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Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

October 21, 2014, 4:00 AM EDT



Two Special Fish during Our First Ultra Marathon

The pictures above show special fish and the anglers who caught them taken during the July 8, 2014 ultra marathon. The shot on the left is a digital image of Jeff Philbrick with his 36 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the largest fish of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. It is also one of only ten white hake that have been landed on the Bunny Clark this season so far. Needless to say, Jeff won the boat pool handily with this fish. The shot on the right is a digital image of Bryan Lewer (FL) holding up his first Atlantic halibut. He snagged the fish in the side but knew right away what it was as he had never had a fish that fought quite like it. Well, actually, he did last year but lost the fish because his drag was too tight. But we won't talk about that episode! Bryan was very pleased with his catch as you can see in the shot. We caught three halibut on that trip, all of which were too small to keep and were released very much alive.




Friday, August 22, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the wind was light out of the northeast, the sky was overcast and the visibility over the ocean seemed very good. Ashore, except for a couple brief peeks at the sun, it was overcast all day. It never did rain. The wind blew out of the northeast at ten to twelve knots. The wind off the water right directly on the shore made it cooler in the coastal areas than it was five or six miles inland. There was almost a ten degree difference between the two areas. The air temperature stayed right around 67F. The visibility was very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east northeast at ten or twelve knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet, three feet after noon. The air temperature was mild. The sky was overcast. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was about fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.9F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 72F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 69F (with a low of 56F).

The fishing/catching (landings) was good overall, maybe better than that. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included two haddock, thirteen cod and two mackerel. They didn't have nearly the number of sub-legal haddock that they had yesterday. Drifting and anchoring was the method. Anchoring worked the best. Cod flies caught the most fish.

Thirteen year old John Keniston (ME) was the fisherman of the day. He probably tied for high hook with Jim Higgins (ME); they both caught a lot of legal fish. And John caught the largest fish of the trip, a 16 pound pollock. Ian took a picture of John's fish. The digital image appears on the left. This is the largest pollock that John has ever caught. It may also be the largest fish that John has ever caught. He was not in the boat pool. John also caught a pollock of 12 pounds. Jim caught two pollock of 12 pounds each, his two largest fish. Christine Munsey (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. She caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! The third largest fish was a 14 pound pollock caught by Jared Keniston.

Other Angler Highlights: Terence Keating (VT) caught an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. Tracey Higgins (ME) landed the hard luck award for being the highest of a few hurlers.

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather was still overcast but the wind had dropped since the morning when they left the dock. There was still a bit of a larger than normal sea that they had to contend with on the way to the fishing grounds. That got some anglers started on the road to the dreaded mal de mer. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at 10 knots to five knots and then calm. The sea state started at two foot chops but ended up smoothing out somewhat before they got back through the gate into Perkins Cove. The air temperature was mild. The sky remained overcast. The current was moderate. The visibility was over fifteen miles in some haze.

The fishing/catching (landings) was good overall. Most legal fish landed were cusk. Legal landings also included nineteen mackerel and two cunners. They released a few mackerel besides and a lot of sub-legal pollock. Anchoring was the method. And the meaning of the method was clear. (Take that Nietzsche!) Everyone used bait. Some added a cod fly to the mix. The mackerel were savage on the cod flies.

Alain LaFerriere (QC) was high hook with three legal including two cusk of 5 pounds each. His two larger cusk tied for the third largest fish of the trip. Zack Havens (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.25 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 6 pound cusk caught by A. J. Havens (NY). Andy Havens (NY) tied Alain with a 5 pound cusk for the third largest fish.

Other Angler Highlights: Chris Parks (NY) caught a cusk of 4.5 pounds. Tim Habernig (NY) caught the largest cunner we have seen in a while weighing in at 1.5 pounds. Chad Havens (NY) earned high hurler status for the hard luck award. More than half of the anglers aboard this evening were sea sick.

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston hosted the Louis DiLeo (NJ) full day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the wind was light out of the north, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore it was cloudy most of the morning, clear and sunny in the afternoon. The wind blew out of the northeast at ten to twelve or more knots in the early part of the daylight hours. It hauled out of the east late morning. The wind died out after 2:00 PM. The air temperature was in the 60s most of the day. It could have been higher than that in the afternoon. The visibility was very good at least.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten knots minimum with seas in chops of two to three feet. The wind dropped all day to the point where there was no wind when they got back to Perkins Cove. The sky was overcast in the morning, clear in the afternoon. The air temperature was warm. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was excellent. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 72F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 73F (with a low of 54F).

The fishing was good as was the catching of legal fish. Most legal fish landed were cod, by far. Legal landings also included a haddock, eleven pollock, two redfish, two mackerel and three cusk. Only eleven sub-legal haddock were caught. Eight dogfish were released. Drifting and anchoring were the methods. All terminal gear worked well.

Park Smith (NJ) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with over ten legal. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. His second largest fish was a 10 pound cod. The second and third largest fish were both caught by Anthony Maiorana (NJ) as a double keeper catch. His catch included two pollock, both exactly 10.25 pounds each, caught on the same line at the same time!

Other Angler Highlights: Mike DiLeo (NJ) was the bachelor for whom this party was thrown. His largest fish was an 8.5 pound cod, the second largest cod of the trip (most of the cod were small markets today). Ian presented him with the hard luck award to help him into his new life as a married man!

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather was beautiful and calm when they left the dock to head for the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction. The ocean was calm. The sky was clear. The air temperature was warm turning to mild. The visibility was a little hazier than the morning giving them a max of fifteen miles. The current was moderate to none.

The fishing/catching of legal fish was good, probably our best afternoon trip of the season. Most legal fish landed were cusk, by far. Legal landings also included sixteen mackerel (a few were released), four whiting, one squirrel hake and three redfish. Nine sub-legal cod and eighteen sub-legal pollock were released. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait and cod flies. No jigs were used.

Louie Koulouris (NY) and Dan Mussen (NY) tied for high hook with three or more legal fish each. Dan was really the fisherman of the evening as he also won the boat pool for the largest fish with either of his two largest fish, a 7 pound cusk and a 6.5 pound cusk. Louie caught the third largest fish, a 6.25 pound cusk.

Other Angler Highlights: Avery Mussen (NY) caught a 6 pound cusk. Noelle Mussen (NY) landed a 5.5 pound cusk, her largest fish. Dan Nowell (ME) caught a 4.5 pound cusk. Ken Wachowicz (NY) also caught a 4.5 pound cusk. Bill LaVoie (ME) caught a 4 pound cusk. All the other cusk that were caught weighed in at 4 pounds or less. Mike Geller (ME) landed the hard luck award getting hung on bottom, getting a hell of a backlash by releasing the eccentric lever, losing his gear and getting sea sick. Ouch! Not Mike's best fishing trip!

Part of my training for the Pan-Mass Challenge involves riding all year round. One of the best rides I do is the "Annual K-Port to Massachusetts Labor Day Century". This I do with friends who I have known over the years. Today was the day. I rode to Kennebunkport, met the rest of the riders and we all headed south. The ride stops twice at Barnacle Billy's, once on the way down and at the end. I end up doing a bit more than 100 miles. This day my total was 119 miles. It is the most enjoyable ride of the year as we enjoy a comfortable pace, make various stops (breakfast and lunch included) and talk. Believe it or not, this tends to be one of my best workouts of the year as well. And it's not so much the miles we log as it is the spinning characteristics of the ride. At right is a shot of the five of us (from left to right: Ben, Brian, Howard, Andy and I). The shot was taken at 7:30 AM at Barnacle Billy's restaurant. I had put 31 miles on the bike at that point.

Sunday, August 24, 2014

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, there was just a skosch of wind out of the northwest, the ocean was flat, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was very good to excellent. Ashore, the air temperature was cool during the early daylight hours. The air temperature started to really warm up after noon. And by 2:00 PM it was over 80F. The sky was clear and sunny. The wind was very light. The ocean was calm. The visibility was very good to excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew lightly out of the northwest. The ocean was calm. The visibility was "unlimited". The sky was clear. The air temperature was warm. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 53F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 75F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 53F).

The fishing/catching of legal fish was good to very good. Landings were very good for one third of the anglers. It was good for most. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included sixteen cod, two haddock and two cusk. There were only seventeen sub-legal haddock returned. And eighteen dogfish were released as well. Drifting was the method. The jig and fly combination worked the best for catching fish.

Matt Freitas (MA) or one Bill Murphy's (NH) crew (Bill Murphy?) was probably high hook today. There was no way to know for sure except by the bags of fillets they brought off the boat. And that would only give you an idea. There was also another angler in the stern who could have been high hook but he was keeping his fish with a group. Regardless, it was very good for these anglers who caught the lion's share of the fish. Charlie McGee (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock caught by Jason McGee (ME). Patrick Kelley (CA) caught the third largest fish, a 13 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Jeremy Huston (ME) caught the largest cod of the day at 10 pounds. Marian "Merv" Murphy (NH) caught a 12 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock, her two biggest fish. And she caught quite a few legal fish. I did not get the count from her. And she would have known right down to the fish! Brian Murphy (NH), Merv's dory mate, didn't do as well with only three legal to his credit. It was the first time in two years, on all the trips he has attended on the Bunny Clark, that he hasn't been high hook. He just didn't have the mojo (He could have bought two for a buck but I guess he didn't think of that!). God does help those who help themselves! Brian's biggest fish was a respectable 10.5 pound pollock. Matt Freitas caught a 12 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Bill Murphy landed a 12 pound pollock, his best. Don Russell (NH) caught a 12 pound pollock. And Zach Freitas (MA) boated a 12 pound pollock as well. Tom "That Guy" Barden (ME) landed the hard luck award for being the most tangled. It got to the point when someone was asked who they were tangled with the reply was "That Guy"!

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather at the dock was beautiful with a very light westerly breeze blowing. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew lightly out of the southwest. The ocean was calm. The air temperature was warm. The visibility was better than ten miles in haze. The tide was light. The sky was clear and sunny.

The fishing was very good. Landings were poor. The catching of fish was fair overall. Most fish caught were sub-legal and no traditional groundfish were landed. Legal landings included three cunners and one mackerel (even the mackerel didn't bite). They did catch a few sub-legal pollock and four sub-legal cod. Drifting was the method. Bait only was used.

Cameron Clegg (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 1.5 pound cunner. Devin Cronin (CT) and Viny Bushee (VT) tied for the second largest fish with a 1 pound fish each. Devin's fish was a 1 pound pollock. Viny's was a 1 pound cunner. Viny also caught a cunner that weighed .75 pounds. Fourteen year old Dmitri Dutkewych (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled.

I received some very thoughtful donations from three sources today supporting my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Those people & their donations included Bill Murphy for $25.00, Brian & Marian Murphy for a generous $100.00 and Bill & Barbara Finkle (ME) for $25.00. Thank you all so very much for your contributions to the cause. I very much appreciate your kindness and generosity!

Monday, August 25, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, there was just a skosch of wind out of the northwest, the ocean was flat, the sky was cloudless and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze. Ashore, the weather was perfect, a perfect summer day. There was no wind all day. There was surf along the shore but just outside the surf was a very calm peaceful sea. The air temperature got up to 85F and yet didn't feel that warm in the shade along the coast. The sky was almost cloudless all day. The visibility was good to very good over the ocean.

On the fishing grounds, the wind was very light and variable in direction. The ocean was flat calm all day. Ken McLaughlin (ME) said it was almost too hot to fish in the afternoon. And I can believe it with the ocean like a mirror and air temperatures in the 80s. Ian said the air temperature was warm in the morning and hot after noon. The visibility ranged to twenty miles in some haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was nearly cloudless as it was ashore. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 85F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 81F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 53F).

The fishing was good. It was no better than that even though the weather conditions were excellent. This was mainly because they caught quite a few dogfish. The "dogs" created more tangles than normal and, of course, take the place of a nice eating groundfish. Landings were lighter than normal as a result. I would put the catching of legal fish in the fair to good category. Some anglers did well today while others did not. One angler only caught one legal fish. Most legal fish landed were pollock by far. Legal landings also included twenty-five cod, one haddock, six redfish, eleven cusk and a monkfish. Fifty-five sub-legal haddock were released and fifty-five dogfish were released as well. Drifting was the only method employed. All terminal gear worked equally well.

Rich Warner (ME) was high hook with eleven legal. His largest fish was a 10.25 pound pollock, the third largest fish of the trip. Tim Collins (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. He also caught the second largest fish, a 10.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Kevin Weisher (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, his best fish. Dean Wolf (NJ) also caught a 10 pound pollock as his largest fish. Gail Bergeron (MA) - I like anyone with the last name of Bergeron (It's a Bruins thing.) - landed the hard luck award for getting quite a few tangles. She was tangled but always "Just minding my own business". Actually, the shirt looked good on her!

Jim LeMay (ME) was on the boat today but Sparkling Jig Feather, from the northern tribe, was not.

Tim Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Alec Levine and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, there was no wind, the ocean was flat, the sky was cloudless and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good. We carried about eight knots of southerly wind on the ride to the fishing grounds. The wind was just rolling over a one foot chop. On the grounds, the wind hauled more out of the south southwest. The wind speed might have gotten up to fifteen knots. Seas were chops averaging two feet, this mainly because we had a tide (current) running up into the wind. The tide was moderate. The sky was cloudless (except over land) for the trip. The air temperature was warm (perfect with the wind). The visibility ran to almost exactly ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.1F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 85F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 56F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was good overall Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included two squirrel hake, six cod, a dogfish, eight haddock, three mackerel, five redfish and nine cusk. Forty-six sub-legal haddock were released along with twenty-five dogfish. We anchored on every spot. Cod flies caught the most fish.

I could not tell you who was high hook. But I don't believe anyone caught more than eight legal. Everybody seemed to catch two or three which got us into the "good" category, success on a collective basis. I do know that Mike Hayes (NY) caught the most dogfish. His count might have been as high as fifteen fish. No one else seemed to be bothered much by them, not like Mike!

Don Cheney (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. He also caught a pollock that weighed 10.5 pounds. Scott Wheeler (CT) caught the second and third largest fish of the trip. His largest was a 14 pound pollock, with which he had the boat pool lead for most of the day. His second largest fish was a pollock of 13.5 pounds. He also caught a pollock that weighed 10 pounds and another that weighed 10.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Ray Gilcris (VT) caught three nice fish including a 10 pound pollock, an 8.5 pound cusk and a 10.5 pound cusk. Mike Barton (NY) landed the best double keeper catch of the trip. His double included a 9.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Patrick Kelley (CA) landed a 12 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Russ O'Connell (NJ) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. He caught his pollock as part of a double with another pollock of 8.5 pounds. Dan Calcaterra (ME) landed a 12.5 pound pollock, the largest groundfish he has ever caught. Kris Guastamachio (NY) caught a 10.5 pound pollock. Jimmy Bradley (VT) landed a 10.5 pound cusk, a tie with Ray and one of our biggest eight cusk of the Bunny Clark season to date. Scott Adams (CT) caught our largest cod of the day at 10 pounds. Zack Van Derminden (NY) landed the hard luck award for being the first of two anglers to hurl today. He fished like a mad man all day, to his credit!

Alec Levine and I ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. Winds were light out of the south southwest and the air temperature was hot when we left the gate to head to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest to almost fifteen knots, maybe less. It was hard to say. Seas were chops of two feet with the occasional larger swell added to the mix. Whatever it was, mal de mer was prevalent throughout the Bunny Clark this evening because of the uneven seas. The air temperature was perfect with the breeze blowing, just warm. The sky was mostly clear and sunny. The visibility ranged to about ten miles in haze. The current was moderate.

The fishing was very good; line tended perfectly, the current was perfect on anchor and there were no dogfish. Landings were poor, the second worst afternoon trip I have probably ever taken. But, to my credit, the bluefish arrived yesterday and scared the mackerel away from the inshore area. When they do this, my experience has been that the groundfish bite shuts down as well. It couldn't be me, could it? For whatever reason, we could not tease a legal desirable groundfish off the bottom this evening. Legal landings included two squirrel hake. Sub-legal fish included two redfish, one cod and one pollock. Ouch! We anchored for three spots. No terminal gear held the answer I was looking for.

Holly Leonard (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a .5 pound squirrel hake. The largest fish was caught by Leonardo and, his son, 8.25 year old Julian Jafet (NY). Unfortunately, Julian hooked it but his father, who wasn't in the boat pool, reeled it in, disqualifying the two for the winnings. Their fish was a sub-legal cod of 1.5 pounds. The third largest fish was a .49 pound squirrel hake caught by Eric Jeffries (CT). Mark Hager (MA) caught the only other two fish (except for a tiny redfish) this evening. One was a bigger redfish than the tiny one and the other was a .25 pound pollock. The hook was bigger than the pollock! Ouch! Jessie Jafet (NY) landed the hard luck award for being the first one to hurl. And she was also the high hurler of the evening as well. I hope she got over her malady shortly after landing!

I received two donations supporting my addiction to fighting cancer with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a generous $70.00 contribution from Mike "Dogman" Hayes (NY) and the other was a donation of $25.00 from George & Janice Thaler (NJ). Thank you all so very much for feeding my habit. I hope to keep helping the Jimmy Fund for as long as I am able. I appreciate the sponsorship.

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was good at least. Ashore, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots. The sky was clear and sunny, the air temperature reached a high of 89F in Ogunquit and the visibility was good in haze. It was one of the warmest days of the summer.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots in the morning but increased to over fifteen knots in the afternoon. Seas were chops of two to three feet (more at times). The sky was hazy clear and sunny all day. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to over fifteen miles in haze. The air temperature was warm, perfect with the wind. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.9F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 88F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 91F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 63F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was good to very good overall. They had a slow start but a great finish. Most legal fish landed were cod, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-three pollock, one haddock, one redfish and eight cusk. All the largest fish were pollock. Thirty dogfish were released but only fourteen sub-legal haddock were released as well. They drift fished for the trip. The jig and fly combo worked the best.

Steve Levine (ME) was high hook with seventeen legal, most of which he released back to the ocean alive (the cod) or gave away. He didn't catch a fish of 10 pounds or better. Ken McLaughlin (ME) caught thirteen legal, mostly cod. There were other anglers who caught numbers between Steve and Ken. Max Macias, Jr. (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. He also tied for second/third place with a 12 pound pollock. Frank Wolfgang (ME) also caught a 12 pound pollock to tie with Max for second/third.

Other Angler Highlights: Marie Harding (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, her largest fish. John LaBrecque (ME) landed a 10.5 pound pollock. Justin Vaillancourt (NY) boated a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Ed Gschrey (NY) landed the hard luck award for attaining high/sole hurler status.

We didn't run an evening trip today.

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran our first fall marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 72F, there was no wind at the house but the buoys were giving light northerly winds, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was good at least. The wind was light from the north, the ocean was calm and the visibility was very good on the ride to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind blew from the north at about eight knots, at most, died out around noon and came on from the northwest at very light speeds (one or two knots?). The ocean was calm all day. The air temperature started out mild/warm, moved to warm and then to too warm. The tide (current) was a little bit stronger than moderate. The sky was mostly sunny. The visibility ranged to twenty-five miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67.6F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 82F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 56F).

