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Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

Tuesday, August 21, 2018, 5:30 AM EDT



The Two Sides of Mark LaRocca's Halibut

The digital images above were taken during the Ultra Marathon trip on July 17, 2018. The angler is Mark LaRocca (NY). The picture shows him holding his 46.5 pound halibut that he caught that day, just after boating the fish. The shot on the left shows Mark presenting the under side of the fish while in the right hand picture he is showing the top of the fish. This fish was caught during a time when we had three halibut on all at the same time, something that had never previously happened on the Bunny Clark. One of those halibut was exceptionally big and broke off, one was sub-legal at 19 pounds and was released alive and one was the one shown in this picture. This was Mark's first halibut, a fish of a lifetime. Needless to say it was a good day for Mark. But to have that kind of luck, you have to be a good fisherman. Mark is a very good fisherman.




Tim Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Captain Ally Fuehrer and I ran our last full day trip together today. Ally goes back to her real job in the Gulf of Mexico on a tanker that could hold hundreds of Bunny Clarks on July 30th. With her own stateroom and three square every day. We will surely miss her. She has been a breath of fresh air and has brought us a lot of good luck.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was overcast, it was misting out, the wind was blowing out of the south at ten knots or less and the visibility over the ocean was fair to poor in haze and coastal fog.

As soon as we left the channel and moved out of sight of the gate to Perkins Cove, the fog set in. We had fog and light south southeast winds all the way to the fishing grounds.

We had fog for all but a half hour on the fishing grounds. For that half hour, before noon, we might have had five miles of visibility. For the rest of the time and the whole ride home, we had, at most, an eighth of a mile of visibility. The wind blew lightly out of the south southeast for the whole time we were fishing. Seas were chops of a foot. The wind piped up to ten and fifteen knots for the ride home with seas in chops of two feet. The air temperature reached a high of 75F. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was mostly clear through the fog. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67.2F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 73F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 71F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 68F).

The fishing was very good overall. The catching and landings were good, at best. There were plenty of fish but not such a great bite. We caught our representative samples from every spot but not a lot of any species anywhere. Most legal fish landed were haddock. The haddock cull was about two to one, sub-legal haddock to legal haddock. Legal landings also included twenty pollock, one redfish, six cusk, two cunners and one monkfish. Released fish included a halibut, twenty-seven cod over 5 pounds, sixty dogfish, two wolffish and a handful of small cod. We drift fished and anchored as seemed necessary. All terminal gear worked well.

If cod counted in the high hook category, Rick Wixon (ME) would have been high hook. Dan Kelley (ME) had similar luck. As far as putting fish in the boat, Marco Morin (ME) was probably high hook. I'm not one hundred percent on this. Rick's largest fish was a 21 pound monkfish, the second largest fish of the trip. This is Rick's largest monkfish and the Bunny Clark's largest monkfish this season so far. I took a picture of Rick holding his big monkfish. That digital image appears on the left in this entry. One of Rick's cod that he released weighed 12 pounds. Marco caught the third largest fish of the trip, a 19.5 pound pollock. Marco's largest cod weighed 13.25 pounds. Dan caught the fourth largest fish, an 18 pound pollock. Dan also caught the largest wolffish at 15.5 pounds. Some of Dan's other good fish included a 15.5 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock.

Scott Halliday (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 23 pound halibut. The is Scott's first Atlantic halibut. The fish was only thirty-eight inches caliper fork length so we had to release it. It took off like a shot to bottom. I did get a picture with my iPhone before Scott let it go, though. That digital image with Scott holding the halibut appears on the right. This is the Bunny Clark's nineteenth halibut of the 2018 fishing season, tying the boat record for number of halibut in a season. And we still have a lot of season to go!

Other Angler Highlights: Tim Williams (CT) caught quite a few fish, his largest a 17 pound pollock. Peter Henss (NH) landed a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Peter might have caught the most haddock. Ron Armstrong (NY) caught a 13 pound pollock, his best fish. Meredith Wireman (OR) landed the largest cusk at 6 pounds. Gene Dowgiert (ME) caught a 17.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish.

The hard luck award? Well that is a story in and of itself. Butch Edgar (NH) was late to the boat. I'm not sure if he thought he could get there at 7:00 AM, when the boat leaves? Or he got into trouble finding Perkins Cove? Or, whatever. At any rate, I didn't think he was going to make it. I was just about to start the engine when he pulled up in his truck above the dock. So I went up there, told him to park in the corral across the street from Barnacle Billy's and leave the keys in it. I would call someone to move the truck and keep the keys. In his haste, Butch took out the right corner post with the right side of his truck creating a large rent starting at the aft part of the wheel well on to the middle of the passenger side door. The truck had been immaculate. Dark Green. Beautiful. That wasn't all. He was tangled frequently on the trip and he threw back a 5 pound haddock, thinking it was a cod and it couldn't be kept. I tried to call out to him before the fish went over the side but it was too late. I think the haddock turned in the water and winked at Butch before heading to bottom. I can't be sure of that last. And I think Butch felt worse about losing the haddock than he did about hitting his truck! And, yes, Butch got the shirt. He had no idea why I asked him what size t-shirt he wore when he got aboard this morning!

