www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

August 30, 2016, 3:10 AM EDT



Our Two Largest White Hake

The digital images above were taken during the ultra marathon invitational trip on July 12, 2016. These shots were taken of the two largest hake of the Bunny Clark fishing season with the anglers who caught them holding them for the camera. The shot on the left shows Bryan Lewer (FL) holding his 40.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This picture was taken with an old Sony camera that loads floppy discs! The shot on the left is a picture of the ever popular (in Bunny Clark shots) Steve Selmer (NH) holding his 40 pound Maine state trophy white hake shortly after gaffing. I took this shot with an iPhone 6s. I could have used a better fill flash. But it still looks good. These are two of my best and favorite anglers.




Starting August 1, 2016 we can keep one cod per angler as long it it approaches or exceeds a minimum size of twenty-four inches. The ability to keep cod will end on October 1, 2016.

Saturday, August 6, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

Although I wasn't in Ogunquit, Deb told me that it rained ashore most of the morning. The afternoon cleared off perfectly and the wind dropped. We were all fearing another bad weather trip like the afternoon before. And Deb (my wife) had even called all the anglers who had made reservations to tell them the weather prediction and to make sure they wanted to drive down when the trip could be canceled. No one wanted to back out. And they were all glad they did as the weather was nearly perfect by the time 4:00 PM rolled around. I didn't get a high temperature reading for Ogunquit but the sky was clear and the visibility was good to very good from 2:00 PM on into the night.The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 94F (with a low of 68F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 89F with a low of 70F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 91F (with a low of 68F).

On the fishing grounds, during the full day trip, the wind blew out of the southwest at fifteen dropping to ten knots or so. Seas were chops of two to four feet, more on the side of three to four in the morning. They had light rain showers for most of the morning and the early part of the afternoon or just about all the time they were actively fishing. The air temperature rose to a value of 68F at the highest. The visibility ranged from three to ten miles in precipitation, haze and some fog. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was overcast. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing was good to very good; better weather could have pushed the fishing into the "very good" category. The catching was about the same, good to very good. Legal landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-two haddock (there were a lot of sub-legal haddock released today), thirteen cod and two cusk. Only three dogfish were caught and released. Drifting was the method of choice, a good choice I believe. All terminal gear worked about the same.

Bob Murch (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.25 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock caught by Mike Shaab (ME). He caught his fish as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 5.5 pounds, the best double of the day. The third largest fish was a 10 pound pollock caught by Josh Roy (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Jack Normand (ME) landed the hard luck award for being the highest of hurlers. We didn't have as many anglers sick as we did last night but we did have a few. Jack was the best of the bunch or the worst, depending on how you look at it!

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. As I mentioned above in the first paragraph, the weather during the afternoon wasn't anything like the weather the National Weather Service had predicted. More often that not, they are better at predicting the weather during the working week than the weekend. I've often thought they leave the underlings in the office on Saturday and Sunday while the big guns go off and play. At least that's what it seems. Never trust a weekend weather prediction.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at about five knots. Seas were old smooth chops of one to two feet, more of a roll and than a chop. The air temperature rose to 71F. The sky was clear and sunny. The visibility improved to fifteen miles or better. There was little current. The surface water temperature took a drop to 61.5F at it's highest value.

The fishing was very good, the catching was good and landings were fair. Only one legal fish was caught and kept, a haddock. They did catch eight mackerel but no one wanted them. There were plenty of short cod and pollock and two sub-legal haddock. They also released a wolffish. No dogfish were seen. They drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked equally well.

Drew Aldrich (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.25 pound wolffish. The second largest fish was a 3.25 pound cod caught by Jess Marshall (ME). Mike Fenton (VT) released the third largest fish, a 3 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Teresa Farrington (VT) caught a 2 pound haddock. Rachel Roberge (ME) landed the hard luck award for, you guessed it, sea sickness. Thankfully, I believe she was the only one. It was also her birthday so I'm wondering if she was really sick at all. I'm thinking Ian wanted to give her a t-shirt for her birthday!

I received two donations sponsoring me in my Pan-Mass Challenge cycling event (the first ride of which started at 5:30 AM today) for cancer research and care with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. One was a $50.00 "egift" through the PMC site from Richard O'Connor (MA) and the other was a very generous $250.00 from Jim Hargrove (MA). Thank you both so very much for this support, every year. It means so much to me!

First Day of the PMC Ride:



The digital image above was taken at about 4:30 AM in front of the Host Hotel in Sturbridge, Massashusetts, near the starting line of the ride. The picture shows (in the back, left to right) Steve LaPlante who drives up from Connecticut just to see us off. Steve is wearing this years Bunny Clark/PMC theme shirt that I make up for every event. This years theme was my tenth anniversary of riding in the PMC. Yes, the color is lavender. I'm in the picture next to Steve and Dave Miller, another wonderful individual, angler and friend is on the other side of me. Both have supported me in too many ways to describe over the many fishing years. In front, left to right, is Paul "Hez" Haseltine, my best friend, and my niece (Hez's daughter), Abby. It's now tradition that Steve, Hez, myself, Dave and whoever else is with us, gets together for a picture before the ride. Somehow this sends us in the right direction. It's more than just a feeling!

The ride was good. I started off with Hez and Abby, thinking I would see any one of twenty-five of my friends also doing the ride. Abby had an easy mechanical in the beginning which Hez and I stopped to fix. That put all my friends ahead of me. I never did see any of them for 112 miles! I ended up riding solo except for ten miles riding with a fast group. I had always wanted to try it; I usually ride with a group. But it takes more energy to ride alone. And I was pooched at the end. It took me a little over 5.5 hours to cover the distance and stop at a couple of water stops along the way. I like to get in to Mass Maritime Academy between 10:30 and 11:00 AM as it gives me the whole afternoon to get everything together and relax. I can't relax at home. And here I can't work (Deb won't allow me to take a computer). So I had no mechanicals, didn't dump the bike this time and no flat tires. Success!



Above is a shot I took from my iPhone while riding behind the sea of humanity on bikes at sunrise leaving Sturbridge.

At MMA, I connected with all the special people I have met on this ride and only see on these two days. I can't tell you how closely connected we are. It's close. And this who endeavor binds us together. We all ride for the cause. The bike ride we take as a gift for fund raising. And it is truly a gift to be with these people, ride and live with them for two glorious days. I ended up heading off to bed at 7:00 PM.

Sunday, August 7, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Sean Devich ran the full day trip today.

Ashore, there was very little wind. The ocean was calm along the shore for most of the day. In the morning the wind was light out of the northwest. The wind stayed out of the northwest all day, at times blowing as much as ten knots. But this was a shore side thing only. The sky was clear, cloudless for a bit. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 89F with a low of 72F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at five knots tops. The ocean was calm, flat calm. The air temperature got up to 74F. The sky was clear. The tide (current) was moderate to light. The visibility seemed unlimited. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

The fishing was almost excellent. It would have been excellent had they not caught thirty-seven dogfish. But if you like dogfish it definitely hit the "excellent" mark. The weather was perfect; you couldn't have had a better fishing platform. There were a lot of small cod and haddock caught, mostly haddock. The haddock cull was four to one, four sub-legal fish for every five haddock caught. This is the worst keeper ratio we have seen for quite a while. So the catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by a bit of a margin. Legal landings also included twenty pollock, seven cod and six cusk. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Cody Brouillard (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. Cody caught this pollock as a double keeper catch with another pollock of 6 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The second and third largest fish were both caught by Jase Groesbeck (NY). They were an 11 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock. He also caught a pollock that weighed 8.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Art Kemler (PA) caught an 8 pound pollock, his largest fish. Andrew Belles (PA) landed the hard luck award for most tangled lines.

Captain Jared Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at eight to ten knots dropping to less than five knots before the fishing was over. Seas were chops of a foot at most to calm. The air temperature had dropped to 71F. The sky was clear, sunny. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged to over ten miles in some haze. The surface water temperature was 61F.

The fishing was good to very good (the tide), the catching was good but landings were poor. Only one legal fish was caught, a squirrel hake. This fish was released. They caught quite a few sub-legal pollock, less sub-legal cod and four sculpins. Not a great night to bring fish home. Anchoring and drifting both were tried. Everyone used bait.

Donna Conlin-Stolberg (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 1.5 pound cod. Travis Hancock (MO) and Katie Chamberlain (VT) tied for the second largest fish. Both were cod. Both weighed 1.25 pounds each. Kris Geist (NY) landed the hard luck award for most tangled lines.

I received two donations sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising cycling event called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a generous $50.00 donation from John Carvalho (NH) and the other was a generous donation of $100.00 from Charles Borgstrom (MA). Charlie's donation was made as an "egift" through the PMC site. [At the time of John's donation, I was on the ferry from Provincetown to Boston celebrating my tenth ride in the PMC!] Thank you both for your generosity and support. I appreciate the help very much!

Second Day of the PMC Ride:

Hez, Abby and I slept in a dorm room at the MMA the night before. Normally those dorm rooms are very warm. This time, after a rain at 7:30 PM, the night before, the wind hauled out of the northwest, blowing cooler air right through the window and into our room. So we all had a pretty good sleep. I woke up at 3:00 AM, like normal, went to the bathroom to shave and, coming back to the room, slipped on a wet tile floor in front of the ladies room and landed on my hip! That bothered me all day. Not enough to stop me from riding but bothersome just the same. We had breakfast at 4:30 AM. Then it was off to grab our bikes.

It was still fairly dark at 5:15 AM when we started to ride to the road leading to the Bourne Bridge. And, as you can imagine, there were many different cyclists from all levels of cycling talent. That's always a nervous time for me. No light on my bike and shouting commands the whole way ("stopping", "braking", "car up", "slowing", etc. etc.). My favorite chirp is "on your left" as I'm free wheeling along passing cyclists! And once over the bridge and on to the path along the Cape Cod Canal you can do that.

