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Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

May 30, 2016, 5:30 AM EDT



The Bunny Clark's Second Largest Halibut

The digital image above was taken by Captain Jared Keniston during the Sunday, May 22, 2016 extreme day trip. The picture shows T. J. Jarvais (ME) holding up his first halibut. The fish weighed 66 pounds and is the second largest halibut that has ever been landed on the Bunny Clark. It was also TJ's first deep sea fishing trip! He caught it on one of our bait rigs with one of our jig sticks. The fish measured fifty-four inches overall. The things you miss when you aren't fishing on the Bunny Clark!




Tim Tuesday, Tres de Mayo, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 43F, the sky was overcast, the roads were dry, there was no mist in the air, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was good (ten miles), at least.

The flags were limp as we left Perkins Cove headed to the fishing grounds. About three miles out, the wind was light out of the northeast. The closer we got to our destination the more northerly the wind direction. On the grounds the wind was out of the north at six or eight knots, not really enough for a true white cap. Seas were about three feet in swells that diminished to about a foot or two by the end of the trip. The sky was overcast from the time we left Perkins Cove until we got home. It rained lightly for a time in the morning. We had no rain from 9:00 AM until it was time to go home. The air temperature ranged from 44F to 48F. The visibility was good in the morning but excellent after noon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 45F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 52F (with a low of 41F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 49F with a low of 45F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 55F (with a low of 41F).

Josh Lester (ME) was with us again auditioning for the swing deck hand's position. He spent some "less than quality" time at the Hotel Bunny Clark. At this time I'm not sure what this means.

The fishing/catching was excellent overall. Most legal fish landed were haddock followed by pollock. It was our best day for both, by far, this season. The cull worked out so that out of every four haddock only one was sub-legal. Most haddock were in the 2 to 3 pound range but we had a few from 4 to 6.75 pounds. The legal pollock were mostly in the 3 to 4 pound range but we had a significant number of pollock in the 7 to 12 pound range. Legal landings also included five redfish and two cusk. Noteable released fish included one porbeagle shark (it broke the line forty feet from the boat), a handful of larger cod (all released, of course) and one 8 pound wolffish. We drift fished and anchored, both had their time and place. All terminal gear worked well.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. Too many anglers were constantly catching fish on a regular basis. Randy Rivette (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.25 pound cod and he also won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, an 18 pound cod. Another fish of his that I weighed was an 11.5 pound cod. I took a quick picture of Randy's largest cod with my iPhone. This digital image appears on the left in this entry. These fish are the Bunny Clark's two largest fish of the 2016 fishing season so far. The third largest fish was a 13.5 pound cod caught by Buzz Leonard (ME). Buzz also caught a cod that weighed 9 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Adam Abel (CT) caught our first Maine state trophy cusk of the season today. It weighed 13 pounds, one of the earliest trophy cusk of the last few years on the Bunny. That was his biggest fish of the trip. It's also the largest cusk he has ever caught. Two of his other fish that I weighed included a 9 pound pollock and a 12 pound cod. Greg Fitzgerald (NY) caught a 9.5 pound cod, his largest fish. Matt Steves (NY) landed the three largest haddock of the day. His two largest weighed 6.75 pounds and 6 pounds. He also had one I didn't weigh that looked to be 5 pounds. Greg also had one that looked to be 5 pounds as well. Matt's two biggest fish were a 10 pound cod and a 10.5 pound cod. Pat Collins (NY) caught a 13 pound cod, a tie with Adam for the fourth largest fish of the trip. Two other cod of Pat's that I weighed were a 9 pounder and a 9.5 pounder. Rodger Aldridge (NY) caught an 11.5 pound cod and an 8.5 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. John Baker (ME) caught the largest pollock of the day at 12 pounds. He also caught a 10 pound cod and a 10.5 pound cod, a tie for the largest cod of his life. Bill Hunsicker (NY) caught a 10 pound cod, the biggest fish of his that we weighed. He almost got the largest fish of the day, a good sized porbeagle shark, to the boat. But it wasn't in the cards. As he was reeling this big shark to the boat the line broke at the fly loop. Wade Colby (ME) caught three nice cod. They weighed 10 pounds, 11.25 pounds and 9.75 pounds, all nice fish. He also landed the hard luck award getting sick. I don't believe it was sea sickness as he was totally recovered an hour after we started fishing. But it looked bad and he seemed to be the most qualified! I felt some compensation was needed.

I received two donations helping me raise money to fight cancer with good research through the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event starting on August 6, 2016. John Davis (NY) gave $10.00 while Ray Washburn (VT) donated a generous $100.00 to support me in the cause. Thank you both so very much for your contributions. I appreciate it very much!

Wednesday, Cuatro de Mayo, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 41F, the sky was overcast, the roads were dry, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was good, ten miles or better. At daylight, the wind started to blow from the east. Very light at first, by noon we had ten knots. At sunset, the easterly wind was blowing seventeen knots sustained. Seas looked from the shore to be two feet. But chops they were. The air temperature labored up to 50F, what I saw as the high temperature in Perkins Cove today. The sky was overcast with very occasional very light rain all day. The visibility was good or even better than that. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 50F (with a low of 40F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 50F with a low of 43F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 50F (with a low of 42F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east northeast at five to ten knots in the morning. After noon, the wind increased to fifteen knots sustained. Seas were chops of two feet over rolling sea swells of two to four feet. The sky was overcast all day without rain. The air temperature reached a high of 46F. It was raw with the easterly wind. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility was very good (over twenty miles). The surface water temperature reached a high of 43.8F.

The fishing was a bit different than what we saw off shore yesterday. They didn't see the pollock we saw. But where we saw resident cod, every one, Ian's crew saw quite a few new fish today. Haddock sizes were smaller. For every two haddock caught, one was sub-legal. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. It wasn't even close. Legal landings also included two small pollock, one redfish and three cusk. The fishing/catching was very good overall. They drift fished in the morning, anchored in the afternoon. All terminal gear worked well.

Jim Feeney (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish or with the most fish, period. His best fish was a 6 pound haddock but he caught quite a few cod as well. Ray Washburn (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound cod. This is the third largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date and our fourth largest fish of the our season as well. Ray caught his larger than normal cod as part of a double keeper (sized - we don't keep or kill cod) catch with another cod of 8.5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Captain Ian took a picture of Ray with his double. This digital image appears on the right. Ally Fuehrer (ME) caught the second largest fish, a 14 pound cod. This is the Bunny Clark's fourth largest cod and fifth largest fish of the season. She also caught another nice cod of 9.5 pounds. The third largest fish was a 13 pound cod caught by John Davis (NY). John also caught his fish as part of a double with another cod of 10.5 pounds. John's largest haddock weighed 6 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Matt Steves (NY) caught a 12.5 pound cod, his largest fish. Bill Hunsicker (NY) landed a 6.5 pound haddock, the Bunny Clark's second largest haddock of the fishing season to date. Bill also landed the hard luck award for losing a jig. Randy Rivette (NY) caught a 10.5 pound cod, his best fish of the trip today.

I received two more donations toward my involvement in the cancer fight with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a $25.00 donation from Katelyn Feeney (MA) the other was a nice $50.00 donation from one of our former best reservationists, Katherine "Katie" Graichen (LA). Thank you both so very much for your thoughtfulness and generosity. I appreciate it very much but so many others appreciate the benefits of your donation so much more.

Thursday, Cinco de Mayo, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and I were supposed to be running the marathon trip today. I made the decision at 3:00 AM to cancel the trip, figuring the wind would come on the tide. I believed I was wrong; the wind (at least along the shore here) died on the tide. I do so hate to screw up and jeopardize a day out on the ocean. I have so few of those opportunities anymore. But when I listened to the buoy reports at 7:00 AM, in the area we were going to be fishing, seas were eight feet every seven seconds. This renewed my faith in decision making - sort of! Anyway, nothing I can do about it now. And I'm not going to kick myself all day; maybe just this morning!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 43F, the sky was overcast, a very light rain was falling, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair in fog, mist, haze and precipitation. The mist, light rain and drizzle hung around until at least 10:00 AM. After that the rain stopped but resumed around sunset. The rain was very light, intermittent but continued into the evening. The sky remained overcast throughout. The wind blew out of the northeast. Wind speeds ashore were in the fifteen to twenty knot range. Off shore, the wind was quite a bit stronger. The wind hauled out of the north around sunset and blew up to twenty knots. This continued with the rain. The air temperature reached a high of 48F in Perkins Cove, located in the teeth of the on shore wind. The visibility was good after 10:00 AM and remained so even with the light rain at the end of the day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 48F (with a low of 43F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 47F with a low of 44F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 52F (with a low of 42F).

I spent the rest of the day in the restaurants (Barnacle Billy's & Barnacle Billy's, Etc.). I ended up leaving at 6:00 PM. I had been up since 1:30 AM and decided to work through. So when I got home I ate a wonderful dinner prepared by my wife, Deb, and went right to bed.

