www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

February 5, 2016, 6:00 AM EST



Winter is Upon Us

The digital images above was taken at 8:00 AM on January 5, 2016. The scene is a shot taken from the parking lot in Perkins Cove out at Crow Island on the eastern side of the Cove looking exactly east southeast. The air temperature at the time was 5F, there was little wind ashore and the sun had risen an hour earlier. You can see the sea smoke coming off the water and the snow left over from our first snowfall of the 2015/2016 winter season. This was our coldest morning (day) since the 2014/2015 winter season.




Monday, January 11, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 35F (it was 41F at 2:30 AM), the sky was clear, the roads were partially dry, almost all the snow and ice had melted away (there were just a few of the higher plowed banks of snow left in places), the wind was blowing out of the west at twenty to twenty-five knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. By 7:00 AM, the air temperature had dropped to 30F. I believe that's as far as it went before the slow short climb back up. I didn't pay much attention to the thermometer today but I never did see a higher temperature that 35F. At 6:00 PM, the air temperature had dropped to 28F. The wind howled for most of the day today. The wind blew out of the west at twenty to thirty knots. It was gusty and strongest in the first few hours after daylight. After sunset, the wind dropped to ten or fifteen knots ashore. But it was still blowing over twenty knots offshore, according to the weather buoys. The sky was most clear during the day, cloudless from 4:00 PM until 6:00 PM. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 47F (with a low of 23F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 51F with a low of 25F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 43F (with a low of 20F).

I had some desk work here and some desk work at Barnacle Billy's. Around that, I had skiffs to bail and storm lines to take in. Also, I had a few things to do with the deck repair project at Barnacle Billy's. The rest of the time I worked on putting the 2016 Bunny Clark fishing schedule on line. I finished that right about mid afternoon. I spent the late afternoon until 6:30 PM "working out".



When I was taking the storm lines off the Petrel this afternoon, I took a picture of the work being completed on the deck at Barnacle Billy's. You can see that we are rebuilding the railing. It will look exactly the same. The key differences are that the main support posts are now through-bolted to the "I" beams below, the balusters are being fastened with stainless screws, the balusters are being supported at the lower end by a dedicated support piece and the whole system is being secured in a way that will make it much stronger than before without changing the look of it at all. That corner of the deck supports the Bush table and the next place to the right (or left on some days) is the LePage table. Bob's kids are getting big enough so that that part of the deck could be useful if they get a little rambunctious! Not that they ever would! Underneath, you can see that all the "I" beams are in place and the staging that is needed to work there. Jared Keniston, in the picture, appears on the deck with an orangy cap while Ian Keniston is on the far right in the picture. Having those guys around will insure that the deck will be put together as well as the Bunny Clark when they are through. Larry Paul and his Atlantic Mechanical, Jared and Ian have really done a super job there so far.

Tuesday, January 12, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 20F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The sky started looking milky at 8:00 AM. The thin cover was extending from west to east with the sky still clear over the ocean. By noon, the sky was almost completely overcast but with a very hazy sun. The sun left us by 1:00 PM. The sky remained totally overcast right through the evening. We had lightly spitting snow at 3:00 PM. It was so light there was no accumulation. By 6:30 PM, we had a patina of snow on the ground, just enough to make the ground white. By 7:00 PM, it was raining. But the air temperature was just above freezing. I didn't pay attention after that. The blew out of the south all afternoon, out of the west all morning. Wind speeds out of the south were as much as twenty knots. The wind had hauled out of the southeast by 6:30 PM. By 9:00 PM, a quick check of with wind revealed twenty-five knots with higher gusts. The air temperature got as high as 35F today, the highest air temperature that I saw. The air temperature hung around the 25F mark most of the morning. The viability was very good to excellent until the snow arrived. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 37F (with a low of 19F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 37F with a low of 21F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 31F (with a low of 15F).

The day was spent in one office or the other today. All morning. I had a meeting with Larry Paul on site at Barnacle Billy's at 3:00 PM. Everything seems to be going well there at the present time. After that I was over at the Bunny Clark taking apart our fixed engine room fire extinguishing system. I also grabbed all the fire extinguishers off both boats and gathered them in one location for inspection on Friday. I was done by 5:30 PM. Nothing very exciting to tell you about today.

I received a very generous $2,000.00 donation from Dennis & Diane LaValley (MA) sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. They continue to support me like royalty through the years with very large donations for every one. They continue to make me look good in the eyes of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. This singular effort, though, is recognized as their's within the PMC organization. And I'm very happy to be the vehicle to get it there! Thank you very much, Dennis & Diane, for all your help. It does mean a lot!

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 23F, the sky was mostly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the west over twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The sky was sunny by 8:00 AM. The wind howled out of the west today with gusts up to forty knots between 10:00 AM and 2:00 PM. The wind backed off a bit by sunset but it was still blowing a solid twenty knots. The air temperature never got above the freezing mark. The visibility remained excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 27F (with a low of 16F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 33F with a low of 21F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 26F (with a low of 12F).

After I rushed to get all my desk work done at 8:30 AM, I headed to Danvers to attend and speak at the Herring Committee (to the New England Fishery Management Council) meeting. Herring, as you know, is the most important forage fish in New England and very much responsible for the spacial relationship between the bottom we catch our groundfish on and the vessels that catch them. Without the herring, the fish and quality of fishing (or the fish) is not there. You can't just look at managing a target species unless you look at all the ecological factors involved in their life cycle. Without herring on the fishing grounds, there are few cod. In fact, the pressure on the herring, moving herring out of an area, also displaces the predator fish including cod and many other species.

The meeting was more about smoke and mirrors, keeping the mid-water herring trawlers in the fishery and to hell with anything else. One of the first issues that was presented was the role of herring as a forage fish. Even though everybody recognizes this, there is no proven scientific method to measure it. So, because of this, nothing was really done to go further with it.