We made up a team, that decided the night before. The team consisted of Jonathan Cartwright, one of my favorite guys I ride with around the southern coast of Maine, Daniel Braun and Katie Mark, a young woman who rides with a friend of mine in the Miami area. The team appears below taken at the Brewster, Massachusetts water stop. From left to right, yours truly, Jonathan, Katie and Daniel.



The four of us traded wheels for almost the first sixty miles of the eighty mile ride. There were a couple of bad crashes, one of which we were the first on the scene and started to help. After seconds there were so many people there helping we decided to leave and carry on. We all stopped at the Wellfleet water stop where we left Katie Mark; she was riding in with "Team Path" and they were going to do a team picture so she wanted to ride in with everyone and not have to wait. So Jonathan, Dan and I took off together and made a kind of race out of it. That was fun. It was less than twenty miles to the finish. At the end of the ride we rode in three abreast, close, arms on each other's shoulders with the official volunteers yelling at us to slow down (it was Jonathan's idea). That was kind of fun. We had another picture taken at the finish. The digital image is below:



And I saw Don & Lisa Johnson at the finish in P-Town. Their family has fished with me on the Bunny Clark for many years. It was great to see them. By 3:00 PM, we were on the Ferry back to Boston and home. This weekend goes by way too fast!

Monday, August 8, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the sky was mostly clear all day. We had few clouds. What clouds there were were high and thin. The wind blew out of the northwest all day. After noon, wind speeds were gusting over fifteen knots with sustained speeds of fifteen knots at times. I'm not sure the air temperature ever got over 80F. It felt like it was over 80F. When I looked it was close, very high 70s. The visibility was excellent after 10:00 AM. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 54F).

The weather told a totally different story on the ocean. The northwest wind never reached off. In fact, three miles offshore, the wind was out of the southeast. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at five knots or less in the morning, died out and then hauled out of the southwest at five knots, max. The ocean was calm over rolling sea swells of one or two feet. Nothing, really, for wind offshore. The air temperature reached a high of 70F. The sky was clear and sunny. The visibility ranged to over twenty-five miles. The tide was light to moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

The fishing was very good to excellent. The weather couldn't have been much better, there were very few dogfish (fourteen total), there were a couple blue shark attacks but, best of all, the anglers were some of our best. So there were very few tangles. The catching was very good as well. Most fish caught were legal pollock. But there were almost as many sub-legal cod in the twenty-two inch category that had to be released. Landings were very good. So most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. But they landed the most legal haddock we have seen on the boat in a month. Or since the last big offshore trip. Legal landings also included eighteen cod, eleven cusk and a whiting. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked really well today.

Mike Wicks (NY) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish, by far, and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 21.5 pound cod. This is a tie for the second largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Ian took a picture of Mike with his cod. This picture appears on the left. A couple of Mike's other good fish included a 14.5 pound pollock and a pollock that weighed 11 pounds. The second largest fish was a 16.5 pound pollock caught by Paul Lynch (MA). John Lambert, Jr. (NY) caught the third largest fish, a 15 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Charlie Harris (MA), on his first trip aboard the "Bunny" this year, landed a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. His father, Dave Harris (MA), landed a pollock of 13 pounds. Matt Smith (CT) caught an 11 pound pollock. Adam Benjamin (VT) landed a 12 pound pollock, his best. Kevin Harding (MA) boated an 11 pound pollock. Erin Harris (MA), I heard, had a late start today! After five stops, all my favorite female angler had to show (for keepers) was a sculpin. I know she had to do better than that later. But I never got the report! Will McKinstry (MA) landed the hard luck award for "almost" getting sea sick.

And I received two more donations of sponsorship today for my part in the Pan-Mass Challenge cancer crushing event. So far, in the ten years I have done this ride, I have raised over a quarter of a million dollars for the Jimmy Fund. Donations like the $60.00 I received from Jim "Chip" Chiapponi (CT) today or the $25.00 I received from Jim Sementilli (NY) today, go a long way to fight cancer and help care for those who have the disease. They are symbols of the many who have given their hard earned dollars to allow me to get to that mark. Thank you, both Jim's, for the support and your kindness. Very much appreciated!

Tim Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Sean Devich and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

The ride to the fishing grounds was quiet with very little spray. The ocean was flat calm for the first ten miles, more or less. The air temperature was mild, the visibility very good, at least, and the sky was mostly clear. On the grounds, the wind came up out of the northeast but only about five knots or less. We had wind ripples on the surface over a two foot long round chop out of the northeast. The northeast wind hung on until a little after noon when it hauled out of the south. Light southerly winds chased us back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature reached a high of 83F. The sky was clear with high thin clouds and sunny soft lighting. The visibility ranged to twenty-five miles at least. The tide (current) was moderate to light. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66.4F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 70F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 92F (with a low of 53F).

The fishing was very good; it could have been better with a few less tangles. But we only saw six dogfish and the tangles weren't terrible. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. But there were far more pollock on the sounding machine than we saw getting hooked up. But that's what you get with such a beautiful weather day. Legal landings also included twenty-four haddock (the cull was about fifty/fifty), seven cusk and eighteen cod. We released a few cod up to 10 pounds. In fact, the largest cod was the 10 pounder we released until the very end of the day. We drift fished for most of the day but our best stop was the one where we stayed on anchor. The bite had slowed down on the drift so we set the hook. That seemed to do the trick. Cod flies caught the most legal fish.

Todd Aiken (NY) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was the 10 pound cod we shook off the hook; he had already decided to keep a smaller legal cod earlier. Brian Aiken (NY) was second hook. Brian also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound cod. The cod was one of the last five fish caught before we headed home. Second place was shared by Peter Jaskievic (MA) and Tim Robinson (ME). They each caught a pollock that weighed 12 pounds. Peter caught his pollock within the first five minutes of the trip while Tim caught his during the last five minutes of the trip!

Other Angler Highlights: Mark Coleman (NY) caught one of the first pollock I could weigh. The fish was 9 pounds. He caught three cod that measured over twenty-four inches - I didn't actually have to measure them; they were all about 7 pounds or better. Dan Johnson (MA) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, his best fish. Ten year old Henry Poissant (MA) caught a 10 pound pollock. Walt Davidson (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting spined by a dogfish! I've seen worse. But it didn't look good. It actually looked like one of the wounds I got after dumping the bike on a training ride in June this year. That required eight stitches! His looked like a three stitcher.

Sean Devich and I ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots to start. This wind petered out to nothing by the time we were ready to head back. The ocean went from a light wind ripple to glassy. The ocean was calm all the way back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature reached a high of 68F, much cooler than the day's trip. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty-five miles or more. The sky was clear. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing, the catching and the keeping were fair to good. Fair on the first spot, best on the third and last stop. Most fish caught were sub-legal pollock, by far. Legal fish included three whiting, two pollock and two mackerel. We released one dogfish. Anchoring was the method. Except for me swinging a jig for fifteen minutes, everyone used bait and cod flies. The cod flies caught a significant number of fish.

Toni Carlina (NY) probably caught the most fish including one whiting and several pollock. Rachel Husmann (MN) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4 pound cod. This fish was sub-legal but only by a half inch! The second largest fish was a 2.25 pound legal pollock caught by twelve year old Declan Lynch (CT). The third largest fish was caught by Declan's father, Steve Lynch (CT). This fish was a 2 pound pollock just shy of being legal.

Other Angler Highlights: Brad Mackin (MA) might have won the boat pool. He caught a pollock that looked to be 4 or 5 pounds. But, as he was lifting the fish out of the water, it fell off the hook and swam straight to bottom! I gave him the hard luck award t-shirt for his loss! Jennifer Lynch (CT) caught the first fish I could weigh, a .6 pound whiting. Maryann Mackin (CT) caught the second good fish I could weigh, a 1.5 pound pollock.

I received several donations from anglers helping me with my cancer fund raising bike ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those anglers and their donations included: Brian Aiken, Todd Aiken and Ed Parrow (all NY) for $60.00, Mark Coleman (NY) for $25.00 and Rob Hickey (MA) for $25.00. Thank you all so very much for your support and kindness. I truly appreciate it!

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Soon after sunrise, you could see the clouds creeping our way from the west. They didn't look like rain clouds at first. But, by 7:00 AM, you knew rain was coming at some point in the morning. And it did. By 9:30 AM, it started to rain. It poured at times but mostly the rain was light. The rain stopped for good around noon. The sky remained cloudy for most of the afternoon. Around 5:00 PM, the sky cleared, the sun came out and it seemed like it had been that way all day! The wind blew out of the south all day. Along the shore it blew up to ten or fifteen knots in the morning but then died out before noon. The wind was mostly light the rest of the day. The air temperature reached a high of at least 72F in Ogunquit. The visibility was good to poor, at times, over the ocean in fog. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 80F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 60F).

On the fishing grounds, they had a calm ride out for the first three or four miles. After that the wind started to build from the south. Five to ten knots at first, the wind started at ten knots or better at the start of the fishing. Seas were one to two feet in chops. The wind was out of the southwest. By noon, sustained fifteen knots winds made chops of two to three feet. Winds of twenty knots showed as they left to head home. Seas were three to four foot chops. The air temperature reached a high value of 68F. The sky was overcast with light rain during almost the whole fishing trip. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged from five to fifteen miles in haze and precipitation. The surface water temperature only got up as high as 65F.

The fishing was good for some fair for others. The salient deterring factor, of course, being the wind. But there were also sixty dogfish caught which only made fishing harder for the desired species. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was 1.5 sub-legal fish to 1 legal haddock. Legal landings also included nine cod, thirty pollock and five cusk. Drifting was Ian's method of choice. All terminal gear worked well but cod flies had the edge.

