www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

Thursday, May 24, 2018, 3:00 AM EDT



Starting the 2018 Bunny Clark Fishing Season

I took this digital image above on April 10, 2018. Captain Ian Keniston and I had just finished all the pre-season engine maintenance. And we were just about to leave the Bunny Clark for the day. We will be leaving the face of Barnacle Billy's dock for the start of the first few trips . So you will find the BC in this position when walking down to put your gear on the boat. Looking forward to beginning of the new season!




Sunday, April 15, 2018

First day of haddock possession.

We canceled today's trip a couple of days ago after viewing the weather forecast and related weather products. The wooden anchors are out for day three!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 31F, the sky was overcast, there was a light coating of snow on the grass, the wind was wind was blowing out of the northeast at twenty plus knots and the visibility over the ocean was good, at least. By sunrise, it was snowing, we had a blanket of snow outside on every surface and the air temperature had dropped to 28F. It snowed periodically all day. There was, maybe, an inch of accumulation but it was a dense inch that turned into ice in the afternoon. The air temperature rose to 34F and then started dropping. By mid afternoon, the air temperature was 28F. The wind blew out of the northeast all day at a steady rate of twenty knots, more or less. I was surprised that it didn't increase or decrease. After sunset, the wind veered more easterly which is where is it was when I went to bed. The visibility over the ocean was fair. The high air temperature in Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) was 39F (with a low of 33F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 32F (with a low of 27F). At the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine the high air temperature was 33F (with a low of 27F).

The digital image below was taken at 7:30 AM. It shows the snow covering the tables on the deck at Barnacle Billy's restaurant, the snow on the Bunny Clark and the white of the snow on everything in the background.



It continued to snow all morning and only some of the afternoon. But the snow that did fall ended up turning to ice. For the first time in my life I have to salt the sidewalk on the ocean side of Barnacle Billy's restaurant. It was treacherous, very slippery.

My day revolved around Barnacle Billy's, the business tempered by the weather. I leave early on Sunday, most times. So I was done by 6:30 PM, dinner at home and then early to bed.

Monday, April 16, 2018

I canceled today's trip on Saturday with gale warnings posted for today, the intense rain predicted and the colder than normal air temperatures. Better days are coming.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 33F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, the wind was blowing out of the east at twenty-five knots with gusts over thirty knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair. The wind stepped up to thirty knots and remained sustained at thirty knots (more or less) for the rest of the day. By nightfall, the wind was hauling out of the east southeast, still hard. Southeast wind struck at 8:30 PM with gusts to almost forty knots. The wind was gone by midnight. It rained all day. The morning saw a steady rain but there were times in the afternoon that I don't think you could get any wetter if you jumped in a lake. In fact, at one point you couldn't see the other side of the Cove, it was raining so hard. One of our customers told me that he had never seen it rain so hard at any time in his life. Maybe he doesn't have a very good memory! The air temperature rose to at least 42F but it seemed colder than that with the wind and rain. The air temperature increased over night with the wind drop. The visibility was fair at best. The high air temperature in Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) was 53F (with a low of 36F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 44F (with a low of 28F). At the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine the high air temperature was 47F (with a low of 33F).

I spent the morning working on Bunny Clark stuff and orders at Barnacle Billy's restaurant. At 10:00 AM, I attended an Ogunquit Community Support Forum for the J1 Summer Work & Travel Program. That lasted until about 12:20 PM. We employ a number of J1 students from eastern Europe who's sponsors were at this meeting. So there was a lot of back and forth on issues important to all of us. At one point we enjoyed a live discussion from Washington, D.C. with a representative from the U. S. State Department via Skype.

The rest of the day was spent at Barnacle Billy's. It was pretty slow today!

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Today's marathon trip was canceled for lack of interest directly connected to the weather. The Bunny Clark's wooden anchors were out all day today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 42F, the sky was overcast, there was no rain, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in black thick fog. The sky remained overcast all morning, the air temperature was still hovering around 43F and the wind was strong from the west. The fog cleared away by 9:00 AM. The sky remained cloudy most of the day with only brief sightings of the sun in the afternoon. Between those sunny spots were clouds with periodic rain showers. Those light rain showers disappeared by 6:30 PM. They were very intermittent anyway. The air temperature hovered around the 43F mark all day, the highest air temperature that I saw was 45F. The wind blew out of the southwest in the morning by hauled out of the west before noon, blowing up to twenty-five knots but sustained at twenty knots. The wind dropped to a sustained fifteen knots later in the afternoon. The visibility was excellent after 10:00 AM. The high air temperature in Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) was 50F (with a low of 40F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 46F (with a low of 36F). At the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine the high air temperature was 47F (with a low of 37F).

I had a full morning of running around straightening things out after yesterday's storm. The higher than normal tide took out the dock leaves last night while I was asleep. These are loose pieces in the dock leading to the float where the Bunny Clark resides. They are not fastened so they can be removed to relieve the pressure on the dock from higher than normal tides. Removing the leaves could mean the difference between the dock surviving a strong storm surge or losing it altogether. Well, I dropped the ball on this one, figuring that the wind would haul out of the southeast soon enough to prevent a higher than normal tide. I was wrong. So part of the morning was spent getting our best carpenter down to the restaurant to fix it.

We had other small problems like getting clean salt water into the lobster tanks. The wind broke the screen door leading into the restaurant. That had to be fixed. And there were various other things the kept me busy until 11:00, when I had to head home to take a shower and get suited up to go to work at Barnacle Billy's restaurant.

Chris Costa called me from WCSH, Channel 6, in Portland, Maine yesterday to do an interview; "Remembering Barbara Bush". That interview took place after noon. It was meant to highlight all the good times during which the Bush Family ate at our restaurant, highlighting Barbara. In the morning, Chris told me the time. In the meantime, I called my brother (who had other plans) and my two sisters, Meg and Cathy. The interview went well except for my being aware of me stumbling over words in the conversation. But I never did like hearing myself speak anyway.

Later in the day we found out Barbara Bush had passed. The interview was timely and immediately put on the evening news. I didn't see it but I got calls from friends who said they did. At 8:30 PM, I got a call from reporter Eric Kane from WHDH, Channel 7 News, out of Boston to do a quick interview on Barbara Bush at the restaurant at 10:00 PM. I didn't really want to do it. But I saw it as an opportunity to tell the Bush Family how important and honored it was to know them. Eric had been referred to me by Boston TV reporter and substitute anchor, Dan Hausle, who eats at our restaurant frequently. He and his wife, Laura, have become friends of mine over the years. And it was the only link to Maine and Barbara that the station could come up with in such short notice. So I felt obligated to help. I was done by 10:30 PM, the piece airing later that night.

It looks like I'm am taking license to call the matriarch by her first name. But she did tell me, twice, that I should call her Barbara, please.

Other than that I visited our harbor master, Fred Mayo, in York Hospital, who seriously hurt his foot when a cradle came down on it. He has serious nerve and ligament damage. Mishap didn't break any bones but I think he would have been better off had that happened. He was in good spirits but his foot and leg looked bad.

I was at the restaurant all day other than the times mentioned above.

It was a melancholy day for me.

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Ah, the Bunny Clark. She is fast to the float at Barnacle Billy's yet again. I am looking forward to tomorrow's marathon trip!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 33F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. It was a milder day today. The air temperature got up into the mid 50s today. I never did get an exact reading. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northwest at about twenty knots all day. The wind blew out of the west off shore. The sky was mostly clear all day with some clouds. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature in Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) was 53F (with a low of 36F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 52F (with a low of 32F). At the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine the high air temperature was 53F (with a low of 34F).

I spent the whole day at Barnacle Billy's restaurant. My sister, Cathy, texted me to say that WGME, Channel 13, wanted an interview at around noon about moments with Barbara Bush. This was my third interview for TV. It was the second for Cathy, Meg and I. Dan McCarthy was the reporter this time, from Portland, Maine. That lasted about a half hour or more. It aired in the evening but I didn't see it. I did see the piece I did on for Channel 7 out of Boston this morning.

Wednesdays are busy days for me at the restaurant mostly because there are quite a few orders. But also, today, because we were fixing things that got broken in the storm. I was done at 4:30 PM, so I could get the Bunny Clark ready for the marathon trip tomorrow.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I are running the marathon trip today, the first trip in a week.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 38F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

We could still see the stars in the sky when we went through the gate headed to the fishing grounds. The visibility was excellent, the ocean had a one to two foot chop created by a ten knot westerly wind and the air temperature was cool.

On the grounds, the sky was overcast and had become so about five miles before we arrived. The wind was out of the west at ten knots. There was a chop of about a foot or slightly more. It started to rain a hour in. It rained for the rest of the morning. By noon, we had no wind at all. The ocean became flat, glassy calm. There was no wind and no sea for about two hours. On the ride home, the wind blew lightly out of the west. There was a light chop of less than a foot. The visibility was excellent all day. The air temperature was raw, raw enough for long underwear and several layers. I was chilled for a good part of the morning. I wouldn't have mentioned this but Ian felt the same way! The tide (current) was light. The surface water temperature reached a high of 39.7F. A half an hour away from the dock headed in, it started to rain again. It rained in Ogunquit for another hour before stopping. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 44F with a low of 36F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 49F (with a low of 32F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 48F (with a low of 38F).

The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were good.The fishing conditions couldn't have been better. We caught a pile of haddock from beginning to end. Most legal fish landed were haddock. We had the bag limit before the end of the trip and were released legal haddock before I called the day. We caught 2.2 sub-legal haddock for every legal haddock. So there were many more sub-legal haddock. And I probably missed a few at that. It was hard to keep track. We also caught a few cod, nineteen of which were between 5 and 11 pounds. Most cod were fairly small. Legal landings also included two redfish. Since we were targeting haddock, I didn't try any areas that might have held other species of fish, like redfish or pollock. We drift fished and anchored. It didn't seem to make a difference. All the best haddock and cod were caught on jigs. But all terminal gear worked well for haddock.

Jason "Jay" O'Connor (ME) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound cod. Jay's largest haddock weighed 5.5 pounds, the second largest haddock of the trip. He fished with a single jig (and no fly) all day long. Neil Hickey (VT) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 9 pound cod. Neil's largest pollock weighed 4 pounds. Dennis Reissig (NY) caught the third largest fish, an 8.75 pound cod. Dennis' largest haddock was a skinny, long 4 pounder.

Other Angler Highlights: Jim Clouse (CT) caught a 7 pound cod, the first fish that I weighed today and his largest fish of the trip. Cody Lank (NH) landed the largest haddock of the trip weighing in at exactly 6 pounds. I took a picture of Cody holding his haddock. This digital image appears on the left. Cody caught the best double of the day. One was an 8 pound cod, the other weighing in at 7 pounds, also a cod, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Bob Mayer (ME) caught a 7.5 pound cod. His largest haddock weighed 5 pounds, the third largest haddock of the trip. I do believe that Tom Murphy (VT) lost a bigger one at the surface. Ty Kashmiry (ME) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for getting tangled three times. He really had great luck and caught a lot of haddock. But I had to give the shirt to someone!