Mike Remkiewicz, a wonderful person, my sister, Meg's, number one and a local lobsterman out of the Perkins Cove, donated a blue lobster to the restaurant for a few days before he plans to release it back into the wild. Meg has been the lobsters Secret Service agent until that time. It's been fun to show people. I teased her after she left work at 4:00 PM today that someone had cooked it by mistake. But she didn't bite. A blue lobster turns red just like every other lobster when cooked. So she never would have known. But I wouldn't do that to her. It's appropriate that the lobster was caught during one of the coldest Aprils we have ever experienced. I've been blue since April started! And I don't think Mother's Day will get to 85F this year like it did last year! I took a picture of the blue lobster. This digital image appears below.



After the cancellation this morning, I was handed a $1,000.00 donation supporting me in my quest for a cancer free world with the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event with the Jimmy Fund. This donation was made by the "Pittsfield Gang" in loving memory of Chris Porter who passed away late last year of a heart attack during a hunting trip with his best friends. Chris was a very caring individual and also cared very much about making monetary contributions to the Jimmy Fund. He wrote me out quite a few $1,000.00 checks supporting my role but I'm sure he gave in other avenues as well. A very unselfish guy. And one of the nicest people you will ever meet. I was very sorry to hear about Chris. And my first thought when it happened was; "How do we deserve this?" And maybe that's selfish. But we lost a good man. Thanks very much, "Gang". Nothing is more meaningful to me right now.

Friday, May 6, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light out of the north and the visibility over the ocean was very good or better. The morning remained overcast without rain. The clouds thinned. By 10:30 AM, patches of blue sky were starting to show. By 11:00 AM we had full sun. The sky was mostly clear by noon. By daylight, the wind had hauled out of the northeast and had dropped. Winds were light out of the northeast until noon when the wind hauled out of the south. We had light southerly winds for the rest of the day. After sunset the sky became mostly cloudy. The air temperature got up to a high of 55F in Perkins Cove. Ten miles inland the air temperature got up to 65F. The visibility was very good at least. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 61F (with a low of 45F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 53F with a low of 46F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 46F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast to east at five to ten knots. Seas were one foot chops over rolling ground swells of three to six feet. The sky was sunny all day on the grounds after riding out under a canopy of clouds. The air temperature reached a high of 48F. The visibility was very good, over twenty miles. The tide, current, was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 44F.

The fishing was very good to excellent. It could have been excellent but there were a fair number of sub-legal fish that had to be returned. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included six pollock. That was it. They hooked a porbeagle shark that they almost brought to gaff. That fish was estimated at 80 to 100 pounds, probably barely legal. They caught a few cod but not nearly as many as we have been catching. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian did not tell me who was high hook. I didn't ask. I should have. But everyone did so well I don't think it really mattered. Paul Paradise (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15.5 pound cod. This is the Bunny Clark's third largest cod of the season. Paul also caught a 15 pound cod, the second largest fish of the trip and a tie for the fourth largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season. The third largest fish was a 12.5 pound cod caught by Paul Barnwell (PA).

Other Angler Highlights: Evelyn Barnwell (PA) caught the only other fish that was large enough to weigh, a 9 pound cod. Paul Seavey (NH) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer. He was also the one who lost the porbeagle. So he could just as well have landed the award for that loss.

I worked at Barnacle Billy's all day. Extraordinary patrons in the dinning room. This is the best part of my job there.

Saturday, May 7, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 48F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light from the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good. The morning was overcast with mist and drizzle along the coast. It never did rain. However, the mist was lighter in the morning than it was after noon. The visibility decreased as the day progressed. By late afternoon, the fog had moved in and the mist was heavy with the prevailing northeast wind. The northeast wind was never very strong. Most of the day it was about ten knots or a little more. But it never gave up. Even after sunset the northeast wind was just slightly under ten knots giving the fog a change to get a firm grip on the coast. By late afternoon, the visibility was fair to poor. The air temperature started to make a come back in the morning with a high over 50F but dropped into the mid 40s by mid afternoon. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 49F (with a low of 45F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 51F with a low of 46F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 54F (with a low of 46F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at ten to five knots. Seas were chops of a foot over a smaller groundswell (smaller than yesterday) of two to three feet. The sky was overcast for the trip. The air temperature was a steady 46F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to a half mile, at most, in fog. The surface water temperature reached a high of 44F.

The fishing was very good for catching, good for landings; most fish were sub-legal and had to be returned. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Out of every three haddock caught, two were sub-legal. Legal landings also included four cusk, one redfish, five pollock and one mackerel. Very few cod were caught that measured twenty-two inches or more. No porbeagle sharks were seen or felt on a line. Anchoring was the boating method today. All terminal gear worked well but bait was king for haddock.

Matt Bonsant (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish by two fish. Mike Miller (NH) was right behind him in second hook. Neither angler caught a fish near 10 pounds. Kathy Miller (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound cod. There was a tie for the second largest fish. Anthony Palumbo (MA) caught a 9 pound cod and Bruce Hart (CT) also caught a 9 pound cod. Ryan Allen (CT) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.

Bruce Hart donated $10.00 to help in my cancer fund raising with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Bruce always thinks of me in this regard every season. Thanks so much, Bruce. All the best!

Mother's Day, Sunday, May 8, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston hosted the Joe Serafina Mother's Day extreme day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky was overcast (or it seemed - the coastal fog), there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was fair to poor in fog. The wind increased out of the south as the morning progressed. The sky stayed overcast. By noon, it had started to rain. It rained for the next two hours and then remained overcast. Wind speeds had been about fifteen knots out of the south. At 2:30 PM or so, we had showers followed by strong west northwest winds - to thirty knots or more. This was followed by clearing skies. The wind kept up until about an hour after sunset and then backed off to ten knots or more. The visibility over the ocean had been poor all morning and some of the afternoon. The strong winds afterward improved the visibility to almost excellent. The air temperature got up to about 60F. I didn't actually see a thermometer. But it certainly felt like 60F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 56F (with a low of 41F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 63F with a low of 46F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 60F (with a low of 36F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest. Five knots at first, the wind increased to fifteen knots or more. Seas increased from one to two foot chops to three and four foot chops. It was foggy to start with a half mile visibility at most. As the wind increased so did the visibility. Three miles was the maximum visibility on the grounds. The air temperature rose to a high value of 47F. The current (tide) was moderate. The sky was sunny in the morning and overcast in the afternoon. It started to rain around noon. That lasted a couple of hours. The surface water temperature reached a high of 44.8F. They ran into strong westerly winds at the ten mile mark (from home). Rain at first with clearing followed.

The catching was very good to excellent today. It could have been our best day of the Bunny Clark season so far for landings (boatings) per hour. Most legal fish landed were haddock, far and away. The cull was one to one; one legal haddock for every two caught. Legal landings also included six pollock, four cusk and one mackerel. Very few cod were caught. They anchored for every stop. Bait ruled today.

Trevor Emmons (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. Dan Michaud (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 6.75 pound haddock, the largest haddock of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Those were the two largest fish. Ed Olson (ME) landed the hard luck award for the most tangled lines.

Todd Adams (ME) donated a generous $40.00 to help in my cancer fund raising drive with Pan-Mass Challenge today. He found me as I was working in the restaurant today. He said that he appreciated what I did and wanted to help. Thanks so much, Todd. I very much appreciate your support!

Monday, May 9, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Micah Tower ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 42F, the sky was partly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten or twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. It was a nice day ashore. The wind blew out of the west with gusts up to thirty knots at times. Sustained winds were in the twenty or more knot range. The air temperature got up to 58F, at least, in Ogunquit. The sky was blue but dotted with puffy white clouds with ragged edges. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 38F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 66F with a low of 46F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 38F).

The wind didn't reach off to the fishing grounds. Out there the wind was from the west northwest at five knots or more with seas in chops of a foot or more. It wasn't until they got within twelve miles of land on the ride home that they saw the wind and three foot plus chops. The sky was sunny with few clouds. The air temperature reached a high of 53F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was unlimited. The surface water temperature reached a high of 45.2F.

The fishing was very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far, again. The cull was a little bit better today; for every three haddock only one was sub-legal. Legal landings also included a pollock and a cusk. There were a few more cod caught over twenty-two inches but the number was not significant. Drifting was the method. Bait was best.

I didn't ask about high hook status today. It didn't matter. It was just a great day of catching. Sean Sheahan (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound cod. He also caught the third largest fish, a 5.25 pound haddock. The second largest fish was a 6 pound cod caught by Ken Lang (MA). Jim LeMay (ME) landed the hard luck award for losing a halibut after a short fight. The fish just spit the hook after taking his line all the way straight to bottom! Now that would have tasted good on the grill!

