $25.00, Mark Cote for $40.00, Fred Kunz for $25.00, Chris Cote for $25.00, Mark Coleman for $40.00, Greg Douglass for $5.00 and Jim Grard for $10.00. I feel very special that so many would support me in this manner. Thanks so very much!

Friday, May 27, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at eight knots or so, just enough to push up a white cap, and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze. The wind stayed out of the east northeast most of the morning. Wind speeds were five to eight knots. By mid afternoon, the wind had hauled more southeast with no increase in wind speed. The sky was overcast or fog bound (it might have been sunny away from the coast) all day. The air temperature got up to 65F in Perkins Cove. The visibility ranged to a mile at times during the day but then shut in with fog at around 7:00 PM. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at five knots. The ocean's surface was calm over rolling sea swells of two to three feet. The sky seemed overcast or could have been overcast. But you couldn't tell for sure as they were enveloped in fog for the trip. The air temperature reached a high of 63F. There was no tide (current) today. The surface water temperature stayed at 54.3F for most of the day. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to a mile in fog.

The fishing was very good to excellent, a fish a cast in most places. Most of the fish, however, were sub-legal. It was a good to very good day for landings. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Most sub-legal fish caught were haddock as well. The cull was two sub-legal haddock to one legal haddock overall. Legal landings also included twenty-one pollock, six cusk, twenty-two mackerel and two whiting. They released three wolffish (8 pounds or less), four dogfish and a few cod between twenty-two inches and 12.5 pounds. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

There were too many good fishermen on today's boat all doing well to know who was high hook. Pete Broughan (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.5 pound cod, weighed and released. The second largest fish was a 12 pound cod caught by Jack Judge (CT/ME). Mike Smith (VT) caught the third and fourth largest fish as a double keeper catch, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. His two fish were both pollock. One weighed 10 pounds and the other weighed 11 pounds. Eric Page (MA) landed the hard luck award for not being able to cope with the motion of the ocean in the fog. I think he would have been fine if he could have seen the horizon.

Bob Munroe & Linn Burgess (both MA) did me a great favor today by donating $40.00 in sponsorship of my Pan-Mass Challenge bike ride for cancer research and care with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts today. Bob & Linn donate every year to the Jimmy Fund through me to support the PMC. They have helped me every year in this regard. Thank you both so very much for the support!

Saturday, May 28, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was clear with a half moon hanging over the southeastern horizon, the wind was light, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in some fog. The wind was light from the northwest most of the day ashore. Later in the early afternoon, the wind hauled out of the west and, later still, the southeast. There was no velocity to the wind. And it was almost like there was none. At 9:00 PM, the wind hauled out of the northeast. The air temperature climbed quickly today. By 10:00 AM, it was already 75F in Ogunquit. I did see an air temperature of 85F. It could have been higher. Our warm temperatures came to a halt with the wind shift out of the northeast around 9:00 PM. The sky was hazy clear with few clouds. The visibility was good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 99F? with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 94F (with a low of 60F). The high temperature reading of 94F in Concord today ties the record high for this date set in 1978.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots or less. The ocean's surface was calm over a rolling sea swell of two feet. The sky was mostly clear with few clouds but with soft hazy lighting. There was no tide (current) in the morning and a moderate tide in the afternoon. The air temperature reached a high of 72F. The visibility ranged to ten miles, max. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57.8F.

The fishing overall was good today. There was no bite to speak of until after the tide turned around 10:30 AM. From then on the fishing was very good to excellent and the catching of legal fish was very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. In fact, there were only two other species of legal fish that were boated, a pollock and a mackerel. The haddock cull amounted to one legal fish out of every three haddock caught. Very few cod were seen today. In fact, only two cod were caught that measured over twenty-two inches. Released fish included one wolffish and nine dogfish. Drifting was the method; it was too calm to do anything else. All terminal gear worked well.

Rafik Bishara (MA) was high hook with the most legal haddock. His largest was 4 pounds, the third largest fish of the trip. Aaron Baker (NY) was second hook. Aaron won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6 pound cod. He also landed the second largest fish of the trip, a 5 pound haddock. The haddock was the largest haddock of the day. Fred Rip (MA) landed the hard luck award for having the worst ratio of legal to sub-legal haddock!

Former President George H. W. Bush, his daughter, Doro, and other came to dine at Barnacle Billy's restaurant today. It was good to see him. And he looked better, health wise, than how I remembered that he looked last year. The Secret Service members told me that his health has been better this year. As the former President was leaving, another customer got up to shake his hand. He wanted to thank the former President for having him at the White House when the Oakland A's won the baseball World Series in 1989. It was Jim Corsi, the former pitcher of the A's who also pitched for the Red Sox at one time. So I had a very interesting afternoon.

Sunday, May 29, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in haze/fog. The wind blew out of the northeast all day with speeds, more or less, of fifteen knots. This was an all day affair. The winds abated to light at around sunset. The day was misty and cool all day with a fair amount of fog just offshore and damp conditions throughout. The air temperature never got to 60F to my knowledge. The visibility over the ocean was poor. But it never rained a drop. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 59F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 52F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at ten knots, more or less. Seas were chops of two to three feet. It was overcast all day but you never would have known anyway because of the fog. Visibility was, at best, a quarter of a mile to a half mile in fog and haze. The air temperature reached a high of 55F. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 53F.

The fishing was good or better than that for legal fish. The weather conditions, the current and the mobility made it very good fishing, at best, overall, for fish of all sizes and species (including dogfish). Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included nine pollock, four cusk and a mackerel. They released a few good sized market cod and fifty dogfish. Anchoring was the method today. All terminal gear worked well.

Joe Gaboury (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19 pound cod. This is the largest cod that has been caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. Captain Ian took a picture of the fish with Joe before it was returned to the ocean alive. This digital image appears on the right. The second largest fish was an 11 pound cod caught and released by Marty Litulippe (VT). Jim Delage (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 10 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Jim Reilly (MA) caught the largest haddock of the day weighing in at 6 pounds. Doug Jones (ME) landed the hard luck of the day award for getting a big sea sick and for not catching a single legal fish, mostly because of his malady.

Memorial Day, Monday, May 30, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in haze and fog. It started to rain lightly after 5:00 AM, just after. It continued to rain throughout the morning. There was never a down pour. It was just a consistent light rain. The air temperature rose to 58F by noon. The rain stopped after noon. The visibility was still fair to good in fog and haze (and precipitation, earlier). By 1:00 PM, the fog started to clear out, the clouds started to part to show the sun and the wind started to blow from the south. The sun was fully out by 3:00 PM and the air temperature had risen to 70F. It was beautiful. The southerly wind was blowing at ten knots by 5:00 PM and the air temperature at that time was still 68F. The wind had picked up to ten knots out of the south southwest by 5:00 PM. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 66F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 76F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots or less. The ocean was calm. There was no swell to speak of. The tide (current) went from none (morning) to light/moderate (afternoon). The sky was overcast until the ride in. The visibility ranged from one mile in the morning in fog, haze and light rain to ten miles in the afternoon. The air temperature reached a high of 54F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 52.5F.

The fishing was very good to excellent for catching all species and all sizes. It was good to very good for legal landings. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far (We are so lucky!). The cull was about one legal haddock for three haddock caught. Legal landings also included twenty-one cusk and two pollock. Released fish included a handful of good sized cod and over sixty dogfish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well. Bait was best for the haddock.

I didn't ask Ian who was high hook. Jim Hallock (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound cod. The second largest fish was an 11 pound cod caught by Kevin Hallenbeck (NH). Joe Columbus (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 10.5 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Dody Bleau (VT) boated a 10 pound cod. He, of course, released this fish alive. Lewis Hazelwood (MA) also caught a 10 pound cod. Joe Dressner (NY) landed the hard luck award for losing his own rod and reel overboard! Ouch! He laid it on the rail for just a second, on the bow, and the weight of his terminal gear flipped it over the side, into the water and down to bottom! His equipment was never recovered! Joe, I know how it feels! I believe that this is the first time that Joe has won the hard luck award. Usually he is high hook!

I received several donations sponsoring my bicycle ride in the Pan-Mass Challenge, an event that raises money to lick cancer through the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Those individuals and their donations included: Dody & Nicki Bleau for a generous $50.00, Jim Hallock for $25.00 and Matt Malloy (VT) for $25.00. Thank you all very much for your support. Of course, it's not about me. It's about this insidious disease and the lives it ruins, of those who have it or will have it in the future. I appreciate your help!

Tim Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 68F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean seemed fair to good.

We had a fairly easy ride to the fishing grounds. The wind blew out of the southwest the whole way. Wind speeds varied from light to over ten knots. Some places the seas were chops of two feet (the tide). Most places were about a foot. Underneath, there was a rolling ground swell from the south that averaged about three feet. The sky was overcast the whole way. We walked right into the fog when we got to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, it stayed foggy all day. Wind speeds increased out of the southwest to fifteen knots with three foot chops. We retained the same southerly sea swell for the trip. The visibility stayed at about five boat lengths even with all the wind. As soon as it was time to go home, the wind abated (ten knots max), the fog cleared (the sky had been clear for three hours) and the wind hauled out of the west. We had a five to ten knot westerly wind with cloudless skies, twenty miles of visibility and a one to two foot chop all the way home. Within ten miles from shore the wind became light from the northwest, the ocean fairly calm. The air temperature was 85F when we pulled in to Perkins Cove. The surface water temperature reached a high of 53.5F on the fishing grounds. The tide (current) ranged from light to moderate. The air temperature reached a high of 63.5F on the grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 65F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 92F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 58F).