"Localized Depletion" was the second big issue. This is when the herring move into an area, stay there for life cycle reasons (a feed rich area, spawning or because of environmental factors) and, in the process, get hammered by relentless commercial fishing. The problem comes when mid-water trawlers are involved, literally vacuuming up an area of herring that have been staying in one area. This gives a lopsided view of the herring biomass due to high landings and (what worries me) it could erase those herring from ever coming back there again. So on the one hand by skewing landings data it makes it look like the herring resource is much healthier than it is resulting in less regulation. On the other hand, this practice may be doing irreparable damage to the resource. When a forage fish displays this type of behavioral pattern it attracts many predator species. We see this in the groundfish fishery with the pollock and cod. But where it concerns the mid-water trawlers working in these areas on large stable populations of herring, they end up also catching regulated species (cod, haddock, pollock etc.) as well as pelagic species (tunas & sharks) and some mammals (whales and porpoises). And they do this. It's been well documented. Mid-water herring trawling has the ability to take too many fish out of an area in an era where much more control is needed. We do not have a healthy fishery. Everyone knows this. Allowing this type of fishing to continue in the manner in which it is happening is, in my mind, unconscionable. By the way, there is no real definition of localized depletion within the Committee like there is in every other part of the world including Canada. But there is no R & D within the Committee (or the Council). So it was easy to table this idea as well.

Then the Committee went on to discuss the haddock bycatch issue of mid-water trawling on Georges Bank. In 2015 the figure was 200 metric tons of haddock they could keep along with catching herring. Haddock, as you know, has been showing a comeback as of late. But should a dirty fishery like mid-water trawling be allowed to catch that many haddock, fish that are about the size of a herring? How many fish is that? It's a very large quantity of immature haddock. This haddock bycatch is being caught in the closed commercial groundfish areas on Georges Bank! Commercial groundfish boats aren't allowed in there. Why are mid-water herring trawlers fishing with small mesh nets allowed to keep over 200 metric tons of haddock? It gets worse. This year they will be allowed to keep over 500 metric tons of haddock! These are the same fish that filtered out of Georges Bank to populate the inshore areas of Stellwagon Bank, Jeffrey's Ledge, etc. If that area does not keep producing haddock and the inshore area is mismanaged, we could be in the same situation as we were between 1986 and 1994 when there were no haddock to catch with 50 miles of the coast of New England. Instead, the Committee put up a motion that asked the Council's Planning and Development Team (PDT) to see if they could work out a process where haddock with the trawlers could be worked out the same as the yellowtail flounder bycatch issue in the scallop fishery. These are two different things: The herring trawlers have the ability to leave the haddock alone on Georges while the scallopers can't get away from the yellowtail flounders. We need the scallop fleet. We do not need the mid-water trawler way of catching herring. Herring seiners, yes. Herring Trawlers, no! As you might expect, this motion passed.

On the last issue I got up an argued that giving away that many haddock to the mid-water fleet as bycatch gives incentive to these boats to target haddock if the herring can't be found. Indeed, last year one mid-water boat landed 100,000 pounds of tiny haddock when herring couldn't be found. Two of the Committee members argued that "it is illegal to sell haddock". Tell that to all the lobstermen up and down the coast who have paid good money for thousands of pounds of haddock with the herring in their lobster bait. I cornered one of the Committee members afterward and told him I wanted to be compensated for the extra money I paid for haddock in my bait. "Oh", he said, "That's the bait dealers." Yeah, right. I thought that comment particularly insulting.

Needless to say, I went away from that meeting very frustrated. How can good fishery management exist in New England with such bad decisions being made by such an unbalanced system? You may well ask!

Thursday, January 14, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 18F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the west over fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind continued to blow out of the west at fifteen to twenty knots all morning. The sky was clear by 8:00 AM, cloudless in the afternoon until sunset. The air temperature hung in the 20s all day. The highest air temperature that I saw was 28F. The visibility remained excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 28F (with a low of 15F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 30F with a low of 21F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 28F (with a low of 11F).

After a pile more of desk work, I spent the rest of the morning at the eye doctor's. After lunch I checked on the progress at the restaurant. Then it was office work again until the end.

Friday, January 15, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 21F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing lightly out of the west and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The sky stayed overcast all day. I looked like it would snow from time to time but no precipitation of any form came down from the sky. The air temperature reached the freezing mark at about 2:00 PM after a morning of up to 25F. By 4:00 PM, the air temperature reached 34F. That was the highest air temperature that I saw in Ogunquit. There was no wind today. In fact, the ocean was calm from dawn to dusk. A little easterly wind showed up before I went to bed. The visibility was very good to excellent all day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 30F (with a low of 10F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 42F with a low of 26F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 32F (with a low of 9F).

My morning started like every other morning (Did you ever see the movie, Groundhog Day?), at the desk until 7:45 PM. At 8:00 AM, I met with a representative from Bally (the walk in freezer people) and a rep from a fabrication firm. We need the change out the doors to the walk-in freezer and walk-in refrigerator at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. Next I had a meeting with Larry Paul at the Barnacle Billy's deck work site. For an hour I took Gill for a run on the beach. I ran three miles at a 7:26 min pace, a little too fast for me at this stage of running (I felt it in my right hamstring when I rode the bike tonight). The good thing is that I was dressed so that I didn't break a sweat. So I was able to don my street clothes for a meeting with Larry Paul and the Town Manager of Ogunquit at 10:00 AM. After that I was on the phone until noon when I had to meet for a fire inspection of both the Petrel and the Bunny Clark.

After lunch, I wrote a long email to John Bullard, the Regional Administrator of NOAA Fisheries Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office (GARFO) in Gloucester, Massachusetts - National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), voicing my concerns in words about the proposed opening of the closed commercial fishing areas in the Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank. It was a fairly long email. And I could have done a better job. But I did get most of what I wanted to say in it. Still, it might have been too much. It's probably too late. And I am only one person. I'm just so afraid, with the state the fishery is in, that any "adjustment" of the closed areas with slow the groundfish recovery.

The New England Fishery Management Council passed the Omnibus Habitat Amendment that included the opening of part of the Western Gulf of Maine (WGOM) closed area (Jeffrey's Ledge region) and rearranging the Georges Bank area. This OHA now goes to the NMFS to be approved, the last stop before implementation. For twenty years the fish have settled in to the WGOM. For almost thirty years haddock have populated the Georges Bank closed area (the reason for the haddock come-back). We have a serious problem with the cod stocks and yet this OHA opens up areas to commercially catch cod (one example). It doesn't make sense.