I received a generous $50.00 donation sponsoring me in my cycling event called the Pan-Mass Challenge. This event to try and find the key to a cancer cure. Dennis Reissig was the wonderful individual responsible for the donation.Thank you very much, Dennis. Much appreciated!

Friday, April 20, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 36F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northwest to twenty-five knots in gusts most of the day, dying out very late in the afternoon. The sky was clear, the visibility was excellent and I observed a high air temperature of 53F in Ogunquit. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 53F with a low of 36F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 50F (with a low of 35F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 52F (with a low of 35F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at ten to fifteen knots with gusts to twenty knots. Seas were two to four feet in chops, maybe less for the ride back to Perkins Cove. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds, the visibility ranged over twenty miles and the surface water temperature reached a high of 40F. The tide was moderate. The air temperature felt cold to most.

The fishing was very good, the frequency of catch was excellent but the conditions weren't calm enough to give the day a value of excellent. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, albeit, a bit smaller then they were yesterday. Legal landings also included two redfish, just like yesterday! The haddock cull was three sub-legal fish to one legal. Released fish, besides small cod and haddock included a wolffish and four cod from 5 to 10 pounds. They drift fished and anchored. Bait worked a little better than jigs did today. It was the reverse yesterday.

Ian couldn't tell me whom was high hook. Bill Socha (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish, a 10 pound cod which was weighed and released immediately. The second largest fish was an 8 pound cod caught by Neil Hickey (VT). Dave Symes (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 5 pound cod. Dave also caught the largest haddock at 4 pounds. Andrew Gannon (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.

And we had a development where Neil dropped his fishing rod, our fishing rod, overboard. As luck would have it, Jim Vacchiano (ME) caught the rod and got it back to the boat. When it dropped overboard, Ian grabbed a rod with a jig, dropped it over the side in hopes of snagging the lost rod and caught a haddock instead! Anyway, all's well that ends well!

I received three donations, sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, an 192 mile cycling event in a quest for a cancer free world. One was an $100.00 "egift" made by Rodger Aldridge (NY) on April 18, 2018, "A Memorial Tribute to the "Enforcer", Barbara Bush". Barbara Bush generated millions to cancer research. Another was from Dave & Rebecca Symes (ME), today, also for $100.00. And Tom Murphy (VT) also donated $40.00 cash, today. Thank you all so very much for your kindness and generosity. It means a lot to me but more to those who are fighting for their lives.

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 34F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the west northwest all day. Twenty knots to start, the wind dropped to just about nothing at sunset. The sky was clear all day. The air temperature rose to 56F in Ogunquit. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 59F with a low of 39F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 58F (with a low of 29F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 31F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west northwest at ten knots, hauled out of the west and dropped to five knots or less. Seas were one to two foot chops in the morning and calm in the afternoon. The air temperature was warm. The sky was sunny. The tide (currrent) was light. The visibility was excellent. The surface water temperature reached a high of 42F.

The fishing was excellent, catching was excellent and landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock. The cull was one to one, a legal fish for every two haddock caught. Legal landings also included nine redfish and a cusk. Released fish included three cod over 5 pounds and one wolffish. Drifting was the only boating method employed. All terminal gear worked well.

Cole Melendy (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish. David Anderson (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.5 pound cod, our largest cod of the fishing season so far. Ian took a picture of David with his nice cod before releasing it. This digital image appears on the right. The second largest fish was a 9 pound wolffish caught by David Robitaille (NH). David also caught one of the largest cod today at 5 pounds. Peter Grant (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 6 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Buzzy Patten (NH) caught the second largest haddock of the trip with one that weighed 4.5 pounds. The largest haddock was a 5 pounder caught by Ken Patryn (NH). Nick Oltsch (NH) landed the hard luck award for getting a little green around the gills.

Sixteen year old Eric Donovan (NH) was auditioning for the swing deck hand position today. He didn't have oil gear or gloves so I lent him mine. My crew and I were impressed with him. We shall see.

Sunday, April 22, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo hosted the Saracina Family & Friends extreme day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 37F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind was light from the north northwest in the morning, just shy of ten knots. This wind flunked out by noon. After noon, the wind blew lightly out of the south and, then south southwest. The sky was clear all day, cloudless all morning and part of the afternoon. The air temperature got up to 58F in Perkins Cove but only momentarily before the wind struck out of the south. The cool wind off the water kept the air temperature down, particularly in the afternoon. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 62F with a low of 42F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 61F (with a low of 25F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 32F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at five knots in the morning and the went variable in direction for the rest of the trip. The ocean was calm all day. The sky was clear, the visibility was thirty miles plus and the air temperature went from mild to warm. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 41F.

The fishing was excellent all the way around, landings, catching and conditions. It was just a great day. Most fish caught and landed were haddock, the best haddock day, by far, of the season to date. And it would have been labeled an incredible day for haddock fishing in any year previous. The haddock cull was 50/50 again. For every two haddock caught, one was over eighteen inches fork length. Legal landings also included two redfish. Released fish besides the small haddock included ten short pollock, four cod of 5 pounds or just slightly more (probably sixty very small cod) and our first porbeagle shark loss. They made one anchor stop. The rest of the time they caught fish while drifting. All terminal gear worked well but only one angler was using a jig.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. Too much going on. Joe Saracina, Jr. (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6 pound cod. The second and third largest fish were both 5.5 pounds, cod both. Steve Keegan (ME) caught one. Ed Olson (ME) caught the other.

Other Angler Highlights: Earl Lagerholm (ME) caught a 5 pound cod, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Mark Saucier (ME) landed the hard luck award for breaking off a six or seven foot porbeagle shark after almost getting it close enough to the boat to gaff. So close but so far away!

I received an $100.00 sponsorship donation for my upcoming cancer bike ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The donation was a "egift" through the PMC site from Jean-Denis Jacob & Louise Bilodeau (QC) "In Memory of the Former First Lady, Barbara Bush", who did so much for cancer research in the past. If luck has it, I will see them at Barnacle Billy's restaurant this summer!. Thank you so much, Jean-Denis & Louise. So very kind of you to reach out from Canada to help me here. All the best to you both!

Monday, April 23, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo were supposed to be running the extreme day today. But we had not enough warm bodies available to make the trip. The wooden anchors will be out today and, maybe, tomorrow as well. Sniff.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 34F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. By 8:30 AM, the air temperature had already risen to 48F. The air temperature went on to rise another ten degrees before falling on a southerly wind in the afternoon. The morning saw the wind blow very lightly out of the northwest, die out and then haul out of the south southeast around 1:00 PM. It never blew as much as ten knots. The sky was nearly cloudless all day. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 58F with a low of 43F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 25F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 62F (with a low of 32F).

We were staining the dock and float area yesterday. So when the Bunny Clark stopped at the town dock to unload passengers, it remained there overnight. The Bunny Clark remained there all morning while I made sure all of the Barnacle Billy's dock was dry before moving it back "home". That was accomplished after 2:00 PM.

My day was filled with meetings and working at Barnacle Billy's restaurant. Normally I get out in the early afternoon to get ready to run the marathon trip the next day. Today I stayed all afternoon and left at 6:30 PM, knowing there would be no trip tomorrow.

Not so Tim Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I were supposed to be running the marathon trip today. We had several chances to get enough anglers on the boat but the predicted weather had much to do with us not leaving the dock today. Another day of rest for the Bunny Clark.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 39F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. By sunrise, the wind had established itself out of the south. By noon, the southerly wind was fifteen knots. It increased to twenty knots sustained through the afternoon and into the night. The air temperature rose again today up through to the high 50s. I never did get a good look at a thermometer. The air temperature might have crested the 60F but the wind off the water blowing into Perkins Cove kept the air temperature down somewhat. The sky was clear all day with high clouds creeping in during the late afternoon. The visibility dropped to very good by mid afternoon and stayed that way into the night. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 69F with a low of 42F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 73F (with a low of 30F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 36F).

I spent most of my day in the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. I stayed there for at least five hours. I had to write a couple of letters, go through emails, make some calls, catch up on getting repairs scheduled and bringing the Barnacle Billy's web site up to modern times. The web site still needs some work. Besides that I did my normal work at the restaurant, talking to patrons and making sure everything was going well. Since I'm normally fishing today, I took off from work early and got home by 6:00 PM.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 49F, the sky was overcast with holes, the wind was light out of the south and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. At 8:30 AM, the air temperature was the same but it had started to rain. It rained periodically all morning. The air temperature was still 49F at 11:45 AM. After noon, it rained continuously all day long and into the night. There was really not much wind around Perkins Cove all day, even at sunset. The visibility was fair in precipitation and haze. The air temperature hovered around the 50F mark, never any higher. And, of course, the sky was overcast all day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 54F with a low of 47F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 56F (with a low of 48F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 54F (with a low of 47F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots all morning. By noon, the wind had hauled more south southeast. Wind speeds ranged from ten to twelve knots or a little more. Seas ranged from calm all morning to two to three foot chops at the very end of the fishing. The sky was overcast all day. They had light occasional rain while fishing. The only steady rain they saw was on the way back to Perkins Cove and only in the last hour of traveling. The tide (current) was strong. The air temperature was cold/mild. The surface water temperature reached a high of 42F, unprecedented for this time of year (cold!).

Captain Ian called the fishing good, the catching good but the landings fair. Most legal fish landed were haddock. The haddock cull was three to one. For every four haddock caught, one was a keeper. Legal landings also included two redfish. There were quite a few sub-legal pollock released. Seven cod from 5 to 14.5 pounds were released. They drift fished and anchored. Bait worked best.

Ray Westermann (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish. His legal haddock count was 12, the bag limit. I'm sure he released a few keeper haddock as well. Benny Cortijo (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.5 pound cod. This is the Bunny Clark's largest cod of the fishing season so far. Captain Ian took a picture of Benny with his cod just before releasing it back to the ocean alive. This digital image appears on the left. Benny also caught the second largest fish, a 9 pound cod. And he caught the largest haddock at 5.5 pounds. The third largest fish was a 6 pound cod caught by Kevin Young (NY). Kevin also caught a 5 pound cod, the first fish to be weighed today. Marty Buskey (NY) landed this year's hard luck t-shirt today for being the last angler to catch a legal fish! This is not like Marty, at all. Every once and a while everyone gets slapped with a reality check! I guess it was Marty's day today!

We had another deck hand auditioning with us today. His name is Corey Carson. My crew said he was okay. We shall see how it works out.

I received two donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a road cycling event to raise money to fight cancer. It occurs on the first Saturday in August every year. This will be my twelfth year doing this event. One donation was from Marty & Elise Buskey (NY) for $25.00. The other was a very generous $250.00 donation from Ray Washburn. Thank you both so very much for your support in this project. My goal this year is to make the one third of a million dollar mark in donations since 2007. We shall see. In the meantime, I so appreciate you helping me reach my goal and to help those who might not, otherwise, have any hope.

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the sky was overcast, there was no rain, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in dense fog.