The fishing was good only. We had a stronger than normal tide and we caught over one hundred dogfish. We even had some places where all we caught were dogfish. Catching was excellent. Landings were very good overall. Size of fish was excellent except for the haddock. We caught so many sub-legal haddock that I lost count after one-hundred and fifty. I suspect we caught over two hundred sub haddock. Most legal fish landed were hake, cod, pollock and haddock, in that order. In fact, we caught hake everywhere we went. Legal landings also included seven redfish, twenty-three cusk and six whiting. We had minor problems with blue sharks, losing three or four rigs to them. We drift fished all day and tried anchoring once. All terminal gear worked well.

I could not tell you who was high hook by an exact fish count. But it had to be Yoshito Umaoka (MA). His legal haddock count was ten, he caught the most hake and he tied with Fred Kunz (NH) for the largest cod at 12 pounds. He caught one of the largest cusk at 9.5 pounds. Yoshito's three largest fish included a 23.5 pound white hake, a 25.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake and a 28 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Eric Grove (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 32 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest fish and hake of the season to date. Erik also landed the third largest fish of the trip, a 30 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Fred Kunz won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 31 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the largest groundfish Fred has caught in three seasons. Fred had nineteen legal including the largest haddock at 5.5 pounds, a tie for the largest cod at 12 pounds, five other white hake between 16 and 21 pounds and several pollock. I took a picture of Fred's biggest hake (this shot appears on the left) and his biggest cod (the shot on the right).

Other Angler Highlights: Chuck Lennon (MA) caught the first fish of the trip, a 15 pound white hake. His largest fish was a 27 pound Maine state trophy white hake. His largest pollock weighed 10 pounds. Guy Hesketh (CT) caught a pile of fish. His largest was a 22 pound white hake. His two best pollock weighed 10.5 pounds each. Wobby Barnes (MA) landed a 21 pound white hake, his biggest fish. Jon Griffin (MA) boated a 22 pound white hake, his best fish. I suspect he will get bigger fish later if it's any kind of fall season at all. Mike "dogman" Hayes (NY) did better than his reputation. He just about every species including dogfish (again) and one 25 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Kleanthe "Bubby" Caryofilles (MA) landed our largest pollock of the season today at 23.5 pounds. It was the last fish in the boat. His largest fish of the trip was a 24 pound white hake.

Ray Westermann (MA) caught the second largest haddock of the trip at 5.25 pounds. His two best fish were both Maine state trophy white hake of 26 pounds each. Cameron Fournier (ME) landed the largest groundfish of this life today, a 29 pound Maine state trophy white hake. He also caught a nice double today that included an 11 pound pollock and a 6 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Travis Cropley (ME) caught a 23 pound white hake and a 21 pound white hake, his two largest fish. Spencer Patton (OR) caught the largest cusk at 11 pounds, the Bunny Clark's third largest cusk of the fishing season to date. Spencer's largest fish was a 25 pound Maine state trophy white hake. He also caught five legal haddock. Al Fournier (ME) landed the second biggest pollock of the trip at 15.5 pounds. Howard Lorenz (MA) boated an 18 pound white hake and a 21 pound white hake, his two best. Chris Porter (MA) landed a 21 pound white hake and a 20 pound white hake. His largest cod was the third largest cod of the trip at 8.5 pounds. Rich Knauer (NJ) landed the hard luck award for catching the least number of legal fish with a count of two! Ouch!

I received a anonymous $20.00 donation helping me raise money to fight cancer with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. I appreciate anything I can get to help the Jimmy Fund. Thank you so very much!

Friday, August 29, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the wind was light out of the northwest, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The wind blew out of the northwest to ten knots until sometime after 10:00 AM when the wind hauled out of the east or southeast. The air temperature hovered around 70F until the wind shift. Then the air temperature dropped a couple of degrees. The sky was sunny with some clouds. The visibility was very good at least.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen to ten knots in the morning. After noon the northeast wind blew from ten to five knots. Seas were chops of two feet or more with a three foot sea in the morning. Seas were much less than that for the ride home. The air temperature was warm. The sky was sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was very good, over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.7F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 71F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 47F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was good overall, better than that for one angler, at least. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-two cod and four cusk. No dogfish were caught. No legal haddock were caught either but they did release thirty-five sub-legal haddock. Anchoring and drift fishing were both used. The jig and fly combo worked the best.

Mark Cote (ME) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with about fifteen legal (more or less). And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.5 pound pollock. Krista Cote (ME) landed the second and third largest fish. They were an 11.5 pound pollock and the largest cod at 10.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Moe Carrier (NY) caught a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Tom Currie (NY) landed the hard luck award for being sea sick.

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather was beautiful, clear, mild and quiet when they left the dock to head for the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot over a two foot sea. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was light. The visibility was excellent. The sky was clear and sunny.

The fishing/catching was good. Landings were fair to good. Most fish caught were sub-legal pollock (over 100). They also caught eleven sub-legal cod and a sub-legal redfish. Legal landings included seven cusk and two cunners. Anchoring was the method. Everyone used bait and cod flies.

Rob Faulkner (CT) caught the largest fish, a 6.75 pound cusk. He was not in the boat pool. Kellie Tabernia (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 6.5 pound cusk. The third largest fish was a 6 pound cusk caught by Sara Faulkner (CT).

Other Angler Highlights: Brady Evans (ME) caught a 3 pound cusk, his best fish and the first fish to be weighed. Mike Santoro (NH) boated a 4.5 pound cusk. Chris Anna Rogers (MA) also caught a 4.5 pound cusk. Glenn Tabernia (NY) caught a 3.75 pound cusk. Megan Tabernia (NY) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the trip.

The Conservation Law Foundation came out with a short video about keeping the Cashes Ledge closed area closed instead of opening it up to commercial dragging as is the plan right now. I had a short part in the video. I am very supportive of keeping the Cashes Ledge area closed and keeping the status quo on the Georges Bank closed areas number 1 & 2. Some on the New England Fishery Management Council want to see Georges Bank, particularly, opened to dragging. This is where our haddock are coming from, the biggest groundfish success story of the modern era. And they want to open it up? It's selfish and crazy. There is a petition to sign at the video link I just gave you. I would appreciate it if you signed your name in support of keeping the Cashes Ledge area closed. The closed areas have been a very important part of the rebuilding of the groundfish stocks in New England. Without the closed areas I am certain you will be kissing your fish goodbye. This isn't the only thing that needs to be done, of course, but it's a good start. Thank you.

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. Ashore, the wind blew out of the southwest at fifteen knots or better for most of the day. The air temperature was perfect (70F or a little warmer than that). The sky was sunny with few clouds. The visibility was very good at least.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at twelve to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The air temperature was mild. The visibility ranged to twenty miles or more. The sky was sunny and mostly clear. The tide (current) was strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 79F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 52F).

The fishing was good but the under-current made the fishing lines tangle more than is normal. Dogfish didn't play too much of a factor as there were only seven caught. Landings were good overall, better than that for guys like Jason Peters (MA) who weilded a jig stick for the trip. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included fourteen cod, five cusk, two redfish, two haddock and three mackerel. Anchoring was the only method employed. Cod flies caught most of the fish today.

As you might have guessed from the allusion, Jason Peters was high hook with the most legal fish. He held court in the pulpit all day. Others did well around him but he was the man. His largest fish was a 14 pound pollock, the second largest fish of the trip. He also caught pollock of 10 pounds and 11 pounds. Scott Matteson (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. His second largest fish was a pollock of 10.25 pounds. And, for the first time, he caught more fish and bigger fish than his father, Fran! Rick Lemieux (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 13 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Sean Kelly (ME) caught a 12.5 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Nicki Frazier (ME) was high hurler and landed the shirt for her efforts! She was in good spirits when I saw her at the dock.

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather was mild, sunny and breezy from the south before they left the dock to head to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at fifteen knots or more. Seas were chops of three feet, more or less. The sky was clear and sunny. The air temperature was mild. The visibility ranged to twleve miles in haze along the shore.

The fishing was fair as was the catching of legal fish. They did catch a few small fish including quite a few pollock and redfish and three cod. Legal landings included two cusk, six squirrel hake and four cunners. They anchored for the evening. Bait and cod flies were used. No jigs.

Dave Holmes (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 5.25 pound cusk. Josh Reed (MA) caught the second largest fish, a 5 pound cusk. The Lowenstein family (ME) were out with us this evening, all of whom were sea sick. This including Dr. Ben who I ride with in the Pan-Mass Challenge every year. So four out of five were eflicted with the dreaded mal de mer. The only one who wasn't was Ellie Lowenstein. As you might imagine, Beth Lowenstein landed the hard luck award for being the annointed high hurler of the evening. But the shirt ended up fitting Ben. This isn't what I would call a good introduction to the Bunny Clark!

I received three donations toward my involvement in cancer research with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts through the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those donors and their contributions included Jeff McGuire (ME) for $25.00, Greg Holt (ME) for $25.00 and Jack Henke (NY) for $45.00. Thank you all so very much for your support. I appreciate it so very much.

Sunday, August 31, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the wind was blowing out of the south southwest at fifteen knots, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. Ashore, the wind was breezy from the southwest to west. It was enough that we couldn't use the awnings over the deck at Barnacle Billy's restaurant for fear of breaking something. The wind dropped off as the day progressed. The sky was clear and sunny most of the morning with encroaching high clouds. By 2:00 PM those clouds had thickened creating overcast conditions. By 6:00 PM, there was a sprinkle or two of rain. These conditions remained until 8:30 PM when we started to get a steady light rain. It rained lightly on and off through the night. It was hazy, with a high air temperature around 80F+ and humid all day.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at fifteen to ten knots or, later, less. Seas were a chop/short swell combination of two to three feet and less as the day progressed. The sky was clear to begin and progressively overcast later. The air temperature was warm. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 85F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 85F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 62F).

The fishing was good. The weather conditions weren't perfect for catching fish and the blue sharks took many jigs today making anglers lose fish and jigs too! The catching (of legal fish) was very good to excellent (for some), despite the conditions. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-eight cod, one haddock, seven cusk and one white hake. Drifting was the method. The jig & fly combo caught the most fish.

High hook could not be determined today. Randy Clark (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 23 pound barn door skate. This is the first barn door skate of the Bunny Clark season and one of only seven ever caught aboard the Bunny Clark in over thirty years. This is primarily due to the fact that these fish have been able to make a come-back with the advent of the closed commercial fishing areas. And this is also a testament to why we have areas that are closed to commercial bottom trawling. Captain Ian took a picture of Randy with his catch. This digital image appears on the right. The skate was promptly released alive after the picture was taken.

The second largest fish was a 19 pound pollock caught by Roger Hopkins (RI). This is one of the largest pollock of the fishing Bunny Clark fishing season. We have caught a couple of pollock weighing 19 pounds and two pollock of 19.5 pounds (plus the 23.5 pounder we caught on Tuesday). Roger also caught a 10 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Justin Grenier (RI) caught the third largest fish, a 15.5 pound pollock. Justin also caught an 11 pound pollock and a pollock of 11.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Bill Grenier (RI) landed a 14 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock and a pollock of 11.5 pounds, his three largest fish. Krystal Burns (NY) boated a 10.5 pound pollock. Pap Papliosas (RI) caught the largest cod of the trip weighing 11.5 pounds. Jeff Ross (NY) caught a 13 pound pollock, his best fish. Gene Schwab (RI) landed a 12 pound pollock, his best. Steven Scardace (RI) boated a 15 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip. He also caught another pollock of 12 pounds. Bill Durning (RI) landed a pollock of 11.5 pounds, his biggest fish of the day. Kevin Reph (RI) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer. A touch, I said.

I received some well needed donations today helping me in my quest with the Pan-Mass Challenge to eradicate cancer. Katie Graichen (LA), one of our best reservationists at Bunny Clark Deep Sea Fishing a couple of years ago and before, gave $25.00 in the form of an "egift" on line through the PMC site. The Roger Hopkins Party (all Rhode Island) gave $50.00. Thank you all so very much for your support. Many really appreciate it!

Monday, September 1, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 71F, the wind was blowing out of the west at five knots, the sky was clear except for the clouds in the eastern horizon and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze. Ashore, it was muggy and very warm. The mercury reached the 80F mark, at least, today. There was very little wind. The ocean was calm all day. The sky was cloudless for most of the daylight hours. The visibility was good, at least, in haze over the ocean.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew from the southwest. But you would hardly know this as it was so light as to just leave a ripple on the surface. The surface of the ocean was calm all day. A dead sea, you might say. The air temperature was warm to hot. The sky was clear and sunny. There was no tide (current). The visibility ranged to ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 65F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 85F with a low of 72F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 63F).

The fishing was excellent all day. Only two dogfish were caught, the ocean was flat, there was no current and I didn't hear of a single blue shark. The catching of legal fish was poor in the morning, fair to good in the afternoon. Most legal fish landed were pollock. In fact, almost everything they landed were pollock. They could have kept twenty-five cod if it were legal to do so. Legal landings also included one redfish and two cusk. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked about the same.

Ryan Keniston could have been high hook with four pollock and five cod over twenty-one inches. But there were others who also could have had nine legal including more pollock than Ryan caught. Ian was just not sure. Personally, I would doubt anyone caught more than Ryan. But that's me. John Baker (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11 pound pollock caught by Brian McCormick (VT). He also caught a 10 pound cusk and a pollock of 10 pounds as well. Louise White (NY) caught a 10.25 pound pollock. Dee Guimond (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick. I'm not sure that this is the boat for her on such a calm day!

I received a $25.00 donation (an "egift on the PMC site) from Frank Wertheim (ME) and the Maine Coast Cycling Club sponsoring me in my cycling event with the Pan-Mass Challenge, a fund raiser to fight cancer with the Jimmy Fund/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. These people from the Maine Coast Cycling Club are just wonderful individuals. I feel so grateful that Breeze Keller brought me up there one fine day for a ride with the Club. I was hooked after that. I spend every Sunday morning that I can with them. They are generous to a person and socially conscious as well. Thanks so much for the kind support!

Tim Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I hosted the Lighthouse Fishing Club (MA) marathon trip charter today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 68F, there was no wind at all, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was fair in what appeared to be ground level fog in the Cove. I had to navigate out through black thick fog to make it out of the gate into the ocean from Perkins Cove. We carried the fog for a few miles before we broke out of it. We never saw the fog again. We had flat calm seas all the way to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, we had some very light wind out of the south. Our first stop showed wind and calm patches, both, on the surface of the water. As the morning progressed, the wind got stronger out of the south. It might have blown as much as ten knots in the early afternoon with seas in chops of a foot or so. The tide (current) was strong in the morning, less so in the afternoon. The air temperature was warm with the wind. It could have been hot without it. The sky was clear for the trip. On the ride home we had thunder showers that lasted about a half an hour or less before breaking into clear skies eight miles from shore. We had very light winds, clear skies and a very calm ocean for the rest of the ride back to the dock. The visibility was six or seven miles in thick haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.8F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 93F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 63F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was very good overall. We never did have a slam but the catching was steady from the moment we started until we stopped at the end of the day. There were only two dogfish caught. The blue sharks were there but didn't really bother us. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included eleven white hake, twenty-eight cusk, eight redfish, two mackerel, five squirrel hake and a whiting. Ten cod and two haddock were returned that would have been legal before September. One was a double keeper catch by Phil Wicker (MA) who had a cod of about 9 pounds and another of 5 or 6 pounds, both cod caught on the same line at the same time. Drifting and anchoring were methods we used back and forth all day. We spent an equal amount of time at both. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Keith Hayden (MA) was high hook with thirty legal. His largest fish was a 13.5 pound white hake. Gloria Gennari (MA) won the Club pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 25 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is her largest groundfish of the season to date. I took a picture of Gloria and her special fish. This digital image appears on the left. Gloria also caught the largest pollock of the trip at 15.5 pounds. And she had another pollock that weighed in at 10.75 pounds. Al Hanson (MA) won the Club pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 24.75 pound white hake. His largest pollock weighed 14.25 pounds, the second largest pollock of the trip. He also caught another hake that weighed 21.75 pounds and led the Club pool for a long time with that fish. Steve Marko (MA) won the Club pool for the third largest fish with the third largest fish, a 24 pound white hake. I had forgotten about Steve (What was I thinking?) and gave the pool to Bill Bolotin who caught a fish slightly smaller at 22 pounds! This after Steve caught the most white hake of the trip with a count of five. He caught them on three different spots, even when others were catching different species! So how did I forget about him? Steve caught two other hake worth a mention. One weighed 18 pounds and the other weighed 16 pounds. One of his hake he caught in 25 fathoms of water!

Other Angler Highlights: Rick Gurney (MA) landed a 10.5 pound pollock and two pollock of 10 pounds each, his three largest fish. He landed the hard luck award for losing a jig and getting his feet wet! Phil Wicker (MA) caught a 10 pound pollock, his best. Mike Kruszyna (MA) landed an 18 pound white hake, his largest fish. His largest pollock weighed 11 pounds. Barry Juhasz (CT) landed a 12.5 pound pollock, his largest fish of the trip.

I received contributions from three anglers supporting my cause with the cancer charity bike riding event called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. These anglers and their contributions are as follows: Steve McGrath (NH) for $25.00, Al & Dawn Hanson for a generous $63.00 (They donate to the PMC every year giving an amount equal to my age in years - a reminder of sorts that I need to remember what I have experienced in all that time!) and Gloria Gennari for $25.00. Thank you all so very much for your kindness and generosity. I appreciate it very much but not nearly as much as those with the disease or the researchers we fund who need the tools (money) to do the great things that they do!

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean appeared good in haze. It was a beautiful sunny day today with much less humidity, clear skies, air temperatures in the lower 80s and good visibility. The wind continued to blow out of the west at speeds up to fifteen knots. It was hard to keep an awning out on the deck at Barnacle Billy's.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at ten to five knots. Seas/chops were about two feet (more or less) including tide chop and wind chop. The tide was bulling into the wind so it appeared rougher than it really was. And it was not rough. The strong tide in the morning slacked off to moderate in the afternoon, same as it did yesterday. The sky was clear all day. The visibility was excellent; over twenty miles. The air temperature was warm, perfect. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.8F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 85F with a low of 72F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 65F).

The fishing was good or better than that. Landings were very good overall, excellent for two. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included five redfish, three cusk and two mackerel. Had cod been legal to keep they would have landed thirty-five. Only three haddock could have been taken if legal to keep them. There were eighteen dogfish released. Drifting and anchoring were the methods. There wasn't much of a problem with blue sharks. Jigs and flies, that combination, did the best.

