www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

July 4, 2015, 5:00 AM EDT



Two More Trophy Haddock to Add to the List

The digital images above were taken during the marathon fishing trip of June 18, 2015. The picture on the left shows Norman Leger (MA) holding our largest haddock of the fishing season so far. At 7.75 pounds it tops our second largest haddock by a half a pound. A great Maine state trophy, Norm caught this fish late in the day. The shot on the right is a picture of Ron Tarentino (MA) holding his 7 pound Maine state trophy haddock. There were quite a few big haddock caught this trip but none bigger than the ones show above. Plus, the weather was fantastic. Hard to find good weather and good fishing on the same day. But sometimes this does happen. It's happened quite a few times this season!




The new recreational fishing rules came out officially on April 28, 2015. They appear below.:





These regulations could have been much more onerous for the recreational angler and the for-hire fleet. If you ever see Frank Blount in Point Judith, RI (he owns the Francis Fleet) you want to make sure you thank him for the help he provided at the Council level to keep us in the fishery.

Thursday, June 4, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today. I was very excited about taking the trip.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 49F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind (nor is there any expected today) and the visibility was good to very good over the ocean.

The ocean was flat calm on the ride to the fishing grounds. As dawn approached, you could see a light wind from the northwest. The sky was partly overcast, the air temperature was mild, the visibility was excellent and we were making excellent time. On the grounds, there wasn't a breath of wind to start. The light northwest had died out completely. But it wasn't long before a light north northwest wind took it's place. The wind increased to almost ten knots with a chop of about a foot. And that was as strong as it got. That wind tapered away by mid-morning. It was replaced by a light northeast wind with wavelets of about a half a foot. Just as we started to head home, the wind hauled out of the southeast at five knots. This wind died out as well and left us with calm seas and comfortable traveling. The sky was overcast for most of the morning, clear and sunny after 11:00 AM. The visibility was excellent. The tide (current) was moderate. The air temperature ranged from 50.2F to 55.6F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 50.7F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 44F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 58F with a low of 49F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 48F).

The fishing was excellent overall, our best trip of the fishing season to date. A fish a cast all day with very few sub-legal fish. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Most of the time we couldn't get through the pollock to get to the haddock. In fact, we were shy of the boat bag limit by five fish. However, every haddock that we kept was over 5 pounds except for two. We caught very few sub-legal haddock, fifteen total! Over half the anglers on the boat caught a haddock of 6 pounds or better but there was only one haddock caught over 7 pounds. Legal landings also included eighteen redfish (from 1.5 pounds to 2.5 pounds), three cusk, two red hake and one mackerel. There were only twenty-three cod from 5 pounds to 12.5 pounds that were caught (and released - all in good health). We only anchored once (on a steep edge to get the redfish). We drift fished on almost every stop. All terminal gear worked well.

It wouldn't have mattered who was high hook today. High hook was a function of how fast you got your fish to the boat before dropping down for another. And if you waited a couple seconds before reeling up you were assured of getting a double keeper catch. John Baker (ME) had many, his largest included a 12 pound pollock and an 8.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. John won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. John also caught a 14 pound pollock, five good sized haddock and the Bunny Clark's second largest redfish of the fishing season so far at 2.1 pounds, a Maine state trophy. I took a picture of John with his 16.5 inch redfish. This digital image appears on the left.

Ny Nhath (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15.5 pound pollock. The only other fish of his that I weighed was a pollock of 10.5 pounds. The third largest fish was a 14.5 pound pollock caught by Ryan Hubbard (NY).

Other Angler Highlights: Mike "Stumpy" Stump (MA) caught a 2 pound Maine state trophy redfish, the first redfish of the day and, I believe, it's the biggest redfish of his life. His largest fish was a pollock that weighed 13 pounds. Stumpy also caught the largest cod of the trip at 12.5 pounds. Russ Jarvis (MA/FL) caught the largest redfish of the Bunny Clark fishing season today. A Maine state trophy fish, it weighed 2.5 pounds and was just shy of seventeen inches caliper fork length. He did not want a picture. He also caught our second largest haddock of the season today with a Maine state trophy fish of 7.25 pounds. Again, no picture. His largest fish was an 11 pound pollock. And he also released an 11 pound cod. Austin Stevens (NY) boated a 2 pound Maine state trophy redfish. This was his first redfish, ever! His largest fish was a 10 pound pollock. Bob Gorghan (MA) caught an 11 pound cod, his largest fish. His largest pollock weighed 10 pounds. Jim Jarvis, Jr. (MA) caught an 11.5 pound cod and landed an 11.5 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Jon Rysz (MA) landed a 10 pound pollock and a pollock of 10.5 pounds, his two biggest fish. He also landed the hard luck award for having the worst tangle. I abused him about the tangle, got a little flack for it (and rightly so) and felt compelled to give him a parting gift because of my less than fair abuse! Jim Jarvis (MA) landed the best double of the day. His double included a 12 pound pollock and a pollock of 10.5 pounds. Ben Krahforst (NY) boated a 14 pound pollock, his largest fish.

Friday, June 5, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the sky was mostly clear, there was not a breath of wind, the ocean was mirror calm and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The ocean stayed calm for the first part of the morning after daylight. At 10:00 AM, the wind started to blow out of the south at ten knots or more. It blew about fifteen knots for the rest of the morning and late into the afternoon before dying out. The sky was sunny all day, a milky sun in the afternoon when some high clouds rolled in. The air temperature was cool along the coast, no better than 60F. The visibility was very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five to ten knots in the morning and out of the south at ten to fifteen knots in the afternoon. The ocean was calm all morning. In the afternoon, the seas were chops of two feet. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds with some overcast conditions. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The air temperature on the grounds started out at 52F and dropped to 50F in the afternoon. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 51.7F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 58F (with a low of 43F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 59F with a low of 50F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 48F). Looking at the high temperatures for the day at the three different locations you can see the significance of the cool on shore breezes.

The fishing was very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included the bag limit of haddock (for the boat), one monkfish and no mackerel today. They released quite a few market cod. And the first dogfish of the season was caught today, only one. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

I didn't ask Ian who was high hook. It looked like Dean Harp (CA) or Bill Murphy (NH) but that is purely a guess. Joe Selmer (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish of the trip, a 14 pound cod. Of course, it was weighed quickly and released alive. Joe also caught the best double of the day with two pollock, one weighed 13 pounds and the other weighed 12 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. He also released a 10.5 pound cod. The 13 pound pollock tied with Bill Murphy for the second largest fish of the trip. Bill also caught a 13 pound pollock. Ian also weighed a 10.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock of Bill's.

Other Angler Highlights: Tim Selmer (NH) caught a 10 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, his two best fish. Patty Bergeron (VT) landed a 9.5 pound pollock and caught a 9 pound cod. Dean Harp had a double keeper catch that included a 9.25 pound pollock and an 11.25 pound pollock. His largest cod weighed 9 pounds. Steve Selmer (NH) could only muster a 10.5 pound pollock for his biggest fish of the trip. It's early in the season yet! Joe Sukatski (CT) caught a 12 pound pollock, his biggest fish of the trip. Randy Bergeron (VT) landed the hard luck award for catching the first dogfish of the fishing season!

I received two donations sponsoring me in my bike ride for cancer research with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Patty Bergeron donated $10.00 while Bill Murphy donated $40.00. Thank you both so very much for your help. I do appreciate the fact that you do this and that you do it every season!

And there have been two days of bad news. Forest Woodruff (VT) died of asphyxiation in his own tuna boat in the engine room. I have no knowledge of the details of this tragedy. Forest was one of the Bunny Clark's best anglers. And Mark Bernard, the guy who was responsible for the design and production of all the Bunny Clark's t-shirts including the annual PMC shirts, died of smoke inhalation from a fire in his apartment. Mark was a very good friend of mine. He, his brother, Kevin, and I grew up in Ogunquit together as good friends. Terrible to think that two such wonderful people would leave us like that. Just awful.

Stanley Cup Saturday, June 6, 2015

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. The sky stayed overcast until about 10:00 AM and then was replaced by partly cloudy skies followed by clear skies in the mid to late afternoon. The wind started to blow out of the north at fifteen knots or better around 11:00 AM. But that was the extent of the wind for the day. The air temperature rose to at least 70F. With the sunny skies, lack of wind and warmer temperatures, it almost seemed like winter had passed!

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north northeast at eight to ten knots. Seas were chops of one to one and a half feet. The sky was sunny all day. The tide (current) was moderate. The air temperature ranged from 54.5F to 59.3F on the grounds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 51.5F. The visibility ranged from fifteen miles in the morning to over twenty miles in the afternoon. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 50F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 67F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 44F).

The fishing was excellent. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Haddock were second, meeting the boat bag limit with no problem. They also caught a mackerel. Twenty-six market cod were released back to the ocean alive. The largest cod weighed 11.5 pounds. Drifting was the method. Jigs worked the best for catching fish today.

Dean Harp (CA) was high hook with the most legal fish. He caught the largest cod of the trip at 11.5 pounds, released alive, of course. Some of his other good fish included an 11.5 pound pollock, a 10 pound cod, an 11 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock. Lou Schoenit (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.5 pound pollock. He also caught a 12 pound pollock. Henry Simonds (NH) caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 14 pound pollock. He caught his pollock as part of a double keeper catch that also included another pollock of 13 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The double is a tie for the Bunny Clark's third largest double of the season to date. Henry also caught another pollock of 13 pounds. The third largest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock caught by Matt Seager (NH). Matt also caught a 10 pound pollock and a cod of 10 pounds that was released alive.

Other Angler Highlights: Joe Sukatski (CT) caught the "more cod today than he has caught on all his recent year's trips combined", a quote from Captain Jared Keniston. In fact, Joe's two best fish were both cod. One weighed 10 pounds while the other weighed 9.5 pounds. Joe also landed the hard luck award for the mental anguish he sustained from two days of releasing nice market cod! Ouch!

Lou Schoenit was caught in the unselfish act of donating to the Pan-Mass Challenge cancer cure bike ride in my behalf as a sponsor. His donation was $35.00 of which I appreciate very much. Thank you, Lou. A very nice thing to do for me and those in need!

Sunday, June 7, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the Mike Schetter (all New York) marathon trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 50F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the sky was cloudless all morning with a brilliant sun. Later, high thin clouds moved in to cover the sun but not block it out, giving us a soft lighting situation for the afternoon. Winds remained light, the air temperature got up around the 70F and the visibility was very good to excellent over the ocean.

On the fishing grounds, the wind was very light out of the northeast in the morning and variable in direction during the afternoon. The ocean was calm all day, the calmest weather this charter has probably ever seen. The sky was clear all day with much sun. The air temperature ranged from 58F to 67F, the highest air temperature on the fishing grounds this season, by far. The visibility was excellent (over 20 miles). The surface water reached a high of 54.7F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 43F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 67F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 38F).

The fishing was excellent overall, the second best day for landings this season. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. They caught pollock everywhere they went. Normally, we weigh all fish over 10 pounds. That was impossible today. This because there were too many to weigh while still attending to normal deck duties. Haddock, of course, were the second most legal fish caught. There were some nice sized haddock caught today but none over 6 pounds. But the pollock bite prevented more haddock landings and cod catch, probably a good thing. Legal landings also included eight mackerel, a porbeagle shark and a cunner. They also caught two wolffish and a few cod of the market size and a little larger today. They drifted most of the trip but also tried anchoring. No one used bait today so jigs and flies caught all the fish.