Andrew Miller (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. Second place was shared a pollock and a cod of 12.5 pounds each. Donna Tolppa (RI) caught the pollock while Rafik Bishara (MA) caught the cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Bruce Paul (NH) caught the second largest cod. It weighed 11.5 pounds. Patrick McMorrow (ME) was the high hurler of day. And, yes, he landed the hard luck award.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at ten to fifteen knots at first and then dropped. Seas ran two to three feet or a little more to start, two feet or more by the end of the fishing. Wind speeds dropped to about five knots by that same time. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The air temperature got up as high as 69F. There was a moderate tide. The surface water temperature only made it up to 62F. The visibility ranged from five to ten miles in haze.

The fishing was fair to good to start, good later in the trip. The catching was good or better than that. Landings were fair. Legal landings included five cusk. There was one cod that was close to being legal. Quite a few sub-legal cod and pollock were released. And one cunner that could have been kept was released. No dogfish. Anchoring and drifting were utilized. Only bait and a couple of flies were used.

Brayden Fairbanks (MA) was high hook with one legal and one almost legal fish. His largest was a 5 pound cusk. But he also caught a 4.5 pound cod that almost made the mark. Yanick Govin (QC) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9.5 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a cusk of 9 pounds caught by Matthew Moser (TX). Bryan Cahoon (NH) caught the third largest fish, a 6 pound cusk.

Other Angler Highlights: Will Prieto (NJ) landed a cusk of 5.25 pounds. Jason Duran (MA) couldn't handle the rocking of the boat and won the hard luck award based on the differential equilibriums.

Bob Munroe & Linn Burgess (MA) sponsored me for my part in the Pan-Mass Challenge again today (they had already donated $40.00 earlier in the year) with another donation of $40.00. This to help in the fight against cancer. Thank you both again for your continued support through the years. I certainly appreciate it!

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was partly cloudy, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean fair to good in haze. At sunrise there was still no wind. We did have wind later in the morning, out of the southwest. But we never saw wind speeds approaching ten knots. It was less than that in Perkins Cove all day. In fact, we hardly saw the ruffle of a flag. The air temperature soared to a value (that I saw) of 94F. And it was humid as well making it very uncomfortable to move around. The dew point did not match the air temperature so we never did see any fog. But that also meant there was no relief from the heat. The sky was sunny all day, indeed cloudless for at least three hours this morning. The visibility was good in some haze.

The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 90F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 96F with a low of 75F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 98F (with a low of 66F). The high temperature in Concord of 98F ties the record high for this date last set in 1944.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. The air temperature was not nearly as high as it was ashore with 73F the highest value they experienced. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The visibility ranged from five to ten miles in haze and some fog. Seas were chop/swells of one to two feet. And the surface water temperature reached a high value of 67F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good and landings were very good to excellent. Had we had our regular marathon jig anglers aboard, I'm sure it would have been a three way tie in the category of excellent. The bite was on and Ian could do no wrong as far as the anglers were concerned, always a great feeling for me meeting the boat. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. In fact, many legal pollock were released. The second most prevalent species was the haddock. Even six legal haddock were released! Legal landings also included ten cod and a cusk. One wolffish and forty-seven dogfish were released. They made three drifts, one very productive drift that lasted over two hours. All terminal gear worked well.

High hook was impossible to discern. Alon Osovizky (MD) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. Jeff Saucier (CT) caught the second largest fish, a 12.5 pound pollock. The third largest fish was an 11 pound pollock caught by Dennis Keyser (ME). Dennis also caught a pollock of 10 pounds, the first fish to be weighed today, and another pollock of 10.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Josh Keyser (ME) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Brian Miller (FL) landed the hard luck award for losing a jig.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas mirrored those of the day trip. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The air temperature got up as high as 72F. The tide was light to moderate. The surface water temperature only made it up to 62F. The visibility ranged from five to ten miles in haze.

The fishing was very good, the catching was excellent but landings were poor. The large majority of fish caught (and released) were pollock, probably the most pollock we have released on a trip in a long time. They also released fifteen sub-legal cod and one cod that was just shy of the minimum mark. Legal landings included one cusk. However, there were six mackerel that were caught that could have been kept but were released instead. Anchoring and drifting were both used. Only bait was used this evening.

Mike Thompson (ON) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4 pound cod. As mentioned, it was just sub-legal. The second largest fish was a 3.25 pound cusk caught by Josh Boule (MA). Ashley Labarre (MA) sewed up the hard luck award when she lost her camera overboard!

The cycling event called the Pan-Mass Challenge was finished last weekend. But cancer never stops killing people and so the fund raising for a cancer never ends either. I collect donations from the end of the event until December 30 every year. Typically I raise another $10,000 to $15,000. I hope that happens this year as I have collected a record donation total to this date. Some of the reason for this is that I had donors who contribute annually, donate early this year. So we shall see. In the spirit of donating after the event, Andy Barowsky (ME) contributed a very generous $250.00 today. Andy is one of my annual donors, and a hell of a wonderful person. Thanks so much, Andy. I appreciate your support.

Friday, August 12, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 77F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean fair to good in haze. The air temperature rose again today but quickly to as high a value as it did yesterday and beyond. The highest air temperature that I saw today was 100F, the highest air temperature I can remember in years. But it felt hotter than that. It was very humid. I don't know when I felt so warm outside. The wind blew out of the west with speeds up to fifteen or twenty knots after 10:30 AM. After noon, the westerly wind backed off a bit to about ten and fifteen knots max. The sky was mostly clear all day until 4:30 PM, when it became mostly cloudy. It started raining at 5:30 PM without thunder, lightning or wind. The rain hung around until just before 7:00 PM before clearing. With the rain ending, the wind shifted out of the east at ten knots. The visibility was good over the ocean for most of the day.

The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 99F (with a low of 66F). The high temperature in Portland of 99F ties the record high for this date last set in 1944. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 98F with a low of 78F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 99F (with a low of 71F). The high temperature in Concord of 99F ties the record high for this date last set in 1944.

On the fishing grounds the wind blew out of the southwest from five to ten knots and then from ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of one to two feet and more before the trip back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature reached a high of 72F. The sky was sunny and mostly clear. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles. And the surface water temperature reached a high value of 67F.

The fishing was very good again today, very similar to yesterday's trip. The catching was very good to excellent as were the landings. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. They also caught the bag limit for cod. This is the first day since the cod season opened that we have caught as many. Every angler caught a legal cod. Legal landings also included twenty-one haddock and seventeen cusk. The haddock cull was fifty/fifty legal fish to sub-legal fish. A few legal cod were released as were seventy-five dogfish and one wolffish. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most legal fish.

Jack Judge (CT/ME) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15.5 pound cod. Jack also caught the third largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock. He caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 9.5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The second largest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock caught by Christie Bentz (AK). She also caught an 11 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Kevin Nord (PA) caught an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. Chuck Mannings (VT) landed a pollock that weighed 10 pounds. Brennon Chafeney (VT) caught the second largest cod of the trip. It weighed 10 pounds. Arthur Haines (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the southwest wind had backed off, somewhat, to five knots. Seas were one to two feet. Later into the trip, the wind hauled out of the northeast. Wind speeds ranged from five to ten knots. The same sea state was maintained. The air temperature reached a high of 73F. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged from three to five miles in fog and haze. The surface water could only muster a high of 65F this evening.

The fishing and catching were good tonight. Landings would have been good had anglers wanted to keep mackerel. The released mackerel count was twenty-eight. Legal landings included one cod out of twenty cod caught. Drifting was the method. Bait, only, was used.

Tricia McGee (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 5 pound cod, the only legal groundfish caught. She caught this cod as part of a double keeper catch with another cod of 4.5 pounds. The second cod was just shy of being legal. Alex Badore (VT) caught the third largest fish, a 3.25 pound sub-legal cod. Emily Fredette (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting, yes, sea sick. Ouch!

Lou & Barb Carangelo (MA) donated $25.00 to sponsor me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thank you so much for your help. I certainly appreciate it!

Saturday, August 13, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was mostly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was good. The morning remained overcast. After noon, we had periods with some sun but the sun was between the clouds. The wind blew out of the northeast all morning. Wind speeds were less than fifteen knots for the most part. After noon the wind hauled more out of the east northeast with wind speeds of about ten knots. The air temperature reached a high of 78F, a far cry from the heat of yesterday. The visibility was good to very good over the ocean. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 65F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east northeast at ten to fifteen knots or somewhere in between. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The air temperature got up to 67F max. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66F.

The fishing, catching and keeping were all very good, a good day to be an angler groundfishing - unless the motion of the ocean made you ill (and there were a couple falling into that category). Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included six cod and twenty-nine haddock. The haddock cull was about fifty/fifty, legal to sub-legal fish. Released fish included forty-five dogfish and about half as many cod and pollock. Drift fishing and anchoring were both used. Drifting was the most productive today. All terminal gear worked well.

I didn't ask who was high hook but it might have been too hard to tell. Tyler Disorda (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 16.5 pound pollock caught by Ernie Searles (NH). Ernie also caught a pollock that weighed 10.5 pounds. Brian Disorda (VT) landed the third largest fish, a 14 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Bobby Bessette (NH) boated an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. Sage Smith (KY) landed the hard luck award for not being able to maintain the equilibrium possessed on land!

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The wind continued to blow out of the east northeast at ten knots but died on the way to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the east at five knots. Seas were swells of two feet or better under a calm surface. The air temperature reached a high of 66F. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged to ten miles in haze. The surface water could only muster a high of 65F this evening.

The fishing was very good, the catching was good and the landings were fair to good. Legal landings included three cod and twenty-five mackerel. No dogfish were caught but there were quite a few sub-legal cod and pollock that were released. Drifting was the method. Mostly bait and a couple of cod flies were used.

Twelve year old Albert Lessard (MA) was high hook by virtue of a double cod catch during the trip. His double included a 5 pound cod and a 3.5 pound cod, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. His 5 pound legal cod was the second largest fish of the trip. The largest fish was a 5.25 pound legal cod caught by Max Fischer (NY). The third largest fish was a 4.75 pound legal cod caught by Natasha Lessard (MA).