Captain Fuehrer and I ran the afternoon half day (4 PM to 8 PM) trip or what some referred to the trip as: The Party Boat Trip From Hell. The wind had breezed up in good shape on the trip back in from the day grounds. By the time we were ready to take the night trip out, seas had risen to three and four feet out of the south. To make it as comfortable as I could, my cruising speed was leveled at eight knots. Every wave was treated with a shriek of joy at first that soon turned to concern. It's tough on the afternoon trips. Most of the anglers have never been on a fishing boat before. Despite the calm I showed and attempts at belaying their fears. Some were still concerned on the grounds. And a third of the boat was sea sick or uncomfortable.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest fifteen knots or more. Seas remained at three feet, more or less, in chops. The air temperature reached a high of 78F. The visibility was limited to five or six miles in haze (we couldn't see the shore line at the seven mile mark. The sky was clear, sunny. The tide (current) was moderate to light but into the wind. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66F.

The fishing was tough, the catching was fair and landings were poor. I would say that the landings were fair as we boated about thirty-five mackerel. But no one wanted to bring mackerel home. Other than the mackerel, we had no legal fish. No legal groundfish. Released fish included quite a few small cod, two small pollock and a couple of mackerel. We anchored on several spots. There were a couple of jigs with jig sticks on the bow. Other than that, everyone used bait and a few flies mixed with the bait rigs.

Austin Ludwing (NY) and Mike Ludwig (NY) were high hook with the most fish including quite a few mackerel, a couple of sub-legal pollock and quite few sub-legal cod (ten?). They were the two anglers with jigs and jig sticks in the bow. Austin's largest fish, besides the mackerel, was a 2.25 pound cod. Mike's, besides the mackerel, was a cod that weighed 1.75 pounds. Pat Dunn (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4.75 pound cod that might have legal had we been able to keep cod. His was the last fish caught this evening. Tara Healy (RI) was leading the boat pool for quite a while. Her's was the second largest fish caught. The third largest fish was a 2.5 pound cod caught by Ken Birch (NY). Eleven year old Jenna Thompson (CT) landed the hard luck award this evening for becoming the high hurler of the trip. I felt bad for her. I hope she likes the shirt!

I received three donations sponsoring me in the upcoming Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event of 192 miles to raise money for cancer research due to start in Sturbridge, Massachusetts on Saturday, August 4, at 5:30 AM. I hope to be there - baring any vocation related problems. One donation was for $25.00 from Lou & Barb Carangelo (MA). Another donation, also for $25.00, came from Norm & LuAnne Herrick (MA). Still one more came as an "egift" through the PMC site from Sheila Wilson (FL) for a generous $50.00. Thank you all so very much for your continued support in this event year after year. This means a lot to me. And it's certainly a help toward the cause and the disease. All the best!

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Ally Fuehrer ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 71F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the south at six knots and the visibility over the ocean was poor in coastal fog. The sky was mostly sunny all day. The sky was sunny inland even in the morning. If you went four miles inland, you left the fog behind along the coast. The visibility was impaired by intermittent fog along the shore. The wind blew out of the south southeast all day at ten knots or better. The air temperature reached a high of 80F in Perkins Cove. It was humid but not hugely humid. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 87F with a low of 75F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 86F (with a low of 73F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 68F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to four feet. The air temperature reached a high of 74F. But the humidity was oppressive and it felt hot, even with the wind blowing as strongly as it was. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to a half mile in fog. The sky seemed or was overcast (hard to tell with the fog). The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

The fishing was fair to good with the choppy surface water conditions, the humidity and a pile of dogfish. The catching was very good, excellent if you included the dogfish. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock. And there were a pile of them. The haddock cull was about a 60/40 split, favoring the legal fish. Legal landings also included five pollock. Released fish included one hundred and fifty plus dogfish, two cod of 5 pounds or better, a few short pollock, a few small cod and a two wolffish. They anchored and drift fished. Bait ruled the day.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. Too much was going on between the haddock, the dogfish tangles and keeping track of fish numbers, the numbers that correspond to the fish landed for each angler (each angler gets a number that corresponds to the fish they caught). Could it have been my friend, Jeff Goebel (ME)? Rich Barnett (NJ), Jeff's dorymate, won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.5 pound pollock. The second and third largest fish were both caught by Pat Arantio (NY). One was a 10 pound wolffish. The other was a 10 pound pollock. Tim Noll (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.Very understandable.