Dan Killay (VT) and Joel Gaines (VT) were high hook with the same number of legal fish that Keith Hayden (MA) caught on the marathon trip yesterday. Impressive. Dan never landed a fish of 10 pounds or greater. Joel caught an 11 pound pollock that tied with Thayne Henry (MA) for the third largest fish of the trip. Thayne also caught an 11 pound pollock. Alan Tuthill (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.5 pound pollock. He caught this pollock as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 8 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The second largest fish was an 11.5 pound pollock caught by Thayne Henry.

Other Angler Highlights: Ken McLaughlin (ME) landed seventeen legal. He didn't have a single legal fish before 11:00 AM! His largest was a 10 pound pollock. Scott Nolan (NH) also caught a pollock of 10 pounds. Joe Goodness (MA) landed the hard luck award for catching nary a single legal fish and for losing a jig. Well, at least he was fishing near the bottom!

Ian caught a lobster buoy in the wheel only a mile from the entrance to Perkins Cove. Of course, this meant I couldn't get right to preparing for the fishing trip tomorrow before I went diving! So off to the house on my scooter where I yanked on my tri-suit, grabbed a mask and back to the boat. The water temperature was 60F so I had to sit on the float with my feet in the water until my ankles got used to the cold. I am truly a wimp when it comes to my feet. Once I got under the boat I noticed that the trap line that was hit got wrapped in the propeller because the lobsterman left a coil of line (Easyhaul) just under the buoy. But it didn't take long to cut it out. It just took a half an hour of my ever increasing valuable time to complete the task.

I received several donations supporting my bike ride for a cancer cure (the ultimate goal) with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. These anglers and their donations are as follows: Linn Burgess (MA) for $20.00, Bob Munroe (MA) for $40.00, my dory mate from the tuna days, Suzanne Graves (ME), contributed $25.00 and Rick & Kathleen Henderson (MD) for a generous $100.00. I want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for your help. We make a great team and I appreciate it so much!

Thursday, September 4, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was very good. It was a beautiful flat calm morning on the ride to the fishing grounds. The sky was clear and full of stars, the visibility was near excellent, the wind was light out of the northwest and the air temperature was 68F. On the grounds, there was no wind. The ocean was flat calm. By mid morning, the wind had hauled out of the south. It blew lightly out of the south for the rest of the trip. The most it blew was probably five knots giving us small waves of a half foot. The sky was clear all day. The air temperature was warm, perfect. The visibility maxed out at 30 miles in some haze. The tide (current) was fairly strong all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 83F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 51F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was good at best. Some spots were very slow. Many others were good. But it was not easy to catch fish today. There were many more fish on the machine than we caught. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included two redfish, five cusk, four squirrel hake, eighteen mackerel and seven white hake. We also caught ten haddock and twenty-three cod that would have been keepers before September 1. Three dogfish, one blue shark and forty-one small haddock were released back to the ocean alive. We alternated between drifting and anchoring. Drifting seemed to work the best. Cod flies caught the most fish.

I believe Bob Jones (ME) was high hook with eleven legal. It might have been Robert Ploss (NY) if we could have kept cod and haddock. Bob's largest fish was a 10.5 pound pollock. And Johnny Castonguay (ME) was close enough in fish count to have tied Bob too. Johnny didn't count his fish. Bryan Lucas (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 26 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Bryan's largest pollock weighted 12 pounds. Jim Iams (ME) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 23 pound white hake. Jim also caught a 21.25 pound white hake, a pollock of 11 pounds and the second largest cod of the trip at 8.5 pounds. Johnny Castonguay landed the third largest fish, a 22.5 pound white hake. Johnny also caught a 12 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Jim Bonney (ME) caught the largest haddock at 5 pounds. Rodney Leach (ME) caught the largest cod at 10 pounds. John Charette (ME) boated a 12.5 pound white hake, his largest fish. Rand Richards (ME) caught a slightly bigger hake at 22 pounds, his largest fish of the trip. Karilyn Bonney (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, her largest fish. Jim Morrell (ME) caught a 14 pound pollock, his biggest fish by far. John McGrath (NY) landed the hard luck award for tangling just a little too much today. His line was much thicker than any of the lines everyone else was using. This gave him more angle on his line compared to the others. And it made him a big target. Had he had thinner line with his position on the boat his line would have been very infrequently tangled. And this is something you really have to consider if you are going on a party that likes to fish in more technically difficult conditions.

The most interesting thing that happened, happened to Robert Ploss. On one of our drifts, he dropped to bottom, hooked into a fish immediately and then got caught on bottom. He sat their with his rod, holding it, swearing to me that he had a fish. I believed him. He's too good a fisherman to be taken lightly. I was busy doing other things when Ian tried to help Robert. They ended up cleating his line off (his line had a rating of 110 pound test!) which, I thought, would hold us there, like an anchor. Later, I looked at our position and realized that we had drifted twelve boat lengths with Robert's line cleated off! Obviously, whatever he hooked was being dragged along the bottom as we drifted along. I pulled on the line and gained some. So I uncleated the line and told Robert to reel. I ended up pulling on the line (with a little help from my friends) as Robert reeled. After quite a long time we brought it to the surface. There, just under the water, was a coil of heavy duty orange electrical extension cable tied to what looked like a broken stantion!. Underneath all this was a 22 pound white hake! The hake, obviously, had wrapped around this mess after having been hooked but Robert managed to get the fish anyway! This is the largest fish that Robert has caught so far this year (he fishes quite frequently) and the second largest hake he has ever caught!

I received a couple of donations helping with my fund raising for the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was give to me by Jim Morrell from the "Larry Reed Crew". Larry had actually chartered the whole boat this day but couldn't make it because of a back problem. We ended up putting two other anglers on the boat to take Larry's and another's place. We had fun but I missed abusing Larry! Their donation was a very generous $275.00. There were two other donations in the form of "egifts", one from Jack Judge (CT/ME) for $50.00 and the other from Lawrence "Jay" Kennedy (VT) for $114.14 (Nothing is simple with Jay!). Thank you all so very much for your generous support.

Friday, September 5, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean appeared good in haze. It was a very warm day today (hot in the sun) but with less humidity than one would expect. The air temperature never reached 90F but it was close. The wind was light from the southwest all day. The sky was clear. There was never a hint of rain. The visibility was good along the shore.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at light speeds in the morning and as much as ten knots in the afternoon. Seas were calm in the morning with a one foot chop after noon. The air temperature stayed comfortably warm with the wind. The tide was moderate to strong at times. The sky was clear all day with much sun. The visibility ranged up to ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67.5F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 91F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 57F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was good to very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, of course (we are now targeting them). Legal landings also included six redfish, a skate and two mackerel. No potentially legal haddock or cusk were caught today. Only sixteen haddock were caught, all under twenty-one inches. Had they been able to keep cod, ten would have been landed. Only three dogfish were caught and released. Anchoring and drifting were the methods. Flies caught the most fish. The jig and fly combination worked the best.

Ian could not tell me who was high hook. However, whomever it was had no more than eight or ten legal. The difference was that almost everyone had at least seven or eight legal! And all the fish were much bigger on average than we have been seeing. Paul Guenthner (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the fishing season to date. The second largest fish was an 18.5 pound pollock caught by John Bye (ME). Todd "Cat Killer" MacDonald (NH) caught the third largest fish, a 17.5 pound pollock. He caught his pollock as part of a double keeper catch that also included a 13 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! This is the largest double keeper catch of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far.

Other Angler Highlights: Ron Covey (VT) caught an 11.5 pound pollock, a 10 pound pollock and a 16 pound pollock, his three largest fish. He also lost two jigs and landed the hard luck award t-shirt! Mitch Prophet (NY) landed a 10 pound pollock, one of the first good sized fish to come aboard today. George Thaler (NJ) caught a 15 pound pollock, one of the bigger fish of the trip. Jay Cobb (NH) tied George also with a 15 pound pollock. Derek Precourt (NY) boated a 12.5 pound pollock and a 14.5 pound pollock, his two best. John Baker (ME) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Bill Precourt (NY) caught a 14 pound pollock. Ken McLaughlin (ME) had seven legal today. His largest fish was a 13 pound pollock. Cliff Foster (ME) rounded off the trip with a 16.5 pound pollock.

Saturday, September 6, 2014

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 73F, the wind was blowing out of the south southwest at ten knots, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean appeared good but it seemed very hazy. The air temperature had climbed into the 80s by 10:00 AM. By noon, the air temperature was 89F. It was hot, hazy and very humid (uncomfortable). The visibility was down to fair because of the excess haze looking out over the ocean. The sky was mostly sunny all day. After noon, thunder showers went by on either side of Perkins Cove. But we never got any rain or lightning until 7:00 PM or slightly after. And we never got the full on thunder storms. The rain went on until 8:00 PM and then stopped. There was never much wind associated with it because we never got the brunt of any storm. Lucky.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at fifteen knots (more or less) with seas in chops of three to four feet. The air temperature was mild with the stronger than normal wind off the water. The sky was clear all day. They did, however, run into the edge of a thunder shower on the way back in. This only lasted a couple of minutes with rain. The tide (current) was strong and right up into the wind. The visibility was about six miles tops in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 65F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 92F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 62F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was fair today. The tide was such that it was running into the wind (you couldn't anchor) and the chops were such that it was uncomfortable to fish. Landings were down today. There was no bite except on cod. They would have been able to bring home twenty-seven cod had they been legal to keep over twenty-one inches. And there were six haddock over twenty-one inches as well (along with thirty haddock under twenty-one inches). However, the pollock, the targeted species, would not bite. And of course the haddock and cod were incidental while going after the pollock. Legal landings included twelve pollock, one redfish and one cusk. Drifting was the method for most of the day. They tried anchoring to no avail. Cod flies caught the most fish. The jig/fly combo worked the best.

Jared didn't tell me who was high hook. Derek Precourt (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11.5 pound pollock caught by Bill Precourt (NY). Mitch Prophet (NY) caught the third largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. Tom Oliver (NH) landed the hard luck award for getting that bad result from a lack of symmetry between his body and the motion of the ocean.

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather for thunder showers had been building all day. You could feel it. When the boat left the dock all I could think of was that I hoped it didn't rain so much that it spoiled the trip for them. On the grounds, that really wasn't the case. Although they saw quite a bit of lightning, they didn't see much rain. They did see lightning around them but nothing so severe to keep them from fishing. The wind blew out of the southwest but it was less than the day trip with the strength about ten to fifteen knots max. Seas were chops of one to two feet. The sky was mostly overcast for the trip. The air temperature was mild. The visibility ranged from one to eight miles in fog and haze.

The fishing/catching was actually pretty good. Landings were down as almost all the fish caught were sub-legal, mostly pollock. Legal fish caught included a cunner, a cusk and three mackerel. There were quite a few sub-legal cod, one sea raven and three sculpins that were also caught and released. They anchored for every stop. Everyone used bait only.

Derek Decesere (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 1.75 pound sub-legal cod caught by Nick Pac (ME). Nick was also the bachelor (all but two anglers were in this "party") being celebrated this evening so Jared gave him the hard luck award as well. Clyde Hill (NY) caught the third largest fish, a 1 pound cunner.

I received a $25.00 donation from Tim Bowden (MA) sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thanks very much, Tim. I very much appreciate the support. And so do many others!

Sunday, September 7, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston were supposed to be hosting the Jim Lennon (all New York) extreme day trip charter (sans Jim) today. Or they tried to. Half way to the grounds, they discovered a coolant leak near one of the heads. At the same time I was on my bicycle headed to the Senior Games to compete in a 40K & 20K road bike race for a chance at going to the Nationals. The event was taking place in Kennebunkport, just fifteen miles down the road from my house. I was almost there when I got the call from Ian. After he described the situation, I suggested that he terminate the trip and head home. This he did. At the same time, I continued to the start of the race to tell them at the registration desk that I wouldn't be in the race and to thank them for allowing me to participate (They had allowed me to sign up late.). I ended up meeting the boat shortly after they got back to the dock.

We worked on the engine all day and seemed to get the problem under control. This with much consulting with Skip Dunning, my preferred road tech from NEDDA (Power Products) in Portland, Maine. We will plan to run the trip tomorrow and start all over again.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the wind barely blowing out of the west, the sky was overcast and the visibility over the ocean appeared good in haze. The overcast skies did not last. By 7:00 AM, the sky had cleared and the sun was shinning brightly. It was a beautiful day overall. The air temperature reached 75F. The humidity of yesterday was gone. The wind blew out of the northeast in the morning, quickly died out later in the morning, became light and variable in direction and then established a southwest direction in the afternoon. The ocean was calm all day. The visibility went from good to excellent. The air temperature cooled to the 60s in the evening. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 76F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 50F).

Monday, September 8, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the wind was blowing lightly out of the northeast, the sky was crystal clear and the visibility over the ocean seemed excellent. The sun rose after 6:00 AM, over a flat calm ocean. When the wind did blow it was very light from the northeast. The wind never got up to ten knots along the shore. Or, if it did get that high it was just ten knots. The ocean remained calm along the shore all day. And Captain Jack Gordon on the charter sailing yacht, Silverlining, was complaining that there just wasn't enough wind to allow his boat to sail properly. Another five knots was all he was asking. He never got it! The air temperature was perfect today with a high reading of 70F at the house. The sky was cloudless most of the day. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or two. The visibility was excellent as it was ashore. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The air temperature was warm. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 50F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 71F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 75F (with a low of 45F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was good overall. It was also very good for catching sub-legal fish (including eight cod over twenty-one inches and three haddock over twenty-one inches). Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included two redfish. Drifting and anchoring were the methods employed. Cod flies caught the most fish. The jig and fly combo worked the best.

I wasn't told exactly whom was high hook. But I do know that it was over ten legal. Sam Maresh (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.5 pound pollock. He caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 13.5 pounds. This is the Bunny Clark's largest double of the season to date. The 13.5 pound pollock tied with another 13.5 pound pollock caught by Dave Latast (NY) for the third largest fish of the trip. Dave also caught a 12 pound pollock. Leon Schrecengost (NY) landed the second largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. And he could have been high hook as well. I just don't know that for sure. Leon also caught a pollock of 11 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Fran Lizor (NY) caught an 11 pound pollock. George Ranney (NY) landed a pollock of 10.5 pounds, his largest fish. Art Green (NY) caught a 13 pound pollock. Our own Ken McLaughlin (ME) landed an 11 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, his two best. Bill Wallace (ME) would have been high hook if you counted his sub-legal fish. In fact, he caught so many sub-legal fish that Ian took pity on him and presented him with the hard luck award!

The engine was fine today. Ian checked it out half way to the grounds. No coolant leaks. On the grounds. No coolant leaks. And back at the barn (Cove). No coolant leaks. I found the problem. And it looks like something we could fix at sea anyway. Now!

Tim Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I hosted the Annual Sweenor (NY) Marathon Trip Charter today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the wind was blowing lightly out of the east, the sky was clear with a few small clouds here and there, the full moon was shinning brightly overhead and the visibility over the ocean seemed excellent for the second day in a row.

We had a decent ride to the fishing grounds. The wind was out of the northeast at less than ten knots headed out the gate. Seas were chops of a foot. The further we got out the windier it got. On the grounds, we had east northeast winds of ten knots and seas in chops of a foot or two. Later in the afternoon, the wind hauled out of the east southeast and blew up to fifteen knots with seas of about three feet, more or less. This wind backed off to five knots or less on the ride back to Perkins Cove. The sky was mostly sunny in the morning, mostly cloudy in the afternoon. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged to twenty miles or more in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.1F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 49F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 69F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 42F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was very good overall. The tide was strong but it was up into the wind most of the day so anglers had an advantage, instead of an expected disadvantage with the full moon tide. We had very few cod & haddock as I pretty much stayed away from them for all but the last hour of the trip. We did release nine cod that would have been legal last month. Haddock was the same. We were able to avoid them until the last drift. Out of the fifteen haddock caught, only two would have been legal with a twenty-one inch minimum size. Most legal fish landed, by far, were pollock. Legal landings also included seven redfish, five cusk, two white hake, one whiting and two butter mullet. We lost three jigs to blue sharks. Not a single dogfish was seen. We anchored on every spot except the last two drops. All terminal gear worked well but the cod flies caught the most fish.

Fran Sweenor, Jr. (NY) was high hook with the most legal fish. I don't know exactly how many he caught but it was well over twenty. His best catch was a double keeper catch that included a 15.5 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! This is the Bunny Clark's third largest double keeper catch of the season to date. Tim Sweenor (NY) caught the largest fish of the trip, a 22 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the season so far. This is the largest fish that Tim has caught in many years. He was not in the boat pool! I took a picture of Tim with his nice fish. This digital image appears on the left. Tim also caught a 12 pound pollock as part of his catch. Dan Seymour (NY) and Stuffy House (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with a tie for the second largest fish of the trip weighing 18 pounds. Dan's was an 18 pound pollock. This fish was caught as a double keeper catch along with another pollock of 7.5 pounds. Some of Dan's other notable fish included a 15 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Stuffy's 18 pounder was a white hake, the largest white hake of the trip. Stuffy also caught two pollock of 12.5 pounds each.

Other Angler Highlights: Keith House (NY) was the first angler to catch a fish I could weigh. That fish was a 10.25 pound pollock. Keith's biggest fish was a pollock of 12 pounds. Dave Sweenor (NY) landed the second largest double keeper catch of the trip. His catch included a 14 pound pollock and a 13.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. This is the Bunny Clark's seventh largest double keeper catch of the season so far. Some of Dave's other great fish included a 10.5 pound pollock, a 12.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. Fran Sweenor, III (NY) landed an 11 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock, his best two fish. Cliff Steinauer (NY) boated a 12 pound pollock, a 10 pound pollock, an 11.5 pound pollock and a15.5 pound pollock, his best fish. Dale Dattler (NY) boated a 10.5 pound pollock very early in the trip. Near the very end of the trip he caught his largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. Ron Witkowski (NY) caught the two largest cod. One weighed 9.5 pounds. The other weighed 8 pounds. He released both right back to the ocean alive. Some of his other good fish included an 11 pound pollock, an 11.5 pound pollock and a double that included a 16.5 pound pollock and a 9 pound pollock. Kevin Dattler (NY) landed a 10 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock, his two best fish. Pat Sweenor (NY) had a hard time getting out of the bunk. The head seemed to garner more of his attention than the fishing. He finally launched himself out of the Hotel Bunny Clark to spend the day on the rail - fishing. For the extra curricular stuff he landed the hard luck award. His reward for fishing was a 17 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip.

I received two generous donations sponsoring me in my Pan-Mass Challenge cycling event for cancer research and care with the Jimmy Fund. The first donation was from Dave & Rita Sweenor (NY) for $50.00. The other donation was $70.00 from Cliff Steinauer (NY). Thank you all so very much for your kindness and support. I very much appreciate that you care as I do.

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston hosted the Annual Tom Bruyere & The St. Lawrence River Rats Extreme Day Trip Charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots, the sky was overcast and the visibility over the ocean was very good, it seemed. Later, I questioned my visibility claim as it looked like some fog or rain showers over the ocean at 7:00 AM. The Bunny Clark headed out of the Cove with everyone forward to lighten up the stern, or deepest drafting part of the boat, to clear the bottom in this full moon dead low (1.5 feet below normal) tide.