This group had their own pool system. I didn't understand how it ran as there were five in the group who weren't entered and they had rules prohibiting sharks, wolffish and cod ("We can't keep the cod so cod don't exist!"). I have a different feeling about all this but it doesn't matter. Whatever they want or wanted is fine with me. But because the pool system had so many limitations, I'm not going to go into it here and risk getting it wrong. Herb Lee caught the largest fish, a 48 pound porbeagle shark. I believe this was gutted weight or maybe with the head off, I'm not sure. At any rate it wasn't an official weight but I will add it to the Bunny Clark's trophy list as 48 pounds. Herb's largest pollock weighed 11.5 pounds. The second largest fish was an 18.5 pound cod, the Bunny Clark's largest cod of the season to date. This was promptly released back to the ocean alive with no pictures taken. The third largest fish was a 17.25 pound pollock caught by Mike Ellison. I think Mike was one of the five who wasn't in the "club" pool. Mike also caught a nice double that included a 9 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time.

Other Angler Highlights: Ian thought that Phil Geras was high hook with the most legal fish. But there is no way to tell if he beat out Mike Schetter (That would be a first!) or not. Phil's largest fish was a 17 pound pollock but he also caught one that weighed 15.5 pounds! Tom Reynolds had some of the nicest fish. A select few of them included a 12 pound pollock, a 12.5 pound pollock, a 15.5 pound pollock and a double keeper catch that included a 14.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. Mike Schetter was only credited with a 10.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. But he must have had a few 10 pounders that Ian didn't weigh. Bob Vogel caught a 12.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Ian also weighed a 10.5 pound pollock of his during the early part of the day. I talked to Bob when the boat got back to the dock. He told me he had a great trip. And it sure looked like he did. Roger Reece landed a 15 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also caught a 12 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock.

Gary Chippendale boated the largest haddock at 5.75 pounds. His largest fish was an 11 pound pollock. James Lindseli caught a 14 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock, his two best fish. Doug Maso had a 13.5 pound pollock as his best fish. Kelly Sloan had two of the best doubles of the day. One included a 9 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. The other included a 14 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. His largest fish was a very respectable 15.25 pound pollock. Eric Nicholson landed a 14.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Charlie Bodine caught a 15 pound pollock as his biggest. And as well as Kelly Sloan did on the fish, and he did very well, he landed the hard luck award for losing his rod overboard while untangling a line. He never got his rod back!

Today was a huge day for my Pan-Mass Challenge bike ride for cancer. Several individuals donated good money to the cause today in my behalf. Those wonderful individuals and their generous donations include: Nancy Stewart (AZ) for $100.00, Jon & Fran Leavitt (NH) for $100.00, Mark & Linda Hamel (NH) for $100.00 and Joe & Lynne Goodman (MA) in an "egift" for $500.00. You all humble me with your sponsorship. I do so appreciate your support. Thank you all so very much!

Monday, June 8, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was mostly overcast, the wind was blowing out of the south at fifteen knots, white caps could be seen from shore and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good. The wind blew out of the south at twenty or more knots all day. The sky was mostly cloudy all morning with a couple of moments with spitting rain but nothing enough to wet the grounds. The afternoon saw mostly clear skies and warm weather. The ocean looked rough from the shore for the day. The air temperature reached the 70F mark at least. The visibility was good in some haze.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at twenty knots with higher gusts. Seas were angry short chops (the tide?) of two to four, initially, and three to five feet late morning through the afternoon. It was uncomfortable fishing. Quite a few anglers were sea sick. The sky was mostly overcast but sunny during the ride in. The air temperature ranged from 54F to 58F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 51.0F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles or a little better than that in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 53F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 76F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 54F).

The fishing was good, at least. But angler participation was down with the weather. Drifting was out as a mode of operation as well. So boating methods for fishing were limited. Because the wind was strong, more scope was needed on the anchor rode so skating while on anchor was a constant issue. Still, they caught quite a few fish. Most legal fish landed were haddock. They were just shy of the bag limit with the larger than normal number of passengers and the lower participation index. Had everyone been fishing, the haddock limit would have easily been attained. Legal landings also included thirty-four pollock, four redfish, three cusk and two mackerel. Bait worked the best today.

Shawn Thompson (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish by far. He also caught the largest fish of the trip, a 10.5 pound pollock. That makes him the fisherman of the day. Shawn also caught the largest haddock since Thursday at 6.75 pounds, just a quarter of a pound shy of a Maine state trophy. He was not entered in the boat pool. Mark Hines (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 10 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 9 pound cod that was caught by Mike Oakes (ME) and quickly released after the weighing.

Other Angler Highlights: Bob Oakes (ME) landed the hard luck award for attaining high hurler status today. It was not a good day for Bob. Ken Carter (ME) was there. Normally, his name is all over this page on the day he fishes with me. However, Ken is a jig fisherman. Jigs were not working very well today, for some reason only the fish know. So Ken was relegated to bait. And bait fishing didn't make him famous today!

Bobby Oakes (ME) did me a solid today by sponsoring me in my upcoming Pan-Mass Challenge bike ride for a cancer cure today. Thanks so much, Bobby. I very much appreciate the help. I need all I can get!

Not So Tim Tuesday, June 9, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I were supposed to be running the marathon trip today. I had enough interest to run this trip today. But, with the weather forecast, I got only two commitments to do so. With a better forecast we would have had eight anglers, plenty enough to go on my day off! Well, now it's a day on. It could be worse but I'm not getting used to having Tuesdays away from the Bunny Clark!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, the wind was blowing out of the south at eighteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in some haze. The morning was mostly overcast with the occasional peek at the sun. Some of the clouds held rain. But it never really rained much. The most rain occurred at about 2:00 PM. That only lasted for a half hour at best. The rain was light. After 3:00 PM, the sky cleared for the first time of the day and stayed that way for the rest of the day. The air temperature was mild with a high air temperature in Ogunquit of at least 70F. The visibility was good except in precipitation. There was a bit of haze. The wind blew out of the south at fifteen knots with higher gusts. At times it seemed really gusty. Mostly it was not. I think the forecasters over-hailed this one but I wasn't offshore to give you a true reading - unfortunately. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 60F).

I spent the day catching up on desk work for the Bunny Clark. I also made a big deposit to the Jimmy Fund with all the Pan-Mass Challenge donations I had saved. I managed to get out on the bike during the afternoon. I did ride through the rain but the air temperature was warm and the rain wasn't much. Afterward, I worked on the engine of the Bunny Clark. The main thing was checking the engine hoses for chaffing and to change out the zinc anodes for the first time. On electronic engines like mine the zincs get eaten away more quickly than on conventional engines. I was done by 7:00 PM.

I did spend an hour in the morning at the desk at Barnacle Billy's and an hour in a meeting there after lunch. But I longed to be out fishing.

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston hosted the St. Lawrence River Rats (all New York) annual extreme day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was cloudless, a half moon was hanging well above the eastern horizon, the wind was blowing a more respectable velocity of eight knots out of the west and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good. Ashore, the wind blew out of the west at fifteen knots or better. The sky was clear, mostly, certainly in the morning. There were periods in the afternoon where it almost looked like we would get a shower. That never happened. It was very hazy along the shore with a visibility that was good but not much better. The air temperature hit the 82F mark. I don't believe it went much higher.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of about a foot over rolling short swells of two to three feet. The tide was strong today. The sky was sunny for the trip. The air temperature was about 60F all day with little variation. The surface water reached a high temperature of 51.6F. The visibility ranged to twenty miles. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 56F).

The fishing was very good to excellent. There were some excellent moments and there were also some good moments. There was never a slow moment. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Haddock came next. They easily attained the bag limit for the boat. Legal landings also included fourteen cusk, four mackerel and not a single redfish. One wolffish and a few cod in the market size range were released. They anchored and drift fished. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. I asked Andrew Bruyere. His reply; "It wasn't my father (Tom Bruyere)". Tom (Ollie) and I roomed together my freshman year in college. This has been a long running joke between me, Andrew, Bob Mathew and Ollie. Ryan Lavigne won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17.5 pound cod. This is the second largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. The second largest fish was a 15 pound cod caught by Warren Putman. This is our fourth largest cod of the season to date. Dan Liscum caught the third largest fish, a 14.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Lavigne caught the best double keeper catch of the trip. His catch included a 14 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. He also caught a 13.5 pound pollock. Kim Demers landed an 11 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock, his two best. Ryan Dishaw landed a double that included a 12 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. He caught one of the bigger cod at 12.5 pounds. Andrew Bruyere landed a 12 pound pollock as his largest fish. He also landed a 10.5 pound pollock and caught an 11.5 pound cod, which he released after a quick weigh. Doug Duprey caught a 10.5 pound pollock. Lance Rudiger caught one slightly bigger at 11.5 pounds, his best. Lee Sovie had an 11 pound cod and a 12 pound cod, the third largest cod of the trip. He caught no pollock over 10 pounds. And the illustrious Tom Bruyere of famous fishing talent boated a pollock that just squeaked by the 9.75 pound mark at an even 10 pounds. Seriously, Tom caught a lot of legal fish today. Curt Dishaw landed the hard luck award for calling the fish more often than fishing. Or was he calling Ralph?

I picked up a donation check at Barnacle Billy's restaurant this morning sponsoring my ride in the Pan-Mass Challenge. The amount on the check was $50.00. It was from Alan Hall, Sr. & Alan Hall, Jr. (NY), both of whom were frequent fliers on the Bunny Clark for many years. I regret that I wasn't there when they left the check almost a week ago. I haven't seen either one for a while. And I really enjoyed having them aboard on our many offshore trips with the big cod they caught - and lost! Thank you very much, Alan and Alan. I appreciate the thoughtfulness and the extra time it took to drop by. I only wish I had been there to see you!

Thursday, June 11, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today. It's been a long week waiting for this day!

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the south at less than ten knots and the visibility was very good over the ocean. More later.

We had a bumpy long ride to the fishing grounds. The wind was out of the south at about ten knots but we had a three to four foot sea/chop that was left over from the wind we had during the night. We pounded into it just getting there. The air temperature was mild, the visibility was good, the sky was partly cloudy and there was no rain. On the grounds, the wind was still blowing out of the south with three to four foot seas (a wider chop than I would have expected). But only an hour later it hauled out of the southwest. The wind blew out of the southwest at fifteen knots or more all day. Seas were three to four feet in chops. Later in the afternoon, the wind started to drop. We had very little wind for the ride back to Perkins Cove. Seas were left over two foot chops. We struck ten knots of westerly wind about 10 miles from the beach. The sky held a hazy sun for the trip. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility ranged from five miles to fifteen miles in haze. The air temperature ranged from 56F to 63F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 52.7F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 63F).

The fishing was very good overall. We had some super excellent spots and some good and very good spots. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. They were some of the biggest pollock we have seen this year. And there were many double keeper catches. I was not able to weigh every fish over 10 pounds today. We also caught plenty of haddock with no problem reaching the boat's bag limit. But I spent quite a bit of time away from the haddock so we wouldn't discard too many either. And the haddock today, although big framed, did not weigh as large as they would have had they been filled out. It almost looked like these were haddock that had already spawned out. Legal landings also included three redfish, nine cusk, three mackerel, a small monkfish and one two pound whiting. There were thirty-three market cod released back to the ocean alive. We were most successful drifting but we also had a couple very successful anchor stops as well. Jigs and flies caught the most pollock. Bait did best with the haddock.