Tuesday, May 10, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and I hosted the "Tugboat" Fred Frabel (sans Fred) marathon trip charter today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 42F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing lightly out of the west and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

The wind was blowing out of the west at fifteen knots with seas in chops of two feet when we were five miles from the fishing grounds. The wind had been the same velocity for the whole ride but the seas got a bit larger the further out we went. On the grounds, the wind and sea state remained the same until later in the morning when the wind shifted out of the northwest with the same velocity and sea state. The wind died by noon. We were left with a fairly calm ocean. Later in the afternoon the wind hauled out of the southwest. We had fifteen knots of southwest wind with a one to two foot chop for most of the ride back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature ranged from 48F to 55F. [The high air temperature in Ogunquit today was 70F.] The visibility was excellent; thirty plus miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 45.5F. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was mostly clear from the time we headed out and an hour before we headed in. The sky was a mix of high clouds and sun on the ride in. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 35F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 47F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 73F (with a low of 32F).

The fishing/catching was very good overall. We worked on pollock in the early part of the morning, boated a porbeagle shark by mid morning and worked on haddock all afternoon. We caught fair sized cod wherever we went, the most good sized cod we have seen since the first day (all released, of course). Most legal fish landed were haddock. Legal landings also included quite a few pollock, a 233.75 pound mackerel (porbeagle) shark and three redfish. We released an 8 pound wolffish and cod up to 13.5 pounds. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well. Bait and cod flies caught the most haddock.

At 7:00 AM, twenty-three year old Andrew Claehsen (NJ) was reeling up a small fish from the bottom when, about half way up, a large fish tried taking the fish off the line and got hooked in the process. He was using one of our Surfland made jig sticks. It didn't take long to realize what it was. It never took a run to bottom. Instead, it took an oblique angle down and then headed out, parallel to the surface. I got everyone to reel in. By the time the lines were reeled in and the rods stowed (somewhat), the fish had taken quite a bit of line off the reel. So I chased after it with the boat as Andrew started to retrieve line. For the last forty minutes, I put the boat into a drift as Andrew fought the fish around the area of the stern. The shark made big circles around. The longer Andrew fought it, the smaller the circles became. At the forty minute mark we got it close enough to see that it was a good sized porbeagle shark. But it was another twenty minutes before Andrew brought the shark to gaff. The whole process took an hour. In that time we had covered two miles. He had hooked the shark with the treble hook of his jig right in the corner of it's mouth. Unlike most porbeagles, it did not roll. So there was no chaffing of the line during the fight. Otherwise, Andrew might have broken the fish off. And I must say, Andrew did a masterful job of fighting that fish, avoiding catching the line on the side of the boat (or the wheel), putting just enough pressure on the fish to win the fight and never gave up. It was great fun and very exciting.

We had to weigh the shark in pieces as my scale only goes to 100 pounds. It probably would have weighed more had we weighed it whole. But the weight is comparable to every other fish of size we have ever boated on the Bunny Clark. They are a very good eating fish, like a more tender swordfish - depending on the cut. And since Jared was butchering it anyway, it was easy enough to weigh. With this 233.75 pound shark, Andrew won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish of the trip, a Maine state trophy mackerel shark. [Only game sharks are considered for the boat pool along with some skates/rays and most groundfish.] This is the second largest porbeagle shark that has ever been landed on the Bunny Clark. Andrew caught a lot of fish today. Another fish of note was a 5 pound haddock, a tie for the largest haddock of the trip.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. Everyone was pooling their fish. Howard Kaulfers (PA) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 15.25 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's largest pollock of the fishing season so far. I took a picture of Howard with his pollock. This digital image appears on the left in this entry. The third largest fish was a 13.5 pound cod caught by Charlie Henkel (NJ). Charlie also caught (and released) two cod of 10 pounds each, a 12 pound cod and a cod of 9.75 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Liam Kennedy (NJ) was one of three anglers to tie for the largest haddock of the trip with a 5 pounder at the end of the day. His two biggest fish were both cod, one weighing 10 pounds and another weighing 11 pounds. Mike Bishop (NY) released a 10 pound cod, his largest fish. Patrick Fama (NY) released the most sub-legal haddock of the trip. His largest fish was a cod that weighed 8.25 pounds. Jack Curtiss (NY) caught the second largest pollock of the day with an 11 pounder. His largest cod weighed 9.5 pounds. Pete Zawisha (NJ) may have caught the most legal haddock. He did catch the only wolffish. It weighed about 8 pounds. That's an estimate as we tossed it right back. Gene Luke (NJ) was the other angler in a three way tie for the largest haddock at 5 pounds. Gene's largest fish was a 10.25 pound cod. Roy Tutunjian (NJ) released a 10.5 pound cod, his biggest fish of the trip. Chris Curtiss (NJ) caught a 10 pound cod, his largest fish. Joe Sullivan (NJ) caught the third largest pollock at 9 pounds. And he caught the most legal pollock of the trip. He also landed the hard luck award for the most tangled lines. I had to give the shirt to someone! Even if he really didn't deserve it!

Mike Bishop helped my fund raising efforts by donating $25.00 to the Pan-Mass Challenge cause. This one cycling event typically raises over $40 million each year to fight cancer with one of the top three research facilities in the country. I so appreciate the support of Mike and everyone else who contributes. Thank you so very much!

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Micah Tower ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky was clear, there was zero wind, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility over it was excellent. By 11:00 AM the air temperature was 66F and there wasn't a breath of wind on a very sunny day. The ocean stayed calm all morning and into the afternoon. Right around 3:00 PM, we started feeling a southerly wind along the shore. But this wind hardly lifted a flag. The air temperature rose to a value over 70F in Ogunquit. I never did get the final figure for the day. It was sunny throughout, the visibility was excellent and it felt like early summer. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 40F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 68F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 35F).

On the fishing grounds, the ocean was calm to start with hardly a breath of wind. As the day progressed the wind direction was established out of the south southwest. But it never blew over eight knots, leaving the ocean calm for the trip. It was sunny and nearly cloudless all day. The visibility was very good (over 15 miles). The air temperature reached a high of 60F in the shade. There was no tide (current) today. The surface water temperature reached a high of 46.2F.

The fishing/catching was very good overall. It could have been excellent if there were a few bigger fish. Most legal fish landed were haddock, probably the most we have seen this season on a trip so far. The cull was two legal haddock for every three haddock caught. Legal landings also included three pollock and eight cusk. There were only nineteen cod that were twenty-two inches or better and no big ones at all. Drifting was the method. Bait caught the most fish, by far.

Wobby Barnes (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was below 6 pounds. Ken Carter (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound cod. He also caught the largest haddock of the day at 5 pounds. The second largest fish of the trip was a 6.5 pound cod caught by Chris Silver (NH). Bill Murphy (NH) caught the third largest fish, a 6 pound cod. Isaac Hutchinson (ME) landed the hard luck award for the most tangled lines.

Thursday, May 12, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. It was flat calm with zero wind on the ride to the fishing grounds. The visibility was excellent. On the grounds, it was flat calm at first. After half an hour the wind came up out of the north. There was just enough wind to call a direction, only. This wind was gone by mid morning. The ocean remained calm until about 1:30 PM, when the wind hauled out of the south and then southwest. The most southerly wind we saw on the grounds was about five knots. The southwest wind increased to about ten knots for the ride home. Seas were chops of no more than a foot. The air temperature was about 48F in the morning but rose to 69F for the high temperature of the day after noon. The visibility was excellent to begin but dropped to very good in some haze by the end of the trip. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 49.5F. The sky was mostly clear from the time we headed out and an hour before we headed in. The sky attained a milky hue on the ride in. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 41F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 66F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 38F).

The fishing/catching was very good overall, very similar to yesterday's trip. There were no big fish. But we saw the most haddock we have seen on a trip this season so far. The cull worked out to be one legal haddock for every three and a half haddock caught. There were most sub-legal haddock released than I have seen for a while. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included six pollock, eleven redfish and three cusk. Released fish included five cod between 6 and 9 pounds, three wolffish, one dogfish, one eel pout and a few sculpins. We drift fished and anchored. Most fish were caught on bait today.