John Bullard's office (GARFO) will look at the OHA first. And I believe that NMFS just received the OHA document within this week. Now the NMFS will look at this package in detail to see how it will be implemented. We shall have to wait and see. I'm worried.

By the way, Mr. Bullard did answer me by the end of the day saying that he had read the whole email (he must have been drinking coffee to stay awake through it) and that he would give my thoughts some consideration.



The digital image above was taken with my iPhone. It's a shot underneath the deck at Barnacle Billy's showing the new galvanized "I" beams and the new pilings going in. Captain Ian Keniston is standing in the foreground near the loader, Larry Paul is the one with the chain saw and Captain Jared Keniston is in back of Larry. Three of the eight pilings are now in place.

Saturday, January 16, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 32F, the sky was overcast with a drizzling light rain, the ground outside was a sheet of slippery wet ice, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was not good. It rained for while after sunrise, the air temperature was just above the freezing mark. But, by 8:00 AM, the air temperature had dropped below freezing and it had started to snow. It kept snowing until noon and then stopped. The wind blew out of the north northeast all morning and part of the early afternoon. Twenty knots at times. By mid afternoon, the wind had dropped, was more northwest, and the sun was out. It had been overcast all day. The air temperature warmed up but I never got a look at the thermometer. The visibility was very during the afternoon. To the nearest of my calculations we received about five inches of snow. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 31F (with a low of 26F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 43F with a low of 34F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 37F (with a low of 29F).

My day was busy in the office, shoveling snow and working on the Guestletter. In the meantime, the fire alarm went off at Barnacle Billy's. I met the Ogunquit Fire Department down there. My brother, Court, and my sister, Cathy, showed up a little later. It was just an electrical problem that needs to be addressed.

And, yes, I did watch the Patriots game. Thankfully, it wasn't the nail biter or the depressing game I thought it could be. I only watched a small part of the Bruins game. There is only so much TV a person can take!

Sunday, January 17, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 32F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The air temperature vacillated between a value below freezing to 34F, maybe higher. The sky was sunny all morning, indeed cloudless for part of it. After noon, the sky clouded over. The sky was overcast after 1:00 PM. The wind blew out of the west until good sunlight. After that, the wind was light out of the northwest. There was barely any wind at all in the afternoon. At sunset, the wind hauled out of the northeast. By the end of the Pittsburgh drubbing, in the last quarter of the football game, the velocity of northeast wind had reached over fifteen knots and it was snowing. The visibility was excellent all day until the snow. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 32F (with a low of 25F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 38F with a low of 29F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 36F (with a low of 26F).

Except for updating this page, I did not do any business work today.

Sunday mornings I, typically, reserve for riding with my cycling club, the Maine Coast Cycling Club. They start at 9:00 AM in the winter. I started out on my cyclocross bike with studded 32 mm tires on the snowy icy roads a little before 8:00 AM, rode up Route 1 to Kennebunk Village and found no one there. I waited ten minutes, got adjusted in the dunny across the street from Perfectos (coffee shop) and then headed on my way alone. [I took the picture, on the right while waiting, for the benefit of those who didn't show!] I had a couple of times where I thought I might dump the bike but, for the most part, I kept it slow on the down hills and made the most of the workout on the up-hill sections. I ended up getting back before 11:00 AM.

The rest of the day I took advantage of our daughter, Halley, up from Boston with her boyfriend. It's Halley's birthday tomorrow. My son and his girlfriend were also here. The six of us went out to brunch. When we came back we watched the two NFL football games. And that was my day.

Monday, January 18, 2016

Happy Birthday Halley!

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 25F, the sky was overcast, it was snowing, the wind was blowing out of the north at fifteen knots or more and the visibility over the ocean was good or slightly worse than that as far as I could tell. It snowed all morning dumping just enough snow to plow. I suspect we got four inches, maybe five. The snow was over by noon. We never really saw any sun. Or, at least, we saw no blue sky, just a yellow disc in the sky through the clouds. And we never really saw much of that. The air temperature got up to at least 30F. I never did see the air temperature go above the freezing mark. The wind was light out of the northwest all morning. Wind speeds as high as fifteen knots were noted but most of the wind was below ten knots. After noon, the wind hauled out of the west and started to blow. The air temperature dropped as well. By noon, the air temperature was 25F. It was 23F by 2:00 PM. The air temperature kept dropping. The wind, by 1:00 PM, was gusting up to thirty knots out of the west. The wind speed increased slightly more with nothing below twenty-five knots with gusts to almost thirty-five knots. The wind blew like this through the night. The visibility after noon was excellent on into the night. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 27F (with a low of 16F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 29F with a low of 19F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 26F (with a low of 13F).

I spent almost all day in the office here at home working on the Guestletter. I did take almost an hour to shovel snow and move trucks around. And I spent an hour in the Cove at Barnacle Billy's working with Protection One on faulty temperature sensors.

Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston worked the morning on the deck project.

I ran five miles on the beach with Gill, our border collie. He is great for the first two miles. After that he pulls back on the leash. We run past many things he would really enjoy smelling. So at the two mile mark I took him off his leash. The beach is only two and a half miles from where I start at the Norseman Hotel. So, if I look back, I can see the dog sniffing around until I turn around to come back. And he always does the same thing; he hunkers down when he can see me coming back. And he treats me like a sheep by not letting me get past him even though I go through a familiar avoidance tactic by heading to the water. But you can tell that he loves this game. We end up running back together. Sometimes he will lag behind and then sprint up to me, tongue hanging out looking up at me. Sometimes he will trot along just ahead of me. Sometimes he will run beside me, constantly looking up - as if to say; "How am I doing Dad?" I always tell him he's a good boy. This time we ran into another dog a half mile before finishing up. Gill held back and went into stalking mode and I ran ahead. But after he got to the dog he just picked up the pace and kept coming. In the past, he used to play with every dog he saw. Gill is becoming a very dedicated runner and a pleasure to be with.

The picture on the left is a shot of Gill after rolling in the snow while I get the truck cleaned off to head for our beach run.