Chuck Lennon (MA) had to be high hook with the most legal fish. I don't know this for sure but if he wasn't I would be very surprised. He also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20.5 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's largest pollock of the season to date. He caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 11 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. To date, this is the Bunny Clark's second largest double of the season. I took a picture of Chuck with his big double. This digital image appears on the right. Some of his other good fish included two pollock of 12 pounds each, a 14 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock. He also released a cod of 11 pounds. Rob Bentley (ME) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, an 18 pound pollock. This is a tie for the second largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. He caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch that also included another pollock of 16 pounds. This double is the largest of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Just before that, Rob caught a double keeper catch that included a 15 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Without his bigger double and Chuck's big double (and, later, Howard's big double - see below), it would have tied for the fifth largest of the season. So much for that mark! Bubby Caryofilles (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 17.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Howard Lorenz (MA) caught a double keeper catch that included a 13.5 pound pollock and a 14.5 pound pollock. This is the fifth largest double of the Bunny Clark season so far. Howard also caught a 14 pound pollock. He also caught the largest haddock of the trip at 5.5 pounds. Wobby Barnes (MA) caught a double that included a 10 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. He caught many pollock in the 10 to 12 pound range that I did not weigh. His best fish, in my opinion, was a 4 pound monkfish that he landed. This is our largest monkfish of the season to date! Jessie Johnson (ME) boated a 13 pound pollock as his largest fish. He caught quite a few haddock, his largest being a 5 pounder. Beth Bentley (ME) boated a double that included a 13 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. She also caught another pollock of 12 pounds. She stopped fishing for quite a while because she hadn't dressed for the colder weather found on the ocean this year. No one has been prepared for this colder water spring!

Clint Crandall (ME) caught a pollock of 10.25 pounds. I'm not so sure this was his largest fish today. He also caught a nice large framed haddock that weighed 5 pounds but should have weighed more! Jon "Griff" Griffin (MA) caught a 15.5 pound pollock, a 15 pound pollock and a pollock that weighed 13 pounds, his three largest fish. Ray Westermann (MA) lost a huge fish. Knowing that he knows exactly what he is doing on the ocean makes me wish I could have seen the fish he lost! The only fish of his that I weighed was a pollock of 11 pounds. He caught bigger. Wade Estabrook, Sr. (ME) caught a 14 pound pollock his largest fish. Stephanie Murray (VT) caught a 15 pound pollock, her largest fish. In fact, it was the largest pollock she has ever caught! I took a picture of her with her prize. This digital image appears on the left. She also released the two biggest cod of the trip. One weighed 11 pounds. The other weighed 12.5 pounds! The larger cod is the largest cod she has ever caught on any New England groundfishing trip! Katie Baumann (MA) landed a double that included a 9 pound pollock and an 11.25 pound pollock. This was her best catch of the day. Clifton Crandall, III (CT) boated a double that included a 14 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. This is a tie for the Bunny Clark's sixth largest double keeper catches of the season to date. Clif also caught a pollock of 11.5 pounds that I weighed.

Deb Hildebrand (VT) caught a 4 pound haddock today. It should have been a heavier fish for the frame that it had. I took a picture of her holding an 8 pound pollock which she caught much later in the day. I don't believe that that was her largest fish. But it could have been. The digital image appears on the right. Andy Zurrin (MA) lost so many jigs, got tangled so much and was out of the action for so long (after breaking off on one - or two - good fish) that I had to give him the hard luck award t-shirt! His largest fish ended up being a pollock of 13.5 pounds!

I received three angler donations today sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Those anglers and their donations included: Rob & Beth Bentley for $20.00, Clifton Crandall, III for a generous $60.00 and Stephanie Murray for $14.00. Every trip we make on the Bunny Clark, before leaving the dock, has a speech given by the captain about our system, tipping, fishing, etc. At the end of the speech, whoever is the captain that day talks about the Pan-Mass Challenge, what it means to us and how you can help. I don't expect anything from this. And, unless asked, I don't mention it again. Nor do my captains. But I'm always surprised at the end of the trip when anglers come up to me and ask me to accept a donation on their behalf. It's humbling that people would trust me enough to commit to this act of kindness. And it is so much appreciated for what I have seen it do over the years. I mean it really saves lives in real time! These three donations are symbols of what people really are inside. Everyone has something that they do to help others. Not everyone makes cancer a top priority. But I do believe there is good in everyone. Thank you so much for making the good trend to my side of the fence. It's one important thing in many. And, as I said, I truly appreciate the support!

Friday, June 12, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was partly cloudy, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility was very good over the ocean. The air temperature was warm all day. I never looked at a thermometer but it had to be at least 80F. The ocean was calm all day. When there was wind, it was light from the south. The sky was clear until the afternoon when clouds rolled in between blue patches. It rained for a short period of time and then cleared. The visibility was good, at least.

On the fishing ground, the wind was light and variable in direction. The ocean was calm all day. Too calm. The sky was sunny during the trip. The air temperature ranged from 59F to 62F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from eight to ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57.7F, by far the warmest surface water temperature we have seen this year. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 58F).

The fishing was good overall but slow enough, as compared to the previous three weeks, for Ian to label it a "fair" day. It was not fair. It was very calm so the bite on bigger fish was off. But it wasn't fair. They caught plenty of fish but many were sub-legal and cod. Most legal fish landed were haddock. They could have caught the boat's bag limit if they had kept every legal fish. They didn't do that, releasing some of the smaller haddock earlier in the trip in hopes of boating a larger one later. Legal landings also included thirteen pollock, eight redfish, three cusk, one whiting and sixteen mackerel. Drifting was the method, the only one available to them because of the calm conditions. All terminal gear worked about the same.

I didn't get a nod from Ian as to whom was high hook. Leon Schrecengost (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. Leon caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch that also included another pollock of 12 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The 12 pounder was the third largest fish of the trip. Jeff Dawson (PA) caught the second largest fish, a 12.25 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Darrin Daigneault (ME) caught the largest haddock of the trip at 5.25 pounds. Ken McLaughlin (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, his best fish. John Lambert, Jr. (NY) released a cod of 10.5 pounds. That must have broken his heart! Frankie Blevins (KY) released a cod of 11.5 pounds. Dylan Dawson (PA) landed the hard luck award for being the youngest angler on the trip. There was no one who really had any bad luck. It was a perfect day for humans on the ocean.

I received two donations supporting my cancer fund raising charge with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One came from my annual donor of nine years, John Lambert, Jr. for a generous $50.00. The other came from an anonymous donor through Barnacle Billy's, Etc. for $25.00. Thank you both so very much for your support and sponsorship. I do so appreciate this!

Saturday, June 13, 2015

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was overcast, it had just stopped raining, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility was very good over the ocean. The wind was very light northeast during the first three daylight hours of the morning. That wind dropped to nothing for the rest of the day. The ocean was flat calm along the shore for the rest of the day. The sky was clear. The air temperature reached 85F or better. The visibility was excellent with very little haze. It was a perfect day.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north northwest at five to eight knots in the morning with a one foot chop. There was no wind in the afternoon. The ocean remained flat calm for the afternoon and the whole ride home. The was clear and sunny all day. The visibility was unlimited, our clearest day of the season. The air temperature ranged from 64F to 68F in the shade. It was warmer in the sun. The surface water reached a high of 56.4F. The tide (current) was moderate. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 85F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 56F).

The fishing was very good again today, much better than yesterday. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. They did not catch the boat's haddock bag limit today. Besides pollock, legal landings included thirty-eight haddock, seven cusk and eight mackerel. Forty cod and one wolffish were released. They had no choice but to drift. The drift was perfect. All terminal gear worked well.

Jared didn't tell me who was high hook. That would have been a pretty hard thing to do anyway with so many keeping fish and fillets together. Mike Roy (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 21 pound pollock. This is the largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Jared took a picture of Mike and his big pollock. The digital image appears on the right. Mike also caught an 11.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. Paul Sibley (ME) caught the second largest fish, a 17.5 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's fifth largest pollock of this year's fishing season to date. The third largest fish was a 14.5 pound pollock caught by Clayton Garland (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Mark Poulin (ME) started off the trip with the first fish big enough to put a scale on, an 11 pound pollock. John Russell (ME) landed a 13 pound pollock, his largest fish. Bernie Audet (ME) caught a 12 pound pollock, his best. Brandon Sibley (ME) boated a 13 pound pollock. Bill Atwood (ME) caught a 13.5 pound pollock, his best fish. Trisha Poulin (ME) landed the fourth largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. Chad Garland (ME) caught the largest cod of the day at 12 pounds, released, of course. Rachel Lee (PA) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer!

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Alec Levine ran our first afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) of the season today. The wind on the fishing grounds had gone from flat calm to a light southwest wind with seas in chops of a foot. The sky was clear. The air temperature stayed around 68.1F. The tide was moderate. The visibility was unlimited or excellent.

The fishing was fair at best. The weather was excellent for humans but not great for a bite. Legal landings included two cusk, one redfish and six mackerel. They released twelve cod, two pollock and a sculpin. Drifting was the method. All the anglers used bait.

Paul Rybicki (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4.5 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 4 pound cod caught by Laurie O'Riordan (MA). Curtis Bartlett (NY) landed the third largest fish, a 3.5 pound cusk. Emmett "Jaws" O'Riordan (OH) landed the hard luck award for catching nary a single fish, legal or otherwise, and having most of the tangles in his corner.

I received another donation of sponsorship for my cancer cure fund raising with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Floyd Lee (PA) was the generous person. His donation was $30.00. Thank you very much, Floyd. I appreciate the support!

We hosted the Bush family today at Barnacle Billy's restaurant for lunch. Among the guests were former President George H. W., his former First Lady Barbara Bush, former First Lady Laura Bush with her daughter, Barbara, Neil Bush, his wife and kids and Doro Bush. There were also many more Secret Service people there in order to have coverage for two former First Ladies, First Kids and one former President! It was a great time. The former President looked much better than I had expected. And he vowed to be back before the summer was out. It made my day and many others!

Sunday, June 14, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was mostly clear with high thin clouds, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility was good in some haze over the ocean. Ashore, it was another warm day with the air temperature approaching 80F. The wind blew out of the north at five knots or more, stopping at noon. The ocean was flat calm. The sky was clear. It was a beautiful summer day in mid June.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at speeds less than five knots. The ocean was calm. After noon, there was no wind. The ocean became flat calm. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The air temperature ranged from 60F to 69F. The tide (current) was light. The visibility was very good to excellent with over twenty miles of range. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 74F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 54F).

The fishing was very good overall. Most fish caught were haddock, the boats legal bag limit caught fairly easily. There were also quite a few more cod than normal (and larger than normal), all returned back to the ocean alive. Legal landings also included twenty-one pollock, two redfish, one whiting, one monkfish and twelve mackerel. They drift fished all day; they had little choice. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Manny Cabral (RI) was probably high hook with the most fish including market cod. Some of his better fish included a 9.5 pound cod, an 11 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock. His biggest pollock was the third largest fish of the trip. Norm Herrick (MA/ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound cod. Norm always was good at catching cod! The second largest fish was a 13.5 cod caught by Arnie Ulrich (NY).

Other Angler Highlights: Josh Cabral (RI) caught a 10.5 pound cod as his largest fish. His two biggest pollock weighed 10 pounds and 9 pounds. Mike "Hollywood" King (RI) caught a 9 pound cod and a 9.5 pound cod, his two best fish, both released unharmed. Matt Guimond (RI) released a 9.5 pound cod, his best fish. Steve Levine (ME) caught a 10.5 pound cod, his biggest fish. Jim Shields (ME) also caught a cod as his biggest fish. Jim's cod weighed 10.75 pounds, released alive. Adam Drake (VT) suffered a few more tangles than everyone else and landed the hard luck award for his efforts!

Norm Herrick gave me a special treat today by supporting my Pan-Mass Challenge cancer drive with a generous $70.00 donation. Thank you so much, Norm. As you know, I very much appreciate your help. But, for the greater cause, it means so much more.

Monday, June 15, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, the ocean was calm along the shore, the wind was light from the south and the visibility was good in some haze and precipitation over the ocean. After sunrise the air temperature hovered in the high 50s and stayed that way all day. It rained during most of the morning. After noon, rain was intermittent. It was hazy with fair to good visibility but the fog never rolled in as I expected it would. The sky remained overcast all day.