Cole Melendy (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish and the most haddock overall. Tom Murphy (VT) was in there somewhere as was Steve Linn (PA). Dustin Moore (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound wolffish. This is the largest wolffish (and the only wolffish) that Dustin has ever caught. Jon "Griff" Griffin (MA) caught the second largest fish, a cod of around 10 pounds. But Griff released the fish at the same time that I was handling Dustin's fish! So I never got to weigh it. [Griff was concerned about the mortality of the fish.] It was the biggest cod of the day. However, of the fish that I did weigh, Griff had the second largest fish of the trip, an 8.5 pound wolffish. So he ended up winning the boat pool for the second largest fish with what I considered to be the third largest fish of the trip! Griff also caught the largest haddock of the trip. His haddock weighed 4.25 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Fred Kunz (NH) lost the largest pollock of the trip right on the surface. It looked to be about 8 pounds but Fred thought it was larger. It might have been. I could have gaffed it in the side but I was waiting for a head shot when it dropped off the line, floated for a bit and then came to life and swam to bottom. At the time I never dreamed that I would be concerned about missing an 8 pound fish and, thus, compromising the pool! Fred's largest weighed fish was a cod of 7.75 pounds. He caught more haddock than any other angler using a jig. And he used a jig all day. Bob Greenly (PA) caught the fourth or fifth largest fish, an 8.25 pound cod. Mark Thyng (VT) released a cod of 6.25 pounds. C. C. Cedano (MA) released the only other wolffish. It weighed 6 or 7 pounds. He also landed the hard luck award for being in the most tangles. There were two other anglers who were almost as tangled. It was a tough choice for me deciding on who was going to get the award!

I received several donations sponsoring me in my role as a cancer research (and care) fund raiser with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The list of donors and their contributions are as follows: Bob Greenly for $20.00, Dennis Kelly (NY) for $20.00, Tom Murphy for $40.00 and Mark & Gail Randis (PA) for $100.00. Thank you all so very much for the tremendous support and for the support you continue to give me every year on this project. I appreciate it!

Friday, May 13, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Micah Tower ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was hazy clear, the wind was light from the south, there was a light ruffle on the oceans surface away from the calm coves along the shore and the visibility over the ocean was very good but with some haze. The sky became overcast at sunrise. The rest of the day gave us overcast skies. Around 2:00 PM, the fog rolled into Perkins Cove. It was foggy for the rest of the day and into the night. A little later, it rained, stopped, rained, etc. This went on until sunset leaving us with a continuous light rain on into the night. The wind was light all day, mostly from the south to begin and then southeast (the reason for the fog) from late morning onward. The air temperature crested at 60F. At least that was the highest air temperature I saw. With the fog and the light on shore wind I can't believe it got any higher in Perkins Cove. The visibility was as you would expect with fog. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 62F (with a low of 46F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 74F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 44F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at about ten knots, more or less, all day. Seas were chops of one to two feet at the most. They got into the fog as soon as they got there and stayed in the fog until they got half way home. At the half way mark, the fog lifted to give them five miles and a look at the sun briefly before getting back into the fog and overcast skies about five miles from home. The visibility on the fishing grounds was about an eighth of a mile at most. The air temperature reached a high of 54F. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 47F.

The fishing was very good overall with an average size haddock larger than what we saw yesterday. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was two legal haddock for every three haddock caught. Legal landings also included three pollock, eight cusk and two mackerel. Released fish included a few more bigger cod than we had yesterday, eight dogfish and a redfish. Both drifting and anchoring were employed. Bait caught the most fish.

Rob Kishbaugh (PA) was high hook with the most legal fish. Steve Linn (PA) was a fish away from getting the ace today (the three largest fish). Steve won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.5 pound cod. His second largest fish was a 10 pound cod, the second largest fish of the trip. Steve also caught a 7 pound cod, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Jerry Garvey (MA) caught the third largest fish, an 8.5 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Mark Randis (PA) landed a 6 pound haddock, a tie for the largest haddock of the last two trips. The other angler to catch a 6 pound haddock was Kurt Luther (NY). Manny Santiago (CT) landed the hard luck award for the most tangled lines.

Saturday, May 14, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Micah Tower are running the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was mostly cloudy, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was surprisingly good (very good) after last night's fog. The day warmed right up quickly. By 7:00 AM it was already 63F. There was very little wind in the morning. It was light west for a while and then out of the south going into noon. We had a southerly sea breeze in the afternoon. This cooled things down around 5:00 PM. But it was still nice. The sky was clear all day. The air temperature got up to 73F, at least. The visibility was very good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 77F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 49F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light out of the southwest all day. The ocean was fairly calm with, a most, a one foot chop. It was really too calm. The sky was sunny and clear. The air temperature got up to 57F in the shade but was t-shirt weather, and a bit too warm in the sun, at the fillet table. Micah wore wool socks underestimating the air temperature and ended up with more water in his boots than if they had holes in them! The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 50F. The visibility was good, about fifteen miles.

The fishing was good to very good. The fish were small today or I would have called it very good. It was very good for numbers of small keepers. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The cull was almost two short haddock for every three caught. Legal landings also included five cusk and three pollock. Nineteen cod from twenty-two to twenty-five inches were released. They also released one wolffish and one dogfish. Drift fishing was the method. All terminal gear worked well today - even jigs.

Jared didn't tell me who was high hook. I didn't ask. I would assume it was Norm Herrick (MA/ME) but one mustn't assume. Norm did get the largest fish of the trip. Or, at least, he brought the largest fish to the surface. It was a pollock. The fish got off the hook and swam to bottom before Jared could get there with a gaff. The fish was between 7 and 8 pounds. Jack Judge (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6 pound pollock. The second largest fish (plural) were both cod of 5.5 pounds each. One was caught by Tim Hopsicker (NY). The other was caught by "Haddock Jack" Brouse (NH). Haddock Jack also caught a 5 pound cusk, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Stanley Bekalb (VT) landed the hard luck award. He was high hurler and was sick from the start. Not a good day for Stanley.

Sunday, May 15, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Micah Tower ran the Lighthouse Fishing Club marathon trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F (It was 59F at 2:00 AM), the sky was mostly cloudy, the wind was light out of the south and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. By 10:00 AM, the air temperature had dropped to 51F and the wind had started to gust to twenty-five and thirty knots out of the west along the shore. It stayed windy all through the late morning, into the afternoon, a lull for an hour or so, and then strong into the night. The sky cleared at sunrise but then became mostly cloudy with the occasional spit of rain. There was not enough rain to coat the roads but just enough to see it on the wind shield and not have to use the wipers. The rain was very infrequent. The air temperature rose to 54F in the early afternoon. But that was the highest I saw the air temperature (except in the early morning). The visibility was close to excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 58F (with a low of 43F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 61F with a low of 45F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 58F (with a low of 48F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at about twenty to twenty-five knots with seas in chops of four to five feet. It was choppy. The air temperature got up as high as 50F. The sky was mostly sunny with a few clouds, some dark, containing rain. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility was very good (over the chops). The water temperature reached a high of 47.5F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was very good overall. It was only the size of the fish that didn't push the fishing into the category of excellent. It was a fish a cast all day. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included nine pollock and six cusk. They had quite a few market cod that were all released alive. Two dogfish were also returned. Anchoring and drift fishing were both employed. Bait caught the most fish, by far.

I never asked who was high hook. I should have. This group usually keeps track of all that. Bill Lewis (MA) won the Club pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11.5 pound cod. Al Hanson (MA) won the Club pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, an 11.25 pound cod. George Sweet (MA) won the Club pool for the third largest fish, an 11 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Dick Carpenter (MA) caught the largest pollock of the trip at 9.5 pounds. Ben Barzousky (MA) caught a 10 pound cod, his largest fish. Gloria Gennari (MA) released a 9 pound cod, her best. Gerry Garner (MA) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler!

I received two donations helping me with my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a generous $50.00 donation from Gloria Gennari (MA). The other was a $25.00 donation from Jason Ridolfi (NY). Thank you both so very much for the support. I certainly appreciate it!

Monday, May 16, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Micah Tower were supposed to be running the extreme day trip today. But with the lower temperatures predicted for today, the gale warning for strong westerly winds and close isobars on the weather charts, I canceled the trip yesterday. It seemed like one of those "break your leg while fishing on the Bunny Clark" kind of days. I just didn't want to take that chance. Yesterday was rough enough. More than that was too much, in my opinion.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 39F, the sky was partly clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The westerly wind increased rapidly. By 6:00 AM it was blowing about seventeen knots. By 9:00 AM, the westerly wind was a sustained twenty-three knots with gusts to twenty-seven knots. From then on the wind blew out of the west from twenty-five to thirty knots. Around 2:00 PM, the wind hauled out of the northwest and blew a little harder. This continued into the night. The air temperature rose slowly. By noon, the air temperature was 53F. I never saw it go any higher. Although, I admit, it wasn't often that I looked at the air temperature today. It was cool all day. The ocean's surface was feather white with small chops. The visibility was excellent. The sky was mostly clear and sunny. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 52F (with a low of 40F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 59F with a low of 42F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 56F (with a low of 35F).

I worked at Barnacle Billy's restaurant all day. Except for four hours of Bunny Clark stuff, that's all I did. Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Micah Tower had the day off. Captain Ian Keniston has had some issues he has had to deal with. He is expected to be back next Tuesday for the marathon trip. I dumped the bike on a training ride with a fast group out of Portsmouth, New Hampshire on Saturday, cracked a couple of ribs, had quite a bit of road rash, ripped up my club kit a bit and had eight stitches in my forearm. That set me back for a day or two. And except for a bit of pain when I sneeze, cough or laugh, I'm okay. So I am grateful that my son, Micah, has been able to help me out. I'm also grateful that Jared could change his schedule to meet Captain Ian's change of plans. And I'm grateful that I didn't do more damage to myself than I already did. I am very much looking forward to tomorrow's trip!