The fishing, catching and retention (of legal fish) was excellent today, our best trip of the year to date. Except for cod, there were very few sub-legal fish caught today. Most legal fish landed were pollock followed by almost the same number of haddock. There were a handful of sub-legal pollock and haddock. The haddock cull was almost five to one legal haddock to sub-legal haddock. The pollock averaged about 7 pounds with a few larger ones. We released quite a few cod over twenty-two inches. Released fish also included about forty-five dogfish, maybe more. It was a very busy day. We also saw the most and the largest tangles of any trip this year. This was due to the lack of uniformity in fishing line/weights, the number of bigger fish and a lack of team knowledge. And we really needed to get away from the individualistic way most fishermen think That didn't happen. So it was very busy. The day was over before it started. We tried drifting initially. That didn't work well. So we stayed on the hook for every stop afterward. All terminal gear worked well. Bait caught the most haddock. Cod flies caught the most pollock.

I don't know, officially, who was high hook. Mike Sliwowski (NJ) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. This ties the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the 2016 fishing season to date. Tom Rodak (NJ) and Joe Dressner (NY) tied for the second largest fish of the trip, each with a fish of 14.5 pounds. Joe's was a 14.5 pound pollock while Tom's was a 14.5 pound cod. Tom didn't enter the boat pool for the second largest fish today so Joe won that title free and clear! Joe caught his bigger pollock as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 7 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time.

Other Angler Highlights: Mark Lenczewski (NJ) and Bronislaw "Bruno" Rodzen (NJ) caught many haddock while fishing side by side on the stern. Bruno had a fair sized pollock that I didn't weigh and many bigger than normal haddock. Mark's largest fish was a 13 pound cod. Taras Melnik (NJ) caught an 11 pound cod right off the bat. He did very well overall. Some of the fish I weighed for Marcin Korszen (NJ) included a 9 pound cod, a 10.25 pound pollock and a 13 pound cod. Tomas Smietanka (PA) caught an 11 pound cod, his largest fish. Toffi Fido (NJ) landed a 12 pound pollock, his largest fish. Lisa Tomilson (ME) landed an 11 pound pollock, her largest fish. She also caught the largest haddock at 6 pounds.


A shot (above) of Jared filleting fish on the ride home.

Mike Sliwowski donated $25.00 to help me raise money to fight cancer with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thank you, Mike, for your support. I appreciate it very much.

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze. The wind was light all day. The wind direction was from the north northeast. Wind speeds were about five knots or so. Late in the afternoon, the wind hauled out of the southeast with wind speeds of about ten knots. The sky was sunny all day with wisps of high cirrus clouds giving the day a feel of soft lighting. The visibility was very good. The high air temperature in Ogunquit was 70F. At least, that's the highest air temperature I saw. It felt like it was warmer. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 53F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 51F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less. The sky was hazy sunny. The air temperature reached a high of 61F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty miles or so. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55.6F.

The fishing was very good overall. Landings were not as good as they have been. This was mostly because of the large number of cod that were caught instead. Needless to say, Ian won't be fishing there for a while. We have caught quite a few cod there in the past. But we have also done extremely well on the pollock too. Not today. Cod took the place of the pollock. All resident fish, many were in the large market size range. Legal landings were almost all haddock, as it has been. The haddock cull was one to one, one legal haddock for every two haddock caught. Legal landings also included a porbeagle shark, two cusk, three pollock, a mackerel and a cunner. Released fish included twenty-five dogfish, two wolffish and, of course, a lot of cod. Drift fishing and anchoring were the boating methods employed. All terminal gear worked well.

Steve Brown (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish and the bag limit for haddock. His two largest fish were a 12 pound cod and a 12.5 pound cod, the fifth and the third largest fish of the trip. Adam Abel (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 55 pound, exactly legal (by a millimeter), porbeagle shark. This is the first porbeagle that Adam has ever caught. He caught his first trophy cusk on the Bunny Clark earlier this season. It remains the only trophy cusk the Bunny Clark has seen this season so far. Captain Ian took a picture of Adam with his shark. This digital image appears on the left. Adam gave everyone shark steaks to bring home, including me. We had a couple of steaks this evening that were better than any swordfish I have ever eaten! The second largest fish was a 13.5 pound cod caught by Jim LeMay (ME). Oddly enough, Jim was aboard last year when the Bunny Clark's largest porbeagle was landed. That fish weighed 304 pounds!

Other Angler Highlights: Rich Warner (ME) caught a 12.25 pound cod, his largest fish. He also landed the hard luck award for not landing a single legal fish today. He might be the only person this season, who was healthy enough during a trip, to do such a thing. I guess it has to happen to somebody at some time! Of course, had cod been legal to take he would have had no problem today. Those, he caught plenty.

Thursday, June 2, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the sky was clear, the wind was light from the east, the sounds from the bell buoy confirmed this and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

The wind was still light from the east when we cleared the gate to Perkins Cove on our way to the fishing grounds. Ten miles offshore, the wind developed a one foot chop. The wind hauled out of the southeast at the three quarter mark. The sky was clear, seas increased to two feet, the visibility was good and the air temperature stayed around 55F. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at ten knots to start but increased to fifteen knots and more later in the trip. Seas were three to four feet in chops with a southerly short swell in there as well. Some of this my have been manufactured by a tide (current) that was up into the wind. The sky was sunny until noon when the clouds started to creep in . By 1:00 PM, the sky was overcast. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water reached a high temperature of 54F. The air temperature never got higher than 55F in the shade. The visibility was good, at least. We had at least fifteen miles or better for the trip. An hour after we left the fishing grounds, the wind and seas started to drop. Half way home the wind was still out of the southeast at five knots with a one foot sea, a chop. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 62F with a low of 56F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 75F (with a low of 48F).

The fishing was excellent overall. It couldn't have been much better, a fish a cast from start to finish. There were very few sub-legal groundfish today. It was the Bunny Clark's best trip of the year in many ways. We started with the problem of too many big market sized cod. But, when I realized what I had done wrong, we were able to get away from them very successfully. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. It was certainly a pollock biting day. We found them everywhere. The average sized pollock was 4 to 6 pounds. But we also had a significant number of pollock from 8 to 10 pounds but, also, a significtant number of legal pollock of 2 & 3 pounds.. Legal landings also included haddock, about one third as many haddock as pollock. The good thing with the haddock today was that we only saw five (total) sub-legal haddock all day! By far the best cull of the year. There might have been a haddock that weighed 6 pounds but I didn't find it to weigh. There was much going on. There were many haddock between 4 and 5 pounds. Those with bait, exclusively, caught a lot of haddock. We released five dogfish and just a handful of cod over 10 pounds. except for anchoring once or twice, we used the sea anchor all day. The sea anchor was perfect; lines were straight down, there was no end to the fish and the drifting course was right along the edge. All terminal gear worked well but bait worked best for the haddock and most pollock came on the cod fly.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. Moose Monahan (NY) was probably the most consistent and least tangled. So it could have been Moose. But he was sharing his fish with two others so all bets are off on that one. Moose caught the third largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. Chuck Lennon (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.25 pound pollock. Chuck was using a jig almost all day and was the method that netted him the bigger than normal pollock. Dave Kiblin (NY) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 13.5 pound cod. He also caught an 11 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Dick Kiblin (NY) caught the first fish I could weigh, a 12.25 pound cod. He caught one of the biggest haddock of the trip at 5 pounds. Jon "Griff" Griffin (MA) caught a 10 pound cod and a 10.25 pound pollock. I didn't weigh any more off Griff's fish. He caught some good ones but none over 11 pounds. Katie Baumann (MA) landed an 11 pound pollock, her largest fish. Ed Smart (NY) landed a 10 pound pollock and an 11 pound cod, his two biggest fish. What's most remarkable was that George Smart (NY) wasn't the "terrible tangler" I expected him to be. He was civil, kept to his fishing and had relatively few screw ups (He had a different expression for that!). George caught a lot of haddock, the largest of which was 5 pounds. Craig Belongie (MA) was his normal good fishing self. But he had a few problems. First, he backlashed his reel so badly he couldn't use it. Second, he got in a massive tangle with someone in the stern (he was fishing in the bow!) and, then, his second reel exploded leaving him with only one choice: using Bunny Clark equipment. For his hard luck I gave him the shirt. I just couldn't pass up the opportunity to abuse him officially! I told him to wear the shirt in good humor; he may never see another one!

Fans of Wobby Barnes (MA) will be delighted to know that he did very well indeed, about as good as you can do!

I received a $10.00 from the Smart Crew as a donation for my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. As Ed Smart said; "Every little bit helps." And indeed it does! Thanks, guys. Nice to have you fishing with us today!

Friday, June 3, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was overcast, the wind was very light from the south, the ocean was calm and the visibility over the ocean was fair as a fog bank was just hanging off the coast allowing no more than a mile. We had a haze/fog and overcast skies hanging around most of the day. Finally, in the late afternoon, the sun came out for a couple of hours. We had no wind all day. What wind we did have seemed southerly or some rendition of this direction. The air temperature got as high as 72F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 61F (with a low of 54F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 70F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 55F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew lightly out of the southeast. Ian told me the wind blew five knots, tops. The ocean was fairly calm over long rolling two to three foot swells. The sky was overcast for the trip. The air temperature reached a high of 57F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from one to three miles in haze/fog. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55.6F.