The weather ashore was perfect starting at 11:00 AM. The clouds had cleared away by that time leaving the sky sunny and clear. The sky remained mostly clear for the rest of the day. The air temperature was mild with a high air temperature of 68F. The wind blew out of the northeast for most of the day. There was no wind by 5:00 PM. The ocean was calm along the shore. The visibility was very good with some haze during the day.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten knots in the morning, less than that in the afternoon. The ocean was calm for the ride back to Perkins Cove. The largest chop they saw was about a foot over chop/swells of two to four feet, this, obviously, from a wind blowing harder off shore. The sky was overcast for most of the morning, clear and sunny around noon. The air temperature went from mild to warm as the wind dropped. The current was moderate to strong. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.9F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 70F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 53F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far, our newest targeted species. They managed to stay away from concentrations of cod and haddock. Had the same rules applied today as they were in August they would have kept four cod and three haddock. They released four dogfish and were not bothered by blue sharks as much as we were yesterday. Legal landings also included eighteen white hake, one mackerel, one cusk, three redfish and two butter mullet. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Rich Mallott (NY) was high hook with fourteen legal. His largest fish was an 18.5 pound white hake. His two largest pollock weighed 11.5 pounds and 11 pounds. Lance Rudiger (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 24 pound white hake. He also caught a hake of 18 pounds. The second largest fish was a 22.5 pound white hake caught by Gregg Mallette (NY). Gerry Hydrusko (NJ) landed the third largest fish, a 19 pound white hake.

Other Angler Highlights: Mike Kotash (NY) caught the largest pollock of the trip at 17.5 pounds. He also caught a 10 pound pollock very early in the trip. Andrew Bruyere (NY) boated a 17.5 pound white hake, his largest fish. His two best pollock weighed 10.5 pounds and 11 pounds. John Gardner (NY) boated the largest haddock at 5 pounds. His biggest fish was a 10 pound pollock. Matt Liscum (NY) landed a 15 pound white hake, his biggest fish. Bob Williams (NY) caught a 17.5 pound white hake, his best. Kim Demers (NY) landed a 13.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, his two best fish. Doug Duprey (NY) caught a 12.5 pound pollock as his largest fish. Tom "Ollie" Bruyere (NY) landed the largest cod at 12 pounds. He hated to see it go! Kimberly Duprey (NY) landed the hard luck award for catching the dreaded mal de mer. Her condition was such that she never wetted a line! Ouch, that's not good!

Every year, early in the year, Tom Bruyere and the "River Rats" give generously, helping me in my cancer bike ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge. This year was no exception. Thanks again, men. We all enjoy having you guys aboard!

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I hosted the Jim Strife Boys & Friends Marathon Fishing Trip Excursion today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, there was no wind in the Cove but the closest weather buoy was giving south southeast wind at ten knots, the sky was mostly clear with an almost full moon overhead and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in some haze.

The wind was blowing out of the south at ten knots under a starry sky with very good visibility and one foot chops as we left the gate at Perkins Cove behind. The wind got a bit stronger before we got to the fishing grounds and the seas made up a foot more. On the grounds, the southerly wind was probably fifteen knots, more or less. Seas were chops of about two feet. Later in the morning the wind hauled out of the south southwest and blew up to twenty knots or so. Seas built to three and five feet. Clouds rolled in after noon. By early afternoon, the sky was overcast. Mid afternoon saw a few sprinkles of rain but not enough to warrant putting oil gear on. The rain stopped almost as soon as it started. The visibility ranged to eight miles in haze. The tide went from strong to moderate. The air temperature was warm/mild. It was just too cool for me to wear just a t-shirt. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.3F on the fishing grounds early in the morning and then never went above 63F after that. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 80F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 58F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was very good overall. We were inundated with blue sharks on the first drift. We lost at least four jigs to them right off the bat. And we hooked others besides. We never hooked another blue shark at any time for the rest of the trip! We used the current to our advantage all day. There were no dogfish seen. And there was no end to the pollock. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by (very) far. In fact, on one spot, we caught more pollock over 10 pounds than on any other spot this season to date. Three of these pollock were over 20 pounds. Legal landings also included thirteen redfish, one cusk, one whiting and two butter mullet. There were six cod over twenty-one inches to 6.5 pounds released as well as two haddock over twenty-one inches out of a total haddock count of six. We drift fished and anchored. Cod flies and jigs caught the most fish by far.

I don't know who was high hook but I suspect it was Trevor Ryan (NY) with over twenty legal. There were others who might have had over twenty as well. I don't know who they were. This primarily because everyone pooled their fish under one number. Some of Trevor's better fish included an 11.5 pound pollock, a 17 pound pollock, a 14.5 pound pollock, a 13.5 pound pollock and a double keeper catch that included a 14 pound pollock and a 16 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! This is the Bunny Clark's fourth largest double keeper catch to date.

Mark Strife (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 24 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's largest pollock of the season so far. I took a picture of he and his nice fish. The digital image appears on the left. Mark also caught a 13.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. [I did not have time today to weigh every pollock over 10 pounds. I was way too busy!] Mark Cerroni (NY) had a very hard day catching fish. In fact, I don't think he caught a legal fish until after 1:00 PM. Then he boated a 22.5 pound pollock. After that, all hell broke loose and he caught one fish after another. With the 22.5 pounder, he won the boat pool for the second largest fish. It was the second largest fish as well. It's also the Bunny Clark's third largest pollock of the season to date. I took a digital image of Mark with his long pollock. This picture appears on the right. A couple other fish of his that I weighed included a pollock of 16 pounds and another pollock of 13 pounds. The third largest fish was a pollock of 21.5 pounds caught by Russell Strife (NY). He caught this as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 10.5 pounds. This is tie for the Bunny Clark's largest double keeper catch of the season so far. The pollock is the fifth largest pollock of the Bunny Clark season to date. Before the double his two largest pollock weighed 10.25 pounds and 12 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Jim Strife landed a 10 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock, his two largest pollock. James Strife, Jr. (NY) landed the only cusk. It weighed 11 pounds, a tie for the third largest cusk of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. His largest pollock weighed 13 pounds. But, to his credit, he spent most of the later part of the day helping the captain/mate gaff pollock! Paul Strife (NY) landed a 17.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Ron Swartout (NY) caught an 11 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, his two best. Mike Strife (NY) landed an 18 pound pollock, his biggest fish. He caught an 11 pound pollock early in the day. Scott Strife (NY) caught so many fish over 10 pounds that I stopped weighing them. The pollock I did weigh had values of 16.5 pounds, 15 pounds, 12 pounds, 13 pounds and 11.5 pounds. Joe Strife (NY) landed a 10.25 pound pollock. He might have caught bigger fish that I didn't weigh. John Strife (NY) landed a 10.5 pound pollock early and then proceeded to get larger fish. Some of the fish that I weighed were a 15 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. He also caught a double that included a 17 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. This comes in as a tie for the ninth largest double of the Bunny Clark season to date. Chris Schilling (KY) had a bit of a slow start in the morning with equipment issues but came on strong after noon. His three best fish included a 14 pound pollock and two pollock of 13 pounds each. Bill Gardner (NY) caught an 11 pound pollock. Bruce Bezanilla (NY) landed a 14.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Pat Bennett (NY) caught a 19 pound pollock, his best fish and the fourth largest fish of the trip. Two other fish of his that I weighed were a 12 pound pollock and a pollock of 15.25 pounds. Mark Connelly, Sr. (NY) boated a 17.5 pound pollock very near the end of the trip, his best fish. Dave Fahsel (NY) landed the hard luck award for spending the whole day in the Hotel Bunny Clark. He asked for a bucket fifteen minutes into the trip and never broke stride until all but the last half hour of the ride in! He never wetted a line! Yes, ouch!

I received two generous sponsorship donations for my ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The first came from this charter as a whole, thanks to help from Jim Strife, a cancer survivor. The donation amount was $110.00 total. Thank you all so very much! The second came to me in the mail from Richard Payeur (FL) and, his daughter, Elinor Kostanski (FL) for a very generous $200.00. They support me very generously every year. Thanks very much, Dick & Elinor. I do so appreciate your joining me in the fight against cancer!

Friday, September 12, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at ten knots, the sky was mostly clear with a partial moon overhead lighting the landscape and the visibility over the ocean seemed very good at least. The sunrise was a bit colder than it has been. Fifty-six degrees was the temperature at 6:00 AM. The high air temperature was 68F. It was sunny all day with a light northwest wind in the morning, dying out around noon. The ocean was calm for the rest of the day with light and variable winds. The visibility was very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were two to three feet in chops. After noon, the wind died to about five knots, still out of the north. Seas were chops of a foot. It was calm for most of the ride back to Perkins Cove. The sky was sunny all day. The air temperature was warm, a shorts and flip flops kind of day. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was very good or over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 47F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 68F with a low of 56F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 47F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was very good today, overall. Some anglers had a fair day, most did good or better and one angler had an excellent day. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included one redfish and three cusk. There were ten cod and twelve haddock that would have been of legal size had the regulations been the same as they were in August. The total haddock catch was about one hundred and fifty or more than we have seen in this same area probably ever. There were twenty-three dogfish caught and released. No blue sharks were seen. Drifting and anchoring were the methods. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Mark Cote (ME) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish an angler has caught during any trip in a month. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.75 pound pollock. His second largest fish was a pollock of 10.5 pounds. Leo Lamoureux (VT) landed the second largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. Leo caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch that also included a 12 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! He also caught a pollock of 10 pounds. The third largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Ken McLaughlin (ME). Ken caught seven legal fish today. This is not a good count for him. But it's not bad either.

Other Angler Highlights: Kamron Kimball (ME) landed the first fish that could be weighed, an 11 pound pollock. Aaron Cote (ME) caught the largest cod of the trip. It weighed 11 pounds. His largest fish was a 12.5 pound pollock. Rick Graves (ME) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, his best fish. Lee Goudy (IN) caught the second largest cod, a 10 pounder. Cindy Harris (ME) landed the hard luck award for attaining high hurler status.

Saturday, September 13, 2014

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 4:30 AM EDT the air temperature was 50F, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots, the sky was clear with a two thirds moon directly overhead and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind was the salient feature of the day. It blew out of the northeast at fifteen to twenty knots most of the day. Before the morning had run out the sky had become overcast. The threat of rain was in the air but it didn't start raining until 5:00 PM. Light to moderate rain fell until after 8:00 PM. There was not much rain after that. The air temperature dropped to 44F at 7:00 AM before rising back up to a high of 62F after noon. The visibility on the ocean was good in haze.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north northeast at fifteen to twenty knots, the same as it did along the shore. Seas were chops of three to five feet for the trip. It wasn't so rough that you couldn't go but it wasn't fun for a number of anglers aboard. Quite a few were sea sick. The sky was sunny for the trip, overcast by the time they made Perkins Cove. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged to ten miles in some haze/spray. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 61F (with a low of 43F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 67F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 58F (with a low of 39F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was poor overall. The sea conditions were hard, the blue sharks bothered them on anchor, there were a few dogfish and there was no bite. Legal landings included seven pollock and two redfish. They would have been able to keep five cod and two haddock had the regulations been the same as they were in the summer. fourteen dogfish were released. They tried drifting but anchoring was the preferred method. All terminal gear worked the same.

Colby Lavin (MA) should have won the boat pool with a pollock that was estimated to have been 12 or 13 pounds when it was whole. Unfortunately, a blue shark took half the fish before they could get it in the boat. The remains (head) weighed 7.5 pounds which made it the second largest fish of the trip. Casey Stearns (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 7 pound pollock caught by Peter Stearns (MA). Peter was the manager at Power Products in Portland, Maine and was instrumental in helping me re-power the Bunny Clark with the engine I still have in her today. I never did see Peter when he arrived to the boat in the morning as I was off on a "century ride" with the Maine Coast Cycling Club before 6:00 AM. And I missed him getting off the boat because I jumped on the bow before the passengers departed and came in by the starboard side curtain. Had I waited until everyone got off the boat I would have been able to shake his hand, something I didn't do before he left the company a few years ago. He helped me quite a bit in those days.

Zack Little (MA) landed the hard luck award for being one of the high hurlers on the Bunny Clark today. He is also getting married here in the near future.

I received a $25.00 from Daniel Lambert (NY) supporting me in my cancer fund raising with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thanks, Dan. I appreciate your generosity!

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The air temperature dropped down to about 48F before it started the climb up to about 62F. The air temperature felt cool. In fact, it felt cooler than 62F except in the sun. There was a little wind from the northwest in the morning. After noon, the wind was light and variable in direction. The ocean along the shore was calm. The visibility was excellent. The sky was nearly cloudless and very sunny all day.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at ten knots or more in the morning. Seas were chops of two feet. The air temperature was cool in the morning. After noon, the northerly wind had dropped to five knots. The air temperature turned warm. Near the end of the trip the wind was light and variable with an almost calm ocean. The sky was a mix of sunny conditions and overcast skies. The tide (current) was strong all day. The visibility was excellent. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 45F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 66F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 63F (with a low of 37F).

The fishing was good or maybe better than that. The current was the only thing they really had to contend with. The weather was good and there were few blue sharks and no dogfish. The catching was fair to good. Landings were poor. Legal fish landed included nine pollock, six redfish, one whiting and three cusk. There were twenty-five cod over twenty-one inches that were released. None of these cod approached the 10 pound mark. There was one haddock of twenty-one inches caught out of forty-six total that were caught. Drifting and anchoring were both utilized with very little difference. There was really no bite today. All terminal worked about the same.

Jeff Vieser (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 9.25 pound cod caught by Ian Kiraly (NH). This fish, of course, was released after weighing. Joe Zydlewski (ME) landed the third largest fish, a 9 pound pollock. Carl Graves (VT) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.

Monday, September 15, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at eight knots, the sky was mostly clear in a cero mackerel sky and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The air temperature warmed up to the mid 50s by 9:00 AM. After noon, the air temperature got up to 63F. It never got any warmer than that because a southwest breeze started to blow in over the ocean keeping the air temperature a bit cooler than it was inland. The wind blew out of the northwest until about 11:30 AM, when it died out. The wind was never stronger than ten knots ashore. The sky was clear, cloudless at times. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at ten to five knots. Seas were chops of a foot or more over a two to three foot long swell. After noon, the wind dropped, the chop was gone and they were left with long rolling sea swells of about two feet. The sky was clear. The air temperature was mild overall. The visibility was excellent. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 41F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 67F with a low of 48F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 66F (with a low of 35F).

The fishing was very good. The catching was very good or better. Landings feel into the "good" category. Most legal fish landed were pollock in the 7 to 8 pound class, a little smaller on average than they have been. Legal landings also included one redfish, two cusk and one butter mullet. There were forty-four cod over twenty-one inches they could have kept had it been August. Six haddock fell into the same category out of a total haddock count of eighty-one. Drifting and anchoring were the methods. Cod flies caught the most fish by far.

Eric Baker (NY) or Tom Zido (NY) were high hook with enough legal fish that they couldn't get an accurate count. Tom caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 10.25 pound pollock. Both Eric and Tom tied for the third largest fish, both with pollock of 10 pounds. Tom had two 10 pounders while Eric had one. Our own Ken McLaughlin (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.75 pound pollock. Mack Williamson (ME) landed the hard luck award for being the only angler aboard to not catch a single legal fish! Oh, man!

Ian Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the marathon trip today.

At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the wind was blowing out of the south southwest at five knots, the sky was overcast and the visibility over the ocean was good (at least eight miles). At 4:30 AM, it was just starting to sprinkle with rain. The rain was short lived. Except for a couple of sprinkles now and then there wasn't enough rain after the 4:30 AM shower to even wet the grounds. The sky stayed overcast all day until just before 5:00 PM when it cleared for good. The air temperature remained in the lower 60s. The visibility was very good. The wind blew very lightly out of the southwest. The ocean remained calm along the shore.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to five knots. Seas were chops of a foot at most to calm. Mostly it was really too calm for a good bite. The sky was overcast for the trip. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility was very good to excellent. The air temperature was mild. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.8F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 61F (with a low of 46F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 65F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 65F (with a low of 48F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was fair overall. Although it was calm, the tide made it difficult to get exactly where you wanted to be. The bite was off because of the calm weather even though I thought the overcast conditions would help. And there were only four dogfish seen today. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-three redfish, two cusk, eleven white hake, four butter mullets and one mackerel. Had the same rules in August applied today they would have also brought home twelve cod and three haddock (out of thirty-seven total). Drifting and anchoring were both used intermittently. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Tom Murphy (VT) was high hook with about fifteen legal, more or less. His largest fish was a 10 pound white hake. Dave Gray (VT) probably had the largest fish of the trip. They never saw the fish as it was lost part way up from bottom. Roger DuHamel (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 26 pound Maine state trophy white hake. He also caught another white hake of 11.5 pounds. The second largest fish was a 21.5 pound white hake caught by Dennis Koch (CT). Ernie Centerbar (NY) landed the third largest fish, also a white hake, of 19.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Joe Sinkler (NY) caught the first good fish to weigh today, a 12.5 pound pollock. Bruce Gray (ME) caught the best double keeper catch of the trip. His double included a 12 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. He also landed a 10.5 pound pollock. Dan Daleb (CT) caught the largest pollock of the trip at 15.5 pounds. He also caught the largest haddock we have seen on the Bunny Clark in weeks. His haddock weighed 6.5 pounds, only a half pound shy of a Maine state trophy. Chad Whittemore (VT) landed an 11.5 pound cusk. This ties the second largest cusk caught on the Bunny Clark this season to date. Fritz Cybulski (CT) caught one of the larger pollock of the trip at 12.5 pounds. Arthur Centerbar (NY) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single legal fish! He was the only angler in that category.

I spent the morning and early afternoon in Portland, Maine at the New England Fishery Management Council's Recreational Advisory Panel meeting. Of most interest to our anglers, we talked about relaxing the prohibition on cod and haddock before November. Although the assessment showed that there are ten times more haddock of value available to the recreational angler, the cod are in such desperate shape that, in it's wisdom (or lack there of), the National Marine Fisheries Service thought it best to keep recreational anglers away from the cod by not allowing anyone to keep haddock. In other words, cod became the choke species for the possession of haddock. It also looks like the recreational angler may not be able to keep haddock in April at this point. There is a chance that that could change over the winter. But this chance is a slim one. However, haddock rules have changed in the past so I believe anything is possible. We will have to see.