We had black thick fog leaving the dock, steering down the channel and through the gate at the entrance of Perkins Cove. I had no visibility from the footbridge to the green can buoy. I used the radar, only, to get to the open ocean. The fog was that thick. The ride to the fishing grounds wasn't bad. But it wasn't fast. We had thick fog all the way to our destination. We didn't have much wind but we did have a sea swell from the southeast that ranged from six to twelve feet. The seas were closer together on the ride out than they were later in the day on the fishing grounds. The cruising speed was down three knots while coping with reduced visibility and the sea conditions. The air temperature was about 49F for most of the ride.

On the grounds, the sky was overcast, the wind was light from the south and the seas ranged from eight to twelve feet in swells from the southeast. We also had a light chop from the south, south southwest and south again, with never more than ten knots of wind. It started to rain about five miles from the fishing grounds. It rained almost all morning. By noon, the rain had stopped and the seas were so far apart it was almost as if we didn't have any sea swell. But the size didn't diminish at all during the day. In fact, the seas were large enough at low tide to have breaking waves at Middle Shoal between Boon Island and Boon Island Ledge. The fog cleared out before noon and the overcast skies gave way to a mostly blue sunny sky. Seven miles from Perkins Cove, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at a sustained twenty-five knots. The air temperature reached a high of 51F. The tide (current) was light to moderately strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 42.7F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 68F with a low of 50F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 43F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 47F).

The fishing was very good despite the weather conditions. The catching started off slow on the first two quick spots and excellent everywhere else. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was nearly one to one, one legal haddock for every two caught. There were slightly more sub-legal haddock than legal haddock at the end of the trip. The haddock size was the best we have seen this season so far with quite a few 3 to 4 pounders. We met the bag limit at the end of the day by releasing a slightly larger haddock during the trip. Legal landings also included seven pollock to 5 pounds, eleven redfish and four cusk. We released thirteen cod from 5 to 8 pounds. We alternated between drifting and anchoring. All terminal gear worked well.

Jason "Jay" O'Connor (ME), Ray Westermann (MA) and Jonathan "Griff" Griffin (MA) shared high hook status for the most legal fish. It was too close for me to tell. And all had the same number of fillet bags. Ray's largest fish was the second largest fish of the trip, a 7.5 pound cod. And he won the boat pool for the second largest fish with this cod. He also caught a 7 pound cod, the third largest fish of the trip. His largest haddock weighed 4.5 pounds. Griff's best fish was a haddock that also weighed 4.5 pounds. Dave Grabowski (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8 pound cod. I also weighed two of his biggest haddock. One weighed 4 pounds and the other weighed 4.5 pounds. Jay had the most good sized haddock, his largest weighing in at 4.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Jack Young (PA) caught the most cod from 3 to 6 pounds. He might have caught the most cod overall. And he did well on the haddock. Wobbie Barnes (MA) landed the largest haddock at 5 pounds. His largest fish was a 6.5 pound cod. Jim Donnelly (PA) spent two or three hours in the Hotel Bunny Clark. But it wasn't just sea sickness. He had a hard time with some kind of sickness through the night before he arrived at the boat this morning. He ended up fishing for most of the trip. But because he was the only one to take a bunk during fishing time, he landed the hard luck award.

Friday, April 27, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 43F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, it was a beautiful day with sunny skies, no wind and air temperatures rising up to 60F by 11:00 AM. By noon, however, the sky became overcast. By 3:00 PM, it had started to rain. The air temperature had dropped to 51F. The day became dismal. It rained or drizzled on into the night. The visibility dropped as the fog rolled in after 8:00 PM. The rain stopped. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 57F with a low of 46F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 61F (with a low of 37F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 40F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was variable in direction and much less than five knots. The ocean was calm with six to eight foot rolling sea swells. After noon, the wind hauled out of the southeast but it still blew less than five knots. The ocean remained calm, even on the ride home. The air temperature reached as high as 54F. The sky was sunny in the morning, overcast in the afternoon. Fifteen minutes before they were to call it a day, it started to rain. It rained all the way back to Perkins Cove. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility was excellent until the wind got established out of the southeast. From that time on the fog rolled in. The surface water temperature reached a high of 44F.

The fishing was very good. It could have been excellent had the tide not been so strong later in the trip. The catching was excellent. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock. The cull was almost exactly one to one; for every two haddock caught, one was a legal fish. Legal landings also included four pollock and twenty-seven redfish. Released fish included six cod from 5 to 8.25 pounds, quite a few small cod, a few small sub-legal pollock and two wolffish. Drifting was the fishing method. All terminal gear worked well but bait had the edge on the haddock.

Ian didn't tell me who was high hook. I didn't ask and his didn't volunteer. Maybe he couldn't tell. Jonathan "Griff" Griffin (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.25 pound cod. Luke Westcott (NH) might have won it had they boated the wolffish that he lost right next to the boat. Ian had the leader of the hook in his hand. But it was so lightly hooked that the hook came out as he tried to lift it over the rail. Since you can't keep wolffish we don't gaff them so it swam away. Ian told me that it probably weighed 10 pounds or so. So Luke didn't win the boat pool but he did land the hard luck award t-shirt! The third largest fish was a 6 pound cod caught by Jack Young (PA). He caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch with another cod of 5 pounds, both fish on the same line at the same time.

Other Angler Highlights: Jim Donnelly (PA) landed the largest haddock of the trip at 4.5 pounds. Carlos Gimenez (ME) caught a cod that weighed 5.5 pounds, his largest fish.

Saturday, April 28, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo hosted the George Roberts/Bill Cody (all NY) marathon trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky seemed overcast, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in thick fog. Ashore, the fog cleared away by 8 AM. We had no fog for the rest of the day. The sky was overcast from the time we could see up through the fog until noon. After noon, the sky became a mix of sun and clouds. The air temperature reached a high of 60F in Ogunquit. We had some light westerly wind early that hauled out of the south by mid morning. The wind remained out of the south at speeds up to about ten knots until sunset. The visibility was very good along the shore. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 70F with a low of 46F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 47F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 45F).

On the fishing grounds, the fog hung around all morning, giving them a half mile visibility at most. After noon, the greatest visibility was about a half mile. There was no wind all morning. The ocean was calm with a three foot swell. After noon, the wind got established out of the south. But, here too, the wind was very light and the ocean was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 47F. The sky was mostly overcast, probably some of this the effects of the fog. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 44.5F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good and landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. They didn't get the bag limit today as we have every pervious trip. But they were close. The haddock cull was almost one to one (legal to sub-legal) with a few more sub-legal haddock than legal. Legal landings also included eight pollock to 6 pounds, twelve redfish and one cusk. Released fish included thirteen cod over 5 pounds and three wolffish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked equally well.

Eddie Berben was high hook with the most legal fish. He caught the first legal fish of the trip, a 5 pound haddock. He also caught the largest pollock of the trip at 6 pounds. And he caught the largest haddock of the trip at 5.5 pounds. Ian took a picture of Eddie holding his 5.5 pound haddock and another haddock he caught weighing 2.5 pounds. That digital image appears on the right. George Roberts, II won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was shared between two anglers (two fish). Bill Cody caught a 7 pound cod and Barb Caswell caught a 7 pound wolffish.

Other Angler Highlights: Greg Caswell caught a 6.5 pound cod, his largest fish. Mike Cody caught a 6 pound cod, his best. George Roberts, III caught a 6.5 pound cod. John Huggler landed the hard luck award not being able to align himself with the motion of the ocean.

I received two donations sponsoring me in my cancer ride called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Both donations were $45.00 each, one from Mike Cody and the other from Bill Cody. Thank you both so very much for your help. I very much appreciate having you aboard every year and I really appreciate your help in this project.

Sunday, April 29, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky seemed overcast, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in thick fog (same conditions as yesterday morning). Ashore, the fog stayed around for most of the morning today. The roads stayed dry until 11:00 AM, when the drizzle and light rain showed up. By noon, the rain came pouring down. The rest of the day, under overcast skies, the rain would come and go on into the night. The fog was gone during the afternoon but the visibility over the ocean was only good along the shore. There was very little wind all day. The highest air temperature in Ogunquit that I saw was 47F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 60F with a low of 43F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 53F (with a low of 41F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 52F (with a low of 43F).

On the fishing grounds, they were enveloped in fog with a quarter of a mile visibility, at most, for most of the day. Near the end of the fishing, the fog opened up to allow them to see three to five miles. The sun made a brief appearance but mostly it was overcast all day. There was some light rain for a small amount of time. The wind blew out of the east southeast at five knots in the morning dropping off to just about no wind in the afternoon. The ocean's surface was calm over swells of two to three feet. The air temperature reached a high of 50F. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 44F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were very good today, the best day for haddock fishing we have had this season so far. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. This time, though, the haddock cull was two to one. For every three haddock caught, two of those haddock were over eighteen inches caliper fork length, the largest average size we have seen this season. And there were many 4 pound haddock today. The bag limit was easily attained. Legal landings also included eight pollock and two redfish. Released fish included nine cod from 5 to 7 pounds and one wolffish. They drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well but bait had a slight edge with the haddock.

It was impossible to tell who was high hook. There was too much action as it was a great biting day and the conditions made it so. Matt Brodka (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 6 pound cod caught by Mark Weldon (NH). Erick Daigle (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 5.5 pound haddock. Ian took a picture of Erick with his larger than normal haddock. This digital image appears on the left.

Other Angler Highlights: Erick's son, Gabe Daigle (ME) caught a 5 pound haddock, his largest fish today. Ian took a picture of Gabe with his haddock as well. Gabe's digital image appears on the right. Mike Kubisiak (NJ) landed a 4.5 pound haddock. Marios Zach (NJ) caught a 5 pound haddock. John Kendall, Jr. (VT) landed the hard luck award for mal de mer and no legal fish. He was a bit incapacitated, unfortunately.

Monday, April 30, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 36F, the sky was clear with a full moon overhead, the wind was light out of the west and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. As the day progressed, the sky became cloudier. By mid afternoon, the sky was overcast. The sky stayed overcast until 6:30 PM when it started to rain. The rain was only temporary. The air temperature was cool all day. It may have reached th 50F mark but the highest air temperature that I saw was 47F. There was very little wind all day. There was so little wind today it wasn't even worth determining a direction. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 48F with a low of 40F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 51F (with a low of 34F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 48F (with a low of 47F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots or less all day. The ocean's surface was calm with a two foot swell underneath. The air temperature reached a high of 52F. The visibility was excellent, over twenty miles. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a new high of 45F, the lowest surface water temperature I can ever remember seeing on May's doorstep.

The fishing was just shy of excellent. Some called it excellent. The catching was excellent. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, the bag limit attained even thought we only kept a larger than legal haddock. The haddock cull was 50/50 today favoring the sub-legal haddock over "our" legal size. Legal landings also included three pollock, eleven redfish and two cusk. Only seven cod from 5 to 9 pounds were caught today. And no wolffish were seen either. Drifting was the fishing method. All terminal gear worked equally well.

Captain Ian couldn't determine who was high hook. There was too much going on. Tony DeLeo (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound cod. The second largest fish was an 8 pound cod caught by Matt Brodak (NY). Matt also landed the hard luck of the day award when he lost a 4 pound haddock on the surface! Frank Kelly (ME) caught a 6.5 pound cod, the third largest fish of the trip.