The fishing was excellent. Legal landings were very good today. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was about 50/50, legal to sub-legal haddock. Legal landings also included twenty-three cusk, thirteen pollock and one cusk. Released fish included quite a few cod over twenty-two inches but not nearly as many market cod as there were legal haddock. There were also six dogfish released. Drift fishing was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

I didn't ask who was high hook and Ian didn't volunteer that information. He might not have known. Norm Herrick (MA/ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11.5 pound cod. Nick Pinkham (ME) landed the second largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 10 pound cod caught by Joe Selmer (NH). There were no haddock caught that weighed 4 pounds or more. Although there were quite a few haddock close to 4 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Travis Campbell (VT) landed the hard luck award for his body's reaction to the motion of the ocean.

Norm Herrick donated a generous $70.00 to help my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Norm & LuAnne Herrick have sponsored me for years in very generous amounts. And I am humbled, that they continue to support my endeavors in cancer research. Thanks so much!

Saturday, June 4, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky appeared overcast, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in black thick fog hugging the coast. After sunrise, we saw clear sky between the breaks in the clouds. We had bouts of fog all morning. First, it would roll in. Then it would roll out. When the fog backed off you could see the sun in mostly clear sky. When the fog rolled in, the sky looked overcast. The air temperature was perfect. I saw a high of 75F. Mostly the air temperature was below that, in the high 60s most of the day. The visibility over the ocean was poor in fog. There was no wind to speak of. I would say if there was wind it was from the southeast, a fog producing wind. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 70F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 59F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was very light and variable in direction. The ocean was calm with hardly a ripple on the surface. There was no sea swell. The air temperature reached a high of 65F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate and took the boat to the southwest while they were drifting. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile or less. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56.3F.

The fishing was good to very good overall. There was a variety of species caught including a number of smaller market cod. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. It was a better cull today with two legal haddock for every three haddock caught. Legal landings also included more pollock than we have seen in a while, a cunner and a mackerel. Released fish, besides the cod, included one halibut and six dogfish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Steve Shugars (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish including his bag limit of haddock. Steve's largest fish was a 7 or 8 pound pollock. Gabe Pearson (NJ) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 21 pound halibut. This is Gabe's first Atlantic halibut and the Bunny Clark's second largest halibut of the fishing season to date. Ian took a quick picture after weighing the fish and then released the halibut alive. The digital image with Gabe holding it can be seen on the right. Gabe also caught the second largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock. He caught this fish as a double keeper catch with another pollock of 4 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Gabe also caught the largest cod of the trip at 9.5 pounds. Jimmy Shea boated the third largest fish of the trip, a 10 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Justin Marchant (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting a bit queazy. And, yes, Owen McIntire (ME) was there!

Steve Shugars donated a very generous $100.00 sponsoring me in a cycling event called the Pan-Mass Challenge for cancer research and care with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Steve has sponsored me every year for the last ten years, all the years I have been involved in this event. This year the ride is trying to raise $45 million for the ride. Last year the event took in slightly less than that. Thank you, Steve, for your continued support. I appreciate your help very much!

Also, Tim Rozan (ME) and Lewis Hazelwood (MA) donated another $20.00 to the Pan-Mass Challenge cause. They typically donate to my cause in small increments all year long! Thank you very much, both of you!

Sunday, June 5, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky appeared overcast, there was no wind, the roads were wet and the visibility over the ocean was poor in black thick fog enveloping the coast. The coast remained enshrouded in black thick fog all morning. The sky was overcast and remained so for the day. It started raining at 10:00 AM. A very light intermittent rain continued into the afternoon. We had a steady rain from 5:00 PM on into the night. The wind blew lightly out of the southeast all morning, picking up velocity after noon and blowing as hard as thirty knots an hour after sunset. The wind started to back off after that. Even thought it rained most of the day, the air temperature was fairly mild with a high of at least 63F in Ogunquit. Although the fog backed off a bit after noon, the bank remained off shore, the visibility over the ocean remained fair at best. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 58F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 67F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 66F (with a low of 56F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southeast at five knots to start, increasing to over fifteen knots by the time they were ready to pack it in and head home. Seas were calm to start ending with a one to two foot chop over a sea/swell/chop of two to three feet. The visibility in the morning ranged from a quarter of a mile to a mile in fog/haze. With the wind velocity increase that range increased to almost two miles. The sky remained overcast for the trip. But they saw very little rain. What rain they did see was light for only a short period of time during the late morning. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55.5F. The tide (current) was moderate. The air temperature reached a high of 58.4F.

The fishing today could be described as an awesome bite with excellent fishing. Landings were very good thanks to a large number of pollock boated, enough so that many medium sized legal fish were released by anglers who already had plenty aboard. Most legal fish landed were haddock and pollock, in that order, with slightly more legal haddock. The haddock cull was good again today with two legal haddock for every three caught. Legal landings also included another halibut. Released fish included quite a few cod in the 5 to 6 pound range and seven dogfish. Ian anchored for every stop. All terminal gear worked well.

High hook? I didn't ask. I'm not sure that I would have received an answer. There was no question as to who won the boat pool, though. Jack Rivers (ME) landed a 59 pound Maine state trophy halibut on one of our monofilament bait rods on this trip. This is Jack's first and the Bunny Clark's third largest halibut ever. Ian took a picture of this magnificent fish with Jack holding it. This digital image appears on the left. The second largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Gary Vincze (CT). Seth Greenwood (NY) caught the third largest fish, a 12 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Dan Bailey (NY) caught an 11 pound pollock. Brett Simpson (ME) was the unfortunate soul who landed the hard luck award for catching the dreaded disease known in the Quebec Province of Canada as mal de mer.

I received some significant donations from people sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those caring unselfish individuals and their donations are as follows: Betsy McLaughlin (NY) for a very generous $500.00, Steve McGrath (NH) for a generous $50.00 and Gary Vincze & Mary Ann Donovan for a generous $100.00. Thank you all so very much for your contributions. I appreciate the help and the nod that I might be on the right track with this project! All the best!

Monday, June 6, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was overcast, the wind was very light from the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was about eight miles or better in haze. The sky stayed overcast through sunrise and then started to clear. By 9:30 AM, we had fog moving in. Fog enshrouded the coast from then until around noon, when it cleared out for good. The air temperature started to warm quickly after the fog left. At 11:00 AM, the air temperature was 63F. By 1:00 PM, the air temperature had increased to 80F. It was probably warmer than that but that was the highest air temperature that I saw. The visibility increased to very good. The sky remained mostly clear, the wind was light and the rum punches at Barnacle Billy's were cold, I was told. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 55F).

On the ride to the fishing grounds, the sky was overcast and the visibility was very good. On the grounds, the fog rolled in at 10:00 AM and departed at 12:30 PM. During that time the visibility ranged from a hundred yards to a quarter of a mile. After 12:30 PM, the visibility ranged from five to ten miles. The air temperature reached a high of 62F. The wind blew out of the south at five knots for most of the morning to ten knots in the afternoon. The ocean was calm with a three to four foot swell from the southeast in the morning and a one foot chop with the same swells in the afternoon. The tide (current) was very strong, the strongest Captain Ian had seen it for a long time. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56F.

The fishing was very good overall. The catching of legal fish was good. It could have been very good if anglers wanted pollock. But this crew did not, except for one guy. And he went home with as many pollock fillets as he wanted. The pollock bite was savage, or close to it. Most legal fish landed were pollock, followed by haddock. The pollock average size was bigger. But the biggest pollock were smaller than they have been. The haddock cull was one and a half legal haddock to one sub-legal haddock. Not bad. Only two species of legal fish were landed. Released fish included forty-two small market cod and seven dogfish. They drift fished and anchored. Anchoring produced the most fish but the tide was so strong the stern was into the wind! All terminal gear worked well.

Again, I never asked as to whom was high hook. Chas Kirk (TN) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound cod, released alive, of course. His largest pollock weighed 10.25 pounds. Steve McGrath (NH) caught the second largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock. He caught this pollock as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 9.5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. It was the best double of the day. Seth Greenwood (NY) caught the third largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. He also caught a 10 pound pollock before that one. Andrew Valentine (PA) landed the hard luck award for, you guessed it, making the high hurler list. It must be the larger than normal swells we have been seeing in conjunction with the fog.

Tim Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 2:30 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was clear, the wind was very light from the west and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

We had south southwest winds of five knots or better with seas in chops of a foot or two on the ride to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest for a couple hours before hauling out of the southwest and blowing up to fifteen knots or more. Seas increased from a foot to three and four feet in chops. This wind dropped to light and variable in direction for the ride home. The sky was mostly sunny for most of the trip. We had a couple of fronts roll over us bringing overcast skies. These fronts didn't bring any rain until the ride home. Our DSC radio kept sounding the alarm with NWS warnings of severe thunder storms in the York County area of Maine. We never saw any thunder or lightning. The air temperature reached a high of 61F in the shade. The tide (current) was very strong.The visibility ranged from five to six miles in haze. The surface water reached a high temperature of 56.1F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 53F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 86F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 51F).