There was no interest in the afternoon trip today. The weather predictions were horrible, including the threat of thunder showers that never did happen.

Thursday, July 26, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo were supposed to be running the full day trip today, a charter. Alas, the weather would not cooperate enough to take the trip. The wooden anchors are out for the day.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the south at fifteen knots or better and the visibility over the ocean was fair in haze and some fog. The wind blew out of the south southeast as much as thirty knots during the middle part of the morning. We started to have rain at 5:30 AM. It rained, sometimes very hard, until before 9:00 AM. At that time, the wind blew the hardest with gusts over twenty knots for three hours. After 9:00 AM the wind backed off, the rain stopped (for three hours) and the sky became sunny. At noon, it started raining again. It rained for the better part of an hour before stopping and starting to rain again. By 6:00 PM, the rain has stopped for the day, the sky became clear and a full moon could be seen rising out of the ocean at the appropriate time. The air temperature in Perkins Cove reached a high of 80F. The visibility was suspect in fog and haze all day. The wind backed off to about five knots or less out of the south in the afternoon. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 86F with a low of 73F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 64F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 67F).

Aside from changing sacrificial anodes on the engine of the Bunny Clark, most of the work I did today was on this web site and at Barnacle Billy's restaurants. I was able to get a forty-one mile bike ride in for PMC preparation. I'm in terrible cycling shape as compared to every other year I have completed the event. It will be interesting to see how I fare on the course next Saturday.

Friday, July 27, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in haze (fog?). It didn't take long for the air temperature to rise. By 7:00 AM, it was already 72F. Along the shore, the wind blew from the southwest at ten knots more or less. It was humid. The air temperature reached a high of 81F in Perkins Cove. The sky was clear all day. The visibility was good in haze. Athough part of the late morning gave us fog with fair to poor visibility. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 90F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 90F (with a low of 61F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The air temperature reached a high of 74F under the canopy top. It was humid and a bit uncomfortable despite the wind. The tide (current) was strong and right into the wind. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to a half mile in fog. The sky was overcast or seemed so with the fog. The surface water temperature reached high of 66F.

The fishing was challenging for some with the seas. But that was the only obstacle. The dogfish were few. It wasn't too hot. And the fish were biting. The catching was excellent but there were a lot of smaller fish, sub-legal fish. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The cull was pretty good too. About a 55/45 split with the higher percentage going to the legal haddock. Legal landings also included sixteen pollock and five cusk. Released fish included twenty-two dogfish, four cod of 5 pounds or better, a few sub-legal pollock and a few small cod. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well today.

Travis Nephew (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 10 pound pollock caught by Keith Ross (NY). All the rest of the fish weighed less than 7 pounds.

Hillary Hanna (MA) was sea sick. But so was Frank Edmunds (NJ). Frank spent the day in the Hotel Bunny Clark. Hillary told Ian that this was the "worst day of my life". In trying to decide who to give the hard luck award to, Ian asked Frank if this was the worst day of his life. Frank's reply; "Not even close." So the shirt went to Hillary.

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM to 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at ten knots. Seas were two feet in chops. The air temperature was 74F. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66F.

The fishing was good, the catching was good and landings were fair. Legal landings included six mackerel, eight whiting, a cusk, a redfish and a haddock. Released fish included twelve short haddock and a few small cod and pollock. They anchored on every spot. All anglers used bait or a combination of bait and cod flies.

Ten year old Daniel Tal (ON) was high hook with the most fish. He caught fish of all species, mostly small. But no one caught as many fish. Some of his fish included a small mackerel, a whiting that weighed 1.5 pounds and another whiting that weighed a pound. Miki Alroy (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 3 pound haddock. Alyssa Hubbard (MA) landed the second largest fish, a 2 pound whiting. Thirteen year old Zack Ciccia (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 1.75 pound cod. He also caught a 1.5 pound haddock that was too small to keep.

Other Angler Highlight: Ten year old Eli Coughlin (VT) caught a haddock that weighed .75 pounds (too small to keep). Ten year old Shealyn Murphy (MA) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single fish. Actually, none of the Murphy family caught any fish. When asked about it, Shealyn relied; "It's Murphy's Law!". Shealyn got the shirt!

I received two significant donations of sponsorship for my cancer fund raising work with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Significant in that Marty Nephew (NY) never forgets me in this. His donation today was for a generous $50.00. Significant also in that Dave Hutchins (ME) gave me $125.00 for a past Bunny Clark fare that he thought he owed me for an extreme day trip. I believe that we didn't have a full boat that day anyway, even though the policy is as he believes it. So I turned around and pushed his money forward to the PMC/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute to increase my cancer fund raising total. Thanks so much, Marty, for your thoughtfulness. And thank you, Dave, for being the wonderful person that you are. In a close knit community like ours, that means a lot to me. Much appreciated, you two!