Other Angler Highlights: Mariusz Zach (NJ) caught the largest haddock of the day weighing 5.5 pounds.

Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I were supposed to be running the marathon trip today. I would have loved to have taken the Bunny Clark out today but, apparently, no one wanted me to be out there because not a living soul signed up to go. And I can't go out there by myself and write about me! No, that would not do.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 35F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind blew lightly out of the northwest in the morning and then lightly out of the south in the afternoon. The on-shore wind was enough to keep the air temperature down lower than predictions. The highest air temperature that I saw was 57F, although I know it was higher just a short ways inland. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 67F with a low of 44F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 38F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 33F).

It was another day at the restaurant but not before I gave my morning up for a long awaited, long bike ride. Tomorrow's another day.

Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northwest all morning at ten knots or so, hauled out of the southwest around noon and then blew out of the west northwest up over twenty knots later in the afternoon only to peter out by sunset. The air temperature reached a high of at least 89F. The sky was mostly sunny all day. The visibility wasn't quite excellent and dropped to good in haze by mid afternoon. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 89F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 38F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was ?F (with a low of ?F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew lightly out of the southwest to begin and then slowly increased to twelve knots or better. Seas were calm to chops of one to two feet. The visibility ranged from three to ten miles. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The air temperature reached a high of 61F. The sky was sunny and clear all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 46F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were very good, another great day of fishing. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The cull was 50/50, legal haddock to sub-legal haddock. Legal landings also included three pollock. Released fish included a few sub-legal pollock, eight cod from 5 to 7 pounds and quite a few small cod. They drift fished and anchored. Both disciplines worked equally. Bait caught the most fish.

Captain Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. Too much action. Neil Hickey (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound cod. Neil also caught the largest haddock of the day at 5 pounds. The second largest fish was a cod of 6 pounds, three of them. Bob Pelletier (ME) caught two 6 pound cod while Christa Wacker (MN) caught one 6 pound cod. Paul Edmonds (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting a little green around the gills.

Thursday, May 3, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I were supposed to be running the marathon trip today. We never signed enough warm human bodies to make the trip. The wooden anchors are out on the day that Barnacle Billy's, Etc. opens.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was mostly cloudy, the wind was light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The air temperature increased again today, the second day of summer. Or so it felt. I saw 79F. The sky was overcast for most of the morning, clearing by 10:00 AM, overcast again by noon. We had a light periodic rain in the early afternoon, clearing again, overcast by 5:00 PM and rain into the night. We had no wind all day. The ocean along the shore was flat calm. The visibility was very good all day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was ?F with a low of ?F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was ?F (with a low of ?F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was ?F (with a low of ?F).

So another marathon trip foiled, the first time in my life that I had a week without once being aboard the Bunny Clark. But if you can't go, you can't go. So I put it out of my mind. And, thankfully, no one mentioned it to me today. It was good, in a way, as this was the opening of Barnacle Billy's, Etc. So I had last night to do last minute orders and all day to help get everything ready. Then I was able to greet patrons as they came through the door. We open that restaurant on the first Thursday in May. I was usually on a marathon trip so I never really had the opportunity to be in this position before. But, for me, today, I would rather be taking a haddock off the hook for a happy angler! But I truly enjoy both businesses.

Friday, Cuatro de Mayo 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 50F, the sky was mostly cloudy with a deep orange/red eastern horizon, the wind was light out of the east and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. The wind stayed very light all day. Mostly from the east, the wind never showed any teeth today. Because of the wind direction, we never had much visibility after sunrise. The visibility was good to fair over the ocean for the presence of a fog bank a couple miles off shore that materialized by mid afternoon. By late afternoon, the fog had crept "in on cats paws" and had enveloped Perkins Cove. This fog remained with us until at least 9:00 PM. The sky was overcast with periods of sun in the morning and peeking through for a brief time in the afternoon. We had no rain despite predictions to the contrary. The air temperature briefly touched 65F but dropped to 60F just before the fog rolled in. The air temperature reached almost 80F only four miles inland. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was ?F with a low of ?F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was ?F (with a low of ?F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was ?F (with a low of ?F).

On the fishing grounds, the visibility was hazy or foggy during the time there. During the morning, the visibility ranged from two to four miles. After noon, the fog set in and gave them a quarter of a mile or less in visibility. The wind was light and variable in direction. The ocean was flat calm. The sky was overcast or appeared so. The air temperature reached a high of 58F. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 48F, the highest we have seen it this year so far.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was a fish a drop and landings were very good. Landings would have been excellent had there not been so many sub-legal haddock in the mix. Still, the haddock bag limit was attained even with only keeping the larger ones. Most legal fish landed were haddock, about thirty percent of all the haddock caught. Legal landings also included twelve pollock, four redfish and three cusk. Our largest wolffish of the season was released today along with twelve cod from 5 to 9.5 pounds and quite a few sub-legal cod, pollock and haddock. They anchored and drift fished. Bait worked best.

Dan Morin (NH) and Mike Morin (NH) were high hook today. Dan caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 9.5 pound cod. Lewis Hazelwood (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound wolffish. This is the Bunny Clark's largest wolffish of the fishing season to date. Captain Ian would have taken a picture of this fish. It was a perfect specimen. But it was so active, a proper picture couldn't have been taken unless the fish was subdued. So it was released instead, Ian afraid that it might die in the process. Lew also caught a 4 pound haddock, his largest. The third largest fish was an 8 pound cod caught by Matt Rudin (MA). Matt also caught a 4 pound haddock, his largest of that species today.

Other Angler Highlights: Tim Rozan (ME) caught the largest pollock of the Bunny Clark season today with one that weighed 7.5 pounds, our fourth largest fish. Captain Ian Keniston dropped down once and caught the largest haddock of the day today at 5 pounds. Paul Blaine (NY) caught a 4.5 pound haddock, his best fish. Mike Graham (MA) boated a 1.5 pound lobster. This is our first lobster of the fishing season. Ian took a picture of Mike and his catch. This digital image appears on the left. Matt Rudin landed the hard luck award for losing a bait rig to the harder than normal bottom, the only equipment loss of the trip. I know, this doesn't see worthy enough for the award but someone had to get it!

Saturday, Cinco de Mayo 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo were supposed to be running the full day trip today. I canceled the trip for the strong wind. Between 3:00 AM through 5:30 AM the wind was out of the west with gusts to forty knots.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F (it was 68F at 2:00 AM!), the sky was clear, the wind was howling out of the west at twenty-eight knots with higher gusts (stronger earlier) and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind continued out of the west for a while, ashore, and then hauled out of the northwest. Wind speeds were up to twenty knots or more. The earlier part of the afternoon saw lighter winds out of the northwest. The air temperature ranged up to 72F by early afternoon and then dropped to the lower 60s with a wind shift out of the south. The wind blew out of the south at ten knots or more on into the night. The sky was mostly clear all day with much sun. The visibility was excellent most of the day.

Without the Bunny Clark sailing, I could concentrate on Barnacle Billy's restaurant. It was very busy. And I'm sure it was busy because of the great weather.

The day ended on a very sad note when I found out that one of our employees had passed away that morning due to a drug overdose. He has been working for us for quite a few years on and off. He had been battling a heroin addiction for many years. Last year he came to me looking for a job. He was straight and appreciative of the opportunity, as he called it, of working for us. And he was good. He was a very good guy, a nice person, one of the best - except for this problem. He had no problems last fall. And he had no problems this year until about ten days ago. He became guarded, couldn't look me in the eye, nervous, borrowing money and showing all the other signs. I regret that I didn't do anything. I was contemplating his situation when I got the news. I had planned to talk to him. I never got the chance. His parents called us. So too bad. Such a wonderful person. Addiction is definitely a disease. Anybody who doesn't think so just doesn't understand.

Sunday, May 6, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo were supposed to be running the extreme day trip today. But, alas, the Bunny Clark will be at the dock until tomorrow's extreme day trip.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was good in some haze. The air temperature hung around the 60F mark all day. The highest air temperature that I saw was 62F. It could have been higher, I'm sure. But I didn't see it. The morning saw a light southwest wind, a northwest wind showed up around noon which was followed by light easterly wind in the afternoon. The ocean along the shore was calm all day. The sky was overcast all day with rain starting around 11:00 AM. It rained periodically all day, sometimes hard, mostly light and sometimes not. The visibility was good for most of the day.

Today was a slower than normal day at Barnacle Billy's restaurants. The weather prediction and the weather were big factors in today's business. Sundays are huge order days for me. So I was in the office for most of it. We are also changing our ordering and ordered items somewhat which took an extra couple of hours.

My daughter, Halley, and her fianc, Nick, were here from New Jersey. So we ate dinner at Barnacle Billy's with my son and very good friends. It was a great way to end a challenging weekend.

Monday, May 7, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo were supposed to be running the extreme day trip today. But, again, no interest. We will be sailing on the Tuesday marathon trip.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 49F, the sky was mostly clear with a half moon hanging high over the eastern horizon, there was no wind, the ocean along the shore was mirror calm and the visibility over the ocean seemed very good. To the south, north and east of us, towns had fog. We did not. At sunrise, the sky cleared and was mostly clear for the rest of the day. There was a layer of high thin clouds over part of the sky in the morning but those disappeared in the afternoon leaving a cloudless sky. The wind blew out of the north northeast at dawn. Eight knots was the most it blew. In the afternoon, the wind blew out of the southeast up to twelve knots or so along the shore. The high air temperature in Ogunquit, that I saw, was 61F. It was cooler in the afternoon with the onshore breeze. The visibility was very good all day.

I worked at the restaurants for part of the morning and all of the afternoon, leaving work at 5:00 PM to get ready for the offshore trip tomorrow.

I still have a Bruins hangover after their loss in Tampa Bay. They were out-coached. They were the better team. It was their series to win or lose. They took too many penalties, did foolish things when they were losing and, to Tampa's credit, couldn't contain the first period. Problem is I haven't another NHL team I would rather watch. But I do love hockey. Maybe after I get over this hangover I'll find a team that might interest me. I like Tampa but not as much as I did two weeks ago!

Tim Tuesday, May 8, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 43F, the sky was occluded, there was no wind, and the visibility over the ocean was poor in black thick fog.

Another foggy still morning had me leaving the Cove via radar and chart plotter alone. After leaving the bridge behind I never did get a visual on anything until the green nun at the gate to Perkins Cove. We carried the fog with us for a few miles until we could start to see the half moon ahead, through the fog and over the eastern horizon. Then we were clear of the fog. We had good visibility, clear sky, mild temperatures, large swells under a calm sea and full cruise all the way to the fishing grounds.

On the grounds, the sky was clear, the wind was light from the east and the surface was calm. Underneath, however, we had a seven to ten foot rolling sea swell. These swells never left us all day. But they were so far apart, it didn't matter anyway. Before mid morning, the fog rolled in a stayed with us all day. When we left for home at the end of the fishing we carried the fog all the way back to Perkins Cove. The fog was shallow above allowing us to tell where the sun was at all times. The wind hauled out of the southeast just at the time the fog arrived. The southeast wind changed to southerly wind on the ride back home. We might have had as much at ten knots at times but certainly no more than that. The air temperature reached a high of 52F. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 45.5F.