Tim Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 45F, the sky was crystal clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was showing Boon Island closer than it really was.

We had our strongest winds on the ride to the fishing grounds; about eight knots, maybe, with seas about a foot in chops. On the grounds, the wind, at first, blew out of the west southwest. The wind kept working its way counterclockwise until it was out of the south. But there wasn't much southerly wind. In fact, we might have had southerly winds of two knots with a very calm ocean on the ride back to Perkins Cover. The air temperature started at 48F in the morning and got as high as 56F after noon. The visibility was excellent all day or about thirty miles plus. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 47.5F. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 40F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 59F with a low of 50F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 33F).

The fishing/catching was excellent in the morning, good in the middle of the trip and excellent in the end, very good overall. Other than a few larger pollock and cod in the morning, the fish were mostly just legal or sub-legal. Most legal fish landed were pollock, a first for 2016. We were within twenty fish of the pollock count with legal haddock, the second most prevalent fish caught. The haddock cull was one legal haddock for one and a half sub-legal haddock caught. Legal landings also included two cusk and one dogfish, the only dogfish seen today. We released twenty-two cod of market size or larger. I mixed up the boating method all day; one spot I might drift while the other I might anchor. I anchored three times in a row. I'm not sure that it made any difference. Although I'm glad I anchored on the first spot. Bait and cod flies showed us the most success.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. If I were to guess I would say it was either Jason Ridolfi (NY) or Steven Karber (MI). Both were very successful today, a fish a cast from start to finish. Jason won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound cod (released alive - like all the cod caught today). Other fish of Jason's that I weighed included a 4 pound haddock, an 8 pound cod and an 8 pound pollock. Steven won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 10.25 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 9.75 pound pollock caught by Grayson Karber (MI). He also caught the fourth largest fish today, a 9.25 pound pollock and the fifth largest fish, a 9 pound pollock. Lastly, he won the hard luck award for being the least productive after noon! I had to give the shirt to someone! And I knew he would be most appreciative of the shirt!

Other Angler Highlights: Marty Cardamone (NY) caught the largest haddock of the trip. It weighed 5 pounds. Mike Cardamone (NY) landed an 8.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. His largest haddock weighed 4 pounds. Mark Cardamone (FL) released an 8 pound cod, his biggest fish. Michael Cardamone (NY) caught an 8.5 pound cod, released, as his biggest fish. Sam Cardamone (NY) caught seven legal haddock in a row on the last stop. I thought that was worth noting.

I was anticipating a harder time on the boat today with the two cracked ribs I sustained in the cycling accident on Saturday. But it was okay. Gaffing pollock was only mildly annoying and hauling the anchor was fine once I figured out a system where my left arm was doing most of the work. And weighing fish wasn't a problem - today. So I was pleased with my physical condition out here. I would have rather not have dumped the bike that day. But it could have been so much worse.

Dan Bailey (NY) donated $30.00 to help me generate research money for a cancer cure with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. I have been doing this cycling event for almost ten years now and I'm getting very close to a total of a quarter of a million dollars in donation money over those years. Thanks, Dan, for getting me a little closer! I appreciate it very much!

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Micah Tower ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 49F, the sky was clear, the wind was light from the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. We had light winds along the shore all day. The wind direction was northeast but we never got up to the ten knot mark. The sun was bright in a nearly cloudless sky. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature was up into the lower 60s, no higher. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 62F (with a low of 45F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 59F with a low of 49F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 42F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at five knots or less in the morning, followed by calm conditions and then light winds out of the southwest. They had eight knots on the ride home; just enough to make up a one foot chop. The sky was sunny all day with few clouds. The visibility was unlimited (40 miles or more). The air temperature reached a high of 51F. The tide (current) was moderate. The water temperature reached a high of 47F.

The fishing was very good overall. But this time it was mostly sub-legal fish of all species. The market size cod catch was up (as compared to yesterday) but the haddock take was down. For keepers, it was a good day at best. Landings included thirty legal haddock, one pollock, three whiting and eight cusk for five anglers. There were three sub-legal haddock for every four haddock caught. The legal haddock were small. They also released a dogfish and a couple of redfish. Drifting and anchoring were the boating methods employed. All terminal gear worked about the same.

I never did find out who was high hook. Gary Karber (MI) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound cod. The second and third largest fish were both caught by John Russell (ME). The second largest was a 7 pound cod and the third largest was a 6 pound cod. Tom Parker (ME) landed the hard luck award for the most lost (good sized) fish.

Thursday, May 19, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and I hosted the Bill Cody, Jr. (NY) & George Roberts, II (NY) marathon trip charter today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 48F, the sky was a mix of clouds & stars, the wind was light from the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least.

The ocean was flat calm from the moment we left Perkins Cove until we arrived on the fishing grounds, fished for the day and landed back at Perkins Cove, just a wonderful weather day. We had some wind but it was so light as to only leave ripples on the surface. The wind didn't start until we were almost on the grounds. On the grounds, the wind direction was southerly to southeast at first. By noon, we were seeing south southwest wind. On the ride home we had light southwest wind. The air temperature ranged from 48F to 50F on the grounds. The sky was mostly filled with slow moving clouds. There was blue sky most of the day but there never seemed to be much blue sky in the same location where the sun could have shone through. The visibility was very good or better than that. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 48.5F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 66F (with a low of 44F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 60F with a low of 50F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 72F (with a low of 45F).

The fishing/catching was excellent all day, our best day, for landings, of the season so far. We have had better days where we caught more fish. But on those trips the fish were mostly sub-legal. Today they were mostly legal. Most legal fish landed were haddock followed by pollock. The haddock cull was four legal for every five haddock caught, our best cull of the year. This, of course, meant the average size was up. This too was the best ratio of the year. We caught the most legal pollock we have caught this year as well. The average size was 6 or 7 pounds. But there were quite a few 8 and 9 pounders and about the same amount smaller than 6 pounds. Legal landings also included seven cusk. We released a significant number of cod over twenty-four inches but under 10 pounds. This trip got no where near the number of good sized cod we found on our first day. But I learned my lesson on that day and I don't intend to repeat it. We also released three dogfish, one porbeagle shark and one chicken halibut. Drifting was the method of choice today. We tried anchoring once with limited success. All terminal gear worked well. I would like to say bait worked better on the haddock but jigs and cod flies worked just as well.

George Roberts, II was high hook today with the most legal fish. He caught the third largest fish of the trip, a 13.5 pound pollock. George also caught three 5 pound haddock and another haddock I weighed that came in at 4.5 pounds. He caught other big haddock I didn't weigh but were not over 5 pounds. George hooked into a porbeagle shark that he lost after a two minute fight. The line parted off at the jig. Looking at the leader afterward, I suspect that the jig was in the shark's mouth all the way past the swivel. Mason LaPoint (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. This is the largest pollock we have seen on the Bunny Clark this season to date. And there wasn't another pollock today close in size. I took a picture with Mason (shown right) with his friend, George Roberts, III (NY), holding this pollock. The digital image appears on the right. Some of Mason's other good fish included a 9 pound cod, an 11.75 pound pollock and a 4.5 pound haddock. Joe Fox (NY) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 15 pound halibut. It was not even close to legal size (I didn't waste time measuring it) so I weighed it quickly, took one picture with Joe holding it and released it alive. The digital image appears on the upper left of this entry. This is the our first halibut of the 2016 Bunny Clark fishing season. A couple other fish of Joe's that I weighed included a 9.75 pound pollock and a 5.5 pound haddock.

Other Angler Highlights: Bill Cody, Sr. (NY) caught an 8 pound cod and a 9 pound cod. His best fish was a 10 pound pollock that he caught as a double keeper catch with another pollock of 5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Adam Peterson (NY) caught three haddock of 5 pounds each. He too may have had more that I didn't weigh. Adam's son, Braydon Peterson (NY), caught a lot of good sized haddock as well. He might have caught one of 5 pounds. But the largest haddock I weighed of his was a haddock that weighed 4.5 pounds. Both Adam and Braydon caught quite a few pollock and haddock. Glenn Jackson (GA) boated a 9.5 pound cod, his largest fish. The cod was released, of course.

Barbara Caswell (NY) caught the best double of the day. Her double included a 10 pound pollock with another pollock that weighed 7.25 pounds. I lost one of her bigger pollock when I tried to pull it over the side with the line. It looked to be in the 10 pound range. That fish was caught as a double along with a 4 pound haddock! George Roberts, III landed an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. His largest haddock weighed 5 pounds. Greg Caswell (NY) caught the largest haddock of the trip at 6 pounds. He caught a 4.5 pound haddock that I weighed a couple hours before the big one. Matt Cohn (NY) landed the hard luck award for the most tangled lines. This wasn't really his fault; he was fishing with a line and weight much different than anyone else. I suspect he wouldn't have been safe anywhere on the Bunny Clark today. He did, however, catch quite a few fish despite his time away from fishing!