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 12F, the sky was mostly overcast, the wind was blowing out of the west at thirty knots with higher gusts and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. It was cold all day. The air temperature might have been higher than 19F but that was the highest air temperature I saw all day. The wind was the most salient weather feature of the day. It blew hard with gusts as high as forty knots out of the west. Sustained wind speeds were thirty knots for much of the day. It was still gusting over thirty knots when I went to bed at 8:00 PM. The sky was mostly overcast over Ogunquit. To the north and west, you could see blue sky. And, eventually, late, we did get that. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 18F (with a low of 12F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 25F with a low of 16F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 23F (with a low of 12F).

I stayed home in the office most of the day. I had a doctor's appointment at 10:20 AM in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Afterward, I took advantage of being in Portsmouth and went to Staples for office supplies. I went to the Cove to check on the repair work from time to time. On the final trip down, I locked up for the night.



The digital image above was taken with my iPhone late this afternoon. The image shows the Atlantic Mechanical crew working on putting in the secondary pilings. At the same time, a plastic skirt has been placed by Knowles in order to heat the foundation to pour concrete. Over the years, the water rushing under the building from rain and storms has taken out the culvert and has been undermining the foundation. Knowles was called in to prepare the damaged area and pour concrete as soon as they can control the temperature enough to do so. From now on the street drains will not bring water under the building. Instead, water will be directed around the building.

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 19F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind was reasonable before daylight. By sunrise, westerly winds were gusting over thirty knots. But this didn't last. By 9:00 AM, the wind was blowing at twenty to twenty-five knots, less than that after noon. By mid afternoon, the wind was west northwest at fifteen knots or so. The sky was clear all day. The air temperature got up as high as 28F in Ogunquit. It could have been higher at some point but it never got up above the freezing mark. The visibility was excellent all day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 28F (with a low of 15F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 33F with a low of 19F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 28F (with a low of 17F).

I spent the morning until 7:00 AM in the home office, went down to the Cove to open up the restaurants at 7:30 AM and then back home until 11:00 AM. I spent the morning working on the Guestletter, the trophy fish list specifically. From 11:00 AM until 1:30 PM, I worked in the Barnacle Billy's, Etc. office. Most of my work there was on this year's advertising and organizing a managers meeting for February to discuss returning employees. Also, today, throughout the day, I worked on the sale and removal of the old Bunny Clark engine, the Volvo 163P. In many ways I hated to take that engine out of the Bunny Clark. It was a great engine. All afternoon I worked on the Guestletter, still with the trophy fish list, mostly, with some writing.



They pumped concrete into the foundation today. There was a huge void left where the culvert had eroded away and the water had undermined the foundation. Plus, concrete was needed in other places to shore up the foundation where age and the environment had taken it's toll. The picture above shows Jared Keniston (orange cap) and Ian Keniston (back to, dealing with the outboard piling) and crew working on putting in the new pilings under the Bush/LePage side (and I don't mean Paul LePage) of the deck. It's amazing that we do this during a winter that, so far, has been kind to us in the temperature department. We can still have a lousy winter. But we planned for that anyway.

Thursday, January 21, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 17F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at fifteen knots (more or less) and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. By 7:30 AM, the air temperature had bottomed out at 12F. The air temperature seemed slow to rise. But it did. By noon, I saw 23F. But the air temperature was 27F at 3:00 PM. I never looked again but I suspect it got a little warmer, just a little. The wind blew fairly hard again today but it was mostly felt offshore, not so much on land. The wind, ashore, was out of the west northwest all day. It was about fifteen knots most of the morning. There were a few higher gusts. After noon, wind speeds increased to twenty knots, more or less, still out of the west northwest. The sky was clear all day. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 27F (with a low of 2F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 33F with a low of 21F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 27F (with a low of 16F).

My normal morning editing (of this page) and desk work were completed by 7:00 AM. From there I opened the restaurants at the Cove, did a little work in the office at B.B's, Etc and then came home. I worked on the Guestletter until 1:00 PM, finishing up the trophy table, completing my seven paragraphs on fishery management items that I think are important for my patrons to understand and moved a few digital images around. My next push there will be to get the first half of the digital images in place. At 1:30 PM, I jumped on the bike for a cold 31 mile ride around the York Beach and Kittery Point area. At 3:30 PM, I started working on building the Bunny Clark's reservation book. I was done by 6:30 PM.

At noon today, Knowles completed all the concrete work they were going to do for now at Barnacle Billy's. Ian Keniston, Jared Keniston and Larry Paul worked until about 5:00 PM. We still have part of a void left in the foundation that will be addressed later. The pilings were all completed today as well. At this point, all the galvanized "I" beams are in place, all the pilings are in place, the concrete work is completed except for the void I mentioned, the deck railing is done and all the new floor joists are in. The structural braces for the pilings are not finished yet. That isn't a big job. The next big one is the opening of the street to work on the street drain system including larger catch basins, larger drain covers and larger piping. I will be in a meeting tomorrow at 1:00 PM to discuss that.

At the risk of coming off a bit maudlin, you have to look at this YouTube video of Eva Cassidy that was done on January 3, 1996 Georgetown, D.C. Many probably know about her. But I only ran across her story a couple of days ago. At the time this video was taken, Eva had liver cancer but didn't realize it. She died less than a year later at the age of 33! I don't believe I have ever heard a more beautiful voice or such a touching choice of songs knowing what she didn't know at the time she was singing it. I have to admit that the video tipped me a bit. But, of course, I'm sure part of this had to do with the cancer thing. I hope you enjoy this as much as I did.

Friday, January 22, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 13F, the sky was clear with an almost full moon setting in the western sky, the wind was blowing out of the west northwest at fifteen knots to twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The temperature dropped, as it did yesterday, by sunrise. At 7:30 AM, the air temperature was 10F. The temperature slowly increased during the day to a value of 30F by 3:30 PM. Then it dropped again going into the night. The air temperature was 26F by 6:00 PM. The sky was mostly clear all day. The wind blew out of the west northwest all day at fifteen to twenty knots, dawn until dusk and beyond. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 30F (with a low of 1F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 32F with a low of 19F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 28F (with a low of 9F).

After putting this update on line at 5:00 AM, I worked until 9:00 AM building the reservation book. From 9:30 AM until 11:00 AM, I was at the Dave Pease's barn helping Carl (with Independent Boat Haulers) with his crane to place my old Volvo engine on a flat bed to be hauled to Boat & Engine Works in Thomaston, Maine. Actually, Dave Pease did most of the helping. I sold the engine to Pat Ricci, the president of the company. At 1:00 PM I had a meeting with Tim Darling (Darling Industrial Group) and Larry Paul about digging up the road in front of Barnacle Billy's and the plans for revamping the storm drain system in the street. I was done there by 2:00 PM. The rest of the day I worked at home.