Other Angler Highlights: Autumn Brown (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the fifth largest fish, a 3.25 pound sub-legal cod (that was weighed and released). Mike Weinstein (MI) landed the hard luck award for catching the same malady that Sage Smith caught during the morning run.

Sunday, August 14, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Sean Devich ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was filled with diminishing clouds, the wind was light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean seemed fair in what appeared to be fog offshore but not along the coast. The visibility was good most of the day. What looked like fog early was gone by 8:00 AM. The air temperature rose steadily. By noon, it was already above 90F. The wind blew out of the west northwest for most of the day. Wind speeds were fifteen knots or better at times. And it was very humid. Very uncomfortable. After a bit of cloudiness in the morning, the sky was most clear and sunny all day. We had no rain except before 4:00 AM this morning. The highest air temperature I saw in Perkins Cove was 94F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 94F (with a low of 63F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 96F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 94F (with a low of 67F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at five to eight knots. Seas were chops of a foot or so. The air temperature reached a high of 71F. The visibility ranged to nine miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate - again. It hasn't been a big year for tides. And when the tide has been strong it's been around the new moon, or the time of the highest tides of the month. Many summers the highest tides occur around the full moon. The surface water temperature reached a high value of 66.6F.

The fishing, the catching and landings were all very good today, about as good as you would ever want on a day trip. The bite was on! There were very few fish over 9 pounds. In fact, there were so many fish that weighed 9 pounds, a third largest fish could not really be determined! Most legal fish landed were pollock and haddock, a larger number than normal of each. Legal landings also included seventeen cod, two mackerel and twenty-three cusk. Only thirty-five dogfish were released. Drifting was the boat method. There was no reason to do anything else. All terminal gear worked well.

Brian Walsh (NJ) was the fisherman of the day. He stayed in the pulpit, alone in the bow, all day and caught fish after fish. He was high hook with the most legal fish, by far; a quarter of the total poundage of all the fish caught today were caught by Brian! He also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. And he caught the largest double keeper catch of the day as well. His double included a 9 pound pollock and a 7 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The second largest fish was a 10 pound pollock caught by Melodie Cyr (ME). That pollock was the only other fish caught that was over 9 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Thirteen year old Jonathan Natoli (MA) caught a double keeper catch that included a 9 pound pollock and a 5 pound pollock. Jim Benson (ME) landed the hard luck award for not feeling like his healthy self and proving it a couple of times! I was sorry to hear about this back at the dock.

I received a nice $25.00 donation today from Linn Elko (VT) sponsoring me for my part in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling fund raising event to fund cancer research and care. Thank you very much, Linn, for your thoughtfulness and help. I very much appreciate the support!

We didn't have enough anglers to make the afternoon half day trip today. So, once the boat was cleaned and put back in her spot for the evening, I came down and changed out our primary engine room bilge pump (we have three in the engine room). It was a pain in the neck. Not only is it located beneath the other two in the keel hollow beneath the engine oil pan and main shaft, you have to remove the other two, and their mounting platforms, before you can address the pump I wanted to get to. The engine room was 115F at that point. It took me about three hours (during which I had a couple of restaurant items I had to address on this busy night) to complete the project. In the first half hour I was completely soaked from perspiration. But I completed the job. I haven't had to actually change a pump out myself in years; someone else always does it in the winter. I was relearning a lot of things that I had implemented when the boat was first built. So I was patting myself on the back for some innovations and cursing myself for things that should have been done differently - all on me, for sure. But it's done, over. So I can put that behind me and move on to the next challenge!

Monday, August 15, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 74F, the sky was filled with stars, the wind was very light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean seemed very good at least. Ashore, the air temperature crept up there again. But the highest reading I saw was 85F in Perkins Cove. It was probably higher at some point. There wasn't as much humidity. And there was a little bit of a northerly breezing going for most of the day. Mayby ten knots to light. The ocean along the shore was calm. The sky was clear with high thin clouds. The sun was shinning all day. The visibility was very good over the ocean. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 65F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 90F with a low of 73F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 62F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction all day. The ocean's surface was calm, smooth. The air temperature reached a high of 87F. This is the highest air temperature we have seen on the fishing grounds this year to date. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 70F.

The fishing was damn near excellent. I guess with a count of eighty dogfish released the fishing might not have reached the excellent category. But I would still call it so; there were so many other fish that were caught. The catching was very good to excellent. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The cull was one to one; for every two haddock caught, one was legal. Legal pollock came in second. Legal landings also included fifteen cod, nine cusk, one monkfish and one mackerel. One wolffish was released. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

We had a special guest on board today: Captain Kenton Geer. He showed up at the house 5:00 AM this morning. We spent a half hour catching up on things. Now there is one hell of a fisherman, Kenton. And he proved, as he always does. He was far and away the high hook with the most legal fish. He also caught the largest fish of the trip, a cod of 16.5 pounds, which he released back to the ocean alive. He could have entered the boat pool. But he didn't on principle. Any previous employees of mine are welcome as guests on the Bunny Clark if we have room. Captain Ian took a picture of Kenton's cod (with the man himself holding it) just before releasing it. This digital image appears on the right. This fish comes in as the eighth largest cod caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. Some of Kenton's other good fish included the only wolffish, a 13.5 pound pollock and a double keeper catch that included a 13 pound pollock and a 9 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time.

Wayne Statham (QC) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. Wayne also caught a keeper double that included a 10.5 pound pollock and a 9 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 14.5 pound pollock caught by Kevin Bean (VT). Kevin also landed a 12 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Mike Kenney (ME) caught a 12 pound pollock. Chris Tankred (OH) caught a 12.5 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock, his two biggest. Nate Hartman (NJ) caught a 12 pound pollock. John Giordino (CT) landed a 14 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Brian Walsh (NJ) caught one of the bigger cod at 10 pounds. Dave Symes (ME) also caught a 10 pound cod. Dan La Roche (MA) caught an 8 pound monkfish, the first monk we have seen in weeks.He also landed the hard luck award for most tangled lines!

I received several donations sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those donors and their donations included: Dave & Rebecca Symes (ME) for a generous $50.00, an anonymous donation of $75.00, Ray Vaillancourt (OH) for $25.00, Michael Kelso (NY) for $25.00 and the missing David Yerke (NY) for $25.00. Thank you all so very much for your support. I do very much appreciate it!

Tim Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Sean Devich and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was very good at least.

The ride to the fishing grounds was quiet and easy. The ocean was flat calm with hardly a ripple. About three miles from the fishing grounds, the wind hauled out of the north northeast. But there was only enough wind to make ripples on the surface. Maybe three knots, tops. The wind was the same on the grounds for an hour or so before going calm again and then hauling out of the south. We had light south winds for the rest of the fishing. The southerly wind blew up to five knots on the ride home. The air temperature reached a high of 78F. But it was humid and muggy so it felt much warmer. The sky was clear with high thin clouds and sunny soft lighting. The visibility ranged to twenty-five miles at least. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 69.6F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 58F).

The fishing was excellent. The drift was perfect, there were only two dogfish caught, there were very few tangles and the weather couldn't have been better for fishing.The catching was good. Landings were very good. I said the catching wasn't as good as the landings because we caught very few sub-legal fish except for haddock. And we didn't really catch a lot of haddock. So when you hooked a fish, mostly they were of legal size. The average size was larger than any of the day trips this season to date. Most legal fish landed were, far and away, pollock. We also caught the boat limit of cod and released quite a few cod from 8 to 12 pounds. Legal landings also included twenty-five haddock, five cusk and two mackerel. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well but jigs and cod flies caught the biggest fish.

Brian Walsh (NJ) was high hook with the most legal fish. His two largest fish were a 16 pound cod and a 15 pound pollock. His best double keeper catch included a 10 pound pollock and a 9.5 pound cod, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Mike Boyle (NC) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 22 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's largest pollock of the fishing season to date. I took a picture of Mike holding his fish. This digital image appears on the right of this entry. He also caught an 18.5 pound pollock, a tie for the Bunny Clark's ninth largest pollock of the season, so far. The second largest fish was a 20 pound pollock caught by Johan Halvorsen (ME). This was Johan's largest fish, ever, and is the Bunny Clark's fourth largest pollock of the season to date. I took a picture of Johan holding his prize. This digital image appears on the left. He caught two pollock of 9 pounds each before the big one was caught. That was the biggest fish of the trip until the last hour! His second largest fish was an 11.5 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 19 pound pollock caught by John Parker (NY). This is a tie for the Bunny Clark's seventh largest pollock of the fishing season so far.

Other Angler Highlights: Arne Halvorson (ME) caught a 10.5 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock, his two best fish. Dave Hammond (NY) - I'm convinced the Hammond name brought us the luck today - caught a 13 pound pollock, a 14 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, his three best fish. Andrew Kerns (PA) landed a 13.5 pound pollock, a 13 pound cod, an 11.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Jack Hammond (NY) caught a 15 pound pollock. Jack's biggest cod weighed 11.5 pounds. Donna Boerschlein (NY) landed a 10 pound cod, her largest fish. Chris Tankred (OH) caught several bigger cod over 10 pounds he had to release. His best, however, weighed 17 pounds, the biggest cod of the trip. Better, though, he caught this cod as part of a double keeper catch with another cod over 10 pounds - which I never weighed because he was intent on saving the fish's life! Another reason why I love that guy! Ray Vaillancourt (OH) caught a 14 pound cod, his best fish. He also landed the hard luck award for getting the worst tangle of the day and for losing a jig.