The fishing was very good. It could have been excellent if the tide hadn't been so strong. The catching was very good. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock. We released a few more haddock than we landed but the cull was about fifty/fifty. Legal landings also included forty-two pollock, a halibut and fourteen cusk. Released fish included six cusk, a wolffish and forty-seven cod from 5 to 13.5 pounds. We alternated between drifting and anchoring. All terminal gear worked well.

Fred Kunz (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish - we suspect. Fred counts his fish. His mind is sharp and he is a numbers man. And I've tested him over the years. He is always right. John Baker (ME) could have been high hook. It seemed that every fish he caught was legal. And he had a fish a drop all day. The problem with determining John's high hook status is that he gives so many fish away. So high hook was either John or Fred. Fred caught the first fish I could weigh, an 8 pound cod. He went on to land the Bunny Clark's largest pollock of the season at 13.5 pounds, release two cod of 10 pounds each and land two other pollock that weighed 10 pounds each. Fred caught the most haddock but most of his haddock were too small to keep. Fred's pollock was the third largest fish of the trip.

On the third spot, before the fog rolled in, John Baker dropped to bottom and hooked, what he thought was a big fish. After a while reeling, his carpal tunnel wrist problem started to hurt. He asked Ian to take over. which he did. Turning to Ian I asked him what it felt like. "Well, I'm gaining all the time but it doesn't feel like a fish." Indeed it looked like he was reeling in a rock. It wasn't until there was about forty feet to go that it acted like a fish. But that only lasted for a few seconds. When I did get a visual, I realized it was a halibut, coming straight up, head first with it's mouth agape. Thank God Paul Pearson (NH) was there. I needed another gaff man and Paul is big, strong and is blessed with much hunting and fishing common sense. I put the first gaff into the fish's head. I thought I had done well until the fish started to twist. But this gave Paul some time to put the other gaff just in the right place. Both of us hauled the fish over the rail on top of me! This was okay as long as the fish was in the boat! At 58" and 98 pounds, this is the largest halibut that has ever been landed on the Bunny Clark. A fish of a lifetime, for sure. Paul was the only man strong enough to weigh the fish. He lifted the fish up by the scale and I positioned it in such a way that I could get the exact weight. It almost bottomed out the scale.

John won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, the 98 pound Maine state trophy halibut. I took a picture of John, his halibut and Paul holding it. This digital image appears on the right. John's largest pollock weighed 11 pounds. His largest cod weighed 9.5 pounds. Tom Duff (PA) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 14 pound wolffish. This wolffish is a tie for the Bunny Clark's largest wolffish of the fishing season so far. Lew Hazelwood (MA) caught one the same size last week. Tom also caught the largest cod of the day at 13 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Jason Plourde (NH) caught the most legal haddock. Jason was using bait. Had everyone been Jason, we would have had the bag limit by noon. Thankfully, not everyone was Jason. His father, Gary, fished right next to him and did well. Dana Decormier (NH) caught a 12 pound cod, his largest fish. One of his pollock weighed 8 pounds. And he might have caught a bigger pollock. But, by the time he did, I was through weighing pollock unless they were over 10 pounds. Sam Readinger (PA) caught a 10 pound cod, his largest fish. His largest pollock weighed 8 pounds. Paul Pearson landed a 13 pound pollock, his largest fish. Ray Washburn (VT) caught some of the biggest haddock. But I don't believe we caught a haddock as large as 4 pounds today. His largest fish was probably a 10 pound cod. Ray did well, as his always does.

On the last stop of the day, a drift, Dana Decormier hooked into, what I believe, was a halibut. He fought it for quite a while. He lost it half way off the bottom. Dana found the end of his line jigless with a 7 or 8 pound cod on the fly above where the jig used to be. Upon lifting the cod with his rod, the cod fell off the line with the fly in it's mouth. And promptly swam away. For this, "Almost Halibut Decormier" landed the hard luck award t-shirt.

The Decormier Family donated $25.00 to help me fight cancer with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Dana and his family have sponsored me for many years in this cycling event, one of my most loyal helpers in the cause. Thanks so much. I do appreciate this!

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky was occluded, there was no wind, and the visibility over the ocean was poor in black thick fog. Amazingly, the fog hung around the shore all day long. It certainly influenced the coastal weather keeping it over fifteen degrees cooler than it was only three miles inland, making it seem like the sky was overcast and making it feel damp and gloomy. I never saw the air temperature broach the 52F degree mark in the Cove but it got up to at least 65F only four miles away. The wind blew lightly out of the southeast all day, bathing the shoreline in cool ocean air. That wind direction held the fog in here. The sky was cloudless four miles inland. It seemed all the world was overcast in Perkins Cove. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 63F with a low of 49F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 41F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 46F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots all day. The ocean was calm over rolling sea swells of two to four feet. The air temperature reached a high of 52F, as it did in Perkins Cove. The tide was light to moderate. The sky seemed overcast but I'm sure it was just thick fog making it seem that way. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to a hundred feet. The surface water temperature reached a high of 48F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings fell into the category of good. There were many sub-legal fish released today. The sub-legal fish were mostly haddock and pollock. But there were also a few cod. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The cull was two to one, sub-legal haddock to legal haddock. For every three haddock caught one was legal. And there was a lack of haddock in the 4 pound range. That was also the case yesterday. Legal fish landed also included four small pollock, four good sized redfish and one cusk. Released fish also included eighteen cod from 5 to 10.5 pounds and one wolffish. They alternated between drifting and anchoring. Bait worked the best today.

Joe Columbus (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish, a redfish ahead of Sam Readinger (PA), who was second hook today. Joe's largest fish was a 10 pound cod, the second largest fish of the trip. He also caught a 7 pound cod. Jared Jacobs (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.5 pound cod. He also caught the largest haddock we have seen in a week at 6 pounds. Steve Shugars (ME) came in at number three with a 9 pound cod, the third largest fish today.

Other Angler Highlights: Billy Cuccio (NH) caught the first fish that Captain Ian could weigh, a 6.5 pound cod. Dan Gamboa (NH) landed the hard luck award for feeling so "under the weather" that he never wetted a line. That's tough.

I received two donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today, an two day 192 mile cycling event to fight cancer with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Most people know the fund raising arm of the DFCI as the Jimmy Fund. One donation was a generous $100.00 from Steve Shugars & Co. The other was a $30.00 donation from Joe Columbus. Thank you both for the support you have shown me over the years. I really do appreciate it. But not as much as those who are looking for a solution to the cancer puzzle.

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky seemed overcast with the fog present, there was no wind, and the visibility over the ocean was fair to poor in fog.

Yet another foggy morning. When I got up this morning, the fog was black thick along the shore. Two hours later, the fog had cleared enough so that I had a clear visual shot down the channel, through the outer cove and to the gate. The light northeast wind had cleared the fog away along the shore. A half mile later we were back into it again. Five miles later we were out of it again looking at a sliver of a moon hanging over the horizon. The ocean was fairly calm until we got within two miles of our destination. The wind went from very light to fifteen knots of northeast wind with a two foot chop.

On the fishing grounds, the wind was blowing hard enough out of the northeast that I decided to anchor. Seas were no more than two feet but I figured the wind would be blowing harder later. It didn't. Fifteen knots with a two foot chop over a three foot swell was the worst it ever got. The wind started to drop by 8:00 AM. The wind gradually died out all morning. By noon, the ocean was fairly calm. The wind hauled out of the south southeast by 1:30 PM. This wind breezed up to almost fifteen knots with a two foot chop and chased us all the way home. The fog stayed with us all day but it wasn't tight like it has been. The visibility ranged from a mile or two to six or seven miles. The air temperature reached a high of 52F. The tide (current) was strong to moderate to strong. The sky remained overcast all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 46.8F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 70F with a low of 49F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 75F (with a low of 45F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 61F (with a low of 43F).

The fishing, catching and landings were excellent today. Most legal fish landed were haddock by far with the best cull we have seen all year. Only ten percent of the fish we caught today were sub-legal. And there were many of them. In fact, we set a limit of nineteen inches caliper fork length before a fish could be kept. We would have had the bag limit by 10:00 AM otherwise. There were not many haddock over 4 pounds but there were a pile in the 3 pound category. We didn't see as many pollock as we did on Tuesday's marathon with only ten kept. And we certainly didn't see any halibut either. Legal landings also included six cusk, two redfish and a cunner. Probably the biggest difference between this trip and all the other trips this season were the numbers of market cod we released, the most, by far, all year. I had an exact count of one hundred and fifty-two cod from 5 to 18.5 pounds that were released back alive. We also released a wolffish that was about 10 pounds. It wasn't hooked very well and fell off the hook before I could get it aboard to weigh it. We anchored for most of the morning but then went to drifting for fear of going overboard with the haddock count. All terminal gear worked well today, a really excellent fishing trip all around.

If you counted cod over 5 pounds, Justin Philbrick (NH) would have been high hook. If you count legal fish, Dody Bleau (VT) was high hook. He released more keeper haddock than most caught today. And he caught a number of haddock he kept, including most of the bigger haddock landed today. Some of Dody's fish included a 10.25 pound cod, a 13.25 pound cod, the largest pollock of the day at 7.5 pounds and a 5 pound haddock. Dody released a 4 pound haddock because it was the last fish we could keep before the bag limit was caught and he "didn't want to be the guy" to boat the last keeper! Justin won the boat pools for the largest fish with the largest fish and the pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish. His two fish were both cod. One weighed 18.5 pounds and the other weighed 17 pounds, the two largest cod caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. I took a picture of Justin with his biggest cod. This digital image appears on the left in this entry. Some of the other fish of his that I weighed included three cod of 12 pounds each, a double that included two cod of 10 pounds each (both fish caught on the same line at the same time) and five other cod of 10 pounds or more that I refused to weigh. He also released a 4 pound haddock after the bag limit had been reached. And I could tell that that hurt!

Charles Haas (KS) caught the third largest fish, a 14 pound cod, the fourth largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Three other fish of his that I weighed included an 11 pound cod, an 11.25 pound cod and an 11.5 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Nikki Bleau (VT) landed the largest haddock of the day at 6 pounds. I took a good picture of her that will end up on the home page of the web site when I get a chance. Her two largest fish were an 11 pound cod and a 12.5 pound cod. Sam Readinger (PA) caught the first good double of the day. His double included an 8 pound cod and a 9 pound cod. I took a picture of him holding both fish before they were unhooked and released. This digital image appears on the right. Some of his other good fish included a 12 pound cod, an 11.5 pound cod and a 13 pound cod. His largest haddock weighed 4.5 pounds. Dean "Patches" Brady (NH) probably caught the most haddock. Albeit, most were small. I didn't weigh his largest cod which was probably 11 pounds. I did weigh a 9.5 pounder that he caught early in the trip. His two largest haddock weighed 5.5 pounds and 5.25 pounds. Chase Haas (KS) landed a few keeper haddock and some cod. But most of his focus was trying to hold it altogether in the Hotel Bunny Clark. He landed the hard luck award for his malady!