The fishing was excellent overall. We had very few sub-legal fish except for cod. We had many market cod, way too many. The cod kept us from catching pollock and haddock, the two other most prevalent species. Legal landings included only three species. Most legal fish were pollock, by far. Although we caught a lot of haddock, there were three times more pollock landed than haddock. The haddock cull was all legal fish except for four. We also caught two cusk. We had one large bluefin tuna on. We saw no other species of fish, not even a single dogfish! We had to use the sea anchor all day. No other method would work. The tide was much too fast to drift - even casting. The lines couldn't tend bottom on anchor. With the sea anchor, the lines tended bottom perfectly with very few (if any) tangles. But we covered a lot of bottom, fast, enough so that I truly believe it effected the haddock bite. On one sea anchor session alone we covered four miles! We used the sea anchor two times. All terminal gear worked well.

It would be impossible to tell you whom was high hook. But I do believe it was between two anglers, Chris Tankred (OH) and Josh Lester (ME). Chris was the angler who caught the most large fish. His two largest fish, both 12 pounds, allowed him to win the boat pool for the second largest fish. The two fish tied for the second largest fish of the trip. One was a cod and the other was a pollock. I can't tell you how many fish of Chris' that I weighed that were 9 to 9.5 pounds. Two of his other bigger fish included a 10 pound pollock and a 10.25 pound pollock. Josh caught the most haddock of the trip. I believe he caught his legal limit. He caught the largest haddock of the trip at 5.5 pounds. Josh's largest fish was a 10 pound pollock.

Andrew Kerns (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.75 pound pollock. His second largest fish was a pollock that weighed 11.5 pounds. He too caught a lot of fish, a fish as cast. Hell, everyone caught some kind of fish a cast. Larry Kabat (NH) brought a fish to the surface, a pollock, and called for a gaff. Instead, I decided to lift it out of the water with the jig it was caught on. That didn't happen. It dropped off the hook, floated out of reach and swam to bottom. The fish looked to be around 12 pounds. And, yes, I admit it, I screwed up! The largest fish of Larry's that I weighed was a 9 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: I never weighed a fish for Dewey Kerns (PA). But he caught plenty. In fact, had he not been keeping his fish with three other anglers, I probably would have found out that he was one of the high hooks. I don't believe he caught a fish of 10 pound or over but he was close on many occasions. Wayne Johnson (NH) caught sixty-eight good sized fish, many cod (his count). If cod were legal at twenty-four inches, Wayne would have caught the most legal fish he has ever caught on a groundfish angling trip. I didn't weigh Wayne's biggest fish but I know he caught a cod of about 9 pounds or better and a pollock that looked to be about 10 pounds. He had quite a few haddock including one that weighed 5 pounds. And he caught many doubles. Kate Sohm (NY) caught an 8.5 pound cod, her largest fish. Ben Sohm (NY) caught a cod I didn't weigh that was about as big. Joe Albritton (PA) landed a double keeper catch that included a 9 pound pollock and an 8.75 pound pollock. He too was heavily invested in landing pollock and catching cod. He also landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer and for breaking a jig off. Joe hooked up the first bluefin tuna of the year. There was no stopping that fish. Before half the line had emptied off his reel, the jig broke off the line and the fish was gone.

Dewey Kerns (PA) did me a solid by donating $20.00 to sponsor me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a fund raising cycling event targeting a cancer cure and care with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. As he told me, it's hard to know who to donate to these days as so much a part of your donation goes to funding those who run the organization. With this event, every rider raised penny goes right to the source, all administrative costs underwritten by businesses around the Boston area (like the Boston Red Sox organization). I appreciate the donation from Dewey and his concern as to where the money is going. It should be everyone's concern. Thanks very much, Dewey. Nice having you and your clan aboard today!

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was partly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the west at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The day was a beautiful day ashore, albeit for the stronger than normal wind from the west. At times, the wind gusted to over thirty knots ashore. Mostly it was twenty knots or better, right out of the west. After noon, the wind took on a more northerly lilt. But, at best, the direction was west northwest. By 5:00 PM, the wind had dropped to about ten knots. The sky was partly cloudy along with some high cirrus clouds as well, giving the day the feeling of soft lighting. The air temperature rose to 72F in Ogunquit (Perkins Cove), at least. The visibility remained excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 53F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 74F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 72F (with a low of 54F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at five to ten knots in the morning and less than five knots in the afternoon. There was a one to two foot chop over a two to three foot swell from the southeast. But there was really only a long swell under a calm surface in the afternoon. The air temperature got up as high as 63F. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The sky was mostly clear all day with few clouds. The sky was cloudless in the morning. The visibility was excellent. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56F.

The fishing was excellent, landings fair. There were too many cod biting hooks before the more desired species could bite. This is our third big cod day in a row. I'm delighted to see it. But it is frustrating for the angler who, just a short time ago, could take these fish home. I spent years convincing people that cod were better than haddock. Now that we can't keep cod, some are disappointed. Most legal fish landed were haddock. The haddock cull worked out to be one legal haddock for every two and a half caught or two legal out of every five. Legal landings also included thirty-seven pollock, two cusk and one mackerel. There were twelve dogfish released. Drifting and anchoring were the methods. All terminal gear worked about the same.

Norm Herrick (MA/ME) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish (and most cod) and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's largest pollock of the fishing season to date. It was the first fish on board today! Funny how that works sometimes. The second largest fish was a 12 pound cod caught by Paul Pearson (NH). This man always seems to find a bigger than normal cod if there is one to be found! Matt Yule (NH) caught the third largest fish, an 11 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: "Haddock Jack" Brouse (NH) did okay. But he didn't catch as many fish (haddock) as we are all used to seeing him catch. We don't call him Haddock Jack for nothing! So Captain Ian saw the opportunity to give Jack the hardest luck of the day award. I think in time HJ will like the shirt!

Norm & LuAnne Herrick donated another $60.00 to keep sponsoring me in my role as a fund raiser to solve the cancer problem with the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event taking place on August 6th. David & Rebecca Symes (ME) did the same with a very generous $100.00 donation today. Dave missed last year for personal reasons. But it was really nice to see him back aboard. I only wish I had been there to abuse him a little! Thank you all so very much for your support and generosity. I so appreciate it!

Thursday, June 9, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

The ride to the fishing grounds gave us westerly winds of fifteen to twenty knot and seas of two to three feet in chops. The sky was clear, the visibility excellent and the air temperature in the low 50s. On the fishing grounds, the wind hauled out of the northwest and blew up to twenty-five and thirty or more knots around the turn of the morning tide. Seas ended the morning in the three to four foot range but increased later in the afternoon to four to six feet with eight footers here and there. It didn't help that the tide was running into the wind during the fishing. The high air temperature for the trip was 56F in the shade. The visibility remained excellent all day. The sky was mostly clear with few clouds. The tide (current) was strong but not as strong as on Tuesday's trip. The surface water temperature reached a high of 54.3F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 66F (with a low of 50F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 69F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 63F (with a low of 50F).

The conditions for fishing were tough. We had a couple of anglers who went down to sea sickness early, another we lost a short time later and one who succumbed to this ailment only two hours before it was time to leave. To the last anglers credit, he did very well until the wave height increased to it's maximum level for the trip. The current was so strong in the morning, most had to add extra weight to get to the bottom on anchor. After a fashion we had to abandon anchoring and drifting as both made reaching the bottom untenable. Also, by mid-morning, the tide had us sideways to the chops on anchor, giving us very uncomfortable beam seas. We went to the sea anchor shortly after that. The fishing wasn't as productive on the sea anchor but we were much more comfortable. There were a couple of places where we did quite well. There were others, like the last spot, where we caught very few fish other than large quantities of dogfish!

The fishing was very good overall, maybe better than that. But legal landings I would put in the fair to good category. We caught a lot of dogfish today and we caught more market sized cod than I wanted as well. The sea anchor doesn't afford you the mobility that you have with drifting. And our best fishing was also the same area where we were catching cod and dogfish. So the action was great. Most legal fish landed were an equal mix of pollock and haddock. The pollock were some of the largest we have seen this season so far. The average size was also larger with very few small ones. The haddock cull was about fifty/fifty legal to sub-legal fish. We never caught a haddock over 4 pounds. Legal landings also included four cusk. All terminal gear worked well.

I'm not sure who was high hook. Jon Rysz (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.5 pound pollock. This is also the Bunny Clark's largest pollock of the fishing season to date. I took a picture of Jon with his nice fish. The digital image appears on the left. Jon also caught a 12 pound pollock and a 10.25 pound pollock. Rob Bentley (ME) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 15.25 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 12.25 pound pollock caught by Beth Bentley (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Austin Stevens (NY) caught the most haddock of the trip. He was very close to the bag limit. Austin's largest fish was a 10 pound pollock. Clifton Randall (CT) landed a 9 pound pollock, his best. Jim Jarvis (MA) and Leo Lamoureux (VT) had some of the nicest double market cod catches of the day today. Both would have been competing for high hook had cod been included in the landings today. Jim's largest fish was an 11.5 pound pollock. He also caught an 8 pound pollock, the first fish of the trip that I could weigh. Leo caught an 11 pound pollock as his largest fish. Another fish of his that I weighed was a 9.25 pound pollock. He also broke a jig off on what I would suspect was a big pollock. I would have liked to have seen that fish!

Jim Jarvis, Jr. (MA) boated a 10 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Bob Gorghan (NY) landed a pollock of 8.5 pounds. Ny Nhath (MA) caught a 10.25 pound pollock, his best fish. His mom, Chen Nhath (MA), landed the hard luck award for having the hardest time with the sea conditions as it pertained to the vessel she was stuck on all day long!