Saturday, July 28, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was mostly overcast, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in haze and some fog. The morning cleared the clouds away by 9:00 AM. The sky was hazy clear for the rest of the day. The wind blew out of the southwest at light speeds, maybe blowing up as much at ten knots. The high air temperature in Perkins Cove was 82F, that I saw. The visibility was fair in heavy haze and, offshore, fog. At 4:15 PM, we had a terrible thunder shower that brought wind, lightning and torrential rain. The rain lasted until 5:00 PM. After clearing, it rained again. The rain came in periodic waves until later in the evening. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 87F with a low of 72F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 67F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 67F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots. The ocean was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 73F. The visibility ranged from an eighth to a half mile in fog. The sky seemed overcast with the fog. The tide (current) was very strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66F.

The fishing was abnormally so for the amount of fish seen on the sounding machine. Except for the strong tide, the fishing conditions were very good. The catching was off, as the bite was way off. Landings were good to very good for Gary Smith (VT), who had the edge, but fair for most everyone else. It took some talent to catch fish today. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far, enough so that I don't like to post the exact figure. The haddock cull was very good in the 70/30 range, highly favoring the legal fish over the sub-legal. Legal landings also included two pollock and three cusk. Released fish included three cod 5 pounds or better, three dogfish (You can tell right there that the bite was off if you can't even catch a dogfish!) and a few small pollock and cod. They anchored and drift fished, the only two boating methods available for catching fish. Bait worked best.

The previously mentioned, Gary Smith was high hook with the most legal fish, by far. He didn't catch anything over 6 pounds as most of his fish were haddock. Dillon Brigham (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound cod. Bobby Zahner (MA) caught the second and third largest fish, also both cod. One weighed 9 pounds. The other weighed 7.5 pounds. All cod are, of course, released, as per order of our Federal government. Jason Brigham (VT) landed the hard luck award today for losing three jigs. Ouch! But better than being sea sick, I think!

With the National Weather Service predicting severe thunder storm activity this afternoon, we could not get a single warm body to attend the afternoon half day trip. As it turns out, it would not have been pretty as the NWS was correct for once. Okay, maybe twice!

Sunday, July 29, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Ally Fuehrer ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was very light from the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was good, at least. Ashore, the wind hauled out of the west before 9:00 AM. But it didn't get out of the single digits for wind velocity. After a calm spell, the wind hauled out of the south and blew lightly into the night. The sky was nearly cloudless all day. It was a lot less humid than it was yesterday. The high air temperature in Perkins Cove, that I saw, was 82F. The visibility was good in haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 74F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 60F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 63F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at five to ten knots with seas in chops of less than a foot over a two foot long rolling swell. The air temperature was an uncomfortable 77F in the shade. The visibility maxed out at twenty miles in haze. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68F.

The fishing conditions would have been excellent had it not been for the strong tide. I would call it very good as there were few dogfish and the ocean was fairly calm. The catching and landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-one haddock (damn near the fewest haddock we have seen for a day trip this season), a monkfish and a mackerel. Released fish included three cod of 5 pounds or better, fifteen short haddock, a few small cod and pollock, a small halibut, seven dogfish and three wolffish. They drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well.

Joe Columbus (MA) and/or Jack Judge (CT) were high hook with the most legal fish. There was no one close. Jack landed a double that included a 12 pound pollock and a 17.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. This is a tie for the Bunny Clark's third largest double of the 2018 fishing season to date. Jack also caught the largest wolffish of the trip at 10 pounds. Joe caught a number of doubles, the first including a 10.5 pound pollock and a 9 pound pollock. The best double, though, included a 21 pound pollock and an 18.5 pound pollock, the Bunny Clark's second largest double of the 2018 fishing season to date. Ian took a picture of Joe holding his two big pollock. That digital image appears on the left in this entry. Joe also caught a 20.5 pound pollock with jig missing on the bottom of his rig, meaning that it was a double that got away. Joe's 21 pound pollock was the third largest fish of the trip.

Zack Crocker (RI) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 24.25 pound pollock, just three quarters of a pound from making Maine's trophy pollock list. This is the largest pollock that Zack has ever caught. It's also the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the 2018 fishing season to date. Ian took a picture of Zack holding his big pollock. That digital image appears on the right. Brian Walsh (NJ) landed the second largest fish of the trip, a 21.5 pound pollock. He also caught the Bunny Clark's second largest monkfish of the season to date, weighing in at 13.5 pounds. And he caught the Bunny Clark's twentieth halibut, weighing in around 12 or 13 pounds. Twenty halibut in a season is a new Bunny Clark boat record. We caught twenty-eight on the Mary E, my first charter boat, in 1979. If we keep catching halibut at this rate we might beat even that mark!