Jared Keniston and Ian Keniston worked on the deck repair project all day.

Saturday, January 23, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 20F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at twenty knots, more or less, and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind blew out of the northeast all the daylight hours. The velocity was twenty to twenty-five knots all morning. From noon into the night, the velocity increased to thirty knots sustained with higher gusts, one over forty knots. By 8:00 AM, the sky had become overcast. The sky remained overcast all day. We never did get a flake of snow. The visibility was very good. The air temperature stayed in the teens all morning. After noon, the highest air temperature I saw was 22F. It might have gone up a degree at one point. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 20F (with a low of 14F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 32F with a low of 20F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 23F (with a low of 9F).

I spent the day in the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. building the reservation book for the 2016 Bunny Clark fishing season. I completed it, after a couple trips home, at 6:30 PM. Everyone else had the day off. This was fine by me. It meant I could work through the day without being bothered.

Sunday, January 24, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 16F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at twenty knots, more or less, and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind hauled out of the north shortly after writing the sentence above. Wind speeds were twenty to thirty knots until sunrise. After that the northerly wind hung around twenty-five knots, more or less, diminishing as the day progressed. We had a west northwest wind shift at 2:00 PM. This wind direction stayed with us until I went to bed. Wind speeds stayed around the ten knot range and then dropped after sunset. The air temperature rose as the wind died. At the time of the wind shift I saw an air temperature of 37F. The sky was mostly sunny all day with a thin cloud cover after sunset. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 35F (with a low of 15F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 36F with a low of 18F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 37F (with a low of 11F).

I had planned to take the day off today, ride my bike and then watch the AFC championship game after a shower. I did ride my bike, a slow 71 miles on studded tires. But I didn't watch much of the Patriots game. From the start, it looked like Denver's defense was getting the best of Brady's time in the pocket. And I didn't want to watch them lose. I stopped watching after the missed extra point attempt. Tell me that Bill Belichick isn't the best coach of American NHL football in history.

Monday, January 25, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 23F, the sky was mostly clear with a full moon high in the western sky, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Even though I was at the computer for most of the day, outside it was beautiful. The air temperature warmed up nicely and fairly quickly in the morning. There was very little wind (out of the north in the morning and calm in the afternoon) and it stayed sunny all day. So when the air temperature went up to 35F, it felt like a spring day. The visibility was excellent as well. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 34F (with a low of 17F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 35F with a low of 26F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 38F (with a low of 14F).

As I alluded above, I stayed glued to the computer most of the morning working on the Guestletter. This Guestletter becomes longer every year. Or maybe it's just longer this year. Most of what I did was picking digital images out, moving them around in the first two thirds of the text and putting the legends in describing the content of each one. I wrote a bit, edited previous paragraphs and checked everything out on other computers and devices to see how it looked.

At noon, I joined my sister, Cathy, in the office to go over a few things. I also had email attachments that I had to print out so she could file them. And I had to get a couple of bills straightened out, one from a chair order from Hunt Country Furniture who my father started doing business with fifty-five years ago!

At 1:00 PM, I headed south to Kittery. On the way I had lunch at Greenleaves. I was hoping to see Dick Lyle there or David MacDonald. But seeing as I didn't call them and they were working (one in Pennsylvania), I wasn't surprised that they weren't there. I know that Gill could have used some sweet and sour pork strips had Dick been there! Then it was two hours getting my eye glasses straightened out. I had let so much time go without renewing my prescription that my eyes weren't used to the new. So that took a while. And then we figured out that the new glasses didn't have the coating I had asked for on one lens. One had the coating but the other didn't!

I got back to the Cove before 5:00 PM. Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston were still working, taking advantage of low water to bolt up piling securing boards (bracing). That deck at Barnacle Billy's (original) has never ever been as strong or as stable as it is now. I can tell you that I feel so much more comfortable about bringing that restaurant into the future. Tomorrow they will start digging up the street to start the revamping of the street drainage system.

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 28F, the sky was clear with a fullish moon higher in the western sky than yesterday morning, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at twenty knots (more or less) and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind blew out of the south southwest most of the day. Wind speeds were supposed to be strong but the most wind I saw was twenty to twenty-five knots, max. After noon, the wind abated somewhat. Winds speeds then ranged around fifteen knots, more or less. The sky was sunny most of the morning. After noon, I didn't keep track anymore as I was in a meeting. The air temperature was mild. When I got home at 6:45 PM, the air temperature was 45F. It must have been higher than that earlier in the afternoon. The visibility was very good at least. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 47F (with a low of 28F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 51F with a low of 28F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 46F (with a low of 26F).

I stayed in the office until about 9:00 AM, maybe later, editing this update and, after, working on the Guestletter. This until I got a call from Tim Darling (Darling Industrial Group) who ran into a challenge from the Town as he was starting to dig up the road in front of the building. This led to a series of negotiations between myself, the town manager and the highway department. It went well, we figured out the property boundaries, what we needed to do to comply and got the Town's help in solving any issues we had down there. We met again down at the Cove at the project and finalized the details of what was going to happen. I ended up being involved with the street project until 11:30 AM.

I had a quick lunch, got dressed in more presentable clothes and headed to Portsmouth to attend the New England Fishery Management Council's meeting. The topic was the Atlantic Herring Committee report. It wasn't much of a fun meeting. I didn't speak. But there wasn't much of an opportunity to speak. Most of the discussion takes place with the Council members as the public looks on. The same issues that came out in the herring meeting were discussed here. But there was not much mention of the haddock bycatch except that 510 metric tons of haddock was going to be given to the mid-water trawlers on Georges Bank for fiscal 2016. I am afraid for our fishery. There are too many things wrong with mid-water trawling with small mesh in the closed areas, catching regulated groundfish species, catching too many haddock and the severe data limitations associated with making salient regulations with no accountability on behalf of the mid-water trawl industry and a lack of observer coverage to make them accountable. On top of that, haddock bycatch is being sold with the herring to lobstermen for bait when it's illegal to sell haddock bycatch. Do you see anything wrong with this picture? Apparently some do not.