I received several donations from anglers helping me with my cancer fund raising bike ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those anglers and their donations included: Dennis Kinnicutt (NY) for $25.00, Mike Cody (NY) for $60.00 and Greg & Barbara Caswell for $20.00. Thank you all so very much for your support and kindness. I truly appreciate it!

Friday, May 20, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Micah Tower ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 48F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. It was another wonderful day of weather. The sky was clear all day, the air temperature climbed over 70F and the wind was light all day. The wind started blowing lightly out of the northwest, died altogether and then hauled out of the south. We never had any wind over eight knots. The ocean along the shore was calm with wind ripples on the surface. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 46F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 44F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west southwest at five knots or less. At 3:00 PM, when it was time to leave the fishing grounds, the wind hauled out of the southwest, again, five knots or less. The ocean was flat calm all day. The sky was clear and sunny. The air temperature rose to 58F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was unlimited. The surface water temperature rose to a value of 49F, the highest water temperature seen today.

The fishing was very good but the fish were mostly sub-legal and small. So the action was there, a fish a cast for some, but most fish were returned. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The cull, however, was four sub-legal haddock for every five caught. Legal landings also included thirty cusk. Released fish included eighteen dogfish (the most dogfish seen this season on a trip so far), fourteen cod of twenty-two to twenty-three inches overall (the largest cod of the day was only 5.5 pounds) and a few sculpins. Drifting was the method. Bait worked best.

I wasn't there to meet the boat today. I was down at Eastman's Docks in Seabrook, New Hampshire buying bait clams! So I never found out who was high hook. Mark Girard (CA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6 pound cusk. There was a tie for the second largest fish. Shane Jackson (MA) caught a 5.5 pound cod and Jim Boehm (NY) also caught a 5.5 pound cod. Jim also caught the largest haddock of the day at 4 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Mike Chickering (ME) landed a 4 pound cusk, one of the bigger fish of the day at the time he caught the fish. Emily Boehm (NY) landed the best double keeper catch of the trip. Her double included a 5 pound cusk and a 4 pound cusk, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! Jamie Capen (MA) landed the hard luck award for having the most tangled lines and losing a good sized cod (that might have been a pool contender) on the surface.

I received several donations, again (like yesterday), supporting my efforts to help cancer research with the Pan-Mass Challenge. The donors and their donations are as follows: Mark Girard (CA) for $50.00, John Lambert, Jr. (NY) for $50.00 and Vince Debari (NJ) for $50.00. All three anglers have supported me for years in this cancer drive. Thank you all again and again for your help. I appreciate it so much!

Saturday, May 21, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Micah Tower ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. At sunrise, the sky was clear and blue. But it didn't take long before the high cirrus clouds starting moving in giving the sky a milky texture by 9:00 AM. We could see the sun all day but it became harder and harder to see as the day went on. The air temperature rose up past the 70F mark. The wind started blowing out of the south during the late morning. I guess it was blowing out of the south earlier but it was so light as to not be blowing at all. The visibility was very good at least. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 49F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 76F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 42F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots during the morning; the ocean was calm. During the late morning/afternoon, the southwest wind increased to ten knots or better. Seas were chops of a foot over a two to three foot rolling sea swell from the southeast. The sky was sunny all day. The air temperature hovered around 56F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to over fifteen miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 51F.

The fishing was excellent; the day weather was perfect and it was a fish a cast for most. However, most of the fish were sub-legal. For legal landings the fishing fell into the "good" category. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull two to one, sub-legal haddock to keeper haddock. Legal landings also included three pollock. They released five dogfish, one small halibut and a few cod over twenty-two inches. Drift fishing was the only boating method employed. Bait worked best.

I did not find out who was high hook. Sefik Kosut (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound cod. There was a tie for second place at 6.5 pounds each. Jim Semones (ME) released a 6.5 pound cod and Ernie Searles (NH) also released a 6.5 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Shane Parrish (NH) released a 5 pound halibut. The fish took a jig full on, was hoisted out of the water by holding the jig, was weighed and then released. Dan Benthal (ME) caught the largest haddock at 4.5 pounds. Bunny landed the hard luck award for attaining high hurler status.

Sunday, May 22, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Micah Tower ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was mostly clouds, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in some haze. The morning sky remained mostly cloudy with many clouds that looked like they carried rain. No rain fell. In fact, by early afternoon, the clouds cleared and the sky became sunny! The air temperature warmed to 67F after getting up over 60F during the late morning. The wind was light and variable all day. The ocean was calm. The visibility was good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 62F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 54F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at eight to ten knots or less. Seas were chops of a foot or so with a moderate ground swell. The sky was sunny all day, unlike it was ashore. The visibility ranged to twelve miles in haze. The air temperature reached a high of 52F. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 50F.

The fishing/catching was excellent overall. Legal landings were good to very good. Most fish caught were haddock followed by cod. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The cull was one legal haddock for every four caught. So there were many haddock that had to be returned. There were also quite a few cod that had to be returned. Legal landings also included three pollock, six mackerel, a halibut and one whiting. There were fifteen dogfish that were released. Drifting was the method. It was a perfect drift. Cod flies caught the most fish by far.

Again, I did not inquire as to who was high hook. It was probably Bethanie Johnson (MA). But I really don't know for sure. T. J. Jarvais (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 66 pound halibut. This is the second largest halibut that has ever been landed on the Bunny Clark. It as also TJ's first deep sea fishing trip and his first halibut, of course. Captain Jared took a picture with him and his halibut. This digital image appears on the left. TJ also caught the second largest fish, a 12 pound cod. The third largest fish was a 10.5 pound cod caught by Tyler Rondeau (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Bethanie caught a 10 pound cod, her largest fish. Adam Quimby (ME) caught a 7.5 pound cod and an 8 pound cod, his two largest fish. Rusty Force (ME) caught a 6.5 pound cod. Don Johnson (MA) released a 10 pound cod and a 9 pound cod. Ken Bonang (ME) released a 9 pound cod. Dan Payne (ME) caught two cod of 10 pounds each and one 8 pound cod, his three largest fish. Khris Gerrish (ME) caught a cod of 9.5 pounds. Danis Mendoza (ME) lost one of our jigs sticks overboard. It was never recovered. Needless to say, Danis got the hard luck award but I had to wear it!

I received two wonderful donations sponsoring me in my Pan-Mass Challenge cycling event to find a cure for cancer. Don & Bethanie Johnson donated $50.00 while Dan Payne donated a generous $100.00. Thank you all very much for your support and help. I do very much appreciate this!

Monday, May 23, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 51F, the sky was smurry clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze. In fact, there was no wind all day. The ocean was flat calm over a big swell that yielded perfect surfing waves along the coast. And the surfers were out. The sky was mostly clear and sunny all morning. The early part of the afternoon was the same. By 4:30 PM, the clouds were starting to move in. The sky was overcast by 5:30 PM. There was rain by 6:00 PM. Light intermittent rain showers went on into the night. The air temperature got up over 70F by noon. I saw a high of 75F. It was probably warmer than that. It certainly felt warmer. The visibility was good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 46F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 44F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind started out from the northeast at five to eight knots. Eight knots may have been an exaggeration as the ocean was calm all day. There was a long rolling sea swell of four feet (more or less). The sky was sunny all day. They never saw much for cloud cover until they were ten miles from shore headed home. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to over twelve miles in haze. The air temperature reached a high of 61F in the shade. The surface water temperature reached the highest value of the year so far at 52F.

The fishing was excellent. The catching (and subsequent landing) of legal fish was good to very good overall. Most of the fish that were caught were released. There were many small fish again today. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far, and a good number for each angler. The haddock cull was about one legal haddock for every four caught. Everyone had plenty of haddock. Legal landings also included three pollock, two cusk, a whiting and four mackerel. They released about thirty-one cod over twenty-two inches, seventeen dogfish, one redfish, one cunner, eight sculpins and five mackerel. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

High hook? Don't ask. I didn't. Langdon Adams (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a cod weighing 11.75 pounds. It was caught and released by Jake Klosek (MA). Leo Lamoureux (VT) caught the third largest fish, an 11 pound cod. Leo also caught the first fish of the day to be weighed, an 8 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Bill Klosek (MA) landed the largest haddock of the trip. The haddock weighed 4 pounds. Shawn Kimball (NH) landed the hardest luck of the day award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.