Other Angler highlights: Jason Parker (VT) caught a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Justin Brown (NY) boated an 18.5 pound pollock and a 19 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Arber Dhamo (ME) also caught an 18.5 pound pollock. Lisa Blackey (NH) landed the hard luck award for getting a little bit green. Or maybe it was more than that. Details were withheld.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Ally Fuehrer ran the afternoon half day (4 PM to 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were a foot in chops over a two rolling sea swell. The air temperature was 74F. The sky was sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

The fishing was very good, catching was good and landings were fair to good. Legal landings included fifteen haddock, one redfish and fifteen mackerel. Released fish included a few small cod, a couple of pollock, a few mackerel, thirteen sub-legal haddock and a wolffish. They anchored and drift fished. Everyone used bait.

Joey Lineham (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound wolffish. The second largest fish was a 4 pound cod caught by Kristen Barrett (VT). She also caught a 1.75 pound haddock. Becky Jacobs (VT) caught the third largest fish, a 3.5 pound cod. She also caught a haddock. Her's weighed 2 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Jeremy Hurley (MA) caught a 2 pound haddock and a 2.75 pound cod, his two best fish. Jason Gwozdz (VT) caught two haddock. One weighed 1.75 pounds. The other weighed 2.5 pounds, the largest haddock of the evening. Lincoln Billert (VT) caught two haddock of 2 pounds each. Brian Billert (VT) caught a 2 pound haddock. Owen Maroney (VT) also caught a 2 pound haddock. Connor Barrett (VT) landed the hard luck award for taking a serious amount of abuse for being outfished by his mom!

I received several donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event on Saturday to raise money to fight cancer. Those donors and their donations included Joe Columbus (MA) for $40.00 (Joe seems to donation at least $20.00 every time he fishes with us!), Jason O'Connor (ME) for a generous $45.00, John & Sue Stebbins (MA) for a generous $50.00 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC site, Joe & Lynne Goodman (MA) for a very generous $500.00 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC site, Bob Zuker (MA) for a generous $100.00 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC site and Carole Auger-Richard (ME) for a generous $50.00 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC site. Thank you all so very much for unself support and help in my project to fight cancer. I so very much appreciate your generosity and, specifically, sponsoring me!

Monday, July 30, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was very light from the northwest, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was good. The wind blew out of the northwest for while, died out and then hauled out of the south. Wind speeds at most were ten knots, maybe. The ocean was calm along the shore all day. The highest air temperature that I saw was 80F. The day started out with very little humidity. By about 2:00 PM, I realized that it was as humid as it was two days ago. It was more humid later in the afternoon. Not my kind of weather but great for the restaurant. The sky was clear all morning with a cloudless sky. By noon, we had high thin clouds. We had sun but it was a milky sun. The visibility over the ocean was good in haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 70F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 56F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 59F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at five knots or less. The ocean was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 73F. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds, probably the same situation we had ashore. The surface water temperature reached a high of 69F, the highest surface water temperature we have seen this year but still lower than it should be by now with these conditions.

The fishing was very good, the catching was very good and landings were good to very good. It was really a great day overall. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. They were back into the haddock again. The haddock cull was 50/50, legal to sub-legal haddock. Legal landings also included twenty-one pollock, one halibut and four cusk. Released fish included sixteen cod of 5 pounds or better, forty-eight dogfish, one wolffish and a few small cod and pollock. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

It was too busy to discern high hook. Way too much going on. Joe Balas (OH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 103.5 pound halibut. This is the largest halibut the Bunny Clark has ever seen boated. We have lost much bigger ones. But we have never landed one this large. Thank you, Bryan Lewer, for keeping us with the live pogies! Ian took a picture of Anthony Palumbo holding the halibut while Joe stood (left) in the background. Joe has had a bad shoulder so he couldn't hold it himself. This digital image appears on the left. Joe also caught the second largest fish, a 22 pound barndoor skate, our first of the season to date and our biggest of the season, of course! The third largest fish was a 17 pound cod caught by Mike Wicks (NY).

Other Angler Highlights: Jeff Vieser (DC) caught a 14.5 pound cod, the fourth largest cod of the trip. Max Collier (NY) landed the hard luck award for losing two jigs.

Micah, in the meantime, was trying to call me via satellite phone. He was way offshore tuna fishing in the Petrel. He left at 5:00 AM. I thought the call was a telemarketor so I didn't answer the call. I guess I'll find out tomorrow what he wanted to tell me.

Tim Tuesday, July 31, 2018

This morning, I found out Micah had landed a tuna while I was asleep. That is his fifth fish this year as a harpoon boat. He's poked a few holes in the ocean but he seems to be getting the hang of it. The nice thing is that he can see fish which is most of the battle. The physical aspect of harpooning comes with time. I am very proud of him.

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the full day trip today with Miki Alroy, a new potential swing deck hand.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was very light from the northwest, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was good.