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 40F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the west knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The sky remained overcast from sunrise and into the morning. You could see blue sky to the west but it was slow to get here. But, by mid morning, we were bathed in sun during a warmer than normal winter day - again! I never did see the highest temperature of the day. The air temperature was around 35F by sunrise. It might have gone as low as the freezing mark before climbing back up to, probably, 40F. That's a guess. The wind blew out of the west at fifteen knots (more or less) all day. The wind was started to blow out of the northwest when I was coming back from a Council meeting at 8:00 PM. The visibility was very good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 46F (with a low of 23F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 45F with a low of 31F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 44F (with a low of 24F).

My routine was the same as yesterday. I worked in the office until around 7:15 AM, when I went down to open up the restaurants for the workers. This time, I found Jared Keniston and Ian Keniston down there waiting for me. They had already opened up Barnacle Billy's and were getting ready to pour concrete in the part of the foundation that had been undermined by years of water erosion. Most of the foundation had already been brought back to normal by Knowles. This new concrete was to fill a big void.

I went back home and worked on the Guestletter until around 11:00 AM. From there I went back down to the Cove to check on the street drain work and then clear up some bills at the office in Barnacle Billy's restaurant. After lunch at 1:45 PM, I headed to Portsmouth to attend the rest of the New England Fishery Management Council meeting at the Sheraton Hotel. At 2:15 PM, the meeting turned to groundfish. Mostly they were discussing the grey sole quota. But there were other things discussed including observer coverage of fishing vessels.

The discussion involving recreational issues lasted all of eleven seconds. There wasn't really anything to say. Although it's not official as of yet, I believe that our 15 haddock bag limit is going to go through and be accepted for fiscal fishing year 2016. The cod bag limit has not been confirmed. There are some modeling problems with the proposal to the National Marine Fisheries Service from the Council. I believe we will be able to keep one cod but I'm not sure what months we will be able to do so. So haddock, yes, cod, we'll have to wait and see.

Thursday, January 28, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 23F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. At dawn, the air temperature was 20F and the ocean was flat calm, glassy in places. The ocean was calm for most of the morning. Late in the morning, a southwest wind was established. By noon, the southwest wind was blowing over fifteen knots and white caps could be seen from the shore. And that's pretty much where the wind stayed. The sky was clear and sunny all day, cloudless for a couple of hours. Even at dusk there were clouds to the southwest but I never did see the sky become overcast. The air temperature got as high as 37F in Ogunquit. The visibility remained excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 37F (with a low of 16F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 42F with a low of 26F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 42F (with a low of 15F).

Except for going down to the restaurant at 7:15 AM to open up, I spent the morning and part of the afternoon (until 3:00 PM) working on the Guestletter. I did check a couple more times down at the Cove to see how work was progressing. The restaurant deck work has been completed. The only thing that remains is for me to go through it with Larry Paul from Atlantic Mechanical to make sure all is in order. But I have been through it from the very beginning. I don't think there will be any surprises. Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston will now be focusing on the Bunny Clark and all the fishing equipment, getting all of it ready for another fishing season.

The work on the road street drains continues. Two water catch basins have been installed so far with one to go. I'm not sure if they will be opening up the ground again tomorrow with the rain/snow forecast. But I will go down there to make sure, tomorrow AM.

Two tons of pellets for the pellet stove were delivered to the house during the mid afternoon. I watched the delivery and then went on a 43 mile bike ride. The last time I rode was Sunday. Between the Council meetings, the work on the Guestletter and the dynamics down at the Cove, I had no chance. The time away from the bike was probably good because I achieved five personal bests and one 10th place overall in six legs of the ride according to Strava. After I got back I moved the two tons of pellets into winter storage.

Friday, January 29, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 32F, the sky was overcast, there was little wind from the south and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The sky stayed overcast all day. It looked like it was going to rain but it never did. In fact, we didn't have a drop of precipitation until 5:00 PM. It snowed from that time until 6:00 PM, no accumulation and no more snow after that. So much for a 50% chance of precip. There was no wind in the morning, the ocean was calm, until sometime before noon when the wind hauled out of the northwest. The wind never blew over fifteen knots. More, it blew about ten knots (more or less). The air temperature reached as high as 37F, that I saw. It could have been higher. I didn't pay much attention to it today. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 35F (with a low of 29F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 41F with a low of 31F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 39F (with a low of 28F).

After the morning ritual at the home office, I went to check on the digging with the new storm drain system at the restaurant. As has been going on, they found discontinued pipes, etc. They also found a water main that had to be repaired before they could continue. But all was very good and very well done. I spent the rest of the morning, all but an hour of it, working on the Guestletter at B.C. Central. I worked an hour at the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc.



Does the picture above look familiar? Tim Darling is the man in the ditch, the lead man (and the best man I could want to be there) on the project.

From there I headed to Portland. First, to picked up our newly inspected and repacked Bunny Clark life raft at Chase Leavitte. Second to pick up some parts to work on the Petrel at http://www.hamiltonmarine.com/. Third, to visit Sawyer & Whitten Marine (electronics) to pick up my repaired SSB (single side band radio) and a new VHF radio with, required, DSC (digital selective calling). "Digital selective calling allows mariners to instantly send an automatically formatted distress alert to the Coast Guard or other rescue authority anywhere in the world. Digital selective calling also allows mariners to initiate or receive distress, urgency, safety and routine radiotelephone calls to or from any similarly equipped vessel or shore station, without requiring either party to be near a radio loudspeaker. DSC acts like the dial and bell of a telephone, allowing you to "direct dial" and "ring" other radios, or allow others to "ring" you, without having to listen to a speaker. New VHF and HF radiotelephones have DSC capability." - this from the USCG's Navigation Center page. Before the Bunny Clark sails again on April 14, we have to have a radio with DSC hooked up to a GPS. It just so happens that our secondary VHF radio went down last fall so we had to replace it anyway.

Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston worked on rods and reels today, getting them ready for another season that I can't wait to start. All aboard?