Other things of interest were new inshore areas to be proposed as cod spawning closures. Some of the meaningful closures we all agree with. But others are no longer cod spawning areas where you find other species including haddock in May. We didn't agree that these other areas should be closed to the recreational angler. There was another proposal for an inshore and offshore designation. Here the thought was that a vessel would have to declare the area to be fished. I was unsure of the timeline for a declaration. Regardless, we thought it unnecessary, a lack of benefit for any of the species (particularly cod), trouble with enforcement and we had safety concerns. And, finally, we sent this motion forward: "The RAP would support for analysis purposes a small or no possession of GOM cod if it means continued prosecution of other recreational fisheries (e.g., haddock, pollock, etc.). The RAP reserves its judgment on haddock bag limits, size limits, seasons, etc for FY 2015 until such data is provided. The RAP requests this information be provided in a timely manner." Read into this what you will. The concern is that keeping any amount of cod for the 2015 season is problematic at best with the new numbers that have just come out. Plus the spawning stock biomass is so low as to make any directed fishery on cod an unlikelihood. I know it doesn't sound good. I will keep working on this problem with others and keep informing you of the details in the future.

I received two donations from anglers I wish I could have taken fishing (myself) today supporting my involvement with the Pan-Mass Challenge cancer cure project. Tom Murphy gave $25.00 while Chad Whittemore gave $20.00. Thank you both so very much for your help. I certainly do appreciate it!

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 51F, there was no wind to speak of, the sky was clear with a crescent moon hanging well above the eastern horizon and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The day ashore was wonderful in the weather department. The wind was light with no discernable direction the whole day. The ocean along the shore was calm. The sky was clear. The air temperature got up to 65F. The visibility was very good. And it was very peaceful in Ogunquit. It was a great day to be here. Unfortunately for me, I spent the whole day in the office, longing to be anywhere outside.

On the fishing grounds, there was no wind and no direction of wind. The ocean was flat calm all day. You could have floated a scallop shell on the ocean today. The air temperature was warm. The sky was clear and sunny. There was no tide or very little current. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.8F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 66F (with a low of 43F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 69F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 69F (with a low of 47F).

The fishing was excellent. The catching was good, at least. Landings were down in the fair category. Legal landings included twenty-two pollock, four redfish, a whiting and four cusk. Eighty-one haddock were released. Six could have been kept if this time were August. And fifteen out of thirty-two cod would have been kept if this were August as well. Ten dogfish were released. Ian didn't mention anything about blue sharks. They drift fished and anchored. It didn't seem to matter. The jig & fly combo worked the best.

Ian didn't mention to me who the high hook was today. He doesn't like catching so few fish. So I believe this makes him ambivalent about the angler who caught the most legal fish. Rick Krajewski (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. He also caught a 10 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11.5 pound pollock caught by Steve Millikan (MA). Steve also caught a 10 pound pollock. John Baker (ME) caught the third largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. John caught this as part of a double keeper catch that also included another pollock of 10.5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time.

Other Angler Highlights: Ken McLaughlin (ME) had an enjoyable day but only caught three legal fish. That's a slow day for him. Nor did he catch a fish close to 10 pounds. Steve Ladd (ME) caught a pollock of 10.75 pounds, his best fish. Chandler Van Orman (ME) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single legal fish. This is new territory for Chandler. He's my neighbor. I won't rub it in too much!

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 48F, there was eight knots of wind out of the west, the sky was clear with a crescent moon hanging over the eastern horizon and the visibility over the ocean seemed excellent.

It was an easy ride to the fishing grounds. The sky was clear, the wind was light from the west and the visibility was very good. There wasn't a hint of fog. On the grounds, the wind was light from the west to start. The wind picked up to about eight knots from the west northwest for about fifteen minutes and then died out. The ocean remained calm past noon and into the afternoon. At 4:00 PM we ran into a line of showers. We only saw light northerly wind with this front. Except for fifteen minutes of these showers, the sky was clear and sunny. We never saw more than a one foot chop and that was early in the trip. The air temperature was warm (t-shirt weather). The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty-four miles at least. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.5F on the fishing grounds early in the morning and then never went above 63F after that. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 43F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 75F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 38F).

The weather was perfect but the fishing was fair. This was due to the very large number (hundreds) of blue sharks that plagued us all morning. We lost sixty rigs to blue sharks and lost approximately twice the fish that we actually landed. All our biggest pollock were taken by blue sharks. The hooking of legal fish was excellent. You could not get to bottom without hooking a fish. It was a toss of a coin as to whether you could get your fish past the blue sharks. This ended after noon when I found some colder surface water inside of where we had primarily been fishing. Landings overall were good, at least. Most legal fish landed were redfish and pollock, in that order. It was our biggest redfish day of the season so far. And it was one of our better pollock trips as well. Legal landings also included seven cusk and eight white hake. We released twelve cod up to 8.5 pounds that would have been legal to keep a month ago. There were also eleven haddock that would have gone into a fish box out of the forty-one haddock that were caught. Not a single dogfish was seen. Drifting and anchoring were both used. Cod flies caught the most fish.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. Everyone caught a lot of fish. And I don't believe there were any stand-outs among anglers. Chris Porter (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 30.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. He also won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 28 pound Maine state trophy white hake! His third largest fish was a 24 pound white hake, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Wobby Barnes (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 24.75 pound white hake. Wobby also landed the two largest pollock of the trip. One pollock weighed 11.25 pounds while the other weighed 11 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Skip Strong (ME) boated the first fish that I could weigh, a 10 pound cod. He also had what I thought was a pretty good sized halibut on his line that he ended up breaking off. I believe the line was frayed from all the blue shark activity. It made one really good run to bottom with Skip bringing it back to the surface when the line broke. The second fish I weighed was a 9 pound pollock caught by Aaron Green (NY). After that I never weighed a fish (except for a couple of haddock) under 10 pounds. Paul Smegal (MA) caught the first good sized haddock, a 5 pounder. Later, Jon Griffin (MA) released a haddock that looked to be 5 pounds. Jon's largest fish was a 23 pound white hake. Ray Westermann (MA) caught the largest haddock of the trip. The fish weighed 5.5 pounds just before release. Jerry Beaudin (NY) landed the hardest luck of the day award for getting a slow start, getting tangles and for losing rigs to blue sharks. Frankly, I couldn't think of anyone else to give it to!

Skip Strong donated $20.00 to help me in my fund raising drive for a cancer cure with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. I thought he had donated enough money to the "Jigs for Blue Sharks Fund" but, apparently, he had enough left over for a good cause! Thank you very much, Skip. It was good having you aboard. And if we get catch a 150 pound halibut with a jig in it's mouth, I'll let you know!

Friday, September 19, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 41F, the wind was out of the north northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen knots or so for all but the last two hours of the morning. So the wind backed off earlier than I expected. After noon, there wasn't much wind and the ocean looked calm except for the left over chop from the previous wind. The air temperature was cool all day. I don't believe we saw a temperature reading out of the 50s mark. I doubt the temperature reached 60F. The sky was clear all day, cloudless in the morning. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind out of the northeast at fifteen knots to start. Seas were three to five feet in chops on the way to the fishing grounds and on the grounds. The wind backed off to five knots or less after noon. The seas backed off as well. The ocean was calm for the ride home. The sky was clear all day. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was very good to excellent. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60.9F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 36F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 56F with a low of 46F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 59F (with a low of 31F).

The fishing was good. The catching was very good. Landings came in with the category of good. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included two mackerel. No cusk or redfish were landed. There were twelve dogfish and one hundred and eleven haddock returned back alive. None of the haddock reached the twenty-one inch mark. Five cod caught have been kept had the regulations allowed the same benefits as were available in August. Drifting and anchoring were both utilized. Cod flies caught the lions share of the fish. Nothing else worked as well.

Ray Westermann (MA) was high hook with sixteen legal. He didn't land a fish of 10 pounds. Norman Lux (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.75 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a pollock of 11.75 pounds caught by Michael Barrows (PA). Scott Anzalone (NJ) and Jon Griffin (MA) tied for the third largest fish. Both anglers caught an 11.5 pound pollock each. Griff also caught a pollock of 11 pounds. Scott also landed the hard luck award for reaching high hurler status. That didn't keep Scott from fishing, however!

Other Angler Highlights: Jim Anderson (NJ) landed two pollock of 10.5 pounds each early in the trip. Norm Herrick (MA) landed a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish.

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 40F, the wind was out of the west southwest at a speed just shy of fifteen knots, the sky was clear with a sliver of a moon over northeast horizon and the visibility over the ocean seemed excellent. Clouds started to move in at dawn. By 8:00 AM, the sky was overcast. It looked like it was going to rain. It never did. The air temperature rose over the high of yesterday by noon. By 1:00 PM, it was 63F. The wind blew out of the south just about all day. It was windy with gusts over twenty-five mph. White caps could be seen from the parking lot. All the scenic tour boats and dude sailboats we done by 1:00 PM. The sky cleared around noon. There was a mix of sun and clouds for the rest of the day. The visibility was good at best in some haze.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at fifteen to twenty knots. Seas were chops of four to five feet. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was very strong all day. The sky was overcast for the trip. The visibility ranged to ten miles in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57.8F on the fishing grounds, the coldest surface water temperature we have seen in a while. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 36F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 73F with a low of 47F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 30F).

The fishing was fair to poor with the sea conditions. Not only was it hard to fish, almost half the anglers on the boat were incapacitated with sea sickness. Despite the conditions, the catching of fish was good. Landings were a little less than good. Legal fish landed included twenty-eight pollock, one cusk and two whiting. Only two haddock out of forty-seven caught were twenty-one inches or better. There were six cod that could have been kept if August were today. Six dogfish were released. No blue sharks were seen. Anchoring and drifting were the methods. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Jared couldn't tell me whom was high hook. It wasn't Scott Anzalone (NJ) who was sea sick again today and didn't fish! He had nine legal yesterday! Kris Whittemore (ME) caught the largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. He was not in the boat pool. Mike Lamparelli (NH) caught the second largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock. He also was not in the boat pool. Jim Anderson (NJ) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the third largest fish, an 8 pound pollock. Jessica Moran (MI) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick just after they left Perkins Cove and never moving again until they got back in. Jared never did get a look at her face because it was down on the rail under a hood for the whole trip. Needless to say, she did not wet a line!

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was overcast, there had just been a fine mist of a rain that had stopped almost as soon as it had started, the wind was blowing out of the south at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean seemed good at least. The rain came again at 6:45 AM. It poured. It rained hard until 7:30 AM. It continued raining afterward but not as hard. The rain had stopped by 8:30 AM. It never rained again for the rest of the day. At 10:00 AM, the sun came out after overcast conditions had ruled the morning. We had sunny skies for almost the whole time from 10:00 AM until 2:00 PM, when overcast skies were the rule again. Except for brief sun shots, overcast skies predominated into and through the evening. At 5:00 PM, the fog rolled in. It was foggy along the shore until I went to bed around 10:00 PM. The air temperature rose to 75F in Ogunquit. The southerly wind blew at ten to fifteen knots until noon. There was little or no wind for the rest of the day. The visibility was good in the morning/early afternoon, fair in the afternoon and poor after 5:00 PM.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at ten knots or more for the time they were fishing, less on the ride back to Perkins Cove. Seas were chops of two feet. The air temperature was mild. The visibility ranged from an eighth of a mile to a mile in fog. The sky was overcast for the trip. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60.1F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 53F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 82F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 51F).

The fishing was good, sort of. It could have been better but they had to leave almost every stop because of the large number of blue sharks bothering the angler's hooked fish. When they couldn't get a fish to the boat because a blue shark would have it, they left for another spot. It was not a bad as it was during the morning of the last marathon trip but it was pretty bad. The catching was good. Landings were fair to good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included fourteen redfish and two cusk. There were ten haddock of twenty-one inches or better with the total of forty-eight individuals that were caught. Cod count over twenty-one inches was twenty fish. Only one dogfish was seen. Drifting and anchoring were the boating methods. Jigs and flies were the only terminal gear used today.

Bernie Gage (VT) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal, a figure I wasn't privy to. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20 pound cod. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest cod of the fishing season to date. It's also a larger cod than any cod we caught last season! Ian weighed the fish quickly and released it. It was hooked in the mouth with no damage done and swam easily away. The second largest fish was a 14 pound pollock caught by Andrew Abair (VT). Joey Mashia (VT) caught the third largest fish, an 11 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Doug Mann (ME) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Howard Field (ME) caught (and released) a 10 pound cod, the second largest cod of the trip. Danny Mashia (VT) landed the hard luck award for being the high hurler of the trip. He might also have been the sole hurler on the trip as well. This information has not been confirmed.

I received three donations from anglers aboard the Bunny Clark today supporting my drive to find a cure for cancer with the Pan-Mass Challenge/Jimmy Fund. Danny Payne (ME) gave a generous $50.00, Chris Young (VT) donated $25.00 and Bernie Gage gave a very generous $135.00. Thank you all so very much for your help and sponsorship. The support means a great deal to me. But the kindness and generosity are appreciated by those who are really sick, by those who are battling the disease and for the future victims. Thanks again!

Monday, September 22, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good, it seemed. The wind piped up from the west at speeds of over twenty knots along the shore. Around noon, the wind hauled out of the west northwest and blew even harder. The sky was sunny and the wind breezy all day. The air temperature was mild/warm with a high over 70F. It was a beautiful day. Many white caps could be seen along the shore. Later in the day, we had seas along the shore that were over seven feet. The waves were even larger along Ogunquit beach. The visibility was very good at least.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest to start with wind speeds of about ten knots and a two foot chop. Before noon, the wind hauled out of the west at twenty knots or more with chops of three to four feet over sea swells of six to ten feet. Ian mentioned that there was a set of three swells that were twelve feet each! Occasionally you get a queer one even out there. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility was excellent, over twenty miles. The sky was sunny all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59.2F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 53F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 74F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 69F (with a low of 58F).

The fishing was tough with the current and the high seas. However, the catching was excellent and the landings were better than good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included a redfish and a cusk. Twelve cod would have been landed if it were August along with three haddock. Six dogfish were released. There were no blue sharks to bother today (hopefully, tomorrow will be the same). Drifting and anchoring were the boating methods used. Everyone used jigs and cod flies. No bait was used.

Ed Werner (PA) was high hook with the most legal fish. He caught the third largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. Bill Otto (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 14 pound pollock caught by Rich Lusis (FL).

Other Angler Highlights: Cynthia Nick (NY) landed a 12 pound pollock, her largest fish. Larry Gaulin (NY) caught a 10 pound pollock, his best. Both shared the hard luck award for getting sea sick!

Tim Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 2:30 AM EDT the air temperature was 44F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west northwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

The ride to the fishing grounds was uneventful. The ocean was calm for the first half of the trip and a one foot chop for the second half. The wind and light chop followed us to the fishing grounds. The sky was cloudless and the visibility was excellent. The air temperature was cool. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest up to ten knots with seas in chops of a foot or a little more. This wind died out sometime after 9:00 AM. We were left with calm seas. Sometime before noon, the wind hauled out of the west and blew up to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two feet, more or less. We carried this same wind and sea state all the way back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature went from cool to mild. The sky was mostly sunny with some clouds after nearly cloudless morning. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty-five miles in some minor haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 41F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 72F with a low of 50F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 37F).

The fishing/catching/landings was very good overall. We saw not a single haddock, dogfish or blue shark. There were only sixteen sub-legal fish caught, including three cod (two of which we could have kept in August) and thirteen redfish. Most legal fish landed were, far and away, pollock. Legal landings also included fifty-three redfish, two white hake and a cusk. Anchoring was the primary method of play, although we did try drifting once. Everyone used jigs and cod flies. There was also a blackback sea gull caught by one, Bill Otto (PA), that was safely released back to the wild. Both Bill and Quentin Tonelli (ME) handled the bird. Quentin got bitten in the process - after I had warned him about not getting too close to the bill!

If I were to take an educated guess, I would tell you that Ed Werner (PA) was the fisherman of the day. He caught the most fish over 10 pounds and, I believe he was also high hook with the most legal fish. Ed won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 24 pound white hake - which he told me wasn't a big fish, as he was reeling it in (with me standing by with the gaff). He also caught the third and fourth largest fish of the trip. These two fish included an 18 pound pollock and a 17.75 pound pollock. Some of his other good fish included two pollock of 10 pounds each, three pollock of 11 pounds each, a 10.5 pound pollock, a 10.25 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. It was a good day to be Ed Werner!

Larry Lee (MN) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 21.5 pound white hake. This is the largest fish he has ever caught in his life. Two of his other good fish included a 15 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Michael Mithen (MA), on his maiden voyage aboard the Bunny Clark, landed a 14 pound pollock as his biggest fish. He also caught two pollock of 11 pounds each. He caught the most fish he has ever caught on a party boat today. And he has been deep sea fishing a few times before. Quentin Tonelli caught a number of fish and a number of good ones. His best fish included a 10 pound pollock, a 14.25 pound pollock, an 11.5 pound pollock, a 14 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Quentin also landed the hard luck award for losing two jigs. Bill Otto caught a 12 pound pollock, his largest fish. Jim Fitzgerald (ME) might have been second hook. Some of his better fish included two pollock of 15.5 pounds each, a 14 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. Tina Cromwell (ME) landed an 11 pound pollock, her largest fish.

Michael Mithan contributed $40.00 as a donation to support me in my quest for a cancer free world with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thanks so much, Michael. I appreciate your help very much. But there are many more of whom you may never know who appreciate it more!

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the weather was perfect. The air temperature reached a high (that I saw) of 64F. We had very little wind along the shore. The sky was nearly cloudless all day. The visibility was very good to excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east northeast at ten to five knots. Seas were about a foot most of the day, less near the end, over long sea swells of two to three feet. The sky was clear with few clouds. The air temperature was mild. The visibility was close to excellent with a range of at least twenty-five miles. The tide was strong to moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 42F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 66F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 39F).

The fishing/catching and landings were good overall. It was just a good day. There were blue sharks today (unlike yesterday). But they weren't so bad as make the boat have to move from a spot (like the other day). Probably three or four jigs were lost to sharks. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-seven redfish, two cusk and one whiting. One dogfish was caught and released. Twenty haddock were caught and released including two that were over twenty-one inches. There were also twenty-four cod caught that were over twenty-one inches, all released (of course). They drift fished and anchored. No bait was used. Only jigs and flies today.

Jimmy Walker (NJ) was probably high hook with the most legal fish today. Ed Werner (PA) might have been there too if you include the cod he caught. Jimmy won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 27 pound Maine state trophy pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's largest pollock of the last two seasons and Jimmy's largest pollock ever. Captain Ian took a picture of Jimmy with his prize. The digital image appears on the left. Jimmy's second largest fish was a 12 pound pollock. Ed caught the second and third largest fish of the trip. His largest (the second largest on the boat) was a 21.5 pound pollock, a tie for the sixth largest pollock caught on the Bunny Clark this season to date. His second largest fish was an 18 pound cod, the third largest cod caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. This was promptly released back to the ocean very much alive. Some of Ed's other good fish included a 14 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound cusk.

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Smith caught a 10.5 pound cod, his largest fish and the first fish of the day big enough to weigh. John Pacitti (NJ) caught a 16.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. John Grochi (CT) landed a 12 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. Bill Otto (PA) landed the largest double keeper catch of the day. His double included a 13 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! John Baker (ME) caught a 12.5 pound cod (released) and an 11 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. He also landed the hard luck award for losing three jigs, two to blue sharks and one to the bottom!