I received a generous $50.00 donation from Dody & Nikki Bleau sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising cycling event called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Dody & Nikki donate to my cause every year. They are always great fun to fish with. Thanks so much, you two. Looking forward to fishing with you again!

Friday, May 11, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky overcast, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots or more and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind continued out of the west at fifteen knots sustained with frequent gusts up to over twenty knots. The sky cleared by late morning and then became clear for the rest of the day. After noon, wind speeds dropped and the direction changed out of the southeast. By 5:00 PM, the wind was light out of the east. By 1:00 PM, Perkins Cove had reached a high of 66F before dropping with the wind shift out of the southeast and east, sending temperatures down in the afternoon, lower, into the night. The visibility remained excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 70F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 66F (with a low of 42F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 45F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind never reached off. Winds were light and variable in direction all day. The ocean was calm over a two to four foot rolling sea swell. Without the wind, the air temperature reached a high of 65F, the highest air temperature we have seen offshore this year to date. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in some lingering haze. The surface water temperature also reached a new high showing a value of 49F in the afternoon. The sky was overcast in the morning but sunny and clear in the afternoon.

The fishing was nearly excellent (the strong tide making it less than the high mark), the catching was excellent and landings were very good. Legal landings were haddock, by far. The cull was very good with a two to one mix of legal to sub-legal haddock. The bag limit was reached by the end of the trip. Legal landings also included eleven pollock around the 4 to 5 pound range, two cunners and one redfish. Released fish included seventy-five cod from 5 to 14.5 pounds. There was a porbeagle sighting, the shark swimming around the boat but not going after a hooked fish. They drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked about the same.

Ian couldn't tell who was high hook. Chris Silver (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.5 pound cod, a tie for the third largest cod caught on the Bunny Clark this season to date. There was a tie for the second largest fish of the trip at 10.5 pounds, both cod. Lewis Hazelwood (MA) caught one and Dody Bleau (VT) caught the other. Dody also caught a 9.5 pound cod. Lew also caught a cod that weighed 10 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Richard Gipp (NY) caught the largest haddock of the day at 6 pounds. This is a tie for the Bunny Clark's largest haddock this season. There are five anglers on the B.C. who have caught haddock this large. Nick Keller (NY) caught a 9 pound cod, his largest fish. Chris Samuel (ME) landed the hard luck award for being a touch under the weather.

The Bunny Clark was boarded by the U. S. Coast Guard on a routine inspection, making sure the boat was following the fishing rules and checking safety equipment. It took a hour but, in the end, the boat passed with flying colors. We do appreciate the Coast Guard. They have a daunting task with trying to stop drug trafficking, policing the fishing rules for all the different fishing sectors (commercial and recreational) and trying to keep boats safe for passengers, hands and captains.

I received a generous $50.00 donation from Chris Silver sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising cycling event called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. I have a really good friend, right now, who has a son with brain cancer. The battle is not going well despite all that is being done. And at no time has this fight been so close to my heart as it is right now. I can't imagine how I would deal with the same situation if it were my son. Thank you, Chris. This means a lot to me, a whole lot. All the best to you.

Saturday, May 12, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 38F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots, and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the day seemed to warm up quickly. It was 50F in now time. But that's about where it ended. The wind increased just a little bit more out of the east (ten knots or so). This kept the air temperature along the shore in the lower 50s. The highest air temperature that I saw was 52F. The visibility was excellent. The sky was clear until about 10:45 AM, when it started to cloud over. By noon, the sky was overcast. The sky remained overcast for the rest of the day. We never did get any rain. But we did get a light drizzle at 2:00 PM. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 53F with a low of 49F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 54F (with a low of 35F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 55F (with a low of 35F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at five to ten knots and then increased during the trip to ten and fifteen knots. Seas rose from a foot to two to three feet in chops by the end of the trip. The air temperature stayed at 52F for the trip. The sky was sunny in the morning and overcast in the afternoon. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was very strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 46F.

The fishing was good to very good (current), the catching was excellent and landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock but there were many small haddock. The ratio was two to one; for every legal haddock caught, two were released. Legal landings also included three pollock and a yellowtail flounder. Released fish, besides the haddock, included eighteen cod from 5 to 12.5 pounds and a few small pollock. There was one porbeagle shark attack. The shark hit a fish coming up but didn't get hooked. They anchored on every spot. The current was too strong to drift. All terminal gear worked equally well.

There was no way that Captain Ian could tell who was high hook. There was way too much action. At least a third of the boat was not fishing because anglers weren't prepared for the colder than normal air temperatures. And, yet, they still attained the haddock bag limit before heading in. So much was happening, too much to get a fish count for anyone.

Steve Collins (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was an 8 pound cod caught by Aaron Hodsdon (ME). Third place was shared by two anglers, both with cod of 7 pounds each. One of the anglers was Sam Zannini (NH) and the other was Sue Utterstrom (ME). Mason Melcher (NH) got sea sick and landed the hard luck award.

Mothers Day, Sunday, May 13, 2018

Mothers Day is a day that we do not schedule for fishing unless it is a charter. In the early days of the Bunny Clark we sailed on a regular basis on this day. The last ten years it has seemed a better day to take off the books. We all have families and, yes, Mothers.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 37F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind was light all morning, predominantly from the east. This gave us a cool breeze on shore, the air temperature never getting any higher than 55F. The afternoon saw the wind haul out of the south. Wind speeds got up to ten knots by sunset. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 54F with a low of 48F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 66F (with a low of 35F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 37F).

The town was busy this Mothers Day. It shows you what a little good weather will do.

I received a $25.00 donation from Helen Hennigan (MA) sponsoring me in my quest for a cancer free world with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The donation came in the form of an "egift" through the PMC web site via credit card. Thank you very much, Helen. Your gift is very much appreciated!

Monday, May 14, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 50F, the sky was mostly overcast, the wind was blowing out of the south at twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the sky stayed mostly overcast and overcast for the morning and part of the early afternoon. The sky cleared and was mostly sunny after 3:00 PM. The wind blew out of the south at ten knots, more or less, all day long. This kept the air along the coast cool, about ten to twenty degrees cooler than it was inland. The high air temperature in Ogunquit reached 63F. The visibility was good in haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 67F with a low of 49F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 46F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 61F (with a low of 49F).

On the fishing grounds, the visibility was obscured by fog. For most of the morning the visibility ranged to a quarter of a mile, max. The fog cleared by afternoon to improve the visibility by ten and fifteen miles. The wind blew out of the south at ten knots all day. The air temperature reached a high of 52F. The sky overcast in the morning and sunny in the afternoon. The tide (current) ran a river, very strong, all day. Seas were chops of about a foot or more over sea swells of two feet. The surface water temperature reached a high of 47F.

The fishing was good to very good (the current), the catching was excellent and the landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The bag limit was easily attained even with an increased keeper size length. The haddock cull was one to one, haddock over nineteen inches to haddock under that length. Legal landings also included fifteen pollock and one cusk. Released fish included eighty-six cod from 5 to 19 pounds and two wolffish. There were also a few small cod and small pollock released. They anchored and drift fished but were forced to anchor with the stronger current at times. All terminal gear worked well but bait caught the most haddock.

Si Hediel (NH) was high hook with the most keeper haddock, a count of twenty-nine, not including the legal haddock he released. Bill Allen (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19 pound cod. This is the largest cod of the 2018 Bunny Clark fishing season to date. He also caught a 12 pound cod, the second largest fish of the trip. There was a tie for the third largest fish at 11 pounds, both cod. Jack Judge (ME/CT) caught one and Kevin O'Brien (MA) caught the other. Jack also caught a cod that weighed 10.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Harley Swanson, Sr. (ME) caught a 10 pound cod, his largest fish. The largest haddock of the day was a 6 pounder caught by Bob Olivo (NJ). This ties with five other anglers this year so far for the largest haddock caught on the Bunny Clark this season. Tony Martin (NH) caught a 10.5 pound cod, his largest fish. Mark DeWolf (NH) caught a 4.25 pound haddock, the second largest haddock of the trip. Jeff Millet (NJ) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines.

I received two donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today, a cycling event to raise money to help cure cancer. One donation was from Jack Judge for $30.00. The other was a very generous $100.00 donation from Larry & Diane Cross (NY). Thank you all so very much for your support in this project. I appreciate it very much but not nearly as much as those who suffer from the disease. And, who knows, it will probably help someone you love!

Tim Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I hosted the Liam Kennedy marathon trip charter today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was hazy clear, the wind was light out of the south and the visibility over the ocean was good, at least, in some haze.

When I turned the corner at the gate I could see Boon Island light flashing away. We carried good visibility all the way to the fishing grounds. The air temperature cooled to 52F only a couple of miles out. The wind was light out of the south. The sky was overcast.

On the fishing grounds, the wind was still light out of the south. Seas were chops of a foot or so. There was zero current when we first started fishing. But that changed an hour later. The tide (current) was between moderate and strong today. The air temperature reached a high of 56F. The wind increased out of the south to fifteen and twenty knots by late morning. Seas increased to two to three feet in chops. As the day progressed, the wind kept working around clockwise. By 2:00 PM, the wind was firmly established out of the southwest. Twenty knots at first, the wind slowly dropped away. When the southerly wind picked up, the fog came with it. We were in the fog for a couple of hours. It was gone by noon. The sky was mostly clear all morning, mostly overcast during the afternoon. We could see the remnants of thunder storms dissipate as they got out to us. We had light rain on the way back to Perkins Cove with very little wind around the rain storms and reduced visibility. The most visibility we had all day was about ten miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 49.3F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 51F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 50F).

The fishing was no better than good with the tide and three foot chops. The catching was excellent. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Most of the haddock were of legal size today. We had no problem getting all the haddock we could legally take. Legal landings also included thirty-five pollock to 10.5 pounds, sixteen redfish and four cusk. We caught a lot of cod today. We released one hundred and thirty-seven cod from 5 to 13 pounds back to the ocean alive. Released fish also included four wolffish and one halibut. We drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well.

I don't know who was high hook but Chris Curtiss (NJ) caught the most legal haddock. In fact, he caught the most haddock, period. His largest fish was a 10 pound cod. Kory Kaulfers (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16.5 pound halibut. This is the second halibut caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. I took a picture with my iPhone with Kory holding the halibut before releasing it. This digital image appears on the left. Kory fished alone in the bow all day. Liam Kennedy (NJ) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 13 pound cod. Some of his other fish included a 4 pound haddock and an 11 pound cod. Kevin LaMorticella (NJ) caught the third largest fish, an 11.5 pound cod. Kevin also caught a cod that weighed 10 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Vinnie Struble (NJ) caught the largest pollock of the trip at 10.5 pounds. He also caught a 10 pound cod and an 11 pound cod. Howard Kaulfers (PA) caught a 10.5 pound cod. John Carlon (NJ) caught the largest haddock at 5 pounds. His two largest pollock were 8 and 9 pounds. Jim "Sitting Fish" Mathews (NJ) boated a cod that weighed 10.5 pounds. Bill Fox (NJ) caught a 10 pound cod, his best fish. Gene Luke (NJ) landed the hard luck award for most tangled lines. There were really no issues with tangled lines. But I had to give the shirt to someone!