Sean Devich and I ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. It started to rain as we headed out of the Cove to round up for the ride to the fishing grounds. The rain didn't last long. We headed into an ever increasing southeast wind that was light at first but was ten knots or better when we arrived. Seas were chops of a foot or so. The sky was cloudy from the time we hit the dock after the day trip until the end of the afternoon trip and the whole time on the fishing grounds. With about five minutes to go in the trip we got another good soaking rain. Other than those two events we saw no rain. The wind was fluky in the rain. The air temperature hung up into the high 60s and the surface water temperature ranged from 69F to 65F. The visibility was good in haze except in the drenching rain. The tide (current) was moderate to more than that.

The fishing was not good, the catching was poor and landings were poor. The first spot was loaded with dogfish that tangled everyone up, preventing anyone from fishing. By the time Sean and I got everyone back to fishing, I had given up on the spot thinking I could do better elsewhere. The next two spots were dog free but they were also groundfish free. Except for a few squirrel hake, a sub-legal redfish and a sub-legal haddock, we caught nothing. The only thing that we caught that we could keep was a 5 pound pollock, caught while reeling up to move to the next spot! We anchored for every stop. Only five flies were used and two jigs. Everyone else used bait. The legal pollock was caught on a fly.

Chris Tankred (OH) was high hook with the most squirrel hake. Andrew Kerns (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 5 pound pollock. Bryan McFarland (MA) landed the hard luck award for not realizing he had a dogfish on his line while the dogfish proceeded to weave in and out of everyone else's line on the boat! The tangle didn't turn out to be as bad as it could have been.

Walt Klinger, Jr. (NY) donated $5.00 to help in my cancer fund raising mission with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thanks, Walt. I appreciate your support!

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 77F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze. Ashore, the wind stayed fairly light until around 9:00 AM. Wind speeds started increasing from the west until, around 10:00 AM, we saw gusts over thirty knots. By 11:00 AM, the wind had hauled around out of the northwest at twenty-five to thirty-five knots. The ocean was feather white with breaking chops marching out to sea. The wind started to back off at 1:00 PM. By 4:00 PM, there was very little wind. By 5:00 PM, there was zero wind and the ocean was flat calm. The sky was mostly clear all morning with small clouds racing out to sea. The afternoon sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The air temperature reached a high of at least 80F in Ogunquit. There was not nearly the humidity we had yesterday - although there was some. The visibility was very good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 63F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 72F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west or west northwest at fifteen knots increasing to twenty-five knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet increasing to three to five feet. The seas were enhanced by a large ocean swell rolling in from the southeast against the chop. This made it seem, at times, that they had dropped into a hole deeper than the chops produced. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The air temperature reached a high of 73F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was clear and very good. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66F.

The fishing was not very good; the sea condition was the prevalent factor making it such. And they released about thirty-five dogfish with the bait rigs making it harder still. However, the catching was very good. There were many sub-legal fish, short cod, pollock and haddock. Landings were good today. Most legal fish landed were haddock, all small. Even the legal haddock were on the small size. Legal landings also included sixteen pollock and one cod. They drift fished mostly. The anchor was tried but the catching was not nearly as good as on the drift. It was more uncomfortable, certainly, but much more productive. All terminal gear worked about the same.

Frank Noble (ME) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with, far and away, the largest fish of the trip, a 17 pound pollock. He snagged this big pollock right in the center of the back. He told me he thought it was a halibut for a while! Frank also caught the second largest fish, an 8 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 7 pound pollock caught by Ryan Willey (NH). Lindsie Baker (NY) didn't make out so well today. She was hurling before they even got to the fishing grounds. For this she earned the hard luck award t-shirt!

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at ten to five knots to zero wind. Seas started off at a foot in chops over a two foot rolling sea swell. It wasn't long before the ocean was calm. The last part of the fishing was calm as was the ride home. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The air temperature got up as high as 72F. The tide was light to moderate. The surface water temperature only made it up to 63F. The visibility ranged over twenty miles.

The fishing was very good, excellent in fact. The catching was fair to good. Landings were poor. Landings included one cod. They also caught four mackerel but they were all released. There were twelve sub-legal cod returned alive. Drifting was the method. Bait worked the best. One jig was tried without success.

Chris Fournier (ON) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 3.75 pound sub-legal cod caught by Nancy Gruenfelder (NH). Bill Bowler (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 3.25 pound sub-legal cod. Olivia Creamer (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines.

Ken & Carolyn Erikson (ME) donated a very generous $200.00 to sponsor me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The event is over but the fund raising (to kill cancer) continues until the end of December. Ken & Carolyn have always supported me in this endeavor. And I appreciate that support very much. Thank you so much for your help!

Thursday, August 18, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm along the shore and the visibility over it was very good. Ashore, the wind was light from the south or southwest all day. The ocean was fairly calm along the shore. The sunrise brought almost overcast skies that had cleared by 9:00 AM. The sky was partly cloudy after that. There was never a threat of rain. The air temperature rose to a value of 89F but it wasn't as humid so it really didn't feel as warm as it has with those temperatures. The visibility was very good, at least. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 88F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 90F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 57F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots after a flat calm ride out. The first hour or so was flat calm followed by a one foot chops with ten knots of southwest wind in the afternoon. The air temperature reached a high of 70F. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 69F.

The fishing was nearly excellent except for forty-seven dogfish that were caught and released. The catching was very good; there were many sub-legal and legal groundfish caught today. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. These fish were mostly on the smaller average size today. Legal landings also included twenty cod, twenty haddock and five cusk. The haddock cull was two to one, sub-legal to legal fish or one keeper out of every three haddock caught. Drifting was the method. Jigs and flies worked the best.

High hook was impossible to discern today. Nathan Young (NC) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. He also caught the third largest fish, a 10 pound pollock. He caught the 10 pounder as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 4 pounds. Nathan was fishing with me on Tuesday. He had a good day that day but not nearly as good as today. Ray Vaillancourt (OH) caught the second largest fish, a 13 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Eli Piscitelli (MA) fought a big fish for quite a while before losing it. It could have been a shark but it was more likely some good fish like a tuna. At any rate, Ian thought he deserved the hard luck award for his efforts and loss. Eli got the shirt!

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The air temperature got up as high as 71F. The tide was light to moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high temperature of 67F. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was good and landings were fair. Legal fish included one cusk, two cunners and ten mackerel. Released fish included a hundred small pollock and twenty-five sub-legal cod. Drifting was the method. Bait was best.

Frank O'Leary (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound cusk. The second largest fish was an almost legal 4.75 pound cod caught by Anna Lamothe (MA). David Flores (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 4 pound cod. Bob Bewley (NY) landed the hard luck award for losing two jigs.

I received two donations supporting me in my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. They included a $25.00 donation from seven year old Christopher Atkins (PA) and a $50.00 donation from Malcolm & Nancy MacKenzie (MA). Thank you all so very much for your help. I appreciate it but so many others who may never know your name will appreciate it much more.

Friday, August 19, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm along the shore and the visibility over it was very good if not excellent. The ocean stayed calm all day. Wind were very light from the northwest in the morning. The wind was so light it was barely detectable. Around noon, the wind died altogether. At 2:00 PM, the wind started to blow out of the southwest. Wind speeds coming down the channel in Perkins Cove were probably about eight knots. The sky was sunny and mostly clear all day. The air temperature reached the 80F, at least. There was much less humidity today. The visibility was very good, at least. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 64F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest but just barely. The ocean was calm. The ocean was calm all the way back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature reached a high of 79F. It was hot and felt like sitting on a mirror out there. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged to twenty miles in haze. The sky was sunny and clear all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 70F.

The fishing was very good; seventy-five dogfish prevented the trip to be put into the excellent category. The catching was very good. Landings were excellent. The average size fish today was bigger than we have seen all year with the exception of, possibly, Tuesday's trip. But I couldn't tell you which trip was better. Most legal fish landing were pollock, by far. Landings of any other species didn't even come close. And there were many pollock of 10 to 12 pounds that Ian never got a chance to weigh. Legal landings also included seventeen haddock (the cull was fifty/fifty - legal to sub-legal fish), five cusk and six cod. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

I didn't ask whom was high hook. I'm not sure Ian could tell me. Enrique Mainit (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock. He also caught the second largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. And he caught, officially, the second largest double keeper catch of the Bunny Clark season today as well. His double included a 13.5 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The third largest weight on a fish today was 15.5 pounds. There were two pollock caught today that were that weight. One was caught by Mike Grabowski (MA), who also caught a 15 pound pollock, and the other was caught by Roger Hopkins (RI).

Other Angler Highlights: Joe Hallock (WO) caught a 10 pound pollock, the first fish to be weighed. He also caught a double that included a 14 pound pollock and a 6 pound pollock. Kara Hopkins (RI) caught a 13.5 pound pollock, her largest fish. She caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 10 pounds! She also caught another pollock that weighed 13 pounds. Ray Nagy (CT) landed a 14 pound pollock, his largest fish. Dan Giaquinto (NY) caught a 12 pound pollock. Jimmy Stewart (VA) boated a pollock that weighed 15 pounds. Josh Dunham (NY) also caught a 15 pound pollock. Steve Ring (NH) spent all day helping with tangles, never fishing! For this Ian gave him the hard luck award t-shirt!

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The wind was blowing lightly out of the southwest when they arrived on the fishing grounds. The ocean remained calm for the trip. The air temperature reached a high of 71F. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty miles in haze. The sky was clear, cloudless, and very sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 69F.

The fishing was excellent, as good as it gets. The ocean was flat calm with a moderate tide, half a boat of patrons and no dogfish. The catching was good; every fish was sub-legal but there were many of them. Landings were, of course, poor. There were no legal fish caught with the exception of four small whiting. Many redfish and pollock were released. And one sub-legal haddock was released as well. Drifting was the method. All bait and cod flies were used.

Brian Boisjoli (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 2.5 pound sub-legal cod. The second largest fish was a 1.25 pound haddock caught by Todd Boisjoli (VT). Jean-Francois LeDuc (QC) landed the hard luck award for losing the only potential keeper!