The wind was very light out of the northwest when we put the nose of the Bunny Clark between the can buoys. The sky was mostly clear, the ocean was flat calm, it was warm but not too warm (67F) and we had good visibility. We lost what little wind we had about half way out. The rest of the ride was uneventful.

On the fishing grounds, the ocean was flat calm with no wind ripples on the surface. The ocean's surface was like a mirror. Later on, the wind started blowing out of the west at two or three knots. We had very light southerly winds on the on the last stop and all the way back to Perkins Cove. The ocean was calm for the trip. The air temperature reached a high of 77F. The humidity increased as the day went on. It was hot in the sun without the wind. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The sky was mostly clear. The surface water temperature reached a high of 70.6F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 60F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 63F).

The fishing conditions were very good once we got a little wind. Until then, the boat drifted in circles and produced some great tangles. And not great in a good way! The catching was good to very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock in the 3 to 4 pound range, by far. Haddock took a second place to the pollock today. Everyone caught haddock but most were too small to keep. For every three haddock caught, only one was a keeper. Legal landings also included two mackerel and seven cusk. Released fish included thirteen cod of 5 pounds or more, one halibut, one wolffish (about 12 pounds - didn't get it aboard - barely hooked), too many sub-legal pollock to count and a handful of small cod. We drift fished for the trip. All terminal gear worked well but bait caught the most haddock. Cod flies caught the most pollock.

I would say that someone in the Best family was high hook with the most legal fish. There was always someone in that family with a fish on the line all trip long. Chris Ramage (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 28 pound Maine state trophy pollock. This is Chris' largest pollock, the Bunny Clark's largest pollock in three years and the pool winning fish as well. Chris caught this fish as part of a double that also included a 12 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest double of the 2018 fishing season so far. I took a picture on the bow with Chris holding both his pollock, both of them. This digital image appears on the left. Chris also caught an 11 pound cod.

The second largest fish was a 20.5 pound halibut caught by Brian Walsh (NJ). This is our twenty-second halibut of the 2018 Bunny Clark fishing season so far. I didn't have time to measure it but it was probably thirty-eight inches long. Definitely sub-legal. I did take a picture of Brian holding his halibut just before releasing it. That digital image appears on the right. Brian's second largest fish was a 12 pound cod.

The third largest fish of the trip was a 19 pound pollock caught by thirteen year old James Best (NH). That pollock is the largest fish that James has ever caught. I asked him what his second biggest fish was. He didn't know but "it was caught on this boat, though". Good answer!

Other Angler Highlights: Dave Martin (MA) caught a 9 pound cod and a 9 pound pollock, his two best fish. Dave Harris (MA) caught an 8.75 pound pollock, his best. Daniel Best (NH) caught a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Bob Ashton (NH) caught an 11 pound cod, his biggest fish by far. Dick Taylor (MA) landed the hard luck award for having the most tangled line. If you were on the boat today, you would have heard; "Some on that side has got me!" There was a ninety percent chance that if you heard that refrain, it was Dick Taylor! Dick got to meet everyone on the boat!

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather was beautiful. The wind was light out of the south. The ocean was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 76F. The tide (current) was very light. The sky was cloudless. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was nearly cloudless. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.5F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good as were the landings. Most legal fish landed were haddock. There were only five short haddock tonight. Legal landings also included fifteen mackerel, a cusk, two whiting, seven pollock and three squirrel hake. Released fish included two cod, ten short pollock and one dogfish. We drift fished all evening. All terminal gear worked well.

Brian Walsh (NJ) was the fisherman of the evening. He was high hook with seven legal fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk. What is interesting, to me, is that I caught the largest cusk I have ever caught in the same spot twenty-eight years ago! It weighed 18 pounds. Brian also caught some haddock, pollock and the only redfish. The redfish was sub-legal. The second largest fish was a 5 pound pollock caught by Steven Jenks (NY). Dennis Vidal (CT) caught the third largest fish, a 4.25 pound haddock, the largest haddock caught today on either trip!

Other Angler Highlights: Kristen Cronin (MA) caught the first haddock of the evening. It weighed 1.25 pounds. Matt Linehan (MA) caught a 2.25 pound haddock. Emily Walsh (MA) also caught a 2.25 pound haddock. Colin Campbell (ON) was second hook with four legal, not including a few mackerel that he also caught. His other legal fish included two haddock of 2 pounds each, a 2.5 pound haddock and another I didn't weigh. He also caught the largest cod at 3 pounds. Colin is fourteen years old but says he "looks like a nine year old". I got a kick out of him saying that. Seven year old James Crawford (PA) landed a 2.25 pound haddock. Laurie Decormier (NH) landed the hard luck award for catching the only dogfish, under the supervision of her husband, Dana!