On the fishing grounds, the wind started out from the south at ten knots or so and increased as the morning progressed. By noon, the wind had hauled out of the south and had decreased to five and ten knots. Seas most of the day showed chops of about a foot. There was also a two foot rolling sea swell from the southeast. The air temperature stayed a 55F all day. The sky was overcast and light rain was present for most of the trip. The visibility ranged from one to three miles in fog during the morning and three to ten miles in the afternoon. It was drier during the afternoon. The tide (current) was moderate to light. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55.7F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 61F (with a low of 54F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 63F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 54F).

The fishing was good to very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included the bag limit of haddock for the boat (Everyone caught their three fish and then took Ian's and Jared's haddock as well! Greedy!), four cusk and ten mackerel. They released twenty-four cod back to the ocean alive. Drifting was the method. No bait was used today so Jigs and cod flies caught every fish.

I would be guessing if I were to tell you who was high hook. And if I were guessing, I would tell you that either Seth Greenwood (NY) or Marty Buskey (NY) was high hook with the most legal fish. Seth won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15.25 pound pollock. His first fish of the day was a 5 pound haddock. His largest cod weighed 10 pounds, released of course. And he caught another pollock of 11 pounds. Marty caught the second and third largest fish. Both were pollock of 14 pounds. One was caught singly while the other was caught as a double keeper catch with another pollock of 8 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Two of Marty's other good fish included a 13 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Dan Bailey (NY) caught the largest cod at 12 pounds. He too, like Seth, caught a haddock that weighed 5 pounds. John Baker (ME) landed a 10 pound pollock, an 11.5 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock, his three largest fish. William R. Young (PA) caught our largest cusk of the season (so far) today. It weighed 11 pounds. Captain Ian took a picture of this fish. The digital image appears on the left. His two best pollock weighed 10.5 pounds and 11.5 pounds. Paul Taylor (TX) caught a 10 pound cod, his best fish. William A. Young (PA) landed a 12.75 pound pollock, his biggest fish of the trip. Tom Zido (NY) landed the hard luck award for being on two trips without a fish over 10 pounds. Sometimes you have to stretch the categories to make and angler worthy of this award!

I received three donations today sponsoring my ride in the Pan-Mass Challenge cancer drive. These three overly kind individuals included Marty & Elise Buskey for $25.00, Seth Greenwood for $25.00 and Dave & Joanne Miller for a very generous $250.00 in memory of my father, Billy Tower. Thank you all so very much for your support. A special thanks to Dave & Joanne for being so generous every year. I appreciate every nickel I can pass along.

Tim Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was overcast, it was drizzling rain, the wind was blowing out of the south at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair in some fog and haze.

The ride to the fishing grounds was just a little uncomfortable this morning. The wind was light from the south but there was a left over gurge (two to three foot left over round chop). That lasted until we got to the fishing grounds. Every once and a while the water would drop out and the boat would drop with it! The visibility wasn't good either. It was foggy all the way to our destination. On the grounds, the sky stayed overcast for the first few hours, sunny for the next four into the afternoon and overcast for the ride home. It never rained during the trip but it did a couple of times on the way in. We were fog bound all day until we started to go home. Eight miles inside the grounds, the wind hauled out of the west northwest and gave us over fifteen miles of visibility, or more than that, for the ride home. That wind flunked out and left us with calm seas and zero wind all the way back to Perkins Cove. While fishing we had one hundred yards to a quarter of a mile visibility. The wind was very light out of the south all day with a glassy left over chop of two to four feet. The air temperature ranged from 59F to 63F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57.1F. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 61F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 56F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 55F).

The fishing was excellent overall. Any rig that got to bottom hooked a fish immediately. This lasted for the whole trip. We only caught three species of fish today. That was it! And this may be a Bunny Clark first! Most legal fish landed were pollock. We caught so many after the first two hours that I tried moving away from them. To no avail! Pollock sizes ranged from sub-legal to 15 pounds but with very few over 10 pounds. We landed forty legal haddock which wasn't the Bunny Clark's bag limit target for the day.Had we kept all the legal ones that we released (eleven fish) we would have just made it. The only other fish we saw were cod. We released twenty-seven nice looking market cod to 14.5 pounds. Drifting was the method I employed. I might have had more success on the haddock by anchoring in the afternoon. All terminal gear worked well but cod flies caught the most pollock.

Officially, I couldn't tell you who was high hook. If asked to guess I would say it was Butch Amidon (VT). Butch caught many doubles. His largest fish was a 10 pound pollock. Rick Dupont (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. His largest cod weighed 12 pounds, the third largest cod of the trip. Matt Yule (NH) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 14.5 pound cod, released alive, of course. The third largest fish was a 14 pound cod released by Dan Bailey (NY).

Other Angler Highlights: Ed Amidon (VT) caught a 10 pound cod, his biggest fish of the day. Michael Katzman (TX) caught our first good sized haddock of the trip. It weighed 6 pounds. K. C. Dowley (VT) landed a 10 pound pollock as his largest fish. Seth Greenwood (NY) boated a 13 pound pollock, the second largest pollock and his biggest fish today. Jesse Farrington (NH - do you suppose he is related to the great S. Kip Farrington?) caught the second largest haddock of the trip at 6.5 pounds. Dana Decormier (NH) caught the largest haddock of the day, a Maine state trophy of 7 pounds! I took a picture of Dana with his big haddock. This digital image appears on the upper right in this entry. Dana is the one with the mustache. Kiya Labadie (NH) landed the hardest luck of the day award for making it to high hurler status. She actually felt good late in the fishing and managed to hook and land a good sized haddock!

Dana Decormier and Seth Greenwood gave $25.00 and $5.00 respectively to sponsor me in my Pan-Mass Challenge ride, again, today. Dana has donated every year and Seth already gave me $25.00 yesterday. Thanks so much for your continued support. Had a hell of a time with both of you on the boat today. Thanks for being there and thanks again for your kindness/help.

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was blowing out of the north at twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore it was a beautiful day with northerly winds of fifteen knots or better to start the dawn, tapering winds in the morning, very little wind at noon and light southerly winds in the afternoon. The sky was nearly cloudless all morning. After noon, we had high thin clouds giving us softer lighting. The air temperature got no higher than the low 70s. The visibility was excellent all day.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at ten knots, more or less, and dropped as the morning progressed. Winds were light and variable in the afternoon. The morning saw one foot chops over three foot rolling sea swells. The afternoon saw two foot rollers without a chop. The sky was clear all day. The air temperature ranged from 60F to 65F. The visibility was excellent. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 53F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 69F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 53F).

The fishing was very good to excellent. Most legal fish landed were haddock followed closely by pollock. The boat's bag limit was attained easily. Legal landings also included three redfish and six cusk. Forty-one cod of market size were released unharmed. Also released were five dogfish, the most we have seen on a trip this year. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Brian Tufts (VT) was high hook with the most fish and the most legal fish. He also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. Taking these two categories landed him the fisherman of the day designation. And he earned it! Some of his other fish included two pollock of 10 pounds each, a 10 pound cod and a double keeper catch that included a 12 pound cod and a 9 pound cod, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. This could be the biggest cod double this season. The second largest fish was a 13 pound cod caught by Ken McLaughlin (ME). Ken also caught a 10 pound cod, a 9.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Bob Martin (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 12.75 pound pollock. Bob also caught a 10.5 pound cod and a 10.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Matt Savarie (NY), a fishing hero matching the standards set by all Bunny Clark elite anglers, could have been second hook. Some of his fish included two pollock of 10 pounds each, an 11 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock. Neil Chamberlin (NH) caught an 11.5 pound cod, a 10 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, his three best fish. Tim Lynch (MA) added a 10 pound cod to his future credits. Christina Machell (VT) caught an 11 pound cod on her birthday today. Happy Birthday, Christina! Ken Noonan (CT) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick. I believe he was the only one today!

Chris & Pat Savarie (NY) sponsored me in my Pan-Mass Challenge ride today with a generous $50.00 donation. They, too, support me every year. And I certainly appreciate it. Thank you very much for the help!

Thursday, June 18, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I hosted the Dave Miller (MA) annual spring marathon trip charter today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was overcast, the wind was very light from the south and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

Sailing out through the gate this morning took us into about ten knots of southerly wind with a one to two foot chop and no swell, to speak of. The sky had cleared some to reveal stars along with high thin clouds. There was no threat of rain. The visibility was very good. Ten miles before the fishing grounds, the wind let go and left us with a glassy surface over a slight swell. On the grounds, we had calm seas for most of the morning. The wind hauled out of the south southwest up to ten knots later. We had ten knots or more before the wind fell off to about eight knots where it remained for another two hours. The wind piped up for the ride home with fifteen to twenty knots south southwest wind with seas of two to three feet and plenty of white caps!. The sky was partly sunny all day. The visibility was very good to excellent. The air temperature ranged from 57F to 64F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56.6F. The tide (current) was moderate. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 50F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 76F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 51F).

The fishing was excellent overall, our best fishing trip of the season to date. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. I tried to weigh all the fish of 10 pounds or better but couldn't find the time to keep it up without falling behind on the deck work. We also caught a lot of haddock. The average size was much larger than anything we have seen this year so far. We had the boat's bag limit by 11:00 AM. We didn't keep a haddock under 4 pounds except for two Dennis Pietro (MA) snuck in! In fact, everyone caught a haddock over 5 pounds. Once we boated the last haddock we left them and never saw another one for the rest of the trip. Legal landings also included two cusk and one mud hake. We released thirteen market cod to 8 pounds back to the ocean alive. Drifting was the method. There was very little bait used. Most fish were caught on cod flies.

The Miller crew is a very good collection of jig fishermen so it's impossible to ever figure out who is high hook. Today was no exception. Take into account that they pool all their fillets and the chances of coming up with a conclusion amounts to something like flipping a coin. Many is the time I have felt privileged indeed to have them aboard. Jim Higgins (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18 pound pollock. He caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 15 pounds, the third largest fish of the trip. This double is the second largest double keeper catch of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. I took a picture of Jim holding his double. This digital image appears on the left. Had Jim been a smaller man, the pollock would have looked about the right size! Jim's largest haddock weighed 6.25 pounds. Ron Anderson (MA) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 16 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Jeff Smith (MA) caught the first fish large enough to weigh today, a 10 pound pollock. Ron Tarentino (MA) caught a 7 pound Maine state trophy haddock, the largest haddock of the day at the time he caught it. His largest fish may have been a 10.75 pound pollock. But, like I said earlier, there were so many fish I didn't weigh in that size range making it quite possible he caught a couple more. Dave Miller caught several pollock in the 10 pound range. His two biggest pollock weighed 12 pounds and 12.5 pounds. Peter Daige (MA) caught one of the bigger haddock at 6.25 pounds. Chris Lien (NH) caught several nice sized pollock. His two largest weighed 11 and 12 pounds. Shane Anderson (MA) returned the most legal haddock including a couple 5 pounders. His best fish was an 11.5 pound pollock. Jared Warren (NH) landed a 6.75 pound haddock, his biggest haddock of the trip. His two largest fish included an 11 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. Rob Provost (MA) also caught a haddock of 6.75 pounds. Norman Leger (MA) caught the largest haddock of the Bunny Clark season today with a specimen weighing 7.75 pounds, a Maine state trophy. Joe Leger (MA) landed one of the bigger pollock today at 13.5 pounds. He also caught a double keeper catch that I weighed which included two pollock both weighing exactly 10 pounds each. But he also landed the hard luck award for most tangled lines. "Was there anybody on the boat today who wasn't tangled with Joe today?" And, yes, Rodney Miller (MA) was aboard today catching a significant number of fish. And Steve Saunders (MA) was right beside him.