We were very lucky to have our forty-first President of the United States, George H. W. Bush, and some of his family at Barnacle Billy's for lunch today. Included were Barbara, George W's daughter, and nine others. I had no opportunity to take pictures but my sister, Meg, did. Her picture is included here in this entry. The picture shows (from left to right), Doro (George H.W.'s daughter), Marvin Bush (his youngest son) and Margaret Bush, Marvin's wife. My sister also caught the former President's head in the picture. I was floored when Marvin asked how my bike ride went (the PMC). I have never formally met Marvin. Although I have seen him many times in the restaurant. So I'm not sure how he was so informed of my charity ride. He was impressed with the 192 miles. But I told him that it was "nothing your brother couldn't do.", which got a laugh out of the table. As most people know, George W. is a very accomplished mountain biker and Jeb just completed a cycling event of unknown distance (to me) to support the cause for MS last week, a road riding event. I talked quite a while with the former President. He is doing very well and looks better than any time I have seen him in the last two years. He has a condition that keeps him wheel chair bound and has to have more help than he wants. But he was in very good spirits and loved the food, my two most important concerns. It was a pleasure to have the family there! A great pleasure. And it was also a great pleasure to have the Secret Service there, many of whom have become friends of mine over the years.

Saturday, August 20, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was mostly clear, there was not a breath of wind, the ocean was flat calm along the shore with zero wind ripples and the visibility over it was very good. Ashore, the wind stayed light almost all morning. The ocean was flat glassy calm. We started to get a light breeze from the south southwest around noon. That wind increased to about ten knots by 4:00 PM. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds during the morning, clear after noon. The air temperature reached a high of 80F. But it wasn't humid so it didn't feel any different than what it was. The visibility was very good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 86F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 56F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew from the southwest at five to eight knots after a calm ride to get there. The ocean was calm with wind ripples. The air temperature was 78F. It was humid so it felt warmer than it was. The tide was strong. The visibility ranged to twenty miles in haze. The surface water reached a high of 70F.

The fishing was fair to good; there was a strong tide running, the fish were smaller than normal and there were more dogfish caught today than has been. So there were tangles, more tangles than probably any trip this season. Thank you, dogfish! The catching was good to very good. There were many sub-legal fish, legal fish and dogfish. Anybody who didn't catch anything today was not fishing. Landings were good, just smaller than normal. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included twenty cod, twenty-six haddock and five cusk. The haddock cull was two to one, sub-legal fish to legal fish or one keeper for every three haddock caught. There were over ninety dogfish caught and released. They anchored and drift fished, both had their benefits. All terminal gear worked well.

John Russell (ME) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.5 pound pollock. He also tied for the second largest fish with another pollock of 7 pounds. Don Annis (MA) caught a 7 pound cod for the tie. Captain Ian had a hard time deciding who was to receive the hard luck award. That was about the time of the bell for the last minute when Ken Waldron (ME) held up two dogfish he caught on the same line! Ian felt that was as good a mark as any so Ken got the shirt!

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The wind was blowing lightly out of the south when they arrived on the fishing grounds. This wind increased to ten and fifteen knots by the time the fishing was done. Seas built (in chops) from a foot to two to three feet. The air temperature reached a high of 73F. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty miles in haze. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

The fishing was good to very good with the weather conditions and the fact that no dogfish were present. The catching was very good to excellent with most sub-legal fish. Landings were good for an evening trip. Legal landings included seven cusk, four cunners and two mackerel. There were quite few sub-legal pollock and sub-legal cod to 4.25 pounds. Ian anchored on one spot for the trip but paid out anchor rode for the whole evening, improving the fishing as he did so and saving the time he would have had to spend looking for another spot. Jigs worked the best.

Steve Hankins (NH) was the fisherman of the evening. He was high hook with the most legal fish, three. And he caught the largest fish of the trip and tied for the third largest fish of the trip. These fish were a 7 pound cusk and a 4.25 pound cusk. He did not enter the boat pool. Camron Burnett (MA) tied with Steve by catching the largest cod of the evening, weighing in at 4.25 pounds, sub-legal and released alive. Mike Michaud (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish of the trip, a 4.75 pound cusk. Mike's largest cod weighed 3.75 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Matt Pease (IL) caught a 4 pound cod, the first fish Ian weighed. Don Desmond (NH) also caught a 4 pound cod. Evan Westbrook (NH) landed a 4 pound cusk. Ted Keith (NH) caught a 3 pound cusk. And Steve Savoie (ME) boated a 3 pound cusk. Heather Barber (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick.

I received two great donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today, a cycling event with the Jimmy Fund - fighting cancer. One was a generous $50.00 donation from John Russell. The other was a generous $50.00 donation from Bill Pakenham (MA). Thank you both so very much for your support. This is the second time John has donated this season. I appreciate all the help I can get!

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Sean Devich ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was mostly clear, there was not a breath of wind, the ocean was flat calm along the shore with zero wind ripples and the visibility over it was very good. Ashore, the wind blew lightly out of the northwest to start, died out and then hauled out of the southeast and blew no more than five knots for the rest of the day. The ocean was calm along the shore. The sky was clear all day until about 7:00 PM, when clouds started to move in from the west. By 8:00 PM, the sky was overcast. It was humid again today with a high temperature in Ogunquit of 80F. I'm not sure if the mercury climbed any more than that. The visibility was very good at least. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 66F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southeast at eight to ten knots. Seas were chops a foot to 1.5 feet. The air temperature hovered around 71F. The visibility ranged over fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate, not too strong. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68F.

The fishing was very good, the catching was very good and landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twelve cod, three haddock, two cusk and two redfish. Forty dogfish were caught and released. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Brian Murphy (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was an 11 pound cod. Steve Balevre (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17.5 pound pollock. The fish was big in weight alone. But the fish was a stand-out in length. Had the girth been consistent with the length, the fish would have weighed 23 pounds. Jared took a picture of Steve with his fish with, I believe, Steve's camera (camera phone?). The digital image appears on the left. Steve also caught a pollock that weighed 10 pounds. The second largest fish was a 15.5 pound pollock caught by Rick Martus (IL). Rick also caught a 13 pound pollock. The weight of 13 pounds tied for the third largest weight of a fish for the trip. The other 13 pounder was a cod caught by Ron Brox (ME). Ron also caught a 12 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Tim Hazelwood (ME) caught a 12.5 pound cod and a 10 pound cod, his two best fish. Danielle Brox (ME) achieved high hurler status and received the hard luck award.

Captain Jared Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The wind blew exactly like it did during the day except with less velocity, a south southeast wind of five knots. They had a one foot chop. The air temperature reached a high of 75F. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged to twelve miles in haze. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

The fishing was very good, the catching was very good and landings were fairly good. Landings included seven cusk and thirteen mackerel. Released fish included thirty-nine sub-legal cod and almost double that of sub-legal pollock. No dogfish were found. They anchored first and ended with a good drift. Everyone used bait.

Kevin Pentalow (NH) was the fisherman of the evening with two legal. And he caught the largest fish of the trip, a 9 pound cusk. Kevin was not entered in the boat pool. John Cotrup (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 7 pound cusk. The third largest fish was a 6.25 pound cusk caught by Tim Krywy (NY).

Other Angler Highlights: Monica Leseault (NY) caught the first fish to be weighed, a 3.25 pound cod. Arthur Charette (NY) released a 4.25 pound cod he caught and landed a 4 pound cusk. Jon DeSilva (NY) boated a 6 pound cusk. Noa Levine (MA) screamed and jumped up to stand on a bench when the first cusk was slapped on to the fillet table, alive and flipping. Jared gave her the hard luck award for this surprising reaction!

I received two donations from anglers aboard the boat, sponsoring me in my stab at curing the cancer problem with the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event with the Jimmy Fund. One was a very generous $125.00 donation from Brian & Marian Murphy in Memory of Christine Kenistion. The other was a $20.00 gift from our newest angler, Tim Hazelwood! Thank you all so very much for your generosity and support. The meaning far outreachs the act itself. I appreciate both.

Monday, August 22, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was overcast, it had just stopped raining, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. Ashore, the wind picked up to fifteen to twenty-five knots with the occasional higher gusts. The ocean was littered with short chop, feather white, white caps marching off shore. Flags were straight out all day. The sky was clear, cloudless all morning and into the afternoon. The visibility was excellent. The highest air temperature I saw was 76F at 1:00 PM in Perkins Cove. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 80F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 52F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at fifteen to twenty knots. Seas were chops of two to four feet with the occasional queer one. The air temperature was a constant 71F. The tide was moderate to strong, stronger near the end of the fishing. The sky was very clear and sunny. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The water temperature reached a high of 66F.

The fishing was fair to good. The sea conditions, dogfish and the tide made it a challenge for the uninitiated. The catching was very good as was the landings. For those who really knew how to fish, it was an excellent day overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-two haddock, eight cusk and thirteen cod. Thirty-six dogfish were released. Drift fishing was practiced in the morning, anchoring in the afternoon. Jigs and cod flies caught the lion's share of legal fish.

Ray Westermann (MA) was high hook with, far and away, the most legal fish today. Had everyone been as successful, landings would have been excellent. Maybe better than that! Ray's prize for the day was a double keeper catch that included a 13.5 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! This is the Bunny Clark's, official, second largest double of the 2016 fishing season to date. The 15 pound pollock was the third largest fish of the trip. Spencer Shields (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 16 pound pollock caught by Liam Jenks (MA).

Other Angler Highlights: Jim Shields (ME) caught a 14 pound pollock, his largest fish. Steve McGrath (NH) landed a pollock of 13.5 pounds. Dustin Brewer (ME) was the high hurler of the trip. He landed the hard luck award for his vociferous activity!

Steve McGrath donated $25.00 to the Pan-Mass Challenge today, in sponsorship of yours truly. This is Steve's second $25.00 donation this season. So, not only is he a good fisherman and a great guy, he's also a generous person who cares. And I certainly appreciate the support! Thanks, Steve, very much!