Many individuals helped my in my cancer fund raising project with the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event that will take place this coming Saturday. Those individuals and their donations included: Bill Harding (ME) for $50.00, Dave Martin for $25.00, Mark Coleman (NY) for $30.00, Paul Domenichella (MA) for $25.00, Mark & Maureen LaRocca (NY) for a very generous $250.00 and Westy Lord (ME) for a generous $100.00. Mark, Mark & Maureen and Westy have sponsored me annually since I started this project in 2007. Thank you all so very much. I do so appreciate your support!

Wednesday, August 1, 2018

We have no trip today. This has been planned. The Bunny Clark resides in Perkins Cove until tomorrow.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 67F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no wind to write about, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was good, at least. The sky stayed mostly clear and sunny until noon. After noon, the sky was becoming occluded. By 2:00 PM, the sky was overcast. By 4:00 PM, it was raining lightly. That didn't last long. We had the occasional light shower through the afternoon and into the night. An hour before sunset, the fog moved in. We had fog for the rest of the evening. The air temperature got up as high as 80F in Ogunquit. The wind blew no more than ten knots during the day. Southwest to begin, the wind hauled out of the south after noon and southeast at around 5:00 PM. The southeast wind blew up as high as fifteen knots in the evening. It seemed to blow the fog right in to Perkins Cove. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 63F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 64F).

I did my normal restaurant thing today. I did get an opportunity to ride forty miles at a spinning/easy pace on my bike to get ready for this weekend's PMC ride.

I received a number of donations today sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, the ride to start at 5:30 AM the day after tomorrow. These sponsors and their donations are as follows: Frank & Dianne Hludik, Jr. (ME) for a generous $100.00, Richie & Barbara Jeffers (MA) for a very generous $250.00, Norm (and Linda) Viens (MA) for a generous $100.00 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC site, Harry (and Susie) Bajakian (NJ) for a very generous $250.00 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC site and Andy Armitage (ME/UK) for a very generous $150.00 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC site. Thank you all so very much for your support and help. I certainly appreciate this. But, more, those with the disease will really appreciate this and never know who to really thank. So I will have to do this here for them. All the best!

Thursday, August 2, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo, with Miki Alroy (in training), ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 73F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at over ten knots and the visibility over the ocean seemed good. Ashore, it was hot, hazy and humid. By noon, the air temperature was 89F. An hour later it crested 90F. It felt warmer but that was the highest air temperature reading that I saw. The wind blew out of the west at ten to fifteen knots, just enough so that we couldn't put the awnings out on the deck of Barnacle Billy's. The sky was hazy clear all day with few clouds. The visibility was good in haze. We had a light rain after 7:00 PM that lasted about twenty minutes. There was no rain for the rest of the evening. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 95F with a low of 76F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 90F (with a low of 69F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 90F (with a low of 71F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The air temperature was a much cooler 74F. In fact, when I took Ian's camera out of his bag to process the digital images he took, the camera felt so cool I was inclined to put the camera to my face just to enjoy the feeling. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The sky was sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68F.

The fishing conditions were very good. The tide was just about perfect, there were no dogfish caught today and the sea state was the only thing that kept the conditions from being perfect or excellent. The catching was very good as were the landings. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. It was a great day for haddock. The haddock cull was 55/45, favoring the legal sized fish. Legal landings also included three pollock, three cusk and two whiting. Released fish included seven cod of 5 pounds or better, a few small cod and a few small pollock. There was not a single dogfish caught today. Drifting was the fishing method. Bait was by far the best for the haddock.

Alisha Willey (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish, mostly haddock, of course. She also caught the largest haddock of the trip weighing in at 4 pounds. Dave Walden (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.5 pound cod. He also caught the Bunny Clark's second largest whiting of the season today, a Maine state trophy of 4.5 pounds. That weight would put it somewhere around the tenth largest whiting ever caught on the Bunny Clark. Ian took a picture of Dave holding his king whiting. That digital image appears on the left in this entry. I don't think I would be insulting Dave by saying that holding that fish properly would have made that fish look much smaller than it really was. I really think that Dave wishes his arms were just a little bit longer for the photo! But I think he's doing a good job to make that fish look bigger than life. This is the largest whiting that Dave has ever seen caught on a party boat. And Dave has been fishing for many years off the coast of New England for groundfish.

As for the other big fish caught today, there were cod that were about 6 pounds. Ian said there were two or three. He didn't bother weighing them because he thought there would be something bigger. That never happened so we don't have the anglers who caught the second and third largest fish today.

Other Angler Highlights: Chad Johnston (ME) caught a 4.25 pound Maine state trophy whiting today, another in the top twenty of the Bunny Clark's largest ever. Ian took a picture of Chad with his big whiting as well. This digital image appears on the right. James Johnston (ME) landed the hard luck award for being sea sick.

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo, with Miki Alroy (in training), ran the afternoon half day (4 PM to 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots or less. The ocean was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 74F. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68F.