Dave Miller did me an extra favor by adding $30.00 to the $250.00 donation he and Joanne just gave me the other day supporting my ride in the Pan-Mass Challenge. I've always loved Dave. But now I like him even more! Thank you very much!

Friday, June 19, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston hosted the Gene Jablonski/Jim Brady (all New York) extreme day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. It started to rain at 5:15 AM and continued for about twenty minutes. Ashore, it remained mostly overcast in the morning with the occasional sprinkle here and there. The rain never amounted to much. In fact, the rain was so little in quantity and duration, it never moved patrons out of the patio area where they were enjoying lunch. A couple hours after noon, the sky cleared and remained clear through the evening. The air temperature got up over 80F but there was no humidity. The visibility was very good. There was no wind. The ocean along the shore remained calm.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to five knots in the morning. There was no wind in the afternoon. The ocean was calm. The sky was similar to what it was inside, albeit, more sun earlier on the grounds than what we saw in Ogunquit. The air temperature ranged from 62F to 70F in the shade. It was hot in the sun on the flat calm ocean in the afternoon. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in some haze. The surface water reached a high of 59.1F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 86F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 50F).

The fishing was excellent today, catching and landings both. Most legal fish landed were pollock and haddock, in that order. The haddock bag limit was attained with no problem. They also boated two cusk, released forty-eight market to large market cod and released two dogfish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Rich Szepek was high hook with the most legal fish and the most cod. His largest cod/fish weighed 15 pounds, the Bunny Clark's seventh largest cod of the fishing season to date. His largest pollock weighed 11.5 pounds. Karl Dence won the boat pool for the largest fish with a pool that weighed exactly the same as a cod caught by Gene Jablonski. Gene didn't share in the boat pool because they weren't counting fish (for the pool) they couldn't keep. So cod, short halibut, short sharks, wolffish, etc. were not included. Karl's fish was a 17.5 pound pollock while Gene's cod weighed 17.5 pounds. Karl caught his fish as part of a double keeper catch that also included another pollock of 12 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. This becomes the fifth largest Bunny Clark double of the season to date. Some of Karl's other good fish included a 12 pound cod, a 10 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. Gene's cod ties for the second largest cod caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. Gene also caught a double keeper catch that included a 12.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Ian also weighed a pollock of 10.5 pounds that Gene caught. Joe Bobdanowic caught the third largest fish, a 16 pound cod. This cod is the Bunny Clark's fifth largest cod of the season to date.

Other Angler Highlights: Jim Bollacker released cod of 10.5, 12.5 and 13 pounds. His largest pollock weighed 13.75 pounds. Jim Tervay caught a 12.25 pound cod, his biggest fish. His biggest pollock weighed 10 pounds. And Jim released an 11 pound cod. Scott Menz landed the second biggest double of the day. His catch included two pollock of 13 pounds each, both caught on the same line at the same time. He also caught an 11 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. Mike Brady caught the largest haddock of the day at 5.5 pounds. His largest fish was a 15.5 pound pollock. Mike also caught a 10.5 pound pollock. Bob Morrison caught a double that included an 11 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock. Bob's largest fish was a 14 pound pollock. Jim Brady caught a 16 pound pollock, his biggest fish. His largest cod weighed 14.5 pounds. He also released an 11 pound cod and boated an 11 pound pollock. Brent Biggerstaff caught a 13 pound cod as his biggest fish. His largest pollock weighed 10.5 pounds. Ronnie Berben landed the hard luck award for catching no legal fish. But there was little to no fishing effort on his part. C'est la vie!

Steve LaPlante (CT) made a sizeable donation sponsoring my ride for a cancer cure in the Pan-Mass Challenge cycling event to take place on August 1. Steve usually drives up there (for the start of the ride in Sturbridge, Massachusetts from Connecticut) early in the morning to see the ride off at 5:30 AM after the singing of the national anthem. It's always great to see him towering over the crowd. It also makes it easier for me to pick him out. Not so much him of me, me being the height of the local populace! Thanks so much, Steve, for supporting me every year in every way. I do so appreciate it.

Saturday, June 20, 2015

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility was excellent over the ocean. There was very little wind, if any, along the shore today. In the morning, we had light northeast wind but it was hardly enough to move a flag. This died out and left the ocean mirror calm. After noon, at some point, the wind hauled out of the southeast. But, again, there was hardly enough wind to move a flag. The sky was sunny and clear. The air temperature got into the 70s. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at five knots with a slightly ruffled calm surface over a two foot long rolling sea swell. The wind dropped and went flatter still before hauling out of the southeast and blowing up to five knots again. The visibility was unlimited. The sky was clear. The air temperature topped out at 65.5F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58.8F on the fishing grounds. The tide was strong. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 49F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 43F).

The fishing was good overall. Most legal fish landed were haddock followed by pollock. The haddock bag limit was not attained today, one of only two times this season. It was close but no cigar. And the bite in general was off today as well. The also caught the largest wolffish of the season so far at 16 pounds, released of course, a cusk that was kept, six dogfish that were released and twenty-six cod (released) of mostly market size. Drifting was the only method. All terminal gear worked about the same.

Jared didn't tell me who was high hook. I didn't ask. And he didn't write it on the day sheet. Matt Laubauskas (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound wolffish. This is the Bunny Clark's largest wolffish that we were able to actually weigh. We had one earlier in the season that we just couldn't get out of the water it was so lightly hooked (it is illegal to keep wolffish so we didn't want to kill it to get a weight). In trying to get it aboard, the hook dropped out and it swam away. That fish was anywhere from 14 to 18 pounds. But it had a big head. On today's fish, they were able to lift it out of the water and get it aboard carefully. They did get a weight but Jared didn't want to keep it out of the water long enough for a picture and compromise the life of the animal. So back in it went alive and, hopefully, happy! Are wolffish capable of happiness? Or is that just a fleeting human trait? Adam Croteau (ME) landed the second largest fish, a 12.5 pound pollock. He might have caught the largest fish if the porbeagle shark he had on the line stayed on the hook. I guess he fought it for a while before losing it. Adam got the shark to within a foot of gaffing it when it took another run, never to be seen again! The third largest fish was a 12 pound cod caught by Chris Barrows (VT).

Other Angler Highlights: Jeff Arthur (ME) caught an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. Marisa Morrill (ME) boated an 11.5 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Dustin Morrill (ME) landed a 10 pound pollock, his best fish. Brett Merrill (ME) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single legal fish. I'm not sure how hard Brett tried.

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. The wind on the fishing grounds was light out of the southeast with seas in chops of a foot, to start. By the end of the trip, the wind was blowing out of the south at fifteen to twenty knots with seas over two feet. The sky was mostly clear. The air temperature stayed around 63F. The tide was strong. The visibility ranged to over ten miles in haze.

The fishing was fair to good. Legal landings included three cusk, a redfish and sixteen mackerel. They released a few sub-legal pollock, five sub-legal cod, a wolffish and five sculpins. They anchored and drift fished. Drifting worked the best. Eveyone used bait.

Krystina Fernandez (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6 pound cusk. She was the one to also catch a wolffish. The wolffish weighed 5 pounds, a tie for the third largest fish of the trip. The second largest fish was a 5.25 pound cusk caught by Joseph Rushlau (ME). Jared Keniston caught a 5 pound cusk to tie with Krystina for the third largest fish. Anna Rushlau (ME) caught the only redfish. It weighed .75 pounds. Jake Sperber (NY) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch sea sick.

I looked on-line today to find that Mark Girard (CA) had donated $100.00 to support me in my Pan-Mass Challenge cancer fund raising bicycle ride. Mark has already given me two donations of almost $100.00 already. Thank you, Mark, for the extra help. I very much appreciate your kindness. By the way, your son's donation to the Bunny Clark has also worked out very well and has also been much appreciated!

Sunday, June 21, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was overcast, it was raining, the wind was out of the southeast at fifteen knots and the visibility was fair over the ocean in precipitation and haze. There was a steady rain all morning through noon. The air temperature was about 60F throughout that time period. The rain stopped at 2:00 PM. It never rained again after that. We had fog along the from noon on. This fog dissipated later in the afternoon but there was still a lot of haze around. The sky remained overcast for the day. Winds were light and variable but the ocean wasn't calm along the shore. There was a gurge that told me winds were otherwise off shore. The air temperature got up into the lower 70s by later afternoon.

On the fishing grounds, it was a slightly different story. Winds blew out of the south at twenty knots, more or less, with seas of three to five feet. After 2:00 PM, the southerly wind dropped to ten knots or less. Seas dropped slightly with the change in wind velocity. The sky was overcast all day. It rained light and continuously until 2:00 PM, when it stopped altogether. The air temperature stayed at 60.5F on the grounds. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to three miles in fog, haze and precipitation. The tide was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55.8F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 76F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 59F).

The fishing was very good overall. Captain Ian tried a new area which turned out to be very productive. Most legal fish landed were pollock. And there were quite a few over 10 pounds. But, today, it was too rough to take the extra time between wave sets to get an accurate weight on each good sized fish. So Ian only weighed the bigger fish and the first good sized fish to come aboard. Haddock was the second most prevalent legal fish. They didn't catch enough to make the boat's bag limit for the second day in a row. This was probably because the pollock bite was so good. They released three dogfish, released only fifteen cod and released one wolffish. They anchored and drift fished. Both worked well. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Kyle Spratt (NY) was high hook for the most legal fish and for fish in general. It was his first time deep sea fishing. And it was a fish a cast for him from beginning until the end. His largest fish was a 12 pound pollock. Joe Columbus (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.5 pound pollock. Joe also caught an 11 pound pollock. The second and third largest fish were both caught by Ryan Keniston. Both fish weighed 13 pounds each. Both were pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Stuffy House (NY) caught the first weighable fish of the trip, an 11 pound pollock. He later caught another pollock of 11 pounds. Jack Gill (MA) caught an 11.5 pound pollock, his best fish. Roger Lavallee (VT) caught the largest cod. It weighed 12.5 pounds, released alive, of course. John Gill (VT) landed the hard luck award for being the best of the few who got sea sick. Pat Sweenor (NY) was there today. At least I think he was!

Roger Lavallee donated $60.00 to help me in my fund raising efforts for cancer research with the Pan-Mass Challenge. The Pan-Mass Challenge is a cycling event that will take place on August 1st, the money generated in this one event (over $40 million) going to the Jimmy Fund, the fund raising arm of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. The DFCI has done wonderful things over the years, the most notable being the success they have had in significantly dropping the death rate for children with cancer. From 1949 the death rate has dropped from 85% to 15%, largely due to the Jimmy Fund. But the DFCI is not just for kids. Adult cancers are looming in the forefront of their research. And they have been tremendously successful as of late. It makes a lot of sense when you think that a very successful fund raising regime supports better researchers for better results. When the money is there things happen. Roger has a personal relationship with the disease. So he gave more, as many do. And I certainly appreciate the nod - as does everyone who has come in contact with the disease. But more people donating would help even more. Thanks so much, Roger, for your support and the kind words yesterday.

Monday, June 22, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was overcast, it had been raining ten minutes earlier, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility was at least nine miles over the ocean. By 7:00 AM, the air temperature had dropped a couple of degrees, the fog had rolled in, it was misting light rain, the sky was overcast and the air was still. We never did see another drop of rain ashore. The sky remained overcast for the morning and early part of the afternoon. It was sunny after that until sunset. The wind blew out of the south in the morning, about ten knots. At 2:00 PM, the southwest wind kicked in a blew up to fifteen knots for about an hour. After that, the wind died and the ocean along the shore went calm. The air temperature got up to the lower 70s.