I received five donations from anglers on today's trip sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, an 192 mile cycling event designed to raise money to fight cancer. Those wonderful individuals and their contributions included Vinnie Struble for $20.00, Kory Kaulfers for $20.00, Kevin LaMorticella for $20.00, Ken Kaulfers (PA) for $30.00 and Liam Kennedy for a generous $55.00. Thank you all so very much for your support and generosity. I enjoyed your trip very much today and certainly appreciate your kindness in the cancer fight.

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 51F, the sky was hazy clear, the wind was out of the northeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, the day had a mostly overcast sky with sun in the morning, overcast skies and sun with mostly clear skies after 5:00 PM. The wind blew out of the northeast up to fifteen or more knots in the morning, dropping to just about nothing by sunset. The highest air temperature that I saw was 55F with wind bringing the cool air off the water. The visibility was good in haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 62F with a low of 50F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 65F (with a low of 44F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 56F (with a low of 48F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at fifteen knots in the morning and dropping to five knots out of the east in the afternoon. The sky was mostly overcast but they did have some sun in the morning. The air temperature reached a high of 51F. The visibility ranged from five to ten miles in fog in the morning to fifteen and twenty miles later in the day. The tide (current) was strong. Seas were chops of two feet (dropping during the day) over swells of three to five feet. These "swells" were actually wind generated chops from a stronger wind offshore. These dropped to two to three feet in the afternoon along with a one foot local wind chop. The surface water temperature reached a high of 49F.

The fishing was good as the conditions just were not the best. The catching was excellent. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock. There was no problem getting what was needed. The haddock cull was about fifty percent good keeper sized fish. Legal landings also included three pollock. Released fish included one wolffish and thirty-five cod. They anchored and drift fished as the conditions dictated. All terminal tackle worked well but bait was best for the haddock.

There was, again, no way to tell who was high hook with the most legal fish. There was too much going on. Phil Brown (NY) and Jeff Gellatly (ME) tied for the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish at 8 pounds. Phil's was a pollock while Jeff's was a cod. The third largest fish was a 6 pound pollock caught by Jeff.

Other Angler Highlights: Nate Woodsum (NH) caught the largest haddock at 4.5 pounds. Hannah Brown (NY) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.

I spent most of the afternoon with NBC's Kerry Sanders shooting a piece about the lack of teenage workers/employees in local restaurants and businesses. He interviewed me on camera as well as my top manager, Matt Pedersen, who does all the hiring for Barnacle Billy's (original). Kerry worked at the Viking, a local restaurant up town, in 1974. So he had some local knowledge. The piece is going to air on May 27 at 6:00 to 7:00 PM. I received a generous $50.00 donation sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The donor was Vince DeBari (NJ), a long time angler and a long time contributor to the cancer cause. I only wish I were on the boat with him today. Vince caught a 26 pound halibut with me that was just an inch under the measure and had to go back. This happened a couple of years ago. Thanks very much, Vince. All the best. See you in October!

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 48F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

We had a clean clear shot out of the Cove, down the channel and out through the gate. We had good visibility, mild air temperatures, fairly calm seas and overcast skies all the way to the fishing grounds.

On the grounds, the wind was still light out of the south southwest. The ocean was fairly calm with only a light wind chop. Later in the morning, the wind died and the ocean went glassy. By 2:00 PM, the wind had hauled out of the southeast and then south. Half way home,.the southerly wind increased to about ten knots. And there it remained until landing in Perkins Cove. Half way through the morning, the fog rolled in. It as foggy for about three hours. When we didn't have fog, the visibility ranged from three miles in the morning to ten miles or more in the afternoon. The tide (current) was slightly stronger than moderate all day. The air temperature reached a high of 56F. The sky was overcast in the morning with some sun at times. There was more sun in the afternoon but it was still mostly cloudy. The surface water temperature reached a high of 48.5F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 48F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 47F).

The fishing was excellent. The catching was good in the morning and excellent in the afternoon. Landings were a little better than good overall, light in the morning and much better in the afternoon - thanks to running into a school of pollock at 1:00 PM. Most legal fish landed were haddock. The haddock cull was six to one; for every seven haddock caught, six were of legal size. And we caught many larger haddock than we have seen, mostly over 3.5 pounds. Legal pollock were right behind the haddock. We also caught nine cusk. Released fish included sixty-eight cod from 5 to 14 pounds (many of which, over 10 pounds, I did not weigh), four wolffish, very few cod smaller than 5 pounds, five sub-legal pollock and a dogfish. We drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. Everyone did equally well. To me, there were no stand outs. The largest fish of the trip should have been a halibut in the 30 to 50 pound range. Alec Adams (ME) was the angler. He brought the fish half way off bottom only to have it swim right back to bottom. He reeled the fish back almost to the half way point again only to lose it! I didn't abuse him about losing the halibut too much. Alec might have caught the most good sized haddock or, even, the most legal haddock. Some of his fish included cod to 10 pounds, a 5.5 pound haddock, the second largest haddock of the trip, two haddock of 5 pounds each and a 14 pound pollock, our second largest pollock of the fishing season so far. With the pollock he tied for the second largest fish of the trip and shared the boat pool with Philip Brown (NY) who caught a 14 pound cod. Some of Phil's good fish included an 11 pound pollock, a 10 pound pollock and a double keeper catch that included a 10 pound cod and a 12 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time.

Bruce Fortier (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16.25 pound pollock. This is the largest pollock that has been caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. I took a picture with Bruce holding his big pollock. This digital image appears on the right. Bruce caught the largest haddock of the day at 5.75 pounds. Some of his other good fish included a 12.75 pound cod, a 10 pound cod and a 13.25 pound cod. A porbeagle shark grabbed one of his haddock but never got hooked. And the haddock only showed a few teeth marks of the skin, not cutting into the fillet.

Other Angler Highlights: Paul Pearson (NH) caught a lot of cod in the 10 pound range. Two that I weighed were 11 pounds and 10.5 pounds. He brought a cod of about 13 pounds up to the boat but it was hooked so lightly I wasn't able to lift it out of the water before I lost it. It was not the pool fish but it was close! Hannah Brown (NY) might have caught the largest wolffish of the Bunny Clark season today. You can't legally keep wolffish so I couldn't gaff it. But I wouldn't have been able to anyway. The fish was just out of reach when it dropped off the hook. To me it looked about 14 to 16 pounds. Maybe bigger. Her first fish that I weighed was a 9.5 pound cod. But she went on to catch larger cod that I didn't weigh, a 10 pound pollock and a double that included an 11 pound cod and a 5 pound haddock. Larry Cross (NY) boated an 11.5 pound pollock. I believe he caught larger cod that I didn't weigh but weren't big enough to contend for the boat pools. Jon Tesnakis (NY) caught a 12.75 pound pollock, his largest fish. His largest haddock weighed 4.75 pounds. Some of Mark Thyng's (VT) largest fish included a 13 pound cod, an 11.25 pound cod and a 10.5 pound pollock. He lost two jigs today. One he lost on the bottom. The other he lost on a big fish of unknown species. Because of his loses, he landed the Bunny Clark's hard luck award t-shirt!

Friday, May 18, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo are running the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was mostly overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind continued at twenty knots out of the northeast until dawn where it piped up even a little more. Gusts on the anemometer showed peak wind volleys of twenty-six knots. This didn't last. By 10:00 AM, the wind had already backed off a skosch. By noon, wind gusts were about fifteen knots. The northeast wind was blowing ten knots by 1:00 PM. The wind was light out of the southeast by sunset. The sky was clear all day, the visibility was excellent and the highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 59F. The wind off the water made it very cool today except in sheltered sunny locations - like the west side of the deck at Barnacle Billy's in the early afternoon! In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 65F with a low of 47F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 40F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 61F (with a low of 43F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen to twenty knots. Seas were chops of three to five feet. After noon, the wind backed off to five and ten knots out of the northeast with two to three feet in chops. The air temperature reached a high of 54F on the fishing grounds. The sky was sunny in the morning and overcast in the afternoon. The visibility was thirty miles or better. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 50F.

The fishing was fair (seas). The catching was excellent. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The cull was two to one; for every three haddock caught, one was legal. Legal landings also included four pollock and a cusk. They had three or four porbeagle sharks around the boat. They broke off a halibut on it's first run to the bottom after getting it almost to the boat. Released fish included fourteen cod from 5 to 12 pounds and one wolffish. They anchored and drift fished. All terminal gear worked well but bait was best for the haddock.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. Mark Thyng (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound wolffish. This is the second largest wolffish of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. The second largest fish was a 12 pound cod caught by Lewis Hazelwood (MA). Steve Dickmann (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 9 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Yvon Duquette (ME) landed the largest haddock of the day at 5 pounds. Mario Dion (NH) landed the hard luck award by being involved in the most tangles.

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 36F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the sky was clear, or mostly so, all morning. The sky became overcast completely around 1:30 PM. By 2:15 PM, we were feeling light rain but not enough rain to get the roads well. By 4:00 PM, we had a steady light rain. It rained on into the night but never truly a hard rain. The wind blew out of the east all day. It never blew more than ten knots. The air temperature in Perkins Cove only reached a high of 56F. Mostly it was slightly colder than this. The visibility was very good before the rain, good to fair/good in precipitation. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 55F with a low of 46F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 35F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 37F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at five to ten knots. The high air temperature for the day was 56F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) ranged from moderate to strong. The seas were one foot chops or less over swells of two to three feet. The surface water temperature reached a high of 49F.

The fishing was nearly excellent. The catching was excellent. Landings were good today, a notch down from what it has been. However, the last spot was very good, so good that Ian left them biting. Most legal fish landed were haddock. They did not catch the haddock bag limit today, one of the only trips this season (including the last marathon trip) where this has been the case. There were, however, a lot of short haddock today, the cull being two to one, short haddock to keepers. Legal landings also included six pollock, one redfish and six cusk. Released fish included twelve cod from five to 10.25 pounds and two wolffish. They anchored for every stop. All terminal gear worked about the same.

John Casey (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish. In fact, he had to help Shawn Sullivan (NH) complete his haddock bag limit! That's the kind of friend that John is! Mike Rygiel, Jr. (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.25 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 9 pound cod caught by Bill Austin (NH). Mike Rygiel, Sr. (MA) landed the third biggest fish of the trip, a 7 pound cod. Mark Austin (NH) landed the hard luck award for allowing the ocean to have it's way with his equilibrium!