Saturday, January 30, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 30F, the sky was a mix of moon, stars and clouds, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. By sunrise, the air temperature had dropped a couple of degrees, the wind had dropped out, the ocean was flat calm and the sky was mostly overcast. The sky remained mostly overcast for the rest of the day. Some parts of the afternoon featured an bright sun in a patch blue between two sections of sky that were overcast. After noon, the wind hauled out of the southwest and blew up to fifteen knots. After sunset, the southwest wind increased to twenty-five knots in gusts. The air temperature rose to at least 40F. The visibility dropped from excellent in the morning to very good and good in the afternoon. No precipitation fell anywhere in southern Maine, to my knowledge. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 40F (with a low of 26F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 43F with a low of 30F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 38F (with a low of 31F).

I spent the morning in the assumed position, in front of the computer editing this page and working on the Guestletter. I also had to spend twenty minutes at the office in Barnacle Billy's as well as do some scanning for the restaurant business at home in the office. After 1:00 PM, I took the rest of the afternoon off.

I received two donations toward my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge (PMC) today. Both donations were in Memory of Christine S. Keniston, Ian & Jared Keniston's mom, who passed away after a two year battle with liver cancer. She was treated at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) in Boston, the same hospital/cancer research center that I support through the PMC. Apparently, she lived a year longer than expected due to her involvement with the cancer treatments there. I had not a clue that this was going on. Neither Jared or Ian mentioned a thing. Lloyd Keniston, Christine's husband (Ian & Jared's father), asked that, in lieu of flowers, donations be sent to the PMC through me. Of course, I felt honored that they should go that route. One donation was from Harry & Sonia Francis (ME) for $30.00. The other donation was from Anthony Landry (ME) for $25.00. Thank you both very much for supporting me supporting the DFCI. Certainly others appreciate it more than I do as they have a personal, life threatening stake. But I appreciate your help very much as I too feel compelled to help - and have for the last ten years.

Sunday, January 31, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 36F, the sky was mostly clear with a perfect half moon hanging well high over a southern horizon, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at twenty knots (more or less) and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The sky was almost exactly as it was yesterday. It was overcast, or nearly so, most of the morning. The difference between Saturday and today was that at 2:00 PM, the sky became cloudless. All day it seemed like there was a blue patch somewhere, even if it was on the horizon. The air temperature was the salient weather feature. By 2:00 PM, I saw 54F. It might have even been higher. But that was the highest value I saw. The wind, although twenty knots or more until daylight, started backing off a little after that time. At noon, we had ten or twelve knots. By 2:00 PM, there was no wind and the ocean was calm. The last three hours of daylight were beautiful, warm and calm. The visibility remained excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 51F (with a low of 34F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 57F with a low of 38F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 52F (with a low of 32F).

I took the day off, spending most of it on my bike. It was a great day for riding.

We start taking reservations tonight after 12:00 midnight (February 1, 2016). Deb started to get ready after noon. Later, we arranged the den with a table and phones, turning it into Bunny Clark Central.

Monday, February 1, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 41F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The air temperature today was again the salient weather feature of the day. I saw the mercury rise to 58F in Ogunquit. But it could have made the 60F mark with no problem. It felt like a warm spring day by 1:00 PM. The wind blew out of the southwest all morning with wind speeds of fifteen knots on average. By noon, the wind had hauled out of the west and blew quite hard for twenty minutes. I didn't see the velocity values first hand but it looked like twenty-five to thirty knots. The settled in at twenty knots later but there could have been higher gusts. By 3:00 PM, the wind was west northwest at fifteen to twenty knots. The sky was sunny all morning. By noon, clouds were rolling in. The sky was mostly overcast from 2:00 PM until sunset. There was not precipitation but it looked like it would rain for a time. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 59F (with a low of 31F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 65F with a low of 39F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 58F (with a low of 30F).

Deb started taking reservations for the 2016 Bunny Clark fishing season at midnight. I came down at 1:30 AM, to take over. I would have rather been getting ready for an offshore marathon trip. But I did enjoy talking to the customers I have seen for many years. It wasn't the best opening day for reservations we have ever had. But it was good enough. I was done with reservations by 7:00 AM, a little late to start my day. I did expect this, of course.

I spent the day running around between the Town officials, the restaurant projects and the my son, Micah, with the Petrel.

I wanted to take advantage of the good weather so I called Micah up to see if he would install the new inflatable life raft bracket on the Petrel. Positioning was important. And, of course, the foot print of the old bracket was unlike the foot print of the new one. I also needed to have the newly required fire extinguisher bracket installed. And there were other items. It took all day. I was only partly involved when Micah needed an extra hand.

I needed to bring several individuals into the Barnacle Billy's project. Tim Darling was already in the process of taking out the long pipe that brought rain water from the street drains to the Cove under the garden. That was a full day project as well. After lunch they had the old pipe removed (see the picture below). Jack Ladderbush showed up about ten minutes before I was going to call him! I hadn't talked to him in a month so it was like we were on the same wavelength. He is going to be re-shingling the part of the building that was damaged with the deck work. I was planning to have that part of the building re-shingled anyway. I had told the crew working for Atlantic Mechanical and Larry Paul from the start to do whatever they had to do to in order to make their job easier; we would clean it all up when they were through. I also had to get John Patton (he does all our landscaping) on board to take some of the garden soil away from that side of the building and put in crushed stone so it would not continue to rot the shingles (Jack Ladderbush's idea). Over time, the soil had crept up the side of the building. Mike Bridges also had to be called for the electrical work. I had to know when he was going to be there and the scope of his work. And, of course, the Town had to be informed of all this. The process was seamless; they are all the best professionals at what they do and I would not have anyone else. But it took time away from the Guestletter I wanted to continue with. I expect this on Mondays.



Above, you can see the trench extending from the street through the garden between the two Barnacle Billy's restaurants (closest to the original restaurant on the left). Tim Darling is in the foreground. The new pipe will be plastic, 18" inside diameter and smooth. The pipe before was galvanized steel and corrugated. This smooth pipe will move more water.

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 35F, the sky was clear with a crescent moon hanging over the eastern horizon, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The sky remained clear with few clouds until late in the afternoon. We had a nice sunset. The air temperature climbed up to almost 50F. I didn't actually see 50F but it was almost there at 1:30 PM. The wind blew out of the west northwest at ten knots or less most of the day. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 48F (with a low of 25F). The value of 48F ties the record high temperature for this date in Portland in 1981. Temperature readings/records in Portland have only been taken for less than seventy-five years. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 50F with a low of 36F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 48F (with a low of 26F).