The Maine Department of Marine Resources has a recreational program headed by Bruce Joule from the West Boothbay Harbor lab. Every year he sends out researchers to ride on various fishing boats to collect recreational data. It's a fact finding mission, of course. But it's also meant to improve data collection so important to regulations affecting recreational anglers and businesses that rely on recreational anglers. The Bunny Clark has it's share of visits from Bruce's people. Today we had our first of the year. Today's data collectors were Cassie Nixon and Chris Uraneck. Both have been with us many times. They are very nice and helpful. They were particularly helpful today where there were so many sub-legal fish that it would have been hard to count them all without them being there. We are hoping their good work leads the recreational fishery in the right direction. I must also add, as a person who holds a seat on the Recreational Advisory Panel to the New England Fishery Management Council, the data coming out of Maine is much more accurate than the same data coming out of the other states in New England. Now this may be true because there are less anglers in Maine. But I would like to believe that it's the good work of the DMR! After all, seeing their work first hand, would lend anyone to believe as I do.

Not So Tim Tuesday, May 24, 2016

We could not get enough warm bodies to pay the freight for a marathon trip today. So the wooden anchors went out again. We sail again tomorrow when Captain Ian Keniston is scheduled to make his return as skipper for the extreme day trip.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the sky was mostly overcast with a couple breaks, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze. At 6:00 AM, the visibility deteriorated as the fog moved in along the coast, the wind started to blow from the northeast and the cloud cover overhead was complete. It started to rain at 6:30 AM; just a light rain. We had intermittent rain for most of the morning, fog all day. And fog into the night. The rain had stopped by noon. We never did get another drop of rain for the rest of the day. But it was damp and drizzly with the northeast wind boiling over the shore and onto the Ogunquit coast. By sunrise, the northeast wind was blowing at fifteen knots or so. The seas, looking from the land, were about two to three feet. At 1:00 PM, the wind started to back off. By sunset, the wind was light again and barely blowing out of the northeast. The visibility, of course, was poor. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 59F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 66F (with a low of 56F).

I had desk work at both the restaurants and at the house, extra desk work I haven't been able to get to. So I got that done. Then I had three hours in engine maintenance I had been meaning to get to but never really had the time to complete. So that was next. I did change the oil and associated filters after the trip two days ago. But I still needed to change the gear oil, gear oil filter, fuel filters, change out the zincs (sacrificial anodes at the raw water side of the intercooler) and clean up the engine and engine room. The rest of the day was centered around procuring my bait for the rest of the summer season and putting it all away. I filled every freezer I had and listened to the whole Penguins/Lightning game on the satellite radio. Somewhere in there I took Deb out to dinner at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. A wonderful restaurant, the food was excellent! I believe it is my favorite restaurant.

I received a very welcome and generous donation from Richard Payeur &, his daughter, Elinor Kostanski, sponsoring me in my Pan-Mass Challenge ride for a cancer cure today. They have been extremely helpful in supporting me every year since I started the ride ten years ago. Thank you very much, Dick & Elinor. Support like yours always cements my resolve to keep doing this ride every year.

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky appeared overcast, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was good for the first mile or two, then it looked like fog was preventing further visibility. Later, the fog moved in to prove the point. It was foggy along the shore for most of the morning. It was also overcast. We started to see some patches of blue right around 11:30 PM. The sky was partly cloudy for the rest of the day. We had no wind all morning. After noon, we had southerly winds up to ten knots, maybe more, along the coast. The visibility went from fair to good in the afternoon. The high air temperature in Perkins Cove was 76F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F? (with a low of 51F?). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was ?F (with a low of ?F).

On the fishing grounds, it was foggy all day. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to a mile in fog. The air temperature only got as high as 55F. The wind blew out of the southwest at about five knots in the morning. It was calm. After noon, the wind increased to about ten knots, just rolling over a white cap of about a foot in height. There was a sea swell that ran about two feet. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was overcast. The surface water temperature reached a high of 51.5F.

The catching was very good overall. Most of these fish were sub-legal. It was fair fishing for legal fish. Legal landings included fifty haddock, three pollock, a cusk and a porbeagle (mackerel) shark. The haddock cull was three to one, sub-legal haddock to legal haddock. The salient feature today was the number of dogfish that were caught and released. Captain Ian estimated that seventy-five dogfish were caught and released. But you really couldn't keep track. There were also thirty-four cod of 5 to 12.5 pounds released today. So there was a lot of action, too much for the yield. Drifting and anchoring worked well. All terminal gear worked well.

I didn't even inquire as to who was high hook. Mark Laroche (VT) landed a porbeagle shark of 135 pounds for an hour before landing it. He caught it on a bait rig. The bait rig broke. But, in the process, the fish got tail wrapped in the rest of the line. He brought the shark to the boat dead! Captain Ian took a picture of Mark and his big shark. The digital image appears on the right. This is the first mackerel shark that Mark has ever caught. It's the fifth largest porbeagle shark that has ever been landed off the Bunny Clark. Mark also released a 10.5 pound cod, the third largest fish of the trip.

The second largest fish was a 12.5 pound cod caught by Dan Perkins (VT).

Other Angler Highlights: Dan Wescom (VT) caught the largest pollock. The fish weighed 8.5 pounds. Debbie Burnor (VT) landed the hard luck award for reaching high hurler status. For this reason she hardly wet a line today. That certainly isn't fun!

Sean Devich (NH) has decided to go for the position of swing deck hand on the Bunny Clark this season. I have accepted his application for that position. He has held that position before and did very well at it. I really enjoyed having Sean aboard in the past. And I enjoyed him as a deck hand when we were lobstering. Not only is he an honest hard working guy, he has knowledge that is only attained by a keen interest in the ocean. He was certainly be an asset for me. I couldn't be happier that he decided to try it again!

My son, Micah Tower, became a Maine Guide today. I'm just another proud father.

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Maine Guide/Captain Micah Tower and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 2:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no wind to speak of and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least.

The ocean was flat calm from the moment we left Perkins Cove until we arrived on the fishing grounds, fished for the day and landed back at Perkins Cove, just a wonderful weather day. This was the second Thursday in a row just like it! On the fishing grounds, it was a perfect drift all day. The air temperature got up as high as 69F in the shade. The sky was mostly sunny with a mix of high thin cirrus clouds and some cumulus clouds, giving us soft lighting for the day. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The visibility was very good in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55.6F but we did go through a patch of water on the way in where the water temperature reached 59F, by far the warmest surface water of the season. The wind started off light from the north, dropped to zero wind and then hauled out of the south for the ride home. We never had more than three knots of wind, maybe less. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 54F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F? (with a low of 54F?).

The fishing/catching was excellent all day, our best day, for landings, of the season so far. It was also our best day for legal haddock. I counted only eighteen haddock that were sub-legal. And because the haddock size was so large, we released anything under twenty-one inches. So there really was no cull today. But had we kept everything that was legal, we would have been trying to get away from the haddock at 10:00 AM. The boat's bag limit would have been reached. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included quite a few pollock. Most pollock were in the 5 to 7 pound range. But we did get a few over 10 pounds. We didn't see as many market cod as we have seen on previous trips. But we did see a handful of cod over 10 pounds. Released fish included twenty-one dogfish. We had many opportunities to bait, gaff or harpoon porbeagle sharks. They were everywhere. We had five major hookups without getting the sharks hooked (they were targeting the groundfish hooked on the line). We had one of these sharks stay so long around a hooked cod that I ended up rubbing his back with the turn of the gaff hook. And we had another that had to be at least 400 pounds stick his nose so far out of water at the waist of the Bunny Clark that, had I been there with a meat hook, I could have put it in his mouth and slid him aboard! I've truly never seen anything like it. It was like they were begging me to take them on, in some fashion. I just figured that with two cracked ribs and such good haddock fishing, I would be wasting everyone's and potentially hurting myself in the process. So we waved to the mackerel sharks and kept fishing. Drifting was the boating method employed. All terminal gear worked well. Bait caught the most haddock.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. I couldn't even guess. Rick Lemieux (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.75 pound pollock. Some of his other fish that I weighed included a 6 pound haddock and an 11 pound pollock. Neil Chamberlin (VT) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 14 pound cod. He wanted a picture but he wasn't quick enough with the camera so I released it very much alive after weighing it. His largest pollock weighed 10 pounds. His largest haddock was 5 pounds. Brian Kett (MA) landed the third largest fish, a 13.75 pound pollock. Brian got an interesting double keeper catch that included a 9.5 pound pollock and a 5.75 pound haddock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. He also caught another pollock that weighed in at 10 pounds, the last fish of the trip.

Other Angler Highlights: Mark Lemieux (ME) caught our largest haddock of the season today, a 7.25 pound Maine state trophy. It's also the first trophy haddock of the season for the Bunny Clark as well. He also might have had the most haddock double keeper catches. I'll probably kick myself for not taking a few pictures of him with a few of his doubles. And he seemed to be involved in a few more tangles than was necessary (I'm kidding, of course) so I presented him with the hard luck award at the end of the trip. It was more a case of not being able to find anyone that would fit the bill for hard luck! And really, a perfect weather day with unlimited legal haddock, a perfect drift and perfectly flat calm, warm weather, it would be hard task to find someone unless I invented something - which I did!