The trip home was a trip in itself. We had to pound right into the seas in order to get back to Perkins Cove. For the first ten miles, all I could make was eight knots over the bottom. Seas were chops of six feet or better with the occasional queer one. For the next seven or eight miles I was happy to be cruising at ten knots. We never did get to full cruising speed. It was a tiring day just being on board.

Several people helped me out with donations of support for my involvement in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those people and their donations included Rob & Beth Bentley for $23.00, Clif Randall (CT) for $20.00 and an anonymous donor for $25.00. Thank you all so very much for your sponsorship!

Friday, June 10, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston hosted the Gary Hammond (all New York) extreme day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light out of the north and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northwest in the morning, died out and then hauled out of the south. I don't believe the wind got any stronger that fifteen knots out of the northwest in the morning. The southerly wind was light in the afternoon. The sky was sunny all day. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature got up to 70F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 50F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 72F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 48F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at ten to five knots, went light and then hauled out of the south on the ride back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature reached a high of 64F in the shade. Seas were chops of a foot or less over a two foot swell. The tide (current) was moderate, much better than it has been recently. The sky was mostly clear. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55F. The visibility was excellent.

The fishing was excellent. The catching was excellent as well if you included cod. Landings were very good today, an excellent day overall. Most fish caught were cod. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. These fish were, again, of a better size than they have been. Landings also included thirty-nine haddock (The cull was fifty/fifty again today), four cusk and a monkfish. Only sixteen dogfish were released today along with a wolffish. Drifting was the answer and the means. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Gary Hammond, Jr. was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was probably a 10 pound pollock. Daryl Van Valenburg won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15.5 pound pollock. He was sea sick all day, took a bunk, woke up near the end, fished for the last fifteen minutes and won the boat pool! The second largest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock caught by Ryan "Principal" Groat. Ryan also landed the hard luck award for losing the most jigs. T. J. Altomer caught the third largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. He also caught a wolffish that weighed 12.5 pounds. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest wolffish of the fishing season to date.

Other Angler Highlights: Joe Scali caught the first fish Ian could weigh, a 10 pound pollock. His largest fish was a pollock that weighed 12.5 pounds. Bob Shultes landed a double that included a 12 pound pollock and an 8 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Logan Groat, on his first deep sea fishing trip, caught a 10 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, his two best fish. P. J. Smith landed a 12.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Frank Altomer caught the two biggest cod of the trip. The largest one weighed 12 pounds. The other weighed 11 pounds. Chris Curtis caught a 10 pound pollock. Gary Hammond, Sr. boated a 10.5 pound pollock.

Saturday, June 11, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 49F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility over it was excellent. The sky stayed clear for part of the morning but became overcast by 9:30 AM. The sky remained overcast for the rest of the day. By 3:00 PM, it had started raining. It rained lightly into the night but stopped around 7:00 PM. The sky remained overcast. The wind was very light all day, from the south. The ocean along the shore remained calm. The visibility remained excellent. The air temperature in Perkins Cove reached 65F but then declined through the rest of the afternoon.The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 46F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 68F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 66F (with a low of 46F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind remained light out of the southwest. The ocean was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 60F. The sky was mostly overcast. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was excellent, over twenty miles. The surface water reached a high temperature of 53.0F.

The fishing was excellent today. Legal landings were fair. The discrepancy came with the large number of cod and dogfish that were caught in place of the more desired pollock and haddock. Legal fish landed included mostly haddock, twenty pollock, a cusk, a mackerel and two cunners. Anchoring and drift fishing were both employed. It seemed that the bite was off in the morning and right on at the last stop. Unfortunately, they left the fish biting because the boat had to be at the dock to take an evening trip that never materialized! So the trip experienced a bit of hard luck overall. All terminal gear worked about the same.

There was no clear high hook today. Scott Hemphill (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9.5 pound cod. This cod was weighed quickly and released back to the ocean alive. Of course, all the cod were released. The second largest fish was an 8 pound cod caught by Dean Harp (CA). Marty Walsh (ME), the "other" Marty Walsh, caught the third largest fish, a 7.5 pound pollock. Marty caught this pollock as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 5 pounds. Ken Rackliff (ME) landed the hard luck award for losing and jig and only landing one legal fish for the trip.

Sunday, June 12, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky seemed overcast, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in black thick fog. After the fog cleared out and moved off the coast we found that the sky was indeed overcast. Most of the morning it remained that way until clearing skies prevailed around noon. Later in the morning the wind hauled out of the west, increasing as time progressed, and the fog disappeared for good. By noon, we had a fifteen knots westerly wind. Right around 2:00 PM, the wind struck out of the northwest and blew up to twenty-five knots. Later, there were gusts to thirty knots. I didn't get a look at a thermometer today but I did hear someone say that their car, in Perkins Cove, showed a reading of 65F. The visibility was very good or better than that. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 80F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 73F (with a low of 55F).

On the fishing grounds, after a ride through the fog, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or so. The wind hauled more westerly by noon, same as it did ashore. But by 1:30 PM, the wind had struck out of the northwest with twenty knot wind speeds. The wind came on stronger as they made the run back to Perkins Cove, the highest gusts (to thirty knots) coming near 5:00 PM. Seas increased to four and five feet in chops. And, from what Jared told me, the ride in was very similar to the ride in on Thursday. It wasn't fun then. And it certainly didn't make it any more fun today. The sky was overcast all morning, sunny in the afternoon. The air temperature reached a high of 62.5F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was excellent after the wind hauled out of the west. The surface water temperature reached a high of 54.0F.

The fishing was excellent, the landings good. We had the Maine Department of Marine Resources observers on board today. It's always a pleasure to have them on the Bunny Clark. There were many fewer dogfish today. But there were quite a few cod that were caught and released alive. There were a number of market sized cod to 10 pounds, all resident fish. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The cull was one to one, one legal haddock for every two haddock caught. Legal landings also included thirty-five pollock and four cusk. Drifting and anchoring were the boating methods employed for fishing. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian couldn't tell who was high hook. Jared Dore (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11 pound pollock caught by Tom Zido (NY). Linda Dore (ME) caught the third largest fish and the largest cod at 10.25 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Dean Harp (CA) caught a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Jason Perrin (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick before the ride back to Perkins Cove.

Monday, June 13, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northwest all day long. Except for gusts up to twenty-five knots around 6:00 PM, the wind blew about fifteen knots with a few higher gusts. The sky was overcast after 7:00 AM and stayed that way all morning. By noon, the sky had cleared and stayed mostly sunny for the rest of the day. The air temperature reached a high of at least 70F in Perkins Cove. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at about fifteen knots or so with higher gusts at times. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The air temperature reached a high of 61F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was excellent. The surface water temperature reached a high of 53F.

The fishing was excellent. The catching of legal fish was very good. Most fish and most legal fish caught were pollock, by far. Many. The second most species caught were cod over five pounds, all released happily alive. Haddock came in third. Still a large number of haddock but third overall. The haddock cull was 50/50, legal to sub-legal fish. Legal landings also included nine cusk. There were eleven dogfish released. Ian anchored for every stop. All terminal gear worked well.

The consensus was that Mark Brighenti (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish. Anthony Brewer (ME) must have been close as he was fishing tangle free on the bow all day and he had many bags of fillets when I saw him at the dock. Anthony won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. This is a tie for the third largest pollock caught on the Bunny Clark for the season to date. Anthony also caught the largest cod at 10.5 pounds. Russell Mott (ME) caught the second largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Tom Zido (NY).

Other Angler Highlights: William Browning (OH) caught the first fish to be weighed, an 11.5 pound pollock. He also caught a 10.5 pound pollock a little later in the day. Jason Bare (NY) caught a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Dave Browning (OH) landed a 12 pound pollock, his largest fish. Bill Martel (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, his best fish. D. J. Crouse (ME) boated an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. Frank Meehan (NY) landed the hard luck award for attaining high hurler status. There were not too many sea sick anglers today. That's a good thing!

Tim Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and I are hosting the Annual Dave Miller Spring Marathon Trip (MA/NH) charter today.

At 2:50 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

The ride to the fishing grounds was right dead nuts to leeward. The sky was slightly overcast, the air temperature was in the 50s and the visibility was excellent. On the grounds, the wind blew from the north northwest at fifteen knots or more. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The wind and sea state remained the same for all but the last hour of the morning. During that time, the sky became clear and sunny and the air temperature remained at 55F. The wind continued to drop in velocity as the day progressed. By 3:00 PM, there was just a light wind from the northwest and the ocean was calm. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The air temperature rose to 65F in the shade. The visibility was thirty miles at least. The surface water temperature reached a high of 54.5F after a day where, most of the day, it never made it above 52.7F! The ride home gave us light northwest wind and a calm sea surface. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 53F).

The fishing, catching and landings were good today. Most good sized fish caught today were pollock and cod over 5 pounds, an equal number of each. Had we been able to keep cod, landings would have been very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock by far. The second most prevalent legal fish was the redfish. Legal haddock numbers came in third. But we had about fifteen redfish that were Maine state trophies or so close you had to weigh them to truly find out. The haddock cull worked out to two legal haddock for every five haddock caught. Legal landings also included six cusk and a 2 pound whiting. Released fish (besides cod) included three wolffish and fifty-seven dogfish. We alternated between drifting and anchoring. All terminal gear worked well but blue flies caught the most pollock and bait caught the most dogfish!