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 44F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light out of the south and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The ocean was flat glassy calm on the ride to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind and sea state were the same. There was no wind and the ocean was flat calm - all day long, including the ride back to Perkins Cove! It was the calmest day of the year today. The sky was overcast for the trip. The air temperature was mild. The visibility ranged to over thirty miles - excellent. The tide was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 42F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 62F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 63F (with a low of 42F).

The fishing and catching of cod and haddock was excellent. I spent most of the day trying to avoid the cod and haddock while still targeting pollock. I found plenty of pollock but no pollock bite. What we did catch were lots of haddock (one-hundred forty) and twenty cod from 5 to 11.5 pounds, all released. We might have had twenty haddock that would have been big enough to keep if today's month was August. In our attempt to get away from the haddock we ran into some hake. We had a nice drift on them for about an hour. There were over forty dogfish released today. We only saw one blue shark (It mauled a haddock). Landings were fair and included fourteen pollock, eight redfish, five cusk, twenty-one hake and six butter mullet. We drift fished and anchored. Most anglers used bait rigs and cod flies. Not a single rig was lost today.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. It would be purely a guess. Dennis Reissig (NY) caught the most cod over twenty-one inches. His cod count was eight or nine out of twelve total. His largest cod weighed 11.5 pounds, the largest cod of the trip. And he caught a double keeper catch of cod that included an 8 pound cod and an 8.5 pound cod, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Some of Dennis' other good fish included a 9 pound pollock and an 11 pound white hake.

Ryan Kilgore (NH) won the boat pool for largest fish with the largest fish, a 29 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Kirk Counter (VT) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 27 pound Maine state trophy white hake. What was most impressive to me was that Kirk caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch with another white hake of 22 pounds! Both of these fish were caught on the same line at the same time! This is the largest double keeper catch of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. I took a picture of Kirk holding up both fish. This picture appears in this entry on the right. The third largest fish was a 26 pound Maine state trophy white hake caught by George Hallock (VT).

Other Angler Highlights: Mark Carter (CT) caught the largest pollock of the trip at 15 pounds. His largest fish was a 21 pound white hake. Jeff Gellatly (ME) also caught a 21 pound white hake as his largest fish. One other of Jeff's great fish included an 18 pound barndoor skate. This is only the Bunny Clark's seventh barndoor skate that has ever been caught since she was launched in 1983! Of course, it's Jeff's first barndoor skate. He also caught a 10 pound cod and another white hake of 15.75 pounds. Bob Crane (NY) landed a 23.5 pound white hake, his largest fish. Bob also released a 10 pound cod. Rob Cormier (VT) landed a 25 pound Maine state trophy white hake, his biggest fish and largest hake of his life. He also caught another white hake of 18 pounds. Russell Trieller (NY) caught a 15.25 pound white hake, his best. Ryan Drapeau (NH) boated an 18 pound white hake and another white hake of 18.25 pounds. Ron Ciotti (NH) caught a 19 pound white hake, his largest fish. Dan Dorr (ME) boated a 17.5 pound white hake. Suzanne Counter (VT) landed the hard luck award for being the only angler not to land a single Internet worthy fish! She did catch plenty of fish though!

Friday, September 26, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. It was a beautiful late summer day overall. At least, that was what it felt like. The sky was sunny all day, almost cloudless. The air temperature got up into the lower 70s. There was very little wind and not enough wind to lift a flag. The ocean along the coast was flat calm with chest high waves rolling on to Ogunquit Beach. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at five to eight knots. The ocean was calm over long rolling sea swells of three feet or so. The sky was clear and sunny for the trip. The air temperature was mild. The visibility ranged to twenty miles or so. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59.2F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 43F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 69F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 44F).

The fishing was very much like yesterdays marathon trip, very good. The catching was good or slightly better than that. Landings were fair. There was no pollock bite whatsoever, despite the fact many big schools could be found. Haddock were abundant, as they were yesterday, with sixty-nine caught total, four over twenty-one inches. Sixteen cod could have been kept has summer rules applied. No good sized cod were caught. Legal landings included five pollock, twenty-seven cusk and three whiting. Twenty-six dogfish were released along with one wolffish. Anchoring and drifting were the boating methods. All terminal gear worked about the same.

Ian didn't give me a name for high hook. Dennis Reissig (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 8.5 pound pollock caught by Matt Sams (NY). Rodney Koistinen (SD) caught the third largest fish, an 8.25 pound cod that was promptly weighed and released. Tom Perry (NY) landed the hard luck award for losing the only jig of the trip after a dogfish cut his line off!

Dennis Reissig did me the greatest of favors by supporting my cancer cause with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. I appreciate this support very much. Thanks, Dennis! Great to have you aboard this week.

Saturday, September 27, 2014

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine hosted the Clive Roberts (NH) full day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was clear, there was no wind to speak of and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. There was a very insignificant amount of wind along the shore. In fact, there really was no wind. And when there was wind it was a whisper from the northwest. The ocean along the shore was flat calm all day. The salient weather feature today was the air temperature which soared to 82F in Ogunquit. It was very warm all day. The sky was cloudless. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at barely five knots. The ocean's surface was calm all day over rolling long sea swells of two to three feet. The sky was cloudless all day. The air temperature was mild/warm (ocean water influence). The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was unlimited. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58.6F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 50F). The high of 84F registered in Portland, Maine today breaks the previous record high temperature of 80F set on this date in 1948. In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 81F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 43F).

The fishing was very good. The calm weather, the clear skies, the slight current and the mild temperatures all combined to make it easy to keep your line where you wanted it. No blue sharks were seen. There were, however, quite a few dogfish caught. Without the dogfish (forty-three total released), the fishing might have been excellent except for the higher frequency of tangles. The catching was good to very good. Landings were on the fair side. Over forty-eight haddock were caught and released, twelve of which they could have taken home had this trip been sometime this late summer. There were about fourteen cod that would have been kept as well that were released instead. Legal landings included twenty-two pollock, two redfish, fifteen cusk, one white hake and two whiting. Drifting was the method used all day today. Everyone used bait and cod flies. No jigs today.

Clive Roberts won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound cod that was weighed promptly and then released alive. The second largest fish was a 10 pound white hake caught by Danny Carignan (NH). Paul Bolton (MA) and Dennis Fournier (NH) tied for third. Both anglers caught a 9 pound pollock each. Owen Sanborn (NH) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler today. Or so I was told!

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Happy Birthday: Meg Tower, Paul Haseltine & Rosie Geer!!

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, it was another beautiful summer day in vacationland. The air temperature rose to 85F in Ogunquit, the most salient weather feature of the day. There was very little wind. The ocean along the shore was calm. The sky was cloudless from 7:00 AM until well after sunset. The visibility was good in some haze. When I checked the air temperature at 10:00 PM, it had only dropped to 68F. It felt like a warm summer night with no wind and very clear skies.

On the fishing grounds, the wind was very light from the southwest. The ocean was calm. After noon, the southwest wind picked up to five and ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot in height. The sky was clear all day. The air temperature was mild with the light wind. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility was about ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59.2F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 87F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 50F).

The fishing was very good. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included seven cusk, six redfish and two whiting. Twenty-four dogfish were released. And about thirty haddock were released, five of which were over twenty-one inches. Twelve cod were released that were over twenty-one inches. Drifting and anchoring were the methods. The jig and fly combination worked the best for catching fish today.

Dana Decormier (NH) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 24.5 pound pollock. This is the largest pollock that Dana has ever caught . And this pollock is the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the season to date. Ian took a picture of Dana and his son, Jack, with Dana's prize pollock. This digital image appears on the left. Dana is the one who looks like Papa Smurf. Dana also caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 19 pound pollock. Some of his other good fish included a 10 pound pollock, a 15 pound pollock and two pollock of 11.5 pounds each. Jack Decormier (NH) landed the third largest fish of the trip, a 16 pound pollock. Jack also caught pollock of 10 pounds and 10.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Dave Darnell (CA) boated a 14.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also caught a 10 pound pollock. Captain Ian caught a 14 pound pollock. Patrick Osborne (NY) boated an 8 pound pollock, his largest fish. Mark Landon (NY) landed the hard luck award for catching nary a single fish worth writing about.

Jack Decormier contributed $25.00 to my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thanks so much, Jack. Glad you and your bearded father had a good time today. I only wish I could have enjoyed it with you!

Monday, September 29, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was clear, the wind was very light from the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was good in some haze. By daylight, the clouds had started to move in. After 7:00 AM, the sky stayed mostly overcast with some infrequent sun shots. After noon, it remained overcast for the rest of the day. The ocean was flat calm until around 10:00 AM, when a northeast wind started to blow. At five knots to start, by noon the northeast wind was blowing ten knots. Early afternoon saw fifteen knots. By 2:00 PM, the wind was blowing a sustained twenty knots with higher gusts. These winds continued on into the night. It never rained, although it looked like it would. The air temperature hovered around the mid 60s before dropped below 60F at sunset. The visibility was good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at five knots or less most of the morning. The ocean was calm. By noon, the northeast wind had struck. By 2:00 PM, the wind velocity had reached twenty knots. Seas were chops of two to four feet, larger near the end of the trip. Seas average four or five feet an hour from Perkins Cove on the ride in. The air temperature was mild to cool. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from ten mile in the morning to a half mile in fog and haze during the later afternoon. The sky was overcast all for the trip. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60.9F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 74F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 53F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish - landings) was very good overall, our best fishing trip since last Tuesday. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. They were biting today. Legal landings also included a redfish and two cusk. Only a few cod and haddock were caught that might have been legal in August (now that you can't keep haddock for another month). There were no blue sharks or dogfish seen today. And on the pollock side of things, quite a few jigs were lost today because of the jig and fly combination. The fish were big enough and the bite good enough to see doubles that would break the jig and fly off on several occasions. Anchoring and drifting were both used. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish, by far.

Ken McLaughlin (ME) was a pound and a half shy of being fisherman of the day. He was far and away high hook with the most legal fish. And he boated four double keeper catches and one triple! His best double included a 15.5 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. His 15.5 pound pollock was the third largest fish of the trip. The double itself ties for the fourth largest double keeper catch of the Bunny Clark season to date. A couple other good fish that Ken landed included a 13.5 pound pollock and another 15 pound pollock. He lost three jigs to big doubles. Chris Urban won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock. He also caught a 14.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock as part of his catch. Jared Keniston caught the second largest fish, a 16 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Tricia Urban (PA) landed a 13 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock as her largest fish. P. J. Weber (VT) landed an 11 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock, his two largest. He might have caught larger fish but he busted off four times, losing four jigs, on doubles! For this he landed the hard luck award for the trip.

I received two donations today sponsoring me in my bicycle ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Chris & Tricia Urban donated $25.00 when they got off the boat today. Dave Nickerson (ME), with RUBB Building Systems, gave a very generous $250.00 to the cause. Thank you all so very much for your help in this project. I am humbled by your support.

Tim Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair in haze.

It was a fairly uncomfortable ride to the fishing grounds. But it wasn't horrible. Seas were eight feet but they were far enough apart that we felt them only as a heavy roll. The only problem for those so uninitiated was that there really was no rhythm to them. So you had to be prepared to hold on all the time. We had good visibility. The air temperature was mild/cool. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen to twenty knots in the morning and five to ten knots in the afternoon. The morning saw three foot chops over eight foot swells about eight or nine seconds apart. During the afternoon we saw the seas go down to three or four feet under a one foot chop. The tide (current) was strong until the last hour of the day. The sky remained overcast. We had short periods of light rain in the afternoon. The air temperature was mild to cool. The visibility ranged from ten miles in the morning to twenty miles in the afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 57F with a low of 56F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 55F).

The fishing was just fair today. We had a very strong current in the morning and most of the afternoon. You couldn't drift. Anchoring saw lines trailing well aft. You had to make sure that you let your terminal gear down slowly. Otherwise you risked tangling with the guy next to you. The catching and landings were fair overall. Most legal fish landed were redfish and pollock, in that order. Legal landings also included a cusk and a squirrel hake. We released ten cod between 5 & 8 pounds. We only caught seven haddock, four of which were over twenty-one inches. We lost seven rigs to blue sharks but were bothered by them all day. One blue shark was fought by three anglers for twenty minutes before we realized what species of fish it really was. We saw nary a single dogfish. We tried drifting a couple of times with no success. Anchoring seemed to be the only method that worked. But, regardless, the bite was well off the mark. We had no problem finding fish. Anglers were most successful when using cod flies.

I don't know who was high hook but whomever it was probably had seven legal - a guess. Jim Watson (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. Tom Lombardo (NY) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Dameon Barnhart (NY).

Other Angler Highlights: Jim Taylor (NY) caught the first fish I thought I should weigh, a 9.25 pound pollock. Dave Cuipylo (NY) caught four good sized pollock on the last stop of the day. The largest of the four weighed 10 pounds. Josh DeBerardinis (NC) landed the hard luck award for being the high hurler of the trip. He called for a bucket fifteen minutes outside the gate and had his head buried in it for most of the rest of the day. He never did wet a line!

I received a thoughtful $25.00 donation from "Smokey" Joe Dorsey (NC) today supporting my work on a cancer cure with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Thanks, Smokey. Your kindness is much appreciated by many.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen or more knots and the visibility over the ocean was good at least. The wind along the shore never got any higher than fifteen knots. In fact, all afternoon the wind was very light out of the northeast. Seas were much reduced from yesterdays trip with three to five footers seen along Ogunquit Beach. It rained very lightly occasionally. A large part of the day saw no rain at all. But later afternoon saw light rain at a steady rate. The air temperature got as high as 58F or more. The sky remained overcast even when it didn't rain. The visibility over the ocean was good, at least.

On the fishing grounds, the swell was gone. The ride out was good with a two foot chop. Three miles from their destination, the chop increased and was three to five feet. The sea state remained this way for the rest of the day. The tide was very strong so one might suspect that some of the bigness of the chops was due to the stronger than normal tide. They saw occasional light rain throughout the day. They did have heavier rain on the ride back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature was mild. The visibility ranged from one to five miles in occasional rain, haze, mist and light fog. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 57F with a low of 56F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 58F (with a low of 55F).

The fishing was fair to good with the tide and a few dogfish (nine total). But they did not have the blue shark problems we had yesterday. This allowed them to land more fish and spend less time playing with something on the line that could have been a bluefin tuna but always turned out to be a blue shark! So landings made it into the "good" category today. Almost every fish caught today was a legal pollock. No other fish were landed. One cod was caught that was over twenty-one inches. Fourteen haddock were caught that were all under twenty-one inches. The only other fish seen was the dogfish. They anchored for every stop. Ian had a hard time anchoring as I did yesterday. Actually, Ian's anchoring might have been a bit more challenging than mine. Where I had problems making the exact location drop, Ian had problems getting the anchor to hold! So the current was, I suspect, was quite a bit stronger. No bait was used today; just jigs and cod flies.

After his training on the marathon trip yesterday along with a change in venue, Dave Cuipylo (NY) capitalized on what he had learned and was the easy high hook today with the most legal fish. He ended up landing seven pollock of 10 pounds or better along with quite a few smaller ones. His better fish included three pollock of 10.5 pounds, two pollock of 10 pounds each, a 12 pound pollock and a pollock of 12.5 pounds. Dennis Pine (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 15 pound pollock caught by Dameon Barnhart (NY). Dameon also caught an 11.5 pound pollock. Tom Lombardo (NY) landed the third largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Ken McLaughlin (ME) caught the best double of the day. His catch included a 12.5 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Dave Vanatta (PA) landed an 11 pound pollock, his best. Randy Russell (NY) boated a 12 pound pollock, his largest. John Lombardo (NY) caught an 11.75 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Jim Watson (NY) rounded out the catch with a 10 pound pollock, his best fish of the trip. "Smokey" Joe Dorsey (NC) landed the hard luck award for not landing a single legal fish. Yesterday, Smokey caught the most cod, catching the three largest ones in the process. He also caught a few redfish. He caught no pollock. Today he must have had the same mojo with the pollock!

At the same time this trip was going on, the New England Fishery Management Council was meeting in Hyannis, Massachusetts to decide the fate of groundfishermen in the Gulf of Maine (GOM), both commercial and recreational. On the table (as a motion) were expanded rolling closures with recreational anglers excluded (this is new), the Western Gulf of Maine closed area (excluded to recreational anglers - also new) and a prohibition for recreational anglers to fish west of 070 longitude for groundfish (also new). This motion was defeated at the end of the day. So from here the regional office of the National Marine Fisheries Service has to come up with an Emergency Action that will keep landings of cod below 200 metric tons for both commercial and recreational fisherman. In fact, it makes cod a bycatch fishery only. It's unlikely that the recreational angler will be able to keep cod next year. And there will be no directed fishery for cod by commercial fishermen. An Emergency Action only lasts for six months, the details of which will be available on November 17, 2014. But EAs can be renewed. Also, since NMFS is making the rules, they can adjust the EA at any time. In the next six months after the EA has been in place, the Council is directed to come up with a plan in the form of a new amendment to take effect by the start of the fiscal fishing year on May 1, 2015. Personally, I don't think the Council has time to do this. So what might happen is that NMFS will roll the old EA into 2015 for another six months, perhaps with some adjustments. Will the new EA be as onerous to the recreational angler as the Council's motion that was defeated today? That is a good question and one that will be worked out in the next very few weeks before mid November. We shall see.

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Today was supposed to be an extreme day trip which I canceled yesterday morning when I saw the Army's UGRIB forecast and the NWS forecast. Tuesday's trip was rough enough for everyone. Today's would have been worse.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in precipitation, haze and light fog. It only rained for an hour or more after 5:00 AM, stopping for good by 7:00 AM. The sky remained overcast until 3:00 PM when the sun broke out. By 3:45 PM, there wasn't a cloud in the sky. The air temperature hovered around the high 50s all morning, finally breaking into the low 60s after noon. The wind blew out of the northeast all day, strong offshore but much less along the shore. Wind speeds were up to twenty knots in the morning and ten knots early afternoon. There was no wind by 6:00 PM but a big sea was crashing up along the shore and beaches. The visibility was very good by sunset.

The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 62F (with a low of 45F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 56F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 65F (with a low of 42F).

Friday, October 3, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots (after a night of light and variable winds only three hours earlier) and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northeast up to almost twenty knots during the late morning and early afternoon. Seas were very large along the shore, breaking at ten feet or more at Ogunquit Beach. There was also a light chop as well. The air temperature seemed cool because of the wind off the water and the moisture content in the air. However, the air temperature did get as high as 62F. The wind dropped to nothing in the mid to late afternoon. The visibility over the ocean was good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet over rolling sea swells that ranged from eight to twelve feet, with the occasional larger one. Ian told me that one measured on the sounding machine at anchor reached fifteen feet. There was quite a distance between them so it wasn't very rough on the boat. The visibility ranged from three to five miles in fog. The tide was moderate to strong. The air temperature was mild. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 62F (with a low of 42F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 55F with a low of 48F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 41F).