Chris Cote (ME) caught the first good haddock I could weigh, a 5.5 pounder. Mark Cote (ME) landed a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Fred Kunz (NH) caught a 10.5 pound cod and a 13.5 pound cod, his two biggest fish. He fished with a jig all day and didn't have a single problem catching haddock. In fact, he broke his old record of legal haddock caught on a jig. This might also be a Bunny Clark record as well. I did take a picture of one of his double keeper haddock catches. This digital image appears on the left. The bigger of the two haddock weighs 5 pounds. Fred will do anything it takes to get the job done, including getting a good picture while holding his rod in his teeth! He also lost a porbeagle shark when the shark straightened his tube hook! Bill Harding (ME) caught a 5 pound haddock, one of the many big haddock he seemed to catch all day long. Russell Winann (MA) also caught a 5 pound haddock, his biggest haddock of the trip. Mark Coleman (NY) boated a double that included a 13 pound cod and a 10 pound pollock. Mark's second biggest cod weighed 10 pounds. His largest haddock weighed 6 pounds. John Baker (ME) caught a 6 pound haddock and a 5.5 pound haddock. Brett Blank (MA) landed a 5 pound haddock. Greg Douglass (ME) caught a 6 pound haddock that I thought for sure was a trophy. It certainly had a frame that would support the weight and more. Jim Grard (ME) boated a 10 pound pollock, one of his last fish of the trip.

I received several donations from people interested in curing cancer by sponsoring me in my bike ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those people and their donations included: Sharon Clark (MA) for $75.00, Mark Lemieux for $25.00, Mark Cote for $40.00, Fred Kunz for $25.00, Chris Cote for $25.00, Mark Coleman for $40.00, Greg Douglass for $5.00 and Jim Grard for $10.00. I feel very special that so many would support me in this manner. Thanks so very much!

Friday, May 27, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at eight knots or so, just enough to push up a white cap, and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze. The wind stayed out of the east northeast most of the morning. Wind speeds were five to eight knots. By mid afternoon, the wind had hauled more southeast with no increase in wind speed. The sky was overcast or fog bound (it might have been sunny away from the coast) all day. The air temperature got up to 65F in Perkins Cove. The visibility ranged to a mile at times during the day but then shut in with fog at around 7:00 PM. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at five knots. The ocean's surface was calm over rolling sea swells of two to three feet. The sky seemed overcast or could have been overcast. But you couldn't tell for sure as they were enveloped in fog for the trip. The air temperature reached a high of 63F. There was no tide (current) today. The surface water temperature stayed at 54.3F for most of the day. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to a mile in fog.

The fishing was very good to excellent, a fish a cast in most places. Most of the fish, however, were sub-legal. It was a good to very good day for landings. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Most sub-legal fish caught were haddock as well. The cull was two sub-legal haddock to one legal haddock overall. Legal landings also included twenty-one pollock, six cusk, twenty-two mackerel and two whiting. They released three wolffish (8 pounds or less), four dogfish and a few cod between twenty-two inches and 12.5 pounds. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

There were too many good fishermen on today's boat all doing well to know who was high hook. Pete Broughan (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.5 pound cod, weighed and released. The second largest fish was a 12 pound cod caught by Jack Judge (CT/ME). Mike Smith (VT) caught the third and fourth largest fish as a double keeper catch, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. His two fish were both pollock. One weighed 10 pounds and the other weighed 11 pounds. Eric Page (MA) landed the hard luck award for not being able to cope with the motion of the ocean in the fog. I think he would have been fine if he could have seen the horizon.

Bob Munroe & Linn Burgess (both MA) did me a great favor today by donating $40.00 in sponsorship of my Pan-Mass Challenge bike ride for cancer research and care with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts today. Bob & Linn donate every year to the Jimmy Fund through me to support the PMC. They have helped me every year in this regard. Thank you both so very much for the support!

Saturday, May 28, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was clear with a half moon hanging over the southeastern horizon, the wind was light, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in some fog. The wind was light from the northwest most of the day ashore. Later in the early afternoon, the wind hauled out of the west and, later still, the southeast. There was no velocity to the wind. And it was almost like there was none. At 9:00 PM, the wind hauled out of the northeast. The air temperature climbed quickly today. By 10:00 AM, it was already 75F in Ogunquit. I did see an air temperature of 85F. It could have been higher. Our warm temperatures came to a halt with the wind shift out of the northeast around 9:00 PM. The sky was hazy clear with few clouds. The visibility was good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 99F? with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 94F (with a low of 60F). The high temperature reading of 94F in Concord today ties the record high for this date set in 1978.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots or less. The ocean's surface was calm over a rolling sea swell of two feet. The sky was mostly clear with few clouds but with soft hazy lighting. There was no tide (current) in the morning and a moderate tide in the afternoon. The air temperature reached a high of 72F. The visibility ranged to ten miles, max. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57.8F.

The fishing overall was good today. There was no bite to speak of until after the tide turned around 10:30 AM. From then on the fishing was very good to excellent and the catching of legal fish was very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. In fact, there were only two other species of legal fish that were boated, a pollock and a mackerel. The haddock cull amounted to one legal fish out of every three haddock caught. Very few cod were seen today. In fact, only two cod were caught that measured over twenty-two inches. Released fish included one wolffish and nine dogfish. Drifting was the method; it was too calm to do anything else. All terminal gear worked well.

Rafik Bishara (MA) was high hook with the most legal haddock. His largest was 4 pounds, the third largest fish of the trip. Aaron Baker (NY) was second hook. Aaron won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6 pound cod. He also landed the second largest fish of the trip, a 5 pound haddock. The haddock was the largest haddock of the day. Fred Rip (MA) landed the hard luck award for having the worst ratio of legal to sub-legal haddock!

Former President George H. W. Bush, his daughter, Doro, and other came to dine at Barnacle Billy's restaurant today. It was good to see him. And he looked better, health wise, than how I remembered that he looked last year. The Secret Service members told me that his health has been better this year. As the former President was leaving, another customer got up to shake his hand. He wanted to thank the former President for having him at the White House when the Oakland A's won the baseball World Series in 1989. It was Jim Corsi, the former pitcher of the A's who also pitched for the Red Sox at one time. So I had a very interesting afternoon.

Sunday, May 29, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in haze/fog. The wind blew out of the northeast all day with speeds, more or less, of fifteen knots. This was an all day affair. The winds abated to light at around sunset. The day was misty and cool all day with a fair amount of fog just offshore and damp conditions throughout. The air temperature never got to 60F to my knowledge. The visibility over the ocean was poor. But it never rained a drop. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 59F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 56F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at ten knots, more or less. Seas were chops of two to three feet. It was overcast all day but you never would have known anyway because of the fog. Visibility was, at best, a quarter of a mile to a half mile in fog and haze. The air temperature reached a high of 55F. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 53F.

The fishing was good or better than that for legal fish. The weather conditions, the current and the mobility made it very good fishing, at best, overall, for fish of all sizes and species (including dogfish). Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included nine pollock, four cusk and a mackerel. They released a few good sized market cod and fifty dogfish. Anchoring was the method today. All terminal gear worked well.

Joe Gaboury (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19 pound cod. This is the largest cod that has been caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. Captain Ian took a picture of the fish with Joe before it was returned to the ocean alive. This digital image appears on the right. The second largest fish was an 11 pound cod caught and released by Marty Litulippe (VT). Jim Delage (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 10 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Jim Reilly (MA) caught the largest haddock of the day weighing in at 6 pounds. Doug Jones (ME) landed the hard luck of the day award for getting a big sea sick and for not catching a single legal fish, mostly because of his malady.

Memorial Day, Monday, May 30, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in haze and fog. More later.

We have available fishing spots on the following trips: the marathon trip on Tuesday, May 31, has six fishing spots available, the extreme day trip on Wednesday, June 1, has sixteen fishing places available, the Thursday, June 2, marathon trip has one fishing spot available, the extreme day trip on Friday, June 3, has eight fishing spots available, the full day trip on Saturday, June 4, has twenty-eight fishing spots available, the extreme day trip of Monday, June 6, has fifteen fishing places available, the Tim Tuesday, June 7, marathon trip has ten fishing spots available and the extreme day trip of Wednesday, June 8, has seventeen fishing spots available. There are plenty of haddock around. The pollock are just starting to show in specific places. We are finding some halibut around. The fishing has been very good. The catching has been excellent. The regulations give us 15 haddock per person straight through the season until the end of February. The minimum size is seventeen inches, a bit too small in my opinion. Now is the time to go if you want to take advantage of the best haddock fishing we have seen in years. Be there or be square! You can call 207-646-2214 for reservations.









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