Tim Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Sean Devich and I ran the full day trip today. I had been waiting all week for this day!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. It felt like fall. In fact, it was cool enough for me to be uncomfortable with just a t-shirt on.

We had a following sea for the ride to the fishing grounds. The wind was out of the northwest for most of the way. Wind speeds varied from twelve to sixteen knots. Seas were chops of about two feet more or less. On the grounds, the wind was the same to start with seas of two feet or a little more. The tide was a strong influence on the wave height today. At least it was in the morning when the tide was the strongest. Later in the trip, the tide backed off as did the wind. Seas were reduced to a half foot chop with five to ten knots of wind. By noon, the wind had hauled out of the west. The air temperature reached a high of 68F. The sky was cloudless for the trip. The visibility ranged over thirty miles. The tide (current) was strong, very strong, all morning, moderate in the afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67.4F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 53F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 46F).

The fishing was fair for most of the morning with the strong current (tide). The fishing was good after noon. The catching and keeping (landings) was good to very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-four haddock, twelve cod and eleven cusk. The haddock cull was fifty/fifty, legal to sub-legal fish. We released twenty dogfish. No blue sharks were seen and no bluefins were lost. We drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well.

I couldn't tell you officially who was high hook but it had to be the father and daughter team of Carmen Damiano (NY) and Jess Damiano (NY), one or the other I would suspect. They, each caught a pollock of 8 pounds or so, their biggest fish each. They each caught double keeper pollock catches (two legal fish on the same line at the same time), the only anglers to do so today. And they reeled in fish with such regularity that we all took it for granted after the first stop! The most consistent after the Damianos had to be Mark Pershing (PA). Mark also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound cod. Brian Robinson (NH) caught the second and third largest fish today. Both pollock, they weighed exactly 10 pounds each. Brian also caught and released two cod of 9 pounds each, thinking he was going to get a bigger one later. That never happened! So he ended up keeping one of 6 pounds!

Other Angler Highlights: Don Cheney (NY) landed a pollock of 9.25 pounds. He too released a cod that was about 8 pounds. His situation was a little different. He had already kept a cod of about 6.5 pounds on the first cast of the day that he decided to keep. Aaron Chiel (NY), on his first deep sea fishing trip, landed an 8.5 pound pollock and an 8 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. I told him at the very beginning of the trip, before we even started fishing, that he wasn't allowed to fish with a bait rig on the stern. I gave him a jig stick and sent him to the bow where he did very well indeed, landing all three species of fish that he wanted. Everyone caught legal fish today except for Sharon Plante (MA). For this and a slight bout of sea sickness, she landed the hard luck award t-shirt!

Sean Devich and I ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at ten knots or better. With the stronger than normal tide, the seas were chops of two feet, maybe more. The air temperature hovered just under 70F. The visibility ranged to thirty miles or more. The sky was nearly cloudless. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66F.

The fishing wasn't great. For some reason (probably the tide) we could not get out of the tangles. We didn't even have a full compliment of anglers aboard! We never saw a single dogfish, thank God, or we would have really been in trouble. The tangling took away from the catching, certainly, but there wasn't much of a bite either. Landings were poor. Landings included three squirrel hake and two cusk. I only saw one cod, very sub-legal in size. The only other fish that were caught were a few very small pollock and a long horn skulpin. We anchored for three spots. Five cod flies were used along with bait rigs. All others used just the bait rigs (a baited hook and sinker).

Paul Vetrano (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.5 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 4 pound cusk caught by Josee Page (QC). Frank Macedo (ME) came in third with a red hake of 1.25 pounds. Twelve year old Luke Moriarty (MA) landed the hard luck award for having a short bout of sea sickness. I wouldn't have known had not someone told me!

I received a very generous $250.00 from "Steaker Jim" Strobridge (NH) sponsoring me as a cyclist in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. His donation came in the form of an "egift" through the PMC web site. Founded in 1980, the PMC is an annual bike-a-thon that today raises more money for charity than any other single event in the country and donates 100% of every rider raised dollar to Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts - in our own back yard. Thank you, Jim, for all the help and support. What would be even better would be seeing you on the boat as well! Am I asking too much? All the best!

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was fairly clear with high thin clouds giving the stars a dull glow, the wind was too light to record, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility over it was excellent. The ocean stayed calm along the shore all morning. Or most of it, anyway. The air temperature climbed slowly until it reached 87F, around 2:00 PM. It wasn't all that humid so didn't really feel as warm as the temperature gage read. The sky was hazy clear in the morning and nearly cloudless later on. The wind blew lightly out of the southwest in the afternoon. The visibility was very good at least. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 90F (with a low of 53F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew from the southwest at five to ten knots after a calm ride to get there. The ocean was calm to chops approaching a foot. The air temperature was 74F. It was humid so it felt warmer than it was. The tide was strong. The visibility ranged to twenty miles in haze. The surface water reached a high of 67F.

The fishing was very good; the tide kept it from making the "excellent" category. The catching was very good. Landings were good. The average legal fish size was smaller than it has been. Most legal fish landed were haddock today. In fact, most fish caught were haddock. The haddock cull was two to one, sub-legal fish to legal fish. Legal landings also included seventeen cod, fourteen pollock, two cusk and a mackerel. Not a single dogfish was seen today! That's a switch! Anchoring and drifting were both tried. All terminal gear seemed to have the same effectiveness.

Craig Wilson (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was an 8.75 pound pollock caught by Rich Knauer (NJ). Colin Fischer (ME) caught a cod of 7.75 pounds, the third largest fish of the trip. Jimmy Connor (NH) got sea sick but landed the hard luck award for his condition.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots. Seas were chops of one to two feet. The sky was clear with a bright sun. The air temperature was warm/hot/humid. The tide was light to moderate. The surface water temperature made it up to 65F. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles.

The fishing was very good, certainly better than last night. The catching was very good too. Landings were poor. Only six legal fish were caught, all mackerel. No legal groundfish were caught. No dogfish were seen either. The did catch (and release) plenty of sub-legal cod and pollock. Anchoring was the method. Almost everyone was using bait alone. A couple used cod flies as well.

Jack Tacy-Munroe (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 3.5 pound sub-legal cod. The second largest fish was a 3.25 pound sub-legal cod caught by Chris Lawton (ME). Emery Lawton (NH) released a 3 pound sub-legal cod, the third largest fish of the trip.

Other Angler Highlights: Reagan Lawton (NH) caught a cod that weighed 2.75 pounds. Landi Boci (NY) landed the hard luck award for getting his line tangled in a sea gull while fishing!

I received an anonymous donation of $100.00 sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thank you so very much for your support. Much appreciated by me and those in need!

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 68F, the sky was clear with a bright half moon almost directly over head, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind stayed at ten knots out of the southwest all morning and into the afternoon. It never got windier than that. After 5:00 PM, the wind died altogether. The sky was clear to begin. As the later part of the morning came upon us, clouds started filling in the blue spots. We had a mix of sun and clouds for the rest of the day. By 6:00 PM, we had mostly overcast skies. We had a sprinkle of rain at 7:00 PM but it wasn't enough to even get the roads wet; the rain was over even before it started. The air temperature rose to 86F by 1:30 PM. The high temperature might have had a bigger value but I didn't see it. The wind off the water kept the air temperature down in Perkins Cove. The visibility was very good in some haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 90F (with a low of 60F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew from the southwest at fifteen to twenty knots after carrying ten knots most of the way there. Seas went from a one foot chop to chops of three to five feet on the grounds. The high air temperature for the day was 71F. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water reached a high of 66F.

The fishing was miserable. It wasn't too choppy to fish but the motion of the boat due to the seas made many patrons sea sick. Those anglers had a hard time paying attention and some were too sick to fish. So the fishing was fair only because of the conditions. The catching was good to very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock. The haddock cull was similar to yesterday's trip, one legal haddock for every three caught. Legal landings also included thirty-six pollock, three cod and one cusk. There were only seven dogfish caught today. They anchored for every stop. All terminal gear worked about the same.

Norm Herrick (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish. Paul Stevens (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a pollock of 13 pounds caught by May Walsh (MA). There was not another fish caught that weighed over 9 pounds. Our own Tyler Hebert (ME - he works for me at Barnacle Billy's restaurant) landed the hard luck award for attaining high hurler status. There wasn't anyone even close. Ouch!

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind had backed off from the strength it showed at the end of the day trip. Winds had backed out of the south instead of the southwest winds of the morning and wind speeds dropped to fifteen and, later, ten knots. Seas were an average of two feet in chops. The air temperature was 70F. The tide was light to moderate. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

The fishing was good, the catching was good (mostly sub-legal pollock) but landings were fair. Legal landings included two cod and two cunners. No dogfish were seen. Anchoring was the method. Bait and cod flies were used. No jigs.

Suzanne Butler (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.5 pound cod. John Donnelly (NY) landed a 5 pound cod, the second largest fish. Jimmy O'Keefe (MA) made it back alive but not without landing the hard luck award for being sea sick!

I received a $10.00 donation from Kevin Andros (CT) today supporting my cancer fund raising charge with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Thanks so much, Kevin. I appreciate your concern and your generosity.