The fishing/catching was fair overall. The conditions were such that they weren't conducive to maintaining a specific movement with the equipment or the ability to keep the lines still. And the bite was off despite seeing plenty of fish on the sounding machine. Legal landings included twenty-one pollock, one redfish and two cusk. Very few haddock and cod were caught. Two cod might have been of legal size had we been able to keep cod. There was only one haddock over twenty-one inches that was released. Drifting and anchoring were the methods. All terminal gear was used but only jigs and cod flies were successful.

Chris King (NY) and Evan Olsen (VT) shared high hook status with six or seven legal fish each. Both anglers tied for the second largest fish of the trip. Each angler caught a 13 pound pollock. The 13 pounder was the only fish that Chris caught weighing 10 pounds or better. Evan also caught a 12 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. Chris Bates (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. Ben Olsen (VT) landed the hard luck award for being the day's high hurler.

I received two donations supporting my involvement in the cancer project with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Chris King gave $25.00 while Mark Randis (PA) donated a generous $100.00 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC website. Thank you both very much for your generosity and help. I very much appreciate it!

Saturday, October 4, 2014

We were supposed to be running the full day trip today. Alas, we had nobody to take! We had a few sign up only to cancel followed by others who did the same. Sunday is looking the same way. Most are talking about the weather. And I can't blame them in that regard. After a week of easterly wind like we have had it's hard to get the courage to go knowing, at the very least, you will get a little sore from just being there. Whatever. We will not be going today. And it looks like we won't be sailing tomorrow either.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was overcast, it was drizzling/light rain, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog and light precipitation. The wind was light out of the east for most of the day. Wind speeds rarely made it over ten knots. Well after sunset, the wind hauled out of the southeast. When I left Perkins Cove at 9:30 PM, the southeast wind was blowing at twelve knots or so. The afternoon saw the fog roll in and out. The fog was all in after sunset. The air temperature was mild. The evening saw rain, sometimes steading, after sunset and well into the night. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 63F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 60F (with a low of 51F).

Sunday, October 5, 2014

We had no anglers for the trip today on the Bunny Clark. The wooden anchors stayed out all day.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was good at least. Ashore, the wind blew out of the west or west northwest at twenty knots or more. The sky stayed clear all day with very few clouds and much sun. Temperatures rose into the lower to mid 60s. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 66F (with a low of 45F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 61F with a low of 49F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 61F (with a low of 35F).

I received a generous $50.00 donation a few days ago from Roger Hopkins (RI) supporting my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge. I'm sure Roger told me he was going to send the donation when he was up fishing with us a few weeks ago. But, alas, I didn't remember. So the check sat on the desk for a week until we figured it out. We weren't sure that I might be a tip for either Ian or Jared. Thank you so much, Roger, for your generosity and kindness. Of course you realize it's a great cause as I do. I appreciate your support in this project.

Monday, October 6, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 42F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The air temperature didn't take long to warm up. By 8:00 AM it was already 50F. The high today topped out around 65F. The wind blew out of the west at six or eight knots in the morning and out of the southwest at ten knots, at most, in the afternoon. The sky was sunny all day. The visibility was very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west to ten knots in the morning and out of the southwest to ten knots or twelve knots in the afternoon. Seas were chops of a foot or two over long rolling sea swells of two to three feet. The sky was sunny and clear all day. The visibility was just shy of excellent. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59.2F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 39F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 67F with a low of 43F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 65F (with a low of 31F).

The fishing/catching was very good today. Landings were very good as well. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. They were bothered by blue sharks enough so that they had to move from two spots because they could not get their fish aboard. Legal landings also included four redfish and three cusk. There were no dogfish caught. Quite a few haddock were caught and released. Only twelve cod would have made the legal mark had possession of cod been legal. Drifting was the method. No bait was used today, only jigs and cod flies were used.

Ian didn't tell me who was high hook. Ken McLaughlin (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. This is the fifth pool that Ken has won this season so far. His second largest fish was a 10 pound pollock. Chris King (NY) boated the second largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. He also caught a 12 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 12.5 pound pollock caught by Cory Fahey (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Joe Columbus (MA) caught a 10 pound pollock and a 10.25 pound pollock, his two largest fish. Mark Majewsky (MN) landed a pollock weighing 11.5 pounds, his biggest fish. Nine year old Jacob Oakes (ME) caught a 10.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Nicole King (NY) landed an 11 pound pollock, her largest fish. Chris King actually landed the hard luck award for losing two jigs. Ken McLaughlin should have won the award for losing three jigs but he won the boat pool! It's hard to give someone the hard luck award when he wins enough money to pay for the jigs he lost.

Joe Columbus did me a solid by sponsoring me in my cancer bike ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Joe always gives me something every year. Thanks, Joe. I always appreciate your support!

Tim Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was partly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the south at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was fairly good.

We had a bumpy ride to the fishing grounds. The wind was out of the south at speeds over fifteen knots with seas in chops of four feet average. And they were fairly steep chops as well. With the sea state and riding in the dark, I couldn't make any more than a ten knot cruising speed. So it seemed like it took forever to get there. On the grounds, the wind freshened to twenty and twenty-five knots. Seas increased to an average eight foot chop by 10:00 AM. The wind increased a bit more on the tide as did the chops. Seas increased to ten feet with the occasional twelve footer or better, this because the tide was running hard right directly into the wind in the area we were fishing. Once we left that area, the height and steepness decreased substantially. The ride home saw seas of seven to eight feet on average. The sky was sunny and mostly clear until we wrapped it up to head back to Perkins Cove. From that moment on, the sky was mostly cloudy with the occasional light rain sprinkle. The air temperature was warm sheltered from the wind and mild in the wind. The tide was moderate to strong. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 73F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 72F (with a low of 45F).

The fishing was good at best with the sea conditions that were prevalent for the day. Regardless, the catching was very good to excellent. In the morning, everything that was caught was legal, an excellent morning. After the tide at about 11:00 AM, the bite on legal fish dropped off but the dogfish bite accelerated to a point I hadn't seen this season yet. To say that we caught forty-eight dogfish in two hours might be understating how many we caught. In fact, we were so busy taking dogfish off the hooks I forgot to count what we released. In fact, I probably couldn't have counted the numbers of dogfish we caught. For the trip, most legal fish landed were redfish and pollock, in that order. The redfish were the largest in average size that we have seen this year, maybe the last three years. There was only one redfish that weighed under 1.25 pounds. All the rest were so close to 2 pounds (Maine state trophy redfish size) that, it seemed, I was weighing every one that came aboard. And we had so many pollock over 10 pounds, I stopped weighing the 10 pounders. Legal landings also included a cusk, twenty-two white hake (mostly small), seven whiting and a mackerel. We anchored for every stop in the morning. After 11:00 AM we couldn't anchor any more. The reason being, when anchored, the tide was keeping the bow pointed directly west which was allowing the particularly steep chops to dump on top of the anglers from the port side! This was too intimidating to pursue so we went to the sea anchor for the rest of the trip. The sea anchor kept the bow directly into the wind and the lines perfectly straight down. But this new dimension of boat attitude and function must have been something that really turned the dogfish on. We could never get away from the dogfish after that method shift, despite the many moves I made. It should also be noted that we saw not a single blue shark. And on one stop we caught four good sized haddock (two of about 4 pounds each) so quickly that I feared the worst (catching too many haddock) so I moved. We did manage to stay away from the cod and haddock pretty much and would have landed four cod and five haddock had the previous regulations still been in place. Jigs and cod flies were used mostly. The jig/fly combination created the most landings.

I would have to say that Kevin Luke (NJ) was, without a doubt, high hook. He caught fish non-stop (including the most dogfish) since we started fishing, throughout the trip and to the end. He won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 22 pound pollock. This ties the sixth largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Some of his other fish that I weighed (excluding redfish) included a 14 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Steve Brown (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 38 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the largest fish/hake of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far! I took a bad picture of Steve (the seas were having their way with me) with his prize. This digital image appears on the left. Steve is also a big man and makes any monster fish look small! Some of his other good fish that I weighed included a 10 pound pollock, a pollock of 11 pounds and a 12 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 21 pound white hake caught by Adam Gubich (NJ).

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Lenox (NY) caught the second largest redfish of the Bunny Clark fishing season today. It weighed 2.5 pounds exactly. We had seven fish that were so close to trophy size that all the fish had to do was to eat a shrimp and it would have qualified. Every redfish caught today was all spawned out, if you can call it that - redfish bare their young alive. So most had the frames of a trophy fish but only Steve's made the weight. I took a picture of Steve with his special fish. The digital image appears on the right. His largest fish was a 13 pound pollock. Liam Kennedy (NJ), whom I rely on heavily for all my biggest fish of the season did not disappoint. However, he never got the fish (two or three of them - two good ones) to the boat. One was huge. Maybe it was a hake or a big pollock but it could also have been a big cod - as unusual as that might seem. The best fish that he did land included a 12 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock and a 12.75 pound pollock. Howard Kaulfers (PA) caught an 11.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also caught one of the bigger hake at 11 pounds. Bob Devonmille (NJ) caught a 10 pound pollock, first thing. He caught the only good double keeper catch of the trip. His catch included a 10.5 pound pollock and a 9 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Gene Luke (NJ) caught a 13 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, his two largest fish. Mike Luke (NJ), sea sick for most of the day, fished for about an hour total and caught a 14.5 pound pollock, a 12.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. I believe these were the only fish he caught except for a few redfish. Roy Tutunjian (NJ) landed the fourth largest fish of the trip, an 18 pound white hake. Bert Kern (NJ) caught a 12 pound pollock. And Bill Luke (NJ) caught a 12 pound pollock. Bill landed the hard luck award for being the only person to lose a jig. He lost three! Ouch!

I received two donations sponsoring me and my efforts to fight cancer with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Liam Kennedy gave $30.00 while Vince DeBari (NJ) gave a generous $50.00. Thank you both so very much for your support. I appreciate it greatly.

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Today's trip was canceled before it even started. We didn't have any anglers to make a trip today. The weather wouldn't have been great anyway. And it seems the wind has blown since October started. That should get the fish biting along with this full moon.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was overcast, it had been raining earlier, the wind was blowing out of the south at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good. It rained lightly, periodically, for the next two hours and then stopped. By 10:30 AM, the sky was almost completely clear and the air temperature had risen to 65F. The wind blew out of the southwest most of the day at about fifteen knots along the shore, twenty knots on the fishing grounds. The sky cleared nicely before noon and remained clear and sunny for the rest of the daylight hours. The visibility was good at least. The air temperature reached over the 70F mark during the early afternoon.The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 73F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 52F).

Except for three different meetings and completing about an hour and a half of much needed engine work, I spent my day working at Barnacle Billy's restaurant.

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at seventeen knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

We had a fairly comfortable ride to the fishing grounds. The wind was still blowing about fifteen knots out of the west but the seas grew as we got further off shore and we were taking them on the starboard beam. The visibility was very good plus we had the advantage of the full moon which was still pretty high in the western sky. On the grounds, the westerly wind increased to twenty knots sustained with a few higher gusts. Seas were three to four feet, more or less, depending on the tide. By 3:00 PM, the wind had started to drop. We had ten knots of westerly wind with a two foot sea on the trip back to Perkins Cove. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The air temperature was mild/cool with the wind. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility maxed out at thirty miles in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 46F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 66F with a low of 50F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 63F (with a low of 39F).

The fishing was good all day. The catching was poor until 1:00 PM, good after that. Most legal fish landed were redfish and pollock. We had trouble with blue sharks all morning. And, except for the redfish, most fish were on the smaller than normal size range. We didn't catch a fish over 9 pounds until after 2:00 PM! Legal landings also included five butter mullet, one whiting and two cusk. Four cod and one haddock were caught that were over twenty-one inches. There were only five cod and four haddock for the trip, all released, of course. We found plenty of fish, pollock mostly, but the bite was really terrible. We drift fished, anchored and used the drogue continuously in hopes of finding a method that worked the best. In the end, one anchor stop and one drift did the trick. The sea anchor, although the most comfortable method, sucked, frankly. Cod flies caught the most fish by far.

Ray Westermann (MA) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with thirteen legal, including two good sized redfish. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 21 pound pollock. The pollock is Ray's largest this season so far and the Bunny Clark's tenth largest pollock this year to date. Ray caught an 8 pound pollock earlier in the day, his second largest fish. Chuck Lennon (MA) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 15 pound cod. This fish was weighed and promptly released. The third largest fish was a 12 pound pollock caught by Alex Ramirez (ME), his only legal fish of the trip.

Other Angler Highlights: Jon Griffin (MA) was second hook with ten legal pollock. His largest one weighed 8 pounds. Michael Bialer (NY) led the boat pool all morning and into the afternoon with a 9 pound pollock, his largest fish of the trip. Chris Porter (MA) was third hook just behind Griff. Three fish of his that I weighed included a 9 pound cod (released), an 8 pound pollock and an 8.25 pound pollock. Steve Lenox (NY) lost a really big fish. His two largest fish included a 10 pound cod and a 7.5 pound pollock. Ralph Nickerson (NH) landed an 8.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Joe Ramirez (ME) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the trip! He tried to fish but had to give it up early in the day.

I received a couple of donations helping with my fund raising for the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a $7.00 gift from Mike Bialer and the other was a $20.00 donation from Steve Lenox. Thank you both very much for your support. Many people appreciate this!

Friday, October 10, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 45F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west southwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The morning seemed to warm slowly. By 9:30 AM, the air temperature was still only 51F. I don't believe it every got to 60F but I could be wrong. It just felt cooler than it has been. The sky was clear all day. The westerly wind backed off by early afternoon. There was not much of any wind by sunset. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The sky was clear all day. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles (excellent). The surface water temperature reached a high of 56.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 41F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 63F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 30F).

The fishing was fair to good with the current and a few dogfish that bothered them. The catching was good to very good. Landings were good, better than yesterday by a few. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included four redfish and a butter mullet. Twenty-five dogfish were caught and released. Forty-three haddock were released. Eight haddock would have been keepers (over twenty-one inches). Eight cod were caught that were over twenty-one inches as well. Drifting and anchoring were the boating methods employed. Cod flies caught the most fish by far.

Mike Shebulka (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish. A number was not provided but it was probably more than the high hook of yesterday. Mike caught the second largest fish of the trip, an 11 pound pollock. Dave Cutter (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.5 pound pollock. He also caught the best double keeper catch. His catch included a 7.5 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The larger of the two fish was the third largest fish of the trip. Tim Twitchell (NH) landed the hard luck award for losing the most jigs, one!

Saturday, October 11, 2014

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 45F, the sky was partly cloudy, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. By daylight, the sky was overcast. It looked like it was going to rain all morning but it never started to rain (except for a spit here and there) until 10:45 AM. The rain alternated between steady and light until 2:00 PM when it stopped altogether. By 3:30 PM, the sky cleared, the sun came out, the wind was zero, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility was very good. The air temperature was cool all morning and early afternoon. I never saw an air temperature much above 50F until later in the afternoon. I never did see an air temperature higher than 52F. The wind blew out of the northeast starting at 7:00 AM but it never got any stronger than eight knots. After noon there was no wind.

On the fishing grounds, the day started out in fog and some precipitation. The wind was light out of the northeast (five to eight knots). The ocean was calm all day. When it wasn't raining, which was most of the time, the sky was overcast. The sky never cleared until they got close to shore on the ride back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature was mild. The tide started out stong and moderated later. The visibility ranged to five miles in haze and fog. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55.9F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 39F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 54F with a low of 47F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 56F (with a low of 35F).

The fishing was good. It could have been better but there were quite a few dogfish getting in the way and the current was a little much in the beginning. The catching was very good. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock of a larger average size than we have seen all week. Legal landings also included three redfish, two cusk and a butter mullet. Forty-three dogfish, sixteen small cod and thirty-three haddock were released. Drift fishing was the only method employed. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Jim Kirby (NH) was high hook with the most legal pollock. His largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught as a double keeper catch with another pollock of 10 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. He also caught an 11 pound pollock. Jared Stevens (ME) didn't catch a legal fish all day until the last stop. His fish, the last fish of the day, was the largest fish of the trip weighing in at 15.5 pounds. With this fish Jared won the boat pool for the largest fish! The second largest fish was a 14.5 pound pollock caught by Matt Peterson (ME). John Stevens (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 14 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Dean Harp (CA) caught a 10 pound pollock, one of the first two fish to be weighed in the morning. Richard Franke (NY) boated a pollock of 13.5 pounds. Hashim Alark (MD) landed a 10.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Ford Stevens (ME) caught a 12.5 pound pollock, his best. Paula Beaulieu (ME) caught a nice double that included a 10.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. John Russell (ME) landed a 13 pound pollock as his largest fish. John also caught an 11.5 pound pollock. Roland Beaulieu (ME) landed the hard luck award for catching nary a single legal fish and for getting involved in quite a few tangles. I'm not qualified at this time to tell you that he was the most tangled. He might have been the only angler aboard without a legal fish.

Don & Lisa Johnson (MA) stopped by today when the boat came in. I enjoyed seeing them and hearing about the recent war stories with their boat. All boats are similar in that regard. They also donated $25.00 to sponsor me in my cancer cure ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge. They have supported me every year since I started riding the PMC in 2007. Thank you very much for your help. You know I appreciate it very much.

Sunday, October 12, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 41F, the sky was crystal clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at seven knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. It was a beautiful fall day today. The wind blew out of the north at ten knots at most. The sky was clear and sunny. The visibility remained very good (some haze) all day. The air temperature got up to the lower 60s. The wind dropped to nothing by early afternoon. The ocean along the coast flattened out.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at ten knots or a bit more. Seas were chops of two feet. As the day progressed, the wind gradually dropped. By noon, there was less than five knots of wind with a calm ocean. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty miles in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56.7F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 36F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 59F with a low of 44F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 61F (with a low of 30F).

The fishing was very good all day. There were very few dogfish, the weather conditions were very nice and the current was light as compared to the last few days. The catching of legal fish (landings) was poor in the morning and excellent in the afternoon, making it a good day overall. It might have been better day than that overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far, of course. Legal landings also included two redfish, four cusk and a white hake. They released twenty-five dogfish, thirty-four haddock, one wolffish and nine cod. Only one cod and one haddock would have made the legal size limit had this been under August regulations. Drifting and anchoring were the boating methods employed. Cod flies caught the most fish by far.

Norm Herrick (MA/ME) was high hook with the most legal fish an angler has caught on a trip any day this week. His largest fish was a 10 pound pollock, a tie for the second largest fish of the trip. Lewis Hazelwood (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.5 pound pollock. Lee Kosiba (NY) tied with Norm for the second largest fish of the trip. Lee also caught a pollock weighing 10 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Saul Maldonado (MA) caught a 9.75 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Tim Rozan (ME) and Greg Johnson (NH) both took home the hard luck award. Greg made an errant cast and caught Tim in the lip with the treble hook of his 16 ounce jig! The hook went right through the lip! It was a minor wound but both were in shock thinking of the possibilities of what could have happened. Ian was thinking that both might pass out as both were a bit ashen in complexion. But all's well that ends well. I saw Tim when he got back to the dock. You would never have known it happened until you were told about it. Of course, Greg was still muttering about how sorry he was.