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction all morning. During the afternoon, the wind hauled out of the southwest but only blew up to about five knots. The ocean surface was calm over rolling sea swells of three to five feet in the morning and two to three in the afternoon. The sky was overcast in the morning, sunny after noon. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from three to five miles in fog/haze in the morning and fifteen to twenty miles in the afternoon. The air temperature ranged from 60F to 63F. The surface water reached a high temperature of 58.2F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 77F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 86F (with a low of 61F).

The fishing was just shy of excellent. Most would probably call it excellent but we have been doing so well this year anyway I'm not sure Ian would qualify it as such. Comparitively, then, it was just shy and this still gives us room to do better. And, you could have done better today (bigger fish, more than one halibut, bigger haddock, less sub-legal fish, etc.). But they had plenty of fish, the bottom line. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Cod over twenty-four inches would have come in second place if we were allowed to keep them. Haddock came in a close third. There were also four cusk landed. Released fish, besides the cod, included two dogfish, one sub-legal halibut and two sculpins. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. Scott Angwin (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16.25 pound pollock. He also caught the first halibut of the Bunny Clark season today. It weighed 10 pounds and was sub-legal by quite a bit. Before the regulations on halibut came, the boat rule was that we didn't keep a halibut unless it made the 10 pound mark. Common sense doesn't prevail in the regulatory system as we know it in New England so we are now on an impractical length limit. [There is just no way the recreational angler is going to hurt the halibut population. But this is a discussion for another day.] Captain Ian took a picture of Scott and halibut before releasing the fish. The digital image appears on the right. This is Scott's first Atlantic halibut. Some of his other good fish included a 14 pound pollock and a 13 pound cod.

Mark Hayes (ME) caught the second largest fish, a 15.5 pound pollock. Mark caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch that also included a 13.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! This is the Bunny Clark's sixth largest double of the season so far. Mark also caught two good sized cod. One weighed 12 pounds and the other weighed 12.5 pounds. There was a tie for the third largest fish. Both fish were 15 pound pollock. Travis Dubuque (VT) caught one and Fred Gerloff, III (PA) caught one. Fred also caught a few other "things" including a 13 pound cod (released, of course), a 13 pound pollock and the hardest luck of the day award t-shirt for losing the only Bunny Clark jig of the day (Ten bucks, please!). And I guess the worst of losing the jig was that he lost it on a big fish, I suspect a double as he was using the jig & fly combination. Ouch! It could have been the hero to zero thing. Like ocean fishing in general, we'll never know!

Other Angler Highlights: Paul Pearson (NH) caught a double that included a 10 pound pollock and an 8 pound pollock. His largest fish was a 12 pound pollock. John Russell (ME) landed a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Brian Gilbert (PA) boated a 13 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, his two best. (Former) Captain Steve McGrath (NH) landed a 12 pound pollock and two pollock of 11 pounds each, his three largest fish. Riley Dubuque (VT) caught an 11 pound pollock.

Steve McGrath helped me out today, like he does every year, by donating $25.00 to my Pan-Mass Challenge cancer fund raising cycling event. It's always great to see Steve (and his son, Corey - who was absent today - I never did ask why!). And his kindness and support in the various projects over the years has always made him extra special to have aboard. Thank you very much, Steve!

Not So Tim Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I were supposed to be running the marathon trip today. We did not. We couldn't garner enough interest to release the Bunny Clark from her wooden anchors.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was overcast, the streets were dry, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog. The sky was overcast all morning with occasional periods of light rain. The afternoon was much the same to start. But blue skies with a warm sun showed between clouds. South of us, Portsmouth, rain showers showed up. But nothing happened in Ogunquit. In fact, showers happened all around Ogunquit but Ogunquit stayed shower free, ending with a nice sunset. The air temperature remained in the 60s in the morning but rose to the low 70s in the afternoon. The wind blew out of the southwest along the shore. Wind speeds of ten knots and stronger were seen. Offshore, the wind was light and variable. The visibility was good, at least, for mosto for most of the day. The fog cleared early and really never did return along the shore. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 86F (with a low of 59F).

I spent the day trying to get things done. Most of my time was spent in the office. I did have to change a fuel filter in the Bunny Clark's engine. And I did work in Barnacle Billy's two restaurants for about an hour and a half. I accomplished a lot today. But I would have rather been fishing.

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was blowing lightly out of the west and the visibility over the ocean seemed excellent. Ashore, the sky was cloudless all morning and the early part of the afternoon. When there were clouds there weren't many and mostly high and out of the way. It was a gorgeous day. The air temperature reached the 80F mark and beyond. It was fairly dry until we got a little humidity around 5:00 PM. The wind blew out of the west all day. Wind speeds got up as high as fifteen knots. But mostly the westerly wind was light. The visibility was excellent all day. The ocean along the shore was calm.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at about ten knots, more or less, to start. After noon the wind hauled out of the west and blew less than five knots. There was a one foot chop over a three foot swell in the morning and a calm surface over a two foot swell in the afternoon. The sky was sunny all day. The tide (current) was moderate to light. The visibility was greater than twenty miles. The air temperature ranged from 67F to 70F. The surface water reached a high temperature of 60.9F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 65F).

The fishing was very good overall. Most legal fish landed today were pollock followed closely by haddock. The haddock boat bag limit was attained without problem and early. Cod of twenty-four inches or better were a distant third. They also caught a cusk, released two dogfish and caught a sculpin. There were many dogfish following hooked fish to the surface but they were not a bother today. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well today.

Dick Lyle (PA) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish (Of course!) and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.5 pound cod. The cod is a tie for the largest cod caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. The other was an 18.5 pound cod caught by Ed Vross (NY) on an extreme day trip on June 7th. Some of Dick's other good fish included a 14 pound cod and a 13 pound cod. All the cod were released, of course. Dick caught the most good sized cod with a count of seven of 10 pounds or better. The second largest fish was a 16 pound cod caught by Joe Lawley (PA) this is also a tie for the sixth largest Bunny Clark cod of the season so far. The third largest fish was also a cod. Caught by Christina Machell (VT), this fish weighed 14.5 pounds!

Other Angler Highlights: Michael Arnold (VT) caught the first decent fish to weigh, a 12.5 pound pollock. Bob Creter (CT) caught an 11 pound cod, his biggest fish. Dillon Lawley (PA) landed the hard luck award for becoming the high hurler of the day. There were two. Dillon was the best!

I received a very generous donation towards my goal for killing cancer with my involvement in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Herb & Pam Cook (NY) contributed $500.00 to the cause through me. I felt very honored indeed. But they truly believe as I believe that the best place to put cancer donation money is with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Thank you both so very much for your support. You know that I very much appreciate it. But I know you share a very special relationship to the disease. And I am very sensitive to that! All the best to you both!

Thursday, June 25, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM, the air temperature was 63F, the sky was clear with few clouds, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at ten knots and the visibility was excellent. I had to ask my wife, Deb, to jot down the air temperature because I didn't have time to look at it. I forgot to set my alarm last night so Deb took it's place by saying; "Ian's here!". He wasn't early. I had overslept! Those words sent something like a jolt of lightning through me. Luckily, I had brought a lot of my gear down to the boat last night. All I needed was a thermos of coffee, my books and my lunch. Deb made my coffee (thanks so much!) while I ran down to the Cove, secured the POB manifest and collected the money from the anglers. When I got back to the house, my lunch was made, two thermos's of coffee had been prepared and my good luck Red Sox ball cap was waiting for me on the hook! We were able to leave the dock being only two minutes late.Thank you Ian & Deb!

The ride to the fishing grounds was uneventful, thankfully. We had a one foot chop on our bum for the ride out, the air temperature was warm enough to be wearing just a t-shirt and the visibility was excellent. On the fishing grounds, the wind was blowing very lightly out of the northwest, the ocean was calm, the sky was crystal and the visibility was excellent. The wind left us altogether by 10:00 AM. The ocean became glassy. The ocean remained calm until it was time to go home. The wind started to blow out of the west, first at five knots, then ten knots or more with a one foot chop. The wind hauled out of the southwest for the ride home. Wind speeds gained to fifteen knots with a chop as high as two feet but then dropped well before we were back. The sky was sunny all day with a few high clouds moving in during the afternoon to give the sky a more milky/blue appearance. The air temperature ranged from 60F to 69F on the fishing grounds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60.6F on the grounds.. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 52F).

The fishing was excellent overall. There was a three hour period where it just doesn't get any better. For the last hour I tried to find areas without pollock so we could bring in some haddock. Most legal fish caught were pollock, by far. Legal haddock was the second most prevalent fish. We caught the bag limit with no problem. We even had to release haddock as large as 6 plus pounds to stay under (Thank you, Fred Kunz!). Legal landings also included thirty-three redfish, our first white hake of the season (a small male) and seven cusk. We lost a porbeagle shark (Fred again), released nine dogfish and released seventeen cod from 6 to 13 pounds. We drift fished mostly but did anchor on one deep edge. All terminal gear worked well.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. If I were to guess, I would say Mark Randis (PA) but that would be purely a guess. Bill Harding (ME) also had potential. Fred Kunz (NH) could have been as he started off the best. But he took his cod fly off after about an hour and decreased his landings by less than half. Mark may have caught a 10 pound pollock. That would have been his biggest fish. I didn't weigh many fish unless I thought they were at least 11 pounds. Fred caught the first fish of the day that I could weigh, a 10.5 pound pollock. Fred shared the boat pool for the second largest fish with a tie for the second largest fish of the trip. Fred's fish was a 15 pound Maine state trophy cusk, the Bunny Clark's largest cusk of the fishing season so far. I took a picture of Fred with his big baloney roll. This digital image appears on the left. Fred also caught the largest cod of the day at 14 pounds and two pollock of 10 pounds each. And he released a haddock that was just shy of 7 pounds. He caught ten haddock of legal size. He fished alone in the bow. Tom Sullivan (ME), on his maiden voyage aboard the Bunny Clark, tied with Fred for the boat pool for the second largest fish with a fish of equal size, a 15 pound pollock. Tom won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19 pound pollock. This is the third largest pollock of the fishing season to date. I also weighed a 10 pound pollock of Tom's. Tom is one of our top chefs at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. restaurant.

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Linn (PA) was another potential high hook guy. He caught a pile of nice haddock and plenty of pollock doubles, like Mark. Steve caught the second largest cod of the trip at 12 pounds. A couple other pollock of his that I weighed included one of 10 pounds and one of 11 pounds. John Baker (ME) caught the best double keeper catch of the trip. His double included two pollock of 12 pounds each, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. His two largest fish were a 12.5 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. Adam Kossler (NC) landed an 11.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also caught a 10 pound cusk, the Bunny Clark's third largest cusk of the fishing season so far. Chris Kirste (ME), one of the head chefs at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. restaurant, caught two Maine state trophy redfish today. One weighed 2.1 pounds and the other weighed 2.3 pounds. The larger redfish is the Bunny Clark's second largest redfish of the season to date. Chris' other redfish it tied for the third largest of the Bunny Clark season as of this writing. His biggest fish of the trip was a 13 pound pollock. Chris also caught a pollock of 11 pounds. Marie Harding (ME) was the only other angler (besides Fred & Chris) to catch a Maine state trophy fish. Her's was a 2.1 pound redfish, another tied for the third largest redfish of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. She did not want a picture with her fish. Gerry Wile (MA) boated our biggest double haddock catch today. One fish was just over 5 pounds and the other was just under 6 pounds. I didn't weigh either fish only because he was over his bag limit and I didn't want to compromise the life of the fish. Fred Kunz won the hard luck award for losing two jigs. He was the only candidate; no one else lost as many (if any), no one was sick, everyone caught a lot of fish and there were only two tangles all day.

I think I enjoyed this trip even more than I normally do. Was it because of the extra sleep?