I can't tell you for sure who was high hook but I believe it was Kris Lien (MA). For an hour he was on a roll catching one pollock after another while everyone else on the boat watched. He caught a lot of market cod, a couple legal haddock and few redfish besides. Three fish of his that I weighed included pollock of 9 pounds, 11 pounds and 12.25 pounds. He led the boat pool all morning.

The pools were run a little differently today. Only fish that could be kept were counted towards the boat pool. So cod and wolffish were not included. Mark Jolin (MA) caught the largest fish of the trip, an 18 pound wolffish. I weighed his fish, took a couple of quick pictures and released the fish back to the ocean alive. This is Mark's largest wolffish and Bunny Clark's largest wolffish of the 2016 fishing season so far. Mark also caught a double keeper catch of big redfish, both caught on the same line at the same time. One weighed 1.95 pounds (the Bunny Clark's fourth largest redfish this season) and the other weighed 1.5 pounds. The second largest fish of the trip was a 15 pound cod caught by Rob Provost (MA). This fish was quickly weighed and released back to the ocean alive. His largest pollock weighed 10 pounds. And Rob landed the Bunny Clark's largest redfish of the season so far, a Maine state trophy of 2.5 pounds. I took a picture of Rob with his big redfish. This digital image appears on the right.

Ron Anderson (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the third largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. He also won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the fourth largest fish of the trip with a 13.5 pound pollock. Ron's two best redfish weighed 2.1 and 2.25 pounds, both Maine state trophies. These two redfish are the Bunny Clark's second and third largest redfish of the season so far. Both were over seventeen inches caliper fork length. He also caught a haddock that was probably the largest of the day at 4 pounds. And he lost four jigs to the bottom. Ron's jig loss was well spread out through the trip!

Other Angler Highlights: Dennis Pietro (NH) landed a double keeper catch that included a 9.5 pound pollock and a 7.25 pound pollock. Jeff Smith (MA) boated the Bunny Clark's second largest cusk of the fishing season so far with an 11 pounder, just one pound shy of a Maine state trophy. He also caught a cod that weighed 11 pounds. The biggest fish I weighed for Dave Miller (MA) was an 8 pound cod. I do believe he caught bigger pollock than that but I don't believe he caught a fish of 10 pounds or better. Rodney Miller (MA) boated an 8 pound pollock earlier in the day. Jimmy Higgins (MA) landed an 8.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Shane Anderson (MA) boated a 12 pound pollock, his best fish. It's not very often that Shane is denied the boat pool! Kenny Casey (MA) caught a 9 pound pollock, his best fish. John Peduzzi (MA) landed the hard luck award for losing four jigs and for not catching a notable fish!

One of the vital members of the Dave Miller crew who always used to go out on these trips, caught many big fish with me and won many boat pools was Ron Tarentino (MA). Ron was a police officer out of Auburn Police Department in Auburn, Massachusetts. He was slain by an idiot with a lengthy criminal record. Ron was shot in the back, a cowardly act, on May 22, 2016. He knew he was dying at the time and asked for help that never came. It never could have come. He was in the wrong place at the wrong time. Dave's crew brought a police memorial flag to fly on the Bunny Clark in honor of Ron and in his place. Of course, having Ron on the boat as much as he was, flying the flag meant a lot to me. I attached the flag just a little bit down from the top on the single side band radio antenna. There it flew all day. And there it will fly until nothing more remains or until the end of the Bunny Clark season.



The shot above shows the flag I was given and it's placement on the antenna. At the time the shot was taken, anglers were getting ready to go fishing. The antennas stay down until we pass under the footbridge that spans the entrance to the Cove. Once we have clearance, the antennas go up until we get back to Perkins Cove.

Much has been in the news media about our police all over our country. It has been fashionable to show videos of "police brutality" without any evidence of their authenticity or the reasons behind the video. This has been painting an inappropriate picture of the people who protect us in this country. I am not so naive as to think that everyone is perfect. And human emotion certainly plays a part in everything everyone does despite how professional or objective you try to be. We are human after all. But these men and women in the blue uniforms throughout our country are the protectors of our country. They are our domestic army fighting to give the ordinary person a safe place in which to live. They have families, same as we do. They have lives, same as we do. But they also put their lives on the line every day to protect us. Ron was one of those people. He was a good person. He was a family man. He was a friend. I do so hope his family gets through this tragedy, healing the deep wounds that have been created by one selfish individual. And God help us if we can't respect those who give their lives to protect us.

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich hosted the St. Lawrence River Rats Extreme Day Trip Charter (NY) today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was partly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the west at twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the west at ten to fifteen knots all day. The wind never really let up. It was a very warm wind. By 2:00 PM, the air temperature had reached 84F. I don't know if it ever got any warmer than that. But it was certainly warm. The ocean was calm all day so you know the wind didn't reach off. The sky was clear, the visibility was excellent and the sun was bright all day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 49F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at ten to five knots, dropping to zero by noon. The ocean went calm. The wind was light and variable in direction for the rest of the day. The ocean remained calm. The air temperature reached a high of 70F in the shade, the warmest day on the ocean this season. The surface water temperature also reached it's highest value this season today with a reading of 58F. The tide (current) remained moderate. The visibility was excellent. The sky was sunny and clear.

The fishing was excellent all day. The catching was very good in the morning, slower in the afternoon. Most good fish landed were legal pollock. The second most prevalent species was the market sized cod. Legal landings also included twenty-nine haddock, three cusk, two mackerel and a cunner. Twenty-eight dogfish were released. They anchored once and drift fished the rest of the day. All terminal gear worked well but most were using jigs and cod flies.

I didn't ask who was high hook. Tom "Ollie" Bruyere won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15.5 pound pollock. He also caught the first fish Ian could weigh, a 10 pound pollock. Andrew Bruyere (who could very well have been high hook) and Bob Williams tied for the second largest fish of the trip at 12.5 pounds each fish. Andrew's was a cod while Bob's was a pollock. Bob caught all the other biggest fish of the trip including a pollock of 11.25 pounds and a 12 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Bob Mathews didn't have his name mentioned on the sheet today. I'm not sure if he didn't feel well, didn't fish or just decided to take a bunk. I'll have to find out later I guess. Mike Kotash landed a 10.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Dan Liscum also caught a 10.5 pound pollock. Mike Mallott landed the hard luck award for losing two jigs.

I received several donations supporting my work raising money for a cancer cure with the Pan-Mass Challenge, cycling event taking place on August 6. Those wonderful individuals and their donations are as follows: Tom Bruyere for $50.00 (he has already donated to my cause this year), John Gardner (NY) for $5.00 and Brian & Cheryl Dodge (MA) from Cutting Edge Tackle for $50.00 plus some jigs to trade for donations! Clever!

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and I hosted the Brandon Stevens (VT) marathon trip charter today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

The ocean was flat calm with nary a ripple on the surface, the air temperature was mild, the sky was mostly clear and the visibility was excellent on the ride to the fishing grounds. As soon as we got to the grounds, the wind started to blow from the northeast. The northeast wind was only strong enough to create a ruffled surface on the ocean. And it didn't last. An hour later the ocean was flat glassy calm again. The ocean stayed calm all day until a little after noon when the wind came up from the south. The wind remained very light out of the south for the whole ride back to Perkins Cove. The sky was mostly clear all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57.7F. The tide (current) was light during the first half of the trip and moderate during the last half. The visibility ranged from ten miles in the morning to thirty miles near the end of the trip. The air temperature reached a high value of 68F in the shade. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 77F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 49F).

The fishing was excellent and so were the landings, one of our three best trips of the Bunny Clark season to date. We caught an equal number of larger sized cod (mostly markets), pollock (most 5 to 8 pounds) and haddock (3 plus pound average). All the cod were released, of course. The haddock cull was excellent with four legal fish landed for every five haddock caught. And everyone had at least one haddock of 4 pounds or better. We also recorded the single best haddock drift of the season today. The drift featured single and double keeper catches for everyone with rarely another species hooked for that time period. There might have been five fish total of other species caught during that single drift. Legal landings also included six cusk. There were eighteen dogfish released. We drift fished for every stop. All terminal gear worked equally well.

Brandon Stevens (VT) was high hook with the most legal fish and market cod. I would like to know how many doubles the man had. He was fishing in the tip of the pulpit all day. He won the boat pool for the second largest fishing with a tie for the fourth largest fish at 10.5 pounds. A cod. There were five other anglers who had bigger fish or fish as large but who didn't get into the second largest fish boat pool! Dan Demers (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19.5 pound cod. This is the largest cod that has been caught on the Bunny Clark this season to date. He caught this big cod as part of a double keeper catch with another cod of 4 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. I took a picture of Dan holding the double before releasing both fish. The digital image appears on the left. Dan also caught the second largest fish, an 11.25 pound pollock. He did not get into the boat pool for the second largest fish. Chip Stevens (VT) caught the third largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. Chip, too, wasn't in the pool for the second largest fish. His largest haddock weighed 5 pounds, a tie for the largest haddock of the trip.

Other Angler Highlights: Jonny Stevens (VT) caught a pollock that weighed 10.5 pounds. He didn't enter the boat pool for the second largest fish. Jonny also caught a cod that weighed 10 pounds, his second largest fish. Tony Atchinson (NH) boated a 5 pound haddock, a tie for the largest haddock of the trip. Dave Stevens (VT) boated a 10.5 pound pollock. Dave didn't join the boat pool for the second largest fish. Craig Stevens (VT) caught the most sub-legal fish of the trip, by far. I would have given him the hard luck award had Dylan Stevens (VT) caught more fish. However, Dylan hardly caught a single fish of any size as he spent the day in the Hotel Bunny Clark, a little green around the gills! And, yes, Dylan got the shirt!