Tim Rozan contributed $20.00 and Lewis Hazelwood gave $20.00 to support my cancer fund raising campaign with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Both have been continuous contributors since I mentioned my fund raising to them. Thank you both very much for your generosity and help. Much appreciated!

Monday, October 13, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 42F, the sky was crystal clear with half moon directly over head, the wind was blowing very lightly out of the west and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, it was a beautiful fall day with high temperatures in the mid 60s, sunny skies and light winds from the southwest. That all changed at 2:00 PM when the sky became overcast. Not having the sun made it seem cold. And the wind picked up off the water dropping the air temperature into the high 50s. The visibility was less clear than yesterday but still very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest in the morning from five to ten knots. Seas were chops of one to two feet. By noon, the southwest wind had increased to ten and fifteen knots. Seas increased to two to three feet, chops. The sky was a mix of sun and overcast, mostly sunny in the morning and mostly overcast in the afternoon. The air temperature was mild. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56.1F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 35F). In Boston, Massachusetts (at Logan International) the high was 63F with a low of 45F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 30F).

The fishing was very good with only ten dogfish, one blue shark and a perfect drift. The catching of legal fish (landings) was excellent, our best day in the last two weeks. Most legal fish landed were pollock of all sizes, but there were many over 10 pounds. Legal landings also included six redfish, two cusk, three whiting and three butter mullets. Only three cod and four haddock would have been kept had it been August. [We are trying hard to stay away from the cod & haddock this fall. It's hard to stay away from the haddock. Cod, not so much.] Drifting was the boating method. Cod flies caught the most fish by far.

Fred Kunz (NH) was high hook with the most fish an individual angler has caught off the Bunny Clark for a single trip in over a month. Some of his better fish included three pollock of 13 pounds each, a double keeper catch that included a 13 pound pollock (one of the three previously mentioned) and a 10 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time, a 12.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Fred did everything but win the boat pool. Brian Tufts (VT) did that for him! In fact, Brian won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17 pound pollock. This day was his birthday today. So it was only fitting that he get the best present available. I know it doesn't always happen. But it did for Brian today. There was a tie for the second largest fish of the trip. Ken McLaughlin (ME) and Dave Stuart (KY) both caught a 15.5 pound pollock each. Ken caught his singly while Dave caught his as a double that also included a pollock of 8 pounds. Ken also caught a pollock of 11 pounds and several in the 10 pound range. Dave had a 12 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock as well.

Other Angler Highlights: Don Robichaud (NH) caught an 11 pound pollock, the first fish to be weighed today. His other good fish included a 10.5 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. Tracie Johnson (NH) landed a 13.5 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock, her best. Jimmy Brandenburg (KY) caught a 15 pound pollock, his largest fish and the fourth largest fish of the trip. Tony Melloni (MA) caught an 11 pound pollock as his largest fish. He also landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines.

Tim Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the Lighthouse Fishing Club trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the south at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

When we reached the one mile mark outside of Perkins Cove the wind was blowing fifteen knots or better out of the southwest. Seas were chops of two to three feet. It was a bit of a rolly ride. This wind had dropped substantially when we arrived on the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest and remained out of the south southwest all day. Wind speeds never got over ten knots while we were fishing. Seas were chops of one to two feet. On the ride home the wind picked up to fifteen knots with seas averaging about two feet, more or less, but then died out again about five miles from shore. The air temperature was mild in the morning, warm in the afternoon. The sky was overcast all morning but clear and sunny in the afternoon. The tide (current) ran into the wind or obliquely to the wind on every fishing spot. Current speed was moderate. The visibility maxed out at fifteen nautical miles in haze. We had no rain today. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 78F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 56F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was very good all day, bordering on excellent. We had very few dogfish to contend with, the lines tended very nicely, not a blue shark was seen and the weather was beautiful. We caught very few sub-legal fish (fourteen cod, twenty-one haddock and three redfish) and all the legal fish (pollock mostly) were larger on average than they have been. It was the best marathon for angler average in at least two and a half weeks, probably more. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far and of course. Legal landings also included three cusk and six redfish. Had we been able to keep cod under the summer regulations we would have brought home nine fish, haddock two fish. We drift fished for most of the day but anchored twice. Cod flies caught the most fish.

Al Hanson (MA) and Steve Wiater (MA) tied for high hook with a couple fish less than Fred Kunz (NH) had yesterday. Some of Steve's better fish included an 11 pound pollock, a 12.5 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock and two pollock of 12 pounds each. Al Hanson's three largest fish included a 10.5 pound pollock, a 12.75 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock.

George Sweet (MA) won the Club pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19 pound pollock. This fish was the last fish boated at the end of the fishing! Some of George's other good fish included an 11 pound pollock, a 13.25 pound pollock, a 10.5 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. Barry Juhasz (CT) won the Club pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, an 18 pound pollock. Some of Barry's better fish included a 15.25 pound pollock, a 12.25 pound pollock and two pollock of 12 pounds each. Dick Carpenter (MA) won the Club pool for the third largest fish with the third largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. Dick caught the most fish over 10 pounds with a total count of eleven! Some of his better fish included two pollock of 13 pounds each, a 13.5 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock, an 11.75 pound pollock and the largest cod of the trip at 11 pounds (released, of course). It was a good day to be a Dick on the Bunny Clark!

Other Angler Highlights: Phil Wicker (MA/FL) led the Club pool for the largest fish for most of the day with a 15.25 pound pollock. Some of his other good fish included a 14 pound pollock, a 12 pound pollock and a 13.75 pound pollock. Paul "Chico" Astorino (MA) caught only the second Bunny Clark Maine state trophy cusk of the season today. The cusk weighed exactly 12 pounds, our second largest cusk of the Bunny Clark season to date. Chico's biggest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock. He also caught an 11.5 pound pollock. Ben Barzousky (MA) caught our second best double keeper catch of the trip (I didn't weigh our biggest - although it was caught by Jim Geary (MA). Ben's double included a 9.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Some of Ben's other good fish included an 11 pound pollock, a 12.25 pound pollock, a 12 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. Jim Geary landed a 14 pound pollock, his largest fish. His second largest fish was a 13 pound pollock. And Jim also caught the second largest cod of the day (released alive), an 8 pounder. Gloria Gennari (MA) landed a 10 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, her two largest fish. And, for the record, Steve Wiater landed the hard luck award for losing two jigs!

Two anglers helped me in my fund raising machinations with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. These anglers were Steve Wiater with a generous $60.00 gift and Barry Juhasz with a donation of $25.00. Thank you both for your generosity, your kindness and putting up with me on the Bunny Clark. I've always enjoyed your crew. And, for the record, many of the anglers on this trip have supported my PMC event either earlier this season or in the past. I very much appreciate that. See you next season!

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was was clear with stars and a half moon almost directly overhead, the wind was very light out of the west and the visibility over the ocean was very good. By 8:00 AM, the air temperature had risen to a humid 64F, the ocean was flat calm with a few wind patches, there looked to be a fog bank about three or four miles off shore and the sky was clear and sunny. The day remained beautiful until well after sunset (although we did see some cloudiness around 8:00 PM). The sky remained clear and sunny all day. The air temperature reached 77F, the wind stayed light, the ocean remained calm and the visibility was good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five to ten knots with a one foot chop. There was also a long sea swell of two to three feet underneath. The sky remained sunny for the trip. The air temperature was warm/mild. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from eight to ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 62F). The high temperature of 76F in Portland today ties the record for the high temperature on this date in 1963. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 59F).

The fishing was very good. The bite was actually better than it was yesterday (Ian's and my collective opinion). The catching of legal fish was very good excellent. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included four redfish, six whiting and four cusk. Fifteen dogfish, twenty-one cod and twelve haddock were released. There were twelve cod that would have been landed had the size limit been the same as it was in the summer and the possession limit been lifted. No blue sharks were seen. Drifting was the method. Only jigs and cod flies were used today. No bait fishing was attempted.

Ray "Tangles" Valente (NH) was the fisherman of the day. He tied for high hook with Jordan Breault (CA). And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15.5 pound pollock. Some of Ray's other good fish included a 10.25 pound pollock, a 14 pound pollock and a double keeper catch that included two 10 pound pollock caught on the same line at the same time. Ray's 14 pound pollock was the second largest fish of the trip. Jordan also had a bunch of nice fish including a 13.5 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock, two pollock of 11.5 pounds each and a 12.25 pound pollock. Sebastian Jablonski (ME) and Henry Yeh (MA) tied for third. They both caught a 13.75 pound pollock each. Henry caught his singly while Sebastian caught his as part of a double keeper catch that also included a pollock of 11.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Lisa Yeh (ME) landed a 12 pound pollock, a 10.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock as her largest three fish. Jourdan Yeh (CA) and Henry Yeh tied for the hard luck award. Jourdan lost a jig and Henry was slightly ill from the adverse, although slight, motion of the ocean.

I received a very generous donation of $250.00 from Howard Goldenfarb (ME/FL) supporting me in my ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today, an event that raises money to fight cancer with the Jimmy Fund, the fund raising arm of the Dana-Farber Cancer Instituted in Boston, Massachusetts. Thanks so much, Howard. I very much appreciate your help.

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Today's marathon trip was canceled yesterday for lack of warm bodies and, I suspect, a lot of that having to do with the severe weather forecast.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was overcast, it had been raining a couple hours earlier, the wind was blowing out of the southeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was good at best. At sunrise, the fog rolling in along the coast, it became a bit muggy and the sky threatened rain. It didn't rain, however, until after noon. After 4:00 PM, the rain became more established. Rain was torrential between 5:00 PM and 6:00 PM. It rained continuous, but not continuously hard, throughout the night. The air temperature was mild/warm throughout the day with high 60s whenever I looked at a thermometer. We lost the fog by mid morning but the visibility remained fair to good for the day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 63F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 70F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 60F).

Friday, October 17, 2014

Today's trip was canceled yesterday. We had not a single person booked for today nor a single inquiry about today's trip.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was overcast, it had been raining a couple hours earlier, the wind was light out of the south southeast and the visibility over the ocean was fair at best in some fog and haze. It rained a little bit more before stopping before 7:00 AM. It never rained again. At 9:00 AM, we had sun here and there among a mostly overcast sky. By 11:00 AM, the sky had cleared and the sun was out for the rest of the day. The air temperature was mild/warm for the rest of the day. The highest air temperature I saw was 69F but I heard that it got up to 72F. The wind stayed light out of the south. The ocean remained calm along the shore. During the late afternoon, seas were making up along the beaches. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 72F (with a low of 53F).

Saturday, October 18, 2014

Today's trip was canceled yesterday. We didn't have enough anglers (two) to make the trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the south on land but was blowing at fifteen knots or more at the closest weather buoy and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good over the ocean, or so it seemed in the dark. We are already seeing larger than normal seas from Hurricane Gonzalo well over 500 miles to the east southeast. Sea swells were already being recorded at 7 & 8 feet only nine miles from shore.

Clouds rolled in around 7:00 AM. This didn't created much of an overcast condition. Instead, we saw clouds and clear blue patches. Some of the clouds looked dark enough to produce rain. But this didn't happen in the morning. After 1:00 PM, we alternated between showers and clear conditions. From 3:00 PM until 6:00 PM, it was mostly raining. At 5:00 PM we had thunder showers and a summer-like rain. The air temperature hung around the mid 60s all day. The wind was generally light from the south. At times, the ocean was calm along the shore. Large seas were breaking all along the coast. A mist hung in the air along all the beaches from the pounding surf. After 6:00 PM, it never rained again. The sky didn't clear completely but there were plenty of clear looks at the sky. The visibility ended up in the "good" category. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 52F).

I spent the day working at the restaurant. It's the last weekend at Barnacle Billy's (original) of the season. Barnacle Billy's, Etc. will remain open daily for two more weeks. Many of the patrons eating at the restaurant today were regular customers of ours. It was like "old home" weekend.

I must say it was unnerving to see the Bunny Clark tied to the dock for the last three days. Never have we lost trips in October during good weather. And I'm so sorry that the state of the fishery has come to the point where regulations are imposed to slow our business down in the most prime month for catching fish of the season. But then maybe this will help us turn things around for the future. Stay tuned.

I received another donation helping my cancer cause with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Dave Haberl (MO), who drives out here every year to go on the Bunny Clark in October, was the donor. His donation was $20.00. Thank you so much, Dave, for seeking me out at the restaurant to help in the cause. Very thoughtful and generous of you and I appreciate it. Hope to see you next season!

Sunday, October 19, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 51F, the sky was mostly clear with a sliver of a moon hanging well over the eastern horizon, the wind was blowing out of the west northwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good, at least. The wind continued to blow out of the northwest or some variation of it all day. The sky clouded over before dawn and remained that way for a few hours. By mid morning, the sky was clear and the sun was bright. But it didn't do much for the air temperature as it stayed cool most of the day. Every time I looked at a thermometer the air temperature was in the low 50s. The sky clouded over again after noon. And we really never saw the sun again for the rest of the day. Seas were large along the shore. The visibility remained very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops over swells of three to five feet. The sky was a mix of sun and overcast conditions. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 44F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 56F with a low of 43F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 53F (with a low of 45F).

The fishing was very good. The conditions weren't perfect but they were certainly good enough. And only six dogfish were caught and released. The catching of legal fish was excellent. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included three redfish. Nine haddock were caught but none were over twenty-one inches. Only six cod were caught that would have made the twenty-one inch minimum had they been able to keep them. Both anchoring and drifting were the boating disciplines involved. Only cod flies and jigs were used.

Jeff Rounds (VT) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a 14.5 pound pollock, the second largest fish of the trip. He also caught a double keeper catch that included two pollock of exactly 11.5 pounds each. Some of his other weighable fish included a 12 pound pollock, a 12.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Cole Melendy (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. Two of his other good fish included a 10.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Jay Haggett (VT) boated the third largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. He also caught a 10 pound pollock that Ian weighed.

Other Angler Highlights: Frank Haggett (VT) caught several nice fish that were weighed. They included an 11 pound pollock, an 11.25 pound pollock, an 11.5 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. Jay & Frank Haggett landed the hard luck awards for never being able to out-fish Jeff Rounds, ever! Ouch.

Monday, October 20, 2014

Today's trip was canceled for lack of anglers.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 38F, the sky was crystal clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at almost twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The sky remained clear for the day, a welcome change after yesterday's mix of mostly clouds with some sun. The air temperature warmed to 48F by 11:30 AM. The air temperature remained cool for the day with the highest reading in Perkins Cove about 56F more or less. The wind blew out of the west at fifteen knots (more or less) with stronger gusts in the morning, less wind after noon and no wind a dusk. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 56F (with a low of 35F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 58F with a low of 39F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 55F (with a low of 34F).

Last night was the last hurrah for the season at Barnacle Billy's (original). It was a very generously warm crowd of patrons and a wonderful staff to work with all season to get to the end. My sister, Meg, was there to make it very special indeed. Everyone loves Meg, as do I. My brother, Court, closed the place, as he does every year. He's the number one guy there and, before I make any decision, I consult with him first. When I left, I knew the place was in good hands and I was a bit sad that "Billy's" was done for another season. I spent the day today writing about it on the Barnacle Billy's website.

This morning I spent time getting everything ready to go at the restaurants and getting the Bunny Clark ready for my trip tomorrow. I was excited about going. And I have "special" plans for tomorrow. Let's see how it all turns out. I waited until 8:00 AM to confir with Court about the clean-up plans. We went over a few things.

From there I went to get my old 87' Porshe I had in storage to start it up, get it registered and put an inspection sticker on it. As I was backing it up to put it back, I noticed black smoke coming out of the hood. Thinking it might be exhaust and worried that I might have no oil, I stopped the car, shut off the ignition and opened the hood. Smoke and fire billowed out. Here I was, all alone without a fire extinguisher at the end of a storage facility with the potential of burning my car and everything around me down! The only thing I could do was to take off my favorite Bunny Clark hoodie and try to smother the fire. This I did. I was covered in smoke and got minor burns on my fingers (and I enhaled a bunch of acrid smoke) but I did manage to put the fire out. I was shaking all over when I was done and covered in soot. An AC condenser had shorted out, started the fire and caught the synthetic covering blanket on fire. The engine is in the back (it's a 911) so no damage was done to the engine. But the smell was not good. And the burns I sustained were from the melting synthetic blankets. My hands were black from it. Needless to say, I was very wound up as well as running out the rest of my morning time on this car. And I ruined my good luck hoodie.

I worked at the restaurant (after I got showered and shaved) for the rest of the day and into the evening.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I are running the marathon trip today.

At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the sky was clear, the wind was very light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. More later.

On September 1, 2014, the possession of cod and haddock became prohibited while fishing in federal waters with rod & reel recreationally. That means that we can't bring cod or haddock fillets back to Perkins Cove. This moratorium on cod & haddock possession is supposed to last for September & October. On November 1, haddock retention returns but cod retention remains prohibited. And, in light of recent developments, I suspect cod retention might be prohibited further into the future. Much of these regulations are up in the air right now.

The Conservation Law Foundation came out with a short video about keeping the Cashes Ledge closed area closed instead of opening it up to commercial dragging as is the plan right now. I had a short part in the video. I am very supportive of keeping the Cashes Ledge area closed and keeping the status quo on the Georges Bank closed areas numbers 1 & 2. Some on the New England Fishery Management Council want to see Georges Bank, particularly, opened to dragging. This is where our haddock are coming from, the biggest groundfish success story of the modern era. And they want to open it up? It's selfish and crazy. The video on my browser starts as soon as you bring up the page but you have to scroll down to see it. Otherwise, all you hear is the narration. There is a petition to sign at the video link I just gave you after the video is completed. I would appreciate it if you signed your name in support of keeping the Cashes Ledge area closed. The closed areas have been a very important part of the rebuilding process of the groundfish stocks in New England. Without the closed areas I am certain you will be kissing your fish goodbye. This isn't the only thing that needs to be done, of course, but it's a good start. Thank you.

We have future fishing trips with openings. The extreme day trip of Sunday, October 19 has sixteen openings available, the extreme day trip of Monday, October 20 has nineteen fishing spots available (only one booked so far), the Tim Tuesday, marathon trip of October 21 has nine fishing spots available, the extreme day trip of Wednesday, October 22 has fourteen fishing spots available, the Thursday, October 23 marathon trip has fourteen spaces available and the extreme day trip of Friday, October 24 is wide open with every fishing spot available. The next couple of days are going to feature southeast wind, a bit of rain and fog (Thursday & Friday - 16th & 17th) which should bring us to a good weather weekend. Next weeks weather also looks good. A good time to go fishing before hunting season. To make a reservation you can call 207-646-2214.









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