Friday, June 26, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. At 5:45 AM, it started to rain lightly. This continued past 8:00 AM. "Rain before 7, stop before 11?" By 9:00 AM, the rain had stopped, the sky was partly cloudy but the air temperature was still 63F. At 9:45 AM, the rain started again. It rained for about a half hour, just enough time to get everything soaked. By 11:00 AM, the rain was all over for the day. The sky remained overcast until about 1:00 PM when the sky cleared completely. The rest of the day was warm in a fallish way (the high temperature in Ogunquit might have reached 73F, maybe - it was 68F at 5:00 PM). There was a light wind blowing from the northeast in the morning and east in the afternoon. The ocean was calm along the shore. There was very little wave action around southern Maine's beaches. Surfers were sad. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of northeast at five or ten knots all day, strongest in the afternoon. The ocean was calm in the morning, a one to two foot chop in the afternoon. This wind died out after 6:00 PM. The air temperature ranged from 60F to 62F. The tide (current) was moderate to strong, strongest in the morning. The sky was overcast in the morning, sunny and clear in the afternoon. A light rain dropped visibility to three and five miles during the morning. The afternoon visibility was very good or better. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 53F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 72F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 54F).

The fishing was very good overall. Most legal fish landed were haddock. In fact, most fish caught were haddock with no problem meeting the boats bag limit. For legal landings, pollock came in a close second. Landings were somewhat restrained because of the twenty-five dogfish and even more cod caught and released. Also released was a halibut and a wolffish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear, bait, flies and jigs, worked well.

I wasn't told who was high hook today. Matthew Roy (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18 pound pollock. This is a tie for the sixth largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Tim Lynch (MA) caught the next two largest fish, a 16 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Mark Girard (CA), based on many passed experiences, could have been high hook today. It was a shame I didn't ask. But then, if he really was, he wouldn't have wanted anyone to know anyway. Mark had the biggest double keeper catch of the trip. This "double" included two pollock of 14 pounds each, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. This would come in at number eight for the top doubles of the Bunny Clark season to date. Some of Mark's other fish included a 13.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. Sean Millikan (MA) caught the second biggest double of the trip. Sean's double included a 13 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. Rob Varas (ME) landed the third largest double of the day. Rob's double included an 11.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Rob caught the largest cod of the trip at 14 pounds. Mark Randis (PA) caught a 12 pound pollock, his largest fish. Glenn Smith (NH) boated a 13 pound pollock. Charles Armstrong (ME) caught a 12.5 pound pollock as his biggest fish. His best fish was an 11 pound sub-legal Atlantic halibut. Ian took a quick picture of Charles and his flat-fish before it was released. This digital image appears on the right. Gordon Willoughby (ME) landed the hardest luck of the day award for sea sickness. It's not a good feeling I am told!

I received two heart felt donations today in sponsorship of the Pan-Mass Challenge bike ride for cancer research I will be riding come August 1, 2015. One was the third donation received this season from Mark Girard. This donation was for $50.00. All he told me was "ride on". The other donation was for $100.00 from Steve & Gail Linn (PA). Gail won her battles a few years ago. Although never "cured", Gail's chances of it coming back are slim. Thank you all so much for your support and help. I appreciate it more than you will know, most reasons are very personal.

Saturday, June 27, 2015

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine hosted the Chris Chojnowski/Mike Burta (MA) full day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was clear, the wind was very light out of the northwest and the visibility was excellent. Ashore, the wind was very light from the north for a short period of time in the morning and then working around to the east and southeast. By 6:00 PM, the wind was out of the southeast at ten knots, by far the strongest wind of the day at that point. The sky was sunny and clear in the morning, a milky blue at noon and overcast by 6:00 PM. The air temperature reached 73F for a high in Ogunquit. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at less than five knots all day. The ocean was calm. The sky was clear with a bright sun during the early part of the trip and a milky sun in the afternoon. The tide (current) was moderate to light. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature hovered around 66.5F in the shade. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 49F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 68F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 49F).

The fishing was good overall. Most legal fish landed were haddock. They were just shy of the bag limit for the boat. Legal landings also included twelve pollock and thirteen cusk. They released twenty-six market cod, none of which were as big as 10 pounds. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Jared did not tell me who was high hook. Max Strickland (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. Ryan Chojnowski (MA) landed the second largest fish, a 10.5 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 10 pound pollock caught by Martin Lee (MA). Dakota Doucette (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting involved in most of the tangles on the boat!

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east south east to south southeast at five to twelve knots, the strongest wind coming on the ride home. Seas went from a light chop on a fairly flat ocean to a one foot chop. The sky was overcast for the trip. The air temperature stayed around 61F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60.5F. The visibility ranged to twelve miles in haze.

The fishing was fair overall. The weather conditions were good for it, we did not have a full boat of anglers (as has been the rule this season so far), there were a few fish around and the current was light to moderate. Most of what they caught were small cod, small sub-legal pollock, sculpins (eight of them) and cunners. Legal landings included three cunners, four squirrel hake and one cusk. They drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear was used with variable success.

Travis Grigsby (VT) caught the largest fish of the evening, a 6.25 pound cusk. He was not entered in the boat pool. Norm Herrick (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 3.25 pound cod, which he released back to the ocean alive - of course.

There could have been a much different outcome to the trip if Abe Bradeen (ME) had his way. A porbeagle shark was seen chasing one of the women's fish as she reeled her line to the boat. Many anglers saw the shark as it turned away from the fish at the last minute. Not too long afterward, a shark (maybe the same shark) was seen finning on the surface close to the boat. Abe, seeing the shark, casted a jig in it's direction hoping it would take the heavy lure. It didn't on the first cast. But Abe hooked up on the second. During the ensuing fight, Abe broke his fishing pole as the shark made a diving run under the boat. Compromised as he was with damaged equipment, Abe still managed to bring the shark into gaffing range. I'm unsure how long the fight lasted. The shark was a foot away from the reach of the gaff when Jared started to leader the fish to get it that much closer. In so doing, the line popped with the shark still too far away! Abe did land something though, the hard luck award t-shirt!

I'm indebted to a family of anglers for continuing to sponsor me in my cancer fund raising event called the Pan-Mass Challenge. The Herricks (MA/ME), Lou-Ann, Norm and Rob, have helped me in the fund raising department since I started with this bike ride in 2007. Today Rob donated $25.00 while Norm donated a generous $48.00 (He had already made another generous donation earlier in the season). Thank you all so much for your generous support and your kindness. I certainly appreciate it!

Sunday, June 28, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston were supposed to be running the extreme day trip today. After watching the weather for the last couple of days I came to the conclusion that the time would be better served ashore with northeast gale warnings predicted for today. I canceled this trip yesterday morning.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was overcast, it was pouring rain, the wind was blowing out of the east southeast at fifteen knots and the visibility was fair in haze and precipitation. It was still pouring rain at 9:00 AM. It poured rain almost all day. It had stopped raining around 6:00 PM but it was blowing so hard off the water pulling in moisture that it made it seem like it still was. After sunrise, the wind hauled out of the east. Wind speeds through the morning were in the twenty to almost thirty knot range. After noon, the wind hauled out of the northeast and blew thirty knots with one gust as high as forty knots. Seas were big and closely spaced along the shore. The closest weather buoy (eight miles from Perkins Cove) reported 13 foot seas every eight seconds at 6:00 PM. The wind started to subside around sunset and then dropped out completely before midnight when the wind hauled out of the northwest. The air temperature didn't get much over 60F. The visibility was poor over the ocean for much of the day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 59F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 59F with a low of 52F). The low temperature of 52F in Boston ties the record for the lowest temperature recorded on this date. There were two other years in which a low of 52F was recorded. Those two years were 1970 and 1918. Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 57F (with a low of 51F).

I spent extra time at the house working at the desk this morning. Normally, I reserve five hours on Sunday mornings to do a long bike ride. The weather was too miserable to do that today. I did have a lot of extra work to do. The rest of the day I spent at Barnacle Billy's restaurants.

I received a nice donation of $50.00 from Mary Ann Donovan & Gary Vincze today. This towards my ride in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a bike ride that raises money for cancer research and care with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. The Jimmy Fund is the fund raising arm of this hospital/research center. Thank you both very much for your annual donation. I do very much appreciate it!

Monday, June 29, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was overcast, clearing skies were on the horizon, the wind was very light out of the west, seas along the shore had diminished substantially and the visibility was good in some haze. Ashore, the sky was overcast all morning, mostly overcast after noon and clear after 2:00 PM. The sky stayed clear until sunset. In fact, it was a good sunset. The air temperature made it up to the 70F mark. It might have even been warmer but I didn't check. A humidity increase was apparent after 3:00 PM. The wind blew out of the west all morning and out of the southwest all afternoon. Winds were light. The visibility was good to very good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 73F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at ten knots or less in the morning and out of the south at ten knots in the afternoon. Seas were chops of a foot over sea swells of four to six feet in the morning and a one foot chop over seas of three to five feet in the afternoon. The sky was overcast in the morning and mostly overcast in the afternoon. The tide (current) was moderate. The air temperature ranged from 54F to 58F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 54.5F. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in the morning to ten miles in haze during the afternoon.

The fishing was excellent for weather, quantity of fish and size of fish. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty haddock, one redfish, one cusk and one cunner. They released approximately thirty market cod and seven dogfish back to the ocean alive. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

It was impossible to tell who was high hook today. Joe Martineau (MA)? Peter Jaskievic (MA)? Who knows. And that's a good thing. Peter told me he hadn't seen fishing like this for years. He was happy. Joe Martineau won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20.5 pound pollock. This is a tie for the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the fishing season so far. Some of his other fish included the second largest cod of the trip at 10 pounds, a 14 pound pollock, a 12.5 pound pollock and a 13.5 pound pollock. Gary Hayden (VT) caught the second largest fish, a 17.5 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 17 pound pollock caught by Kyle Benwitz (NY). Kyle caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch that also included a 12 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. This is the Bunny Clark's sixth largest double of the season to date. Kyle also caught a 14 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Chris Helander (ME) caught the largest cod of the trip at 11 pounds. Peter Jaskievic caught the second largest double of the trip today. He double included a pollock of 16.25 pounds and a pollock of 12.5 pounds. Some of Peter's other good fish included a 13 pound pollock,a 15 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. Steve Martineau (MA) caught the first fish to be weighed, an 11.5 pound pollock. Ian didn't weigh many fish under 12 pounds after that. Steve's best catch was a double that included a 14 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. Ron Dube (WY) landed an 11.5 pound pollock, his best fish. Ian weighed a double for Rick Benwitz (NY) that included an 11 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. Rick caught two other fish of note, a 12.5 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. Todd Meucci (TN) boated a 10.5 pound pollock, his best fish. P.J. Gibbs (NY) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler.

Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I were supposed to be running the marathon trip today. Alas, we could not get enough warm bodies aboard to make the trip. So the wooden anchors are out today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the sky was clear, the wind was very light out of the west, the ocean's surface was calm and the visibility was very good at least. The wind was light out of the west, calm or light out of the south all day. By 7:00 PM, there was no wind at all. The full moon came up over a glassy sea. The sky was clear all day except for the clouds hovering for a half hour or so at the end of the day. The air temperature reached the 75F mark. The visibility was very good.The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 54F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west northwest for a bit, hauled out of the west or southwest and then went calm. Later in the day the wind hauled out of the south. But the southerly did not blow very hard. Around 7:30 PM, the wind blew up to about ten knots and then backed off. The ocean had a rout going all day. Sometimes the swells were as much as six feet in height. But there was also some kind of left over chop. Even when there was no wind there was a hubble on the ocean. The sky was clear all day. The air temperature got no higher than 60F. With the wind, the air temperature seemed cold. And I had everything I could bring on to stay warm (I stayed in a tuna tower all day). I could have used some wool pants as the wind went right through my cotton ones. The visibility was very good in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61.7F.