After we got back to the dock I was contemplating a cool down bike ride. But I looked at the engine hours and knew I had to change the lubricating oil in the engine instead. I ended up getting home at 9:00 PM.

Friday, June 17, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 51F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was light out of the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the day was excellent. Winds were light all day, very light. The sky was clear with few clouds. The air temperature reached a very comfortable 75F in Ogunquit. The visibility was excellent. There was very little humidity. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 49F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 74F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 48F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at five knots or less, went calm and then hauled out of the southwest at five knots or less. The ocean was flat calm all day with zero swell or seas. The sky was nearly cloudless with a bright sun. The high air temperature was 66.5F in the shade. The visibility was thirty miles or better. There was a moderate tide (current) most of the day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

The fishing was excellent; the weather conditions were perfect and there was no shortage of fish. Landings were in the good category today. This mainly because many of the fish caught were cod, mostly markets. And there were plenty of dogfish and sub-legal sized fish to return. Most legal fish landed were pollock followed by haddock. Legal landings also included two cusk, a redfish, a mackerel and a cunner. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear, bait, jigs and flies, worked equally well.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. The suspects included Rafik Bishara (MA), Matt Freitas (MA) and Zach Freitas (MA). Bruce Randall (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11.5 pound cod caught by Zach Freitas. There was a tie for the third slot at 10 pounds. Matt Freitas caught a 10 pound pollock and Russell Mott (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Brian Waild (ME) caught a 9 pound cod, his largest fish. Devin Randall (VT) landed the hard luck award for losing three jigs.

I received a very generous donation of $200.00 from Sue King (NY) sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a bike ride to solve the cancer riddle, today. Sue has been very generous in her donations to the cause since I started this ride ten years ago. And she still believes in the cause today. Thank you very much, Sue. Very much appreciated by many!

Saturday, June 18, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the day was excellent for weather. The high air temperature in Ogunquit was around 73F. The wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots most of the morning, giving us a feeling of a warm fall day with little humidity. The wind hauled out of the south after the northeast dropped in the mid afternoon. There was very little wind to speak of all day. The sky was nearly cloudless with a bright sun. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 53F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 72F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 48F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten knots or a little more most of the day. Seas were chops of a foot or more with no sea swell. The wind was backing off as they were coming back in to Perkins Cove. The sky was clear all day. The high air temperature was 62F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was excellent. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57F.

The fishing was excellent with quite a few cod and many less dogfish than the last few days. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-five haddock and a mackerel. Both anchoring and drifting were used. Drifting caught the most good fish. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. He said that Jerry Charron (ME) caught the most haddock with a count of seven legal, the most for an angler today. But he didn't land as many pollock as some. Others were keeping their fish together as a group. So, it was impossible to get a definitive answer on the question. Jerry won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. Bob Long (ME) caught the second and third largest fish of the trip. Both fish were pollock and both fish weighed in at 10 pounds each.

Other Angler Highlights: Bruce Mura (NY) caught the largest cod at 8 pounds. He also landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer!

Sunday, June 19, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was cloudless (again), the wind was blowing out of the south at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The sky remained cloudless all morning and toward the beginning of the afternoon. A few clouds showed up in the otherwise clear sky a little later. The wind blew out of the south southwest up to twenty knots by afternoon. The southerly wind increased to twenty knots shortly after noon. It veered more southwest by early afternoon. The air temperature got up as high as 79F in Ogunquit. The visibility went from excellent to very good by afternoon. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 53F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 90F (with a low of 51F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at ten knots to start, quickly increased to fifteen knots and then to twenty knots. Seas were about two feet to start (chops) and three to four feet (chops) for the last hour of the trip. They had an ambient air temperature of 63F. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was very clear. The visibility started at thirty miles but dropped to twenty miles in haze later in the day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56F.

The fishing was very good, primarily because of the seas. The catching was excellent. Landings came in at the good category. Again, there were a good number of market cod. But there were also a few large market cod as well, resident fish all. And the dogfish count ran to fifty-six which isn't huge but just enough to keep the good fish off the hook and the hassle of chafed lines and tangles. Legal landings included mostly haddock, by far. In fact, most fish caught were haddock. The cull was one to one, keepers to sub-legal fish. They caught a good number of legal pollock but about half as many legal pollock as legal haddock. Legal landings also included a cusk. Two wolffish were released back to the ocean alive. Anchoring was the method. All terminal gear worked well - that's always a very good sign!

Ian didn't have a clue as to whom was high hook. I know Ian's son, Ryan, was aboard today and caught a half dozen legal pollock and the same number of legal haddock. Ryan is usually at the upper end of the angling talent, if not at the top. I don't believe he was high hook today. But it gives you an idea of the fishing. Ryan caught quite a few cod. He was using a jig. Alexis Lailer (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 14 pound wolffish caught by Ryan Smith. This is the Bunny Clark's third largest wolffish of the fishing season to date. Jim LeMay (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 13.5 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Rich Warner (ME) boated the largest pollock of the trip at 10 pounds. George Grovo (ME) was today's high hurler. For this he landed the Bunny Clark's hard luck award t-shirt!

I received two donations from people who sponsor me in my efforts to fight cancer year after year with the Pan-Mass Challenge. The first was from Joe Columbus (MA) for $20.00. The second was from Mark & Linda Hamel (NH) for a generous $100.00. Thank you all so very much for your support and kindness. It means a lot to me. But it means more to those who are suffering with the disease and those who are close who may get the disease in the future. Cancer patients may never know the people behind the scenes who raise the money to fight the cause. But I do. And it shows me that there are so many good people out there. I might appreciate that more than the act itself!

Monday, June 20, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the south and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze. Before sunrise, the wind started to pipe up from the south. By sunrise, the wind was already blowing ten knots. By noon, the wind was blowing out of the south at fifteen knots. The rest of the day saw southerly wind of fifteen to twenty knots. The most wind came during the late afternoon. The air temperature soared into the 80s. It didn't feel so bad along the shore as the wind was wicking the cool water temperatures and the wind, alone, kept the air temperature down. I saw a high of 82F in Perkins Cove. But I'm sure that it was warmer just a mile away from the shore. The sky was nearly cloudless most of the morning and very few clouds in the afternoon. It was brilliantly sunny all day. The visibility was good to very good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 83F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 91F (with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet. It wasn't as windy as it was the day before. The sky was sunny all day. The high air temperature for the trip, in the shade, was 62F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty miles. There was haze. But Ian felt the haze was constrained near shore and not to the east. Interesting. The surface water reached a high temperature of 57.2F.

The fishing was very good, the catching was phenominal and landings fell on the very good side. Most good sized fish caught were cod, by far. I don't like to print this but it was true today. And the dogfish were worse with eighty counted and released. Most legal fish landed were pollock, not as many as the market cod but close, within seventy-five fish. Legal landings also included twenty-three haddock, three cusk and two cunners. They released one wolffish. They anchored on every spot. All terminal gear worked well.

I don't know who was high hook but Jack Henke (NY) released thirty-nine market cod (from twenty-two inches and up in length) and kept twelve pollock. That would be huge day if we were able to keep cod. His largest fish was an 11 pound pollock. John Russell (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. He also caught a 10 pound pollock later in the day. The second largest fish was a 12.5 pound cod caught by Chris Savarie (NY). His son, Matt, wasn't aboard so he, finally, got the opportunity to catch more fish than his son! It's been a long time coming. The third largest fish was a 12 pound pollock caught by Mackenzie Cattrete (NC).

Other Angler Highlights: Gina Brooks (VT) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, her biggest fish. Reggie Theriault (ME) landed the best double keeper catch of the day. His double included a 10 pound pollock and a 9 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! Octavia Norman (TN) was high hurler and won the hard luck award for his malady.

John Russell helped my out in my quest for a cancer free world by sponsoring me in my ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. John donated a generous $50.00. Thank you so very much for your support, John. I appreciate it very much!

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the south at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze.

I was just about to leave the boat to go back up to the house to get the rest of my stuff when Tim Rozan (ME) told me that Lewis Hazelwood (MA) coming up from Massachusetts was lost. They were doing road work on Route 1 around the Cape Neddick area and were directing traffic inland and around. Lewis got turned around when his GPS unit he was using in the car failed and ended up back at the exit off Route 95 in York. So I got on the phone with him and gave him instructions to Perkins Cove via the coastal route. Lewis had never been that route before. I stayed on the phone with him for twenty minutes until I saw the lights of his vehicle passing to the west of Perkins Cove and in to his destination. But this threw me off. I ended up with a different cap/hat for the day, the speech wasn't perfect and we ended up leaving the dock a few minutes later than I had wanted to. It didn't change my game plan (maybe it would have helped the outcome of the trip had it done so). But it took me a bit to get on track again.