Friday, August 26, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston hosted the Andy Harding (ME - most from the County) full day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 74F, the sky was clear with a crescent of a moon almost directly over head and clouds over the horizon off to the east, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze. The clouds started to creep in after sunrise. Soon, the sky was mostly overcast. At 10:00 AM, it started to rain, lightly, just enough to make the road damp, not really wet. We had the occasional misting rain until noon. After noon, the sky cleared, the rain stopped and the sun came out. There was no wind all morning. It was humid. Although temperatures inland rose as high as 90F, in Perkins Cove the highest air temperature I saw was 83F. Obviously, the wind off the water made it a bit more pleasant for us despite the humidity. The sky remained cloudless into the night with zero wind. The visibility remained good, at least, over the ocean in some haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 88F (with a low of 65F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 91F with a low of 73F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 90F (with a low of 63F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots or so in the morning. Seas were chops of a foot or so. After noon, the wind dropped to just about nothing. The chops were replaced by a long rolling two foot swell out of the southeast. This is likely the beginning influence of tropical storm Gaston southeast of Bermuda. Swells should be higher from this system tomorrow. The air temperature reached a high of 73F. The tide was strong. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water reached a high of 67F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good and landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Again, like yesterday, the average legal fish size was smaller than we have seen as of late. Legal landings also included thirty-six haddock, twelve cod and sixteen cusk. Only one dogfish was caught. Drifting was the method. Only one jig was used today; everyone chose to use bait rigs.

Josh Richardson won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 10 pound pollock caught by Walter Curtis. Andy Harding (ME) caught the third and fourth largest fish. They included a 9.5 pound pollock and the largest cod of the day at 9 pounds. Despite the calm weather, Rusty Archer couldn't control his equilibrium enough to avoid winning the hard luck award.

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The wind was blowing lightly out of the southwest when they arrived on the fishing grounds. The ocean remained calm for the trip. The air temperature reached a high of 73F. The tide was light to moderate. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The sky was clear, cloudless, and very sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good but landings, again, were poor. Legal landings included two cod and two mackerel. Three cod could have been the total, maybe, if Sean had gaffed a cod that looked to be legal. However, it was so close that killing the fish just to get it aboard to make sure just was not an option. Besides, the angler wasn't keeping his fish anyway. Released fish included twenty-four sub-legal cod and seventy-five sub-legal pollock. No dogfish were seen. Drifting was the method. Bait worked the best.

Scott Pelletier (NJ) was high hook with the most legal fish, in fact, all the legal groundfish landed. This made him the fisherman of the evening as he also caught the two largest fish! He won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.5 pound cod. He second largest fish, the second largest fish of the trip, was a 6 pound cod. Jared Cohen (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 5.25 pound, sub-legal (it was fat and short!), cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Andy Cohen (MA) caught a 4 pound cod and another 4 pound cod. Both fish were sub-legal in length. Francois Thibault (QC) landed the hard luck award for losing that cod that could have potentially been a legal fish. The shirt fit well and looked very good on him when he left the boat this evening!

Saturday, August 27, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was cloudless with a crescent moon high above the eastern horizon, there was no detectable wind and the visibility over the ocean appeared excellent. There was no wind to speak of in the morning. Inland, the wind blew out of the north at five knots, maybe. The ocean along the shore was calm all day. After noon, we got a nice little breeze out of the southwest in Perkins Cove. The wind was no more than five knots. That died later in the evening but so did the air temperature. The air temperature got up as high as 84F in Perkins Cove. The sky was mostly clear with very few clouds. The visibility was very good at least. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 83F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 58F).

The wind was light and variable in direction on the fishing grounds. Wind speeds never got to the five knot value. The ocean was calm all day. The air temperature reached a high of 77F in the shade. It was hot on deck. The tide was back to moderate after yesterday's strong current. The visibility was over twenty-five miles or excellent. The sky was very clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

The fishing was excellent; only two dogfish were caught, there wasn't much current and the ocean was flat calm all day. The catching was very good. Most fish caught today were sub-legal groundfish and small legal groundfish. Landings were good or better than that. There was only one legal fish landed today over 7 pounds. Legal landings included thirty-five pollock, thirty haddock, three cusk and twenty-one cod. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Missy Tripp (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, by far, a 12 pound cod. Jen Lane (ME) landed the hard luck award for catching not a single legal fish. It was thought, at the time, that she was the only one. It wasn't until the award was given out that Ian found one other angler.

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew lightly out of the southeast. The ocean remained calm for the trip. The air temperature reached a high of 76F. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The visibility ranged over twenty miles. The sky was clear and very sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good and landings were poor. Legal fish included a cod, a cusk, a mackerel and three cunners. released fish included twenty-seven sub-legal cod and more that three times that number in sub-legal pollock. Drifting was the method. Bait worked best this evening.

Gary Kaufman (MA) landed the largest fish, a 7.25 pound cod. He was not entered into the boat pool. Larry Ross (MA) caught the second largest fish, a 4.5 pound cusk. He too was not in the pool. Ryan McDonnell (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the third largest fish, a 3.75 pound sub-legal cod. Trey Colter (CT) landed the hard luck award for most tangled lines.

Missy Tripp did me a solid today with a donation of $25.00 to help my fund raising cause (the cancer fight) with the Pan-Mass Challenge. This years event is just a memory now but cancer never sleeps and neither does my fund raising. This years collecting will not end until the end of December. Thank you so very much, Missy, for your support and kindness. I appreciate it very much indeed!

Sunday, August 28, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Sean Devich ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was clear with a crescent moon hanging a bit lower above the eastern horizon, there was no detectable wind and the visibility over the ocean appeared very good to excellent. There was no wind at sunrise. The ocean was flat glass calm. Late morning, the wind started to blow out of the southeast. This wind blew up to ten knots. By 2:00 PM, the wind had hauled out of the south. The wind blowing down the channel in Perkins Cove was about ten knots. The sky was clear all day. The visibility was very good, at least. The air temperature reached a high of 79F, or so it seemed. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at five knots or less. The ocean was calm over a one to two foot long period swell. The air temperature reached a high of 72F. The tide was moderate to strong. The visibility ranged to twelve miles in haze. The sky was sunny with few clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

The fishing was very good. The tide and nineteen dogfish kept the fishing out of the excellent category. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twelve haddock (the cull was one legal haddock for every four caught), ten cusk, two cod and six cunners. The average size of the fish was much bigger today, a good thing. Drifting was the method employed. Cod flies caught the most fish by far.

There was a high hook but I never got the name from Jared. Kevin Kiesman (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. Kevin also caught the second largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. He caught that pollock as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 9 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The third largest fish weighed 11.5 pounds, two fish, both pollock. One was caught by Billy Mahoney (MA). The other was caught by Jeff Thompson (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Alrick Thomas (ME) landed an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. Jordan O'Keefe (ME) also caught an 11 pound pollock as his largest fish. Howie Allgaier (NH) landed the hard luck award for spending the day baiting other angler's hooks, working on tangles and assisting others while not attending to his own fishing in the process! Sounds like something I do when I go on other people's boats!

Captain Jared Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew up to ten or more knots out of the southeast. Seas were chops of two feet on average. The air temperature reached a high of 70F. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The visibility ranged to ten miles in haze. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

The fishing was good to very good. The seas made it uncomfortable for some. The catching was good. Landings were poor. Legal fish included one cusk and six mackerel. They also caught nine sub-legal cod and a few sub-legal pollock and sub-legal redfish. Anchoring was the method. Everyone used bait.

Jessica Horan (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.5 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a twenty-three inch, super skinny, 3.5 pound sub-legal cod caught by Rachel White (NH). Brenda Hicks (QC) landed the hard luck award for "tossing her cookies". She did not have a good time.

I received two donations sponsoring me in my ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a generous $50.00 donation from Tom & Deb McDonnell (MA) while the other was a $25.00 donation from Ralph Trotto (MA). Thank you all so very much for your help and kindness. It means a lot to me but more to those who may never know the people behind the generosity.

Monday, August 29, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was partly cloudy showing some stars but no moon, the wind was blowing out of the south at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. Ashore, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots by 7:00 AM. The wind continued out of that direction and strength until 11:30 when the wind hauled out of the northwest and blew up to fifteen knots. An hour later the northwest wind was blowing twenty to twenty-five knots sustained with the occasional gusts to thirty knots. This wind kept up until 5:00 PM when it started to drop. The air temperature was very warm today. I saw a reading of 84F in Perkins Cove. The sky was mostly clear with a bright sun and many scattered clouds. There was more blue sky than clouds. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 68F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 90F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 69F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west southwest at about fifteen knots, more or less, all morning. Seas were chops of two to three feet. After noon, the wind hauled out of the northwest but only blew up to ten knots. Seas dropped a skosch with the wind shift. [The wind we had ashore didn't reach off to the fishing grounds. They did run into the strong northwest winds about ten miles from shore, headed home.] The air temperature reached a high of 73F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was over twenty-five miles. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66F.

The fishing was very good. The seas were too bad for the initiated and they only released nine dogfish today so tangles weren't much of a problem. The catching was very good. Landings were good to very good. The fish average size was down again from yesterday. But the salient item from this trip was the large number of legal haddock that were landed. Most legal fish landed today were haddock, by far, our best catch of haddock for many days. Legal landings also included sixty-one pollock, four cusk and twelve cod. They also released a small wolffish today, a species we haven't seen for while; we don't fish in wolffish areas very much. They drift fished all day. All terminal gear worked well.

Either Mike Hayes (NY) or Steve Brown (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. Steve must have caught the most haddock but I didn't ask. All I know is that they both caught a lot of fish and Steve is one of our best at catching haddock. Neither angler caught a fish of 9 pounds or better. John LaFleur (NH) - I wonder if he is related to Guy? - won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 10 pound pollock caught by Dan Pushaw (ME). Scott Cmejla (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 9.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Jeff Glidden (ME) caught the first fish to be weighed today. The fish was a 9 pound pollock. John St. Hilaire (ME) landed the hard luck award for going to the dark side and having serious equilibrium problems.

Note: I read your email, Dick. Haven't had time to respond. But I appreciate the good words, can only imagine how good a blackberry pie tastes and am missing you every day the Bunny Clark sails without you! Good luck on mending!

Tim Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and I are running the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was clear with stars, there was no wind to speak of and the visibility over the ocean was very good. More later.









Download Our Newest Guestletter

Graphic Click the icon to view a complimentary copy of the 2016 Guestletter.

www.bunnyclark.com






Back To Home Page, Deep Sea Fishing Maine