When I realized I wasn't going to get my fishing fix for the week, I went into sulk mode and got to bed early last night. I got up at 3:00 AM; I can't help myself. This meant I was able to get all the desk work done early. It was such a beautiful day, a tuna day, I couldn' t stop thinking that I could go harpooning if I could get on a boat. It so happened that as I was going for a coffee, I saw Matt Forbes, a good friend of mine who has the Amy Elizabeth, a fairly new harpoon boat for him. He actually invited me aboard for the day if I wanted to go. It took me about five minutes to think it over. It took ten minutes to thank him, say yes and go get all the stuff I would have been bringing on the Bunny Clark this day had we sailed. My brother, Court, made me a lunch!

I stayed in the tuna tower all day, ate my lunch there and rode back from the fishing grounds to Perkins Cove. It was a very exciting day. I have always considered myself pretty good at spotting fish. Matt Forbes and Bachi LaRusso (his deck hand and excellent helmsman) were better at it than I was. I did spot one bunch on my own. But they spotted all the others. We had two chances on harpooning a fish. One fish Matt might have hit had we picked the fish on the left (This is purely conjecture, a feeling I have, and may not have worked. Hindsight is 20/20, right?). The other fish in the school were alerted to our presence before Matt could get a shot off. The other chance was blown when the fish took off earlier than expected and too far away for a descent throw. Had Matt expected the fish to behave this way, he might have taken a chance and thrown early. But it was a hard shot at best. Even when I was younger and doing this all the time I don't think I would have done any better.

It was certainly exciting, though. We chased one bunch that would settle away before we got close enough for a throw and then show up about ten boat lengths ahead. We chased those for a while to no avail. And we chased another bunch that wouldn't act right. And we chased one bunch that was coming right at us. Bachi did as nice a job as I have ever seen coming around that bunch without spooking them and giving Matt as good an opportunity we could have ever expected on that bunch.

It was a great day and one that brings back many good memories of growing up on the Maine coast. In fact, I probably talked Matt's and Bachi's ears off about old tuna stories. Sorry, guys, if I talked too much! But I had a great day off. I only wish I could have contributed more to bring better luck. But as I remind everyone, fishing is fishing and nothing is ever a guarantee on the ocean. Actually, the Bunny Clark is the closest you are going to get! My opinion, of course!

The shot on the right is a picture of me at the age of 29, taken in August of 1981, on the stand of my previous boat, the Mary E just before I harpooned a fish that weighed 746 pounds dressed or about 900+ pounds round. We caught fifteen fish in two weeks in this area, the largest being 1145 pounds, which is the current harpoon record in Maine. Billy Stevens was my helmsman and remains an excellent builder, carpenter and friend. By the way, these fish were running only three miles from where Fred Kunz (NH) set our original Bunny Clark haddock record of twenty-seven for most haddock caught on a jig, approximately twenty-five years later!

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston were supposed to be running our first mid-week full day trip today. We had two reservations for this trip that were moved to a different date. The wooden anchors again!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was partly cloudy but a nice sunrise over the ocean, there was no wind, the ocean's surface was calm and the visibility was fair in thick haze. By 6:00 AM, we lost our visibility in fog. By 7:00 AM, the fog had backed off, the sky was overcast and it was raining. It was still raining at 11:00 AM. After noon, the rain came and went. Everything would dry out, the sky would be partly sunny and rain clouds would come in and get everything wet again. The last bout happened at 7:00 PM and lasted until about 8:00 PM. After that, the rain was over for the day. The wind was light out of a range of directions from the southeast to the southwest. However, the wind blew upwards of twenty knots for four hours in the morning to about 1:00 PM, out of the southeast. Rain was associated with this wind. By 2:00 PM, the wind was blowing lightly out of the southwest. The air temperature reached the 72F mark. The visibility ranged from about three miles in precipitation and haze to over ten miles or more when it wasn't raining. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 61F).

I spent the morning working at Bunny Clark Central, working in the office at Barnacle Billy's Central (two hours), cleaning the pellet stove, getting a leaking toilet fixed and getting Mike Dumas (Dumas Welding), the best welder I have ever known, down to the boat so he could fabricate an adjustable stainless steel support piece in the engine room. The rest of the day I worked at Barnacle Billy's restaurant. By 4:00 PM, Mike was already on the boat putting the new piece in place. He can't always do things that quickly (I was lucky he wasn't invested in a big project.). But if he can he will. I love that guy. It took him about an hour to install it completely. I just watched. I went back working at the restaurant. I was done by 9:30 PM.

Thursday, July 2, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at eight knots and the visibility was good overall in some haze. Ashore, the wind blew out of the west or west northwest in the morning. Some gusts blew up to twenty knots. The wind backed off after noon but continued to blow out of the west. The sky was clear all day. The air temperature reached a temperature of at least 80F. The visibility was good to very good in some haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 80F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 56F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots (or less) all day. Seas included a one foot chop from the southwest over rolling sea swells of two to three feet from the southeast. It was hubbly for sure. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The air temperature hovered around 64F. And that was also the highest temperature of the trip. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature topped out at 54.2F. The visibility was very good or had a range over twenty miles.

The fishing was very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Ian didn't weigh anything under 13 pounds. Every angler boated a fish over 10 pounds today. Some anglers had several over 10 pounds. Legal landings also included eighteen haddock. They released twenty-one market cod, a sculpin and one dogfish. They anchored and drift fished. All terminal gear worked great.

Dave Darnell (CA) was high hook with the most legal fish. He also tied for the third largest fish with his dory mate, Mike Benton (CA). They both caught a 14.5 pound pollock each. Dave also caught a 13 pound pollock while Mike also caught a pollock of 14 pounds. Kris Brown (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18 pound pollock, the first fish of the trip! This is a tie for the seventh largest pollock caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. He caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 7 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time (That's for you, Bob Johnson!). The second largest fish was a 15 pound pollock caught by Joe Madera (IN).

Other Angler Highlights: Debbie Harwood (IN) caught a 13 pound pollock, her best fish. Olivia Fassnacht (PA) also caught a pollock of 13 pounds as her largest fish. Jenny Jorgensen (NJ) landed the hard luck award for getting the dreaded mal de mer. She was the high hurler today. In fact, she might have been the sole hurler as well.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. At the dock, with the sun and the high air temperature, it was a bit too warm. The wind was light out of the west. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at eight to five knots. Seas were similar to the day trip with a one foot chop over southeast swells of two to three feet. The sky was overcast. The air temperature was 64F. The surface water temperature was 59.5F. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze.

The fishing was better than it has been on the afternoon trips. There were plenty of mackerel caught, some released, most kept. Landings also included four cusk and four redfish. None of the cod would have been big enough to keep even if they could have kept them. They released eight cod. And there were a few sub-legal pollock released. Drifting was the method. Only cod flies and bait was used. No jigs tonight.

Stefan Walberg (CO) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.5 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 6 pound cusk caught by Logan Dorr (Greenland - the country). Ten year old Sophia VillaMaino (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 5.5 pound cusk. She also caught a small legal redfish.

Other Angler Highlights: Twelve year old Marlow Mangada (CA) caught a 4 pound cusk. Will Myers (MI) caught a redfish that was a half a pound in weight. Rachel Walwood (MN) landed the hard luck award for almost hurling. There was no one who was really sea sick this evening.

I received a tremendously generous donation today from Dennis & Diane LaValley (MA) sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event to raise money for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute through the Jimmy Fund. The DFCI is located in Boston, Massachusetts, right in our back yard. The donation was $2,000.00, a tie for the largest single donation given to me this year so far. Dennis & Diane have been annually generous to me since I started this event in 2007. And they have an intimate relationship with this disease. Thank you both so very much for your help and for supporting me in such a fine way. I truly appreciate this very much and always have!

Friday, July 3, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility was good at least, an excellent tuna day. Ashore, it was a beautiful day. By noon, the air temperature was well above 70F. The high was somewhere upwards of 80F. The wind blew light out of the northwest to start, died out, the ocean went calm and then the wind came up out of the south. All light breezes and a calm ocean today. The sky was cloudless after 11:00 AM and was nearly so before that. The visibility was very good at least. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 54F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 76F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest to start, light (five knots or less), died out, the ocean went glassy and then hauled out of the south, much like it did along the shore. The ocean was calm all day. The sky remained sunny with very few clouds. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature ranged from 62F to 67F. The tide (current) was moderate to light. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56.5F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was fair to good overall. Landings were on the fair side of good while catching was good. Most fish caught were haddock, mostly sub-legal. There was just shy of a four to one ratio of sub-legal haddock to haddock landings. These are the smallest haddock we have seen on a trip this season. Legal landings also included twenty-three pollock, four redfish and a cusk. They released fifteen market sized cod. No dogfish were seen. Drifting was the method; the conditions didn't warrant another method. All terminal gear worked about the same.

I didn't ask Ian who was high hook. Nor did he volunteer that information. What he did say was that he wished he had started......... And, you know, hindsight is twenty/twenty or even better than that. Zack Grimm (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. The second largest fish title was shared by two anglers who each caught a 12 pound fish. Both fish were pollock. The anglers were Dick Grimm (ME) and Norm Herrick (MA/ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Jack Judge (CT/ME) was on his fourth trip today. On the first three trips he won the boat pool for the largest fish every time. Today he did not. I went down to the boat very interested in finding out if he had done it. Alas, it was not to be. He caught at least three legal haddock but he released one of his fish that was eighteen inches long thinking he would get a larger one. Jack did walk off the boat with four good sized haddock fillets. Cameron Cahill (VT) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick. I'm not sure if anyone else got sick.

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. At the dock, it was warm and calm with a bright sun shinning down. There was no wind. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots. Seas were chops of one to two feet. The sky was clear for the evening, the visibility was about fifteen miles (more or less) in haze and the air temperature stayed a cool 64F. The surface water temperature on the fishing grounds was 58.9F.

The fishing was fair to good. There were plenty of fish to be caught (good). Most of those fish were sub-legal (fair). Legal landings included fourteen mackerel and three cusk. They released quite a few sub-legal pollock, twelve cod and four sculpins. Drifting was the method. Everyone used either bait, cod flies or a combination of both. No one used a jig.

Chris Bennett (MA) was the fisherman of the evening. He was high hook with two legal fish and he caught the largest fish of the trip, a 6.25 pound cusk. Chris did not enter the boat pool. He also caught a cod that would have been legal last year that weighed 4.25 pounds, released, of course. Tyler Hurlburt (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 5 pound cusk. The third largest fish was another "would have been legal" cod that weighed 4.5 pounds and caught by Toby Jakobowski (VT).

Other Angler Highlights: Jake Jakubiak (VT) caught a cusk that weighed 3.75 pounds. Emma Simonsen (CT) released a 3.5 pound cod. Jon Wileman (UK - London) landed the hard luck award for catching the dreaded mal de mer and for catch nary a single living thing on a hook!

Independance Day, Saturday, July 4, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was mostly cloud, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility was very good over the ocean. More later.

There are several upcoming fishing trips that have plenty of room. The full day trip of Sunday, July 5, has twenty-four spots available, the extreme day trip of Monday, July 6, has four fishing places available, the Wednesday, July 8, full day trip has room for twenty-four anglers, the Thursday, July 9, full day trip has every fishing spot available, Friday, July 10, full day trip has twenty-nine fishing places available, the Saturday, July 11, full day trip has nineteen fishing places available, the Sunday, July 12, full day trip has twenty-six fishing spots available and the Monday, July 13, extreme day trip has openings for seven more anglers. The fishing is still very good to excellent. I would be there if I were you. Can't brag if you don't bag! To make a reservation you can call 207-646-2214.









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