It rained at the dock just before we were to leave for the fishing grounds. On the way to the grounds, the rain, thunder and lightning followed along. We never did get any strikes near the boat. And, eventually, we got far enough out that the cold surface water sapped the strength right out of the storms anyway. On the ride, the seas were chops of two to three feet from a southerly wind that was blowing fifteen knots or more. The rain chased us all the way to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, it rained for about ten minutes and then stopped for the day. The sun came out later in the morning. The sun remained with us for the rest of the trip. At 7:00 AM, we had a wind shift from the southwest. The wind continued to blow out of the southwest for the rest of the day. Seas were two to three feet, at most, in the morning. The wind and seas diminished all day until the last stop where the southwest wind was very light and the ocean was calm. We ran into northwest wind two thirds of the way back towards Perkins Cove. The air temperature ranged up to 63F in the shade. The tide (current) ranged from light to moderate. The visibility improved from very good in haze to excellent. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57.2F. The air temperature reached a high value of 68F in the shade. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 85F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 87F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 55F).

The fishing was very good overall. Catching the same. Landings were down from where I was hoping they would go. It wasn't for lack of fish. But the bite was way off from where I had hoped it would go The early morning arrival didn't seem to help as it usually does. And I went through anchoring, drifting and sea anchoring methods for every stop. Some methods worked better for each spot but nothing worked well, in my estimation. And if I had to pick one method as best, I would have to say that the sea anchor came through with the most positive results. Most good fish caught were cod in the small market variety with a few bigger fish mixed in. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. We found them everywhere. Legal pollock were the third most prevalent species caught. The haddock cull turned out to be two legal fish for every five fish caught. Legal landings also included two redfish and two cusk. About thirty dogfish were released. All terminal gear worked well but jigs and cod flies seemed to work the best.


High hook status was shared with Tim Rozan and thirteen year old Erin Harris. If you included market cod in the mix, Tim was high hook for the trip. If you eliminated the cod, Erin was high hook, no question. Tim may have caught a cod of 8 pounds or so as his biggest fish. Erin caught the most legal pollock of any angler today. Some of the fish of hers that I weighed included four pollock of 8 pounds each, a 14.5 pound pollock, a 10.5 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock, a 9 pound pollock and a 7 pound cod. She had two or three cod in the 7 pound range. Her three largest fish were the second, third and fourth (a tie) largest fish of the trip. She didn't enter the boat pool for the second largest fish. I took a picture of Erin fighting her 14.5 pound pollock. This digital image appears above.

Larry Kabat (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. His second and third largest fish were both pollock of 9 pounds each. Ken Noonan (CT) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with a tie for the fourth largest fish of the trip, a 10.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Bryan Lewer (FL) caught one of the two largest cod of the day at 9.5 pounds. His largest pollock weighed 9 pounds. And he caught a few haddock, all with a jig and (sometimes) a fly. Dave Harris, Erin's father, landed the largest haddock of the day at 4.75 pounds. His largest fish was a 9 pound pollock. Although I released a cod of his that was probably as big or bigger. Tim Libby (NH) tied Bryan in the cod department with a 9.5 pounder. Bob Mayer (ME) caught an 8 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also landed the hard luck award for fighting the wire mesh door of a discarded four foot lobster trap!

I received two donations sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising cycling ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those donors and donations included Tim Rozan and Lewis Hazelwood for another $20.00 (they give me donations all year long and have for many years) and Larry Kabat for a generous $80.00. Thank you all so much for your help in the cancer fight. I appreciate the support!

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the sky stayed clear until 9:00 AM. We saw clouds at that time. Some with light rain. Just a little light rain. Not enough to get the road wet but enough to see spots on a wind shield. The sky cleared again and then became overcast at noon. At 1:00 PM it started to rain, a good solid rain. Water poured down the street from the road hill coming into Perkins Cove. The new storm drains I had installed last winter took care of the water with no problem. We put awnings out at first on the deck at Barnacle Billy's. But the wind started to blow so we hauled them back in most of the way for fear of having them ripped. But the wind never got that strong. The rain, wind, thunder and lightning lasted until 2:00 PM. It drizzled for another half our to hour and then started to clear. The sky was bright, clear and sunny again by 4:00 PM. Except for the rain where we had northwest wind gusts to twenty-five knots, the wind was light and variable in direction for the whole day. The stronger winds lasted only a half hour. The air temperature got up to at least 75F. The visibility was excellent except during the rain. The ocean was flat calm all day. It still looked flat calm even with the wind as it was blowing off shore. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 53F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 73F (with a low of 48F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction all morning. Wind speeds were less than three knots. The ocean was flat calm. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. After noon, the wind found direction out of the southwest at five knots, maybe. The whole day saw a three to four foot swell from the southeast. At 2:00 PM, a squall struck bringing rain and northwest winds from fifteen to twenty-five knots. There were two foot chops over the swells for less than an hour. The weather got nicer after the squall passed. The sky cleared, the wind dropped again, the visibility became very good (it was hazy with ten to fifteen miles visibility before) and the air temperature ranged to 66F. The tide (current) ranged from none to light to moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58.4F.

The fishing was excellent. The catching was excellent - if you included fish of all sizes and species. Landings were good, very similar to yesterday's marathon trip. Most fish caught were legal pollock followed closely by market cod (that have to be released alive by law). Legal haddock came in third for numbers. The haddock cull was about one to one, a legal fish for every two caught. Only two species of legal fish were caught today. Released fish, besides the cod, included thirteen dogfish. Drifting was the boating method. The drift was way too slow to anchor or use the drogue. All terminal gear worked well.

There was no high hook today. Except for just a small number of anglers, everyone landed the same number of legal fish. All did good. Frank Noble (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. He also caught a pollock that weighed 10 pounds. The second largest fish was a pollock that weighed 12 pounds and was caught by Bill Young. Bill also landed the third and fourth largest fish of the trip, both pollock, both weighing 11.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Arnie Ulrich (NJ) caught a 10 pound cod, his largest fish. Norm Herrick (MA/ME) caught a 10 pound pollock and a 10 pound cod, his two largest fish. Sandy Besaw (NY) landed the hard luck award for being uncomfortable on the boat. This was her first time on a small boat in the Atlantic. It appeared to me that she was as scared of being on the boat as I used to be of flying in a commercial airliner. I used to be terrified and alcohol and xanex were my closest allies. Thank God it's not that way anymore. But I sympathized with her. I really did. I think the feeling of being trapped with no where to go can be the worst if you let it get to you.

I received two donations sponsoring me in my cancer fighting cycling event called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a $30.00 donation from Frank Noble. The other was a $25.00 donation from Marty & Elise Buskey (NY). Thank you all so very much for your thoughtfulness and generosity. The support means a great deal to me, that you believe as I do. And that goes a long way!

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and I were supposed to be running the marathon trip today. Three miles out, headed to the fishing grounds on a flat calm ocean (a perfect day), the high water alarm started going off. We had a failure in a raw water pipe leading out of the raw water pump. Looking at it now, this pipe seems to be isolated from the rest of the system where the zinc anodes are placed. This because the failure was caused by the pipe end disintegrating where the rubber gasket meets the elbow coming off the raw water pump. In other words, it looks like electrolysis taking place in this pipe. It's a really simple fix but it's a serious failure and a lost trip. I was so dreaming of hanging that big halibut.......... Alas, the wooden anchors are out again!

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was light out of the west and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. By 7:30 AM, the air temperature had risen to 64, the ocean was flat calm, there wasn't a breath of wind and the visibility was excellent. The air temperature got up as high as 78F in Perkins Cove. The wind remained light out of the southwest mostly. The ocean remained calm. The sky was clear. The visibility was just short of excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 50F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 77F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 48F).

After 7:00 AM, I made the appropriate calls to Bruce Woodfin at Power Products in Wakefield, Massachusetts and Skip Dunning, the worlds best road tech, at Power Products in Portland, Maine. Bruce ended up taking a raw water pipe off an existing new engine, grabbing Aaron Mayerson, mechanic extraordinaire, and driving to Perkins Cove from the Wakefield location. They got there at 9:30 AM. By 10:00 AM, Aaron had the new pipe in place and all checked out for leaks and fit. Sea trials lasted about fifteen minutes. All went well. For the rest of the morning I spent the time cleaning up the engine room, putting down new oil absorbtion pads and checking the whole package. All looked fine. Power Products has been very good to me other the years. Today's fix was just another example.

I spent the rest of the day catching up on desk work. I didn't go in to Barnacle Billy's as I have in the past when I couldn't take the Bunny Clark out. Steve Weiner and my son, Micah, ironed a tuna fish earlier in the day. I went down to the Cove at 8:00 PM to watch them unload the fish. Micah was the helmsman and Steve did the harpooning. The fished looked to be 300 pounds dressed with fair fat content. Not a high priced fish but they might do okay on the Japanese market.

Before they left the boat, two of today's anglers donated $25.00 each to my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge. They were Charlie Rollins (MA) and Phil Rollins (MA). Thank you both very much for your support. And thanks for being so understanding today (as was everyone). No one likes to be canceled the day of the trip. I felt robbed. I don't get to go out as often as I would like. So missing a great weather day with the potential of going offshore is a real bummer for me. Anyway, I really appreciate your donations.

Friday, June 24, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the northwest, the ocean was calm and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. More later.

We have available fishing spots on the following trips: the extreme day trip on Monday, June 27, has twelve fishing spots available, the Tim Tuesday, June 28, marathon trip has thirteen fishing places available, the extreme day trip of Wednesday, June 29, has seventeen fishing spots available and the marathon trip of Thursday, June 30, has sixteen fishing places available.

The fishing has been very good, excellent offshore. There are many haddock around, the pollock have settled in everywhere and there are special fish to be caught. The weather has been excellent lately. Looking forward to seeing you on the high seas! You can call 207-646-2214 for reservations.









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