I spent little time in the office today. The time I did spend was utilized on getting this update on line. The rest of the day was spent running around, checking the Cove, getting new eye glasses, helping Micah install the Petrel's life raft, picking up the life raft, back to Kittery Eye to order sun glasses, checking with electricians, Tim Darling, landscapers and taking calls. The sunglasses thing was last. From there I attended a Selectman's meeting with my sister, Cathy, where Barnacle Billy's liquor license was up for renewal. I was asked questions about the amusement license we have at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. I also spoke in favor of installing three cross-walk pedestrian initiated flashing lights in three problem areas in Ogunquit. And I spoke on business employee parking policy in the Town of Ogunquit. I was home by 8:00 PM.

The street drainage system is pretty much completed now. This afternoon, Tim Darling and crew sealed the dirt exposed areas with cold pack asphalt, producing a make shift curbing in the process. This will remain so until late March or April when the temperature of the ground becomes uniform and we can get a paving company in there to seal the road properly.

Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston finished rebuilding all the Bunny Clark reels and a few customer reels today. Nice to have that one behind us.

I received three donations sponsoring me in my Pan-Mass Challenge (PMC) cycling event to raise money to fight cancer with the Jimmy Fund and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Those individuals and their contributions included Mark & Maureen LaRocca (NY) with a very generous $500.00 donation, Gary & Donna Lanouette (ME) for $50.00 in Memory of Christine S.Keniston and Ron & Carolyn Pease (ME) for $25.00, also in Memory of Christine S. Keniston; "who put up a long and valiant fight with cancer." Thank you all so very much for your support in this project. I truly believe in the good work they are doing in Boston and I'm glad you fee the same. I certainly appreciate anything you can do to help!

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 30F, the sky was mostly overcast with a ghostly crescent moon barely shinning through the clouds, the wind was blowing out of the southeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. By sunrise, the sky was totally overcast. It started to rain at 10:00 AM. It rained for the rest of the day, on and off. There wasn't a lot of rain. Judging by the water in the skiffs, I don't believe we got an inch. The most salient weather feature today was the wind. The wind blew out of the south or southeast at twenty to twenty-five knots most of the day. By mid afternoon, the wind increased in strength. By sunset, the wind was blowing a sustained thirty knots with higher gusts. Between 8:00 PM and 9:00 PM, the wind howled with sustained wind speeds of thirty-eight knots with gusts to fifty knots at times. Branches broke off trees, one tree fell on Bourne Lane blocking traffic on the road in either direction and new leaves were everywhere. Have the town lost power. Our section of town did not. So I'm not sure when the power on the other side was restored. The air temperature was very warm for this time of year. I saw 55F in Ogunquit. There wasn't even a hint of snow at any point today. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 50F (with a low of 31F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 57F with a low of 35F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 45F (with a low of 27F).

I spent the day running around, on the phone, between both offices, moving old engine parts around to sell, buttoning up payments for the restaurant projects, scheduling delivery appointments, making business decisions on restaurant items, etc., etc and then spending two hours before dinner working on my profile at the PMC site. I had expected to be working on the Guestletter today but never once started on it. I figured with the rain, I would get an opportunity to work at the desk. But many people took the opportunity to call me about business items. I think the only unfettered time I get to work is on the weekends. No one seems to bother me then.

Tim Rozan (ME) sent a generous $100.00 donation sponsoring me in my upcoming Pan-Mass Challenge cycling event for cancer research and care today via "egift" through the PMC site. He had already sent me another donation for the same amount earlier this year. This was sent in honor of Christine S. Keniston with condolences to both Jared Keniston and Ian Keniston from Tim and his fishing partner in Massachusetts, Lewis Hazelwood. Thank you so much for the support you (both) give me in this project. I appreciate it very much!

Thursday, February 4, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 55F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light out of the south and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The sky remained overcast all morning and into the afternoon. It rained lightly for about an hour during the mid morning. The rest of the day was dry. In fact, by 2:00 PM, the roads were dry as well. The air temperature was mild all day. I saw 58F in Ogunquit. I'm not sure if the air temperature broached that figure or not. Mid afternoon, the sun came out in a fairly clear sky. We had a cloud obscured sunset. The visibility was excellent. The wind, after 10:00 AM, was light and variable in direction until 2:00 PM. After that the wind kicked up to about ten knots or more sustained until at least 8:00 PM. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 55F (with a low of 38F). The high temperature of 55F in Portland today breaks the high temperature record on this date of 50F set in 1991. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 56F with a low of 43F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 53F (with a low of 34F).

I went down to the Cove this morning to check on things and bail skiffs. All was in order down there with very little surge. The streets were covered with small branches and left over rain in puddles. It was unnaturally warm.

Finally, today, I got to work on the Guestletter. I didn't spend nearly as much time on it as I wanted as there were many distractions. I had to address some issues in the Cove for a while; Darling Industries wanted to make the cuts in the street before they left so the paving would go on better in the spring. Micah came down to complete the new fire extinguisher installation on the Petrel. And Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston came by to pick up rod building materials (lath, Flexcoat, containers, etc.). We didn't have enough Flexcoat so I had to spend about a half hour figuring out how I ordered it in 2013! And there were a few other distractions.

With the weather so nice and future weather predictions calling for snow, I figured that this would be one of my last chances to ride the bike on roads completely devoid of ice in mild temperatures and fairly light winds. I was riding out of the yard at 4:00 PM. I was done for the day after that.

I received two donations supporting me in my cancer fund raising cycling ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Both donations were made in Memory of Christine S. Keniston, Jared & Ian's mom. One was from Jack & Shirley Judge (CT/ME) for $50.00 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC site. The other was a $30.00 donation from Stephen & Marion Marsh (ME). Thank you all so much for your helping in the cancer fight. I always feel more encouraged when I find like minded individuals in this arena.

Friday, February 5, 2016

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 36F, the sky was overcast, it was raining but there was some snow falling, the ground was wet with no evidence that snow existed in the land, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at almost twenty knots sustained and the visibility over the ocean was good in mixed precipitation. More later.









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