Sunday, May 20, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. The sky was mostly overcast all day with periodic light rain after noon. The rain was so light that it only made the roads wet once. After that, the rain seemed to dry out before it hit the ground. After 5:00 PM, the sun was out until sunset and the sky stayed clear on into the night. The wind started out southwest but turned west and then west northwest by noon. Wind speeds were fifteen knots or so around noon but dropped off during the afternoon. The wind blew lightly out of the northwest at sunset and beyond. The air temperature got up as high as 78F in Perkins Cove. It was also very humid. The visibility ranged from good to very good in haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 49F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 49F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to four feet. As the day progressed, the wind let go and the seas dropped. By the time they were ready to "head her to the barn", the wind was less than five knots and the seas were less than a foot chop over close period swells of two to four feet. The air temperature reached a high of 59F. The visibility ranged from an eighth of a mile in fog to ten miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was mostly overcast. The surface water temperature reached a high of 49F.

The fishing was good (surface water conditions), the catching was excellent and landings were very good. They ended up just shy of the bag limit for haddock only because there were so many smaller haddock caught in place of the haddock of better size and because four or five anglers didn't fish for fighting the dreaded mal de mer. Still the cull was two to one, subs to legal fish. Most legal fish landed were haddock, of course. Legal landings also included three pollock, six redfish, three cusk and a cunner. Released fish included forty-eight cod over 5 pounds, a few short pollock/cod and one wolffish. They drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well but bait worked best for haddock.

Art Kemler, Jr. (PA/ME) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.5 pound wolffish. Chris Deschambault (ME) caught the second largest fish, a 10 pound cod. The third largest fish was an 8.5 pound cod caught by Mark Weldon (NH). Melissa Holmwood (ME) landed the hard luck award for being the most sea sick. Ouch!

Jon Li (NJ) did me a "hard solid" by sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge, an 192 mile charity cycling event. Thank you so much, Jon. I appreciate the nod and the generous $50.00 contribution!

Monday, May 21, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 50F, the sky was clear, the wind was very light out of the west, the water was so calm along the shore that you could float a scallop shell upon it and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, it was a beautiful day. The wind was light in the morning, from the west. By noon, the wind had hauled out of the south. By 3:00 PM, it was blowing about ten knots. That's, pretty much, all we got for wind in Perkins Cove. The sky was cloudless all day. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature reached a high in Perkins Cove of 78F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 80F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 46F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 44F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at five knots in the morning. Seas were swells of two to three feet. After noon, the wind hauled out of the southwest and blew from ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of one to two feet over the same two to three foot swell. The air temperature reached a high of 63F, the highest air temperature we have seen this season so far. The visibility was thirty miles or more. The sky was clear and sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 54F, the highest we have seen it this year, to date.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. They had no problem reaching the bag limit. The cull flipped today with a 1.5 to 1 ratio, keepers to haddock less than eighteen inches fork length. Legal landings also included four pollock, four cusk and a cunner. Released fish included fifty-eight cod over 5 pounds, a few smaller cod and pollock and one wolffish. They drift fished all day. Almost everyone used bait today. But both (jigs, bait and cod flies) worked well.

There was no way that Ian could discern who was high hook with the most legal fish. Keith Weber (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9.5 pound pollock. Tamanee Meader (NH) and Tim Tobias (MI) tied for second place, both with cod of 9 pounds each. Steve Brown (ME) landed the hard luck award today for being the magnet for other lines ensnarled with his. I can't tell you any more about this. I wasn't there.

A good friend of mine's son died of brain cancer early this morning. I didn't find out about it until I got back from a late morning bike ride (training for the PMC). Needless to say it's been a pretty sad day for his family and ours. It had been over two years since the initial diagnosis. One, of course, thinks of your own son at this time. And after all I have done to help in the research, I would still find it difficult to know where to start if it were my son. And the whole thing brought me in close contact with my son this afternoon. A short conversation, a hug and truly being thankful that it isn't our turn - yet. Life is a very tenuous thing. Sometimes you just don't think close enough along those lines. It wasn't the best reminder for me today.

I received two donations supporting me in my cancer charity ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Both were $5.00. One was from Fran Leavitte (NH). The other was anonymous. Thank you both very much for freely giving when asked! I really do appreciate it very much!

Tim Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, the sky was clear, the wind was very light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean seemed excellent.

I had another clean shot out of Perkins Cove this morning. No fog to contend with, I still left the light on at the helm and used radar alone to steer down the channel, out to the outer cove and the dogleg, left, through the gate. This new Furuno color radar we put in this season is really unbelievably accurate in tight spaces. Remarkable, really. After leaving the gate, we had a little bit of a swell from the south that disappeared at the ten mile mark, leaving us with a calm surface and no swell. We had no wind, mild air temperatures, calm seas, very good visibility and mostly clear skies all the way to the fishing grounds.

On the grounds, there was no wind and the ocean was flat calm. These sea conditions remained for the whole fishing trip and for half the ride back home. The ocean's surface was glassy. The tide (current) was light for the first two or three hours of fishing, moderate after that. The visibility ranged to over fifteen miles. It was hard to tell because there was nothing on the surface big enough, at a distance, to tell. The air temperature reached a high of just 60F. The sky was mostly cloudy during the fishing with a various peeks at the sun from time to time. The sky was overcast by the time we were ready to head home. The surface water temperature reached a high of 47.8F. During the ride in we had periodic rain showers and variable winds up to five or six knots. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 67F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 69F (with a low of 46F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 62F (with a low of 50F).

The fishing, catching and landings were excellent today. It was very rare to drop to bottom and not immediately get a fish on the line. Of the fish we could keep, there were very that were sub-legal in size. We only had seven short haddock and a couple pollock that were two small. I only counted forty-five cod over 5 pounds that we had to released. And there were very few cod under 5 pounds (ten, maybe?). Most legal fish landed were haddock. We kept the keeper size to nineteen inches fork but even that didn't help us extend the bag limit past noon. Many of our haddock were 3 to 4 pounds. We had our best day of the season for pollock landings as well, way ahead of our second best trip. The pollock were of good size. But you could also tell that they were on the move as they were way up in the water column. [Thank God for good sounding machines!] Besides the larger cod, the other releases of note were two wolffish of decent size. We drift fished the entire trip. All terminal gear worked well.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. Everyone did extremely well. Ed Robichaud (FL/ME) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the largest fish of the trip, a 20.5 pound pollock. He didn't enter the boat pool for the largest fish. This is the largest pollock that the Bunny Clark has seen this season so far. I took a picture with Ed holding his prize. This digital image appears on the left. Ed also caught two pollock of 11 pounds each and another pollock that weighed 16 pounds, our third largest pollock of the season to date.

Kevin Viel (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 17.5 pound cod. This is the Bunny Clark's third largest cod of the fishing season to date. Some of the other fish that Kevin caught an I weighed included a 5 pound haddock, a 10 pound cod, a 13 pound cod and a 14 pound pollock. Mark Majewsky (MN) boated the third largest fish, a 17 pound cod. He also caught two cod of 12 pounds each and many haddock.

Other Angler Highlights: If you counted cod over 5 pounds, legal sized haddock, pollock and wolffish, Fred Kunz (NH) was probably high hook. He led both pools for all but the last hour and a half of the day. Some of his fish included a 9 pound wolffish, a 10.5 pound cod, a 15 pound cod, a 12 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. John Baker (ME) caught a fish or two a cast. I don't believe he brought his line to the surface once without a fish. No halibut today as he did last time out but he did catch some good sized haddock, pollock and cod. Some of his fish that I weighed included an 11 pound wolffish, a 10.5 pound pollock, a 5.25 pound haddock and an 11 pound cod. Fred Tardie (MA) caught three good cod that I weighed before releasing. These cod weighed 11.5 pounds, 13 pounds and 10 pounds. His largest pollock weighed 12 pounds. Jim Quinney (NH) caught the largest haddock of the trip at 6 pounds and also tied with six other anglers for the largest haddock of the Bunny Clark fishing season (so far) with this fish. One of his last haddock of the trip was a fish that had to be a trophy (7 pounds or greater). He tried swinging it over the rail only to have it fall off the hook in mid swing, bounce off the pulpit and into the water. That was the biggest haddock of the season, truly. Jim also landed the hard luck award for breaking the tip off his rod while swinging in an 11 pound pollock - five minutes before I called the day! Ouch!

Rory Casey (MA) caught the most good sized haddock of the trip. He fished with only a bare bait hook with no fly above the sinker. After the first hour of fishing he told Ian, who was at the cutting table, that; "I'm going to have to switch to a jig." Ian asked him why. "I'm catching too many fish!" Funny.

I was sponsored by several people today in my quest for a cancer free world with my involvement the Pan-Mass Challenge, a charity cycling event taking place the first Saturday of August. These people and their donations are as follows: Kevin Viel for a generous $70.00, Jason Ridolfi (NY) for a generous $50.00, an anonymous, very generous, donation of $100.00, Dan Bailey (NY) for $30.00 and John Baker for $25.00. Thank you all for your generosity and support. I very much appreciate it but not as much as the family's do who's representative's lives are on the line. All the best to you all!

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo with Captain Ally Fuehrer ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. Ashore, the sky stayed mostly overcast until about 10:00 AM, when the sky opened up to a cloudless day. The sky remained cloudless, or nearly so, until sunset. The air temperature was 60F by 8:15 AM. The high temperature reached a value of 78F in Perkins Cove. It felt warmer than that. It was still 73F at 6:00 PM. There was very little wind. What wind we did have was from the south. The visibility was very good to excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 53F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 53F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were one foot chops or less over a two foot long swell. The air temperature reached a high of 63F. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was sunny all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 54F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, as it has been. I feel like a broken record when I sit down to write this part of the update. There are a lot of haddock around. I don't know how long it's going to last. But, right now, the haddock fishing couldn't be much better. The cull today was 50/50 shorts to legal fish. Although legal fish today, on the Bunny, were eighteen inches fork length. They still caught the bag limit. Legal fish landed also included four pollock, one redfish, fifteen cusk and five mackerel. Released fish included forty-six cod over 5 pounds, a few small cod and pollock. Drifting was the boating method employed. All terminal gear worked well but bait worked best for haddock.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. Hank Small (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a wolffish of 11 pounds caught by Trish Compitella (NY). Dan Bailey (NY), today's cod king, caught the third largest fish, a 10 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Mike Gonzalez (MA) caught a 9.5 pound cod, the fourth largest fish of the trip. James Ferreira (OH) landed the hard luck award for getting into the most tangled lines.

I received two donations sponsoring my cancer ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge. One was a $5.00 "pink laces" donation from Bill & Ann (I'll print their last names later). The other was a $25.00 from Steve Guilmet (MA). Steve has contributed to my cause since I started "riding for cancer" in 2007. Thank you all so much for your help and support. It means a great deal to me.

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston, Captain Ally Fuehrer and I are running the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was clear with an (almost) half moon hanging over the eastern horizon, the wind was strong enough out of the northeast to hear the bell buoy in the bed room but weak enough that nary a leave russled and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. More later.

We have several openings for fishing trips in the near future. Those trips and vacancies are as follows: We have fourteen spots available on the Friday, May 5, extreme day trip, nineteen spots available on the Sunday, May 27, extreme day trip, ten spots available on the Monday, May 28, extreme day trip and all eighteen fishing spaces available on the Tim Tuesday, May 29, marathon trip. Haddock landings have been high this spring, pollock & porbeagles are starting to show up and the weather is certainly getting better. For reservations you can call 207-646-2214.









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