The fishing was excellent, perfect conditions for angling humans on the high seas. The catching was good, landings fair. And it's probably good that landings were fair as very few people wanted to take fillets home this evening. Legal landings included a haddock, a pollock, six cusk and thirty mackerel. Released fish included a small mako shark, six or seven small cod and a few sub-legal pollock. Drifting was the method. Only bait and a few cod flies were used.

Lincoln Cramer (CT) was high hook with nine legal, including mackerel, mostly, and a cusk. Avery Burnham (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a cusk that weighed 5.25 pounds, caught by John Cramer (CT). Shelby Dejana (CT) caught the third largest fish, a 5 pound cusk. She also caught the only pollock. Her pollock weighed 2.25 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Conrad Francis (NY) hooked into a mako about thirty inches long. Talk about flying around. That fish did everything but jump out of the water. It was so fast that Ian couldn't tell what it was at first. The speed gave him a clue after a second. It bit a cod fly. But the teeth finally cut the monofilament attached to the fly and off it went as if it never happened. It would have been too small to keep anyway. But it was exciting for the anglers to watch. I would have loved to have seen that. Rayan Salahuddin (MA) caught the only haddock, legal or sub-legal this evening. His haddock weighed 2 pounds. Alessandra Rodda (NJ) caught a 1.5 pound cusk, one of the first fish to be weighed this evening. Ada Mayer (CT) landed the hard luck award due to an equilibrium problem.

I received another batch of donations today sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge. I will be leaving for Boston tomorrow at 9:00 AM to start the weekend journey. These wonderfully thoughtful, generous, individuals are as follows: Lynn Welsch (NM) for a generous $50.00 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC site, Dr. Sam Pelletier (ME) for a very generous $100.00 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC site, Stu Dunn & Kam Moulton (ME) for a very generous $100.00, Kerry Ellen Enright (ME) for $20.00, an anonymous donation of $1.00, my sister, Cathy Koppstein, for a generous $50.00 and Eric & Caroline Chase (ME) for a very generous $100.00. Thank you all so very much for your help and support in this project. I appreciate it very much that you chose me to be your emissary for cancer research.

Friday, August 3, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 73F, the sky was mostly clear, there wasn't enough wind to write about, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was good. I wasn't in Ogunquit during the day but I do know that they had a thunder storm and 3:00 PM, pretty much canceling the evening trip that could have been. There was a lot of wind and heavy rain. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 91F with a low of 77F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 68F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 70F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots for the whole trip. Seas were chops of one to two feet over long rolling sea swells of two feet. The sky was sunny and clear. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The high air temperature on the fishing grounds was a much cooler (than land) 72F. The tide (current) was moderate. The water temperature reached a high of 68F.

The fishing conditions were nearly excellent, the catching was very good and landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock with haddock close behind. The haddock cull was about 50/50 legal haddock to shorts. Legal landings also included sixteen cusk. Released fish included twenty-three cod of 5 pounds or better, a few small pollock, four dogfish and a few small cod. Drifting was the fishing method. All terminal gear worked about the same.

Ian didn't spend too much on high hook status today. There was a lot going on. Jeff Rickett (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 24.5 pound pollock. This is Jeff's biggest pollock and a tie for the Bunny Clark's third largest pollock of the fishing season so far. Joe Balas (OH) caught the second largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. He also caught the third and fourth largest fish as well! Those two fish included an 8 pound cod and a 7 pound pollock. Al Bisceglia (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting not a single legal fish. He admitted that he was much better at golf than he was at fishing!

As I alluded to previously, today's afternoon trip was canceled due to a thunder storm and the strong threat of thunder storms throughout the evening on all the weather stations.

First Day of Pan-Mass Challenge: At 9:30 AM, Paul Haseltine (Hez) and I got in his car and he drove us with bikes and gear in the back to his daughter's (my niece - Abby Mitchell) house where we picked up Abby and her bike and gear. From there we headed to Boston. In Boston, it's tradition that we eat at the Yankee Lobster near the World Trade Center on the water near the docks and some of the fish companies. During lunch was saw a crash in the traffic circle right next to where we were eating. No one was hurt but it was a reminder about that same possibility on two wheels!

We were done eating around noon. It was just a short drive to get our bikes to the eighteen wheelers that transport them to Sturbridge, Massachusetts for the beginning of the PMC ride. Then Hez parked his car near the Ferry Terminal and we boarded a bus to Sturbridge. This the three of us did, after saying hello to many we have known from previous PMCs.

The bus ride to the Host Hotel in Sturbridge is always uneventful. Some bring beers, others bring a book, some just talk and some listen to music. I bring a book, never read a sentence and try to sleep with zero success, every time. We had a rain shower along the way. The rain had cleared by the time we had arrived at our destination. There we registered for the event, secured our room for the night in the Host and had a couple of beers with those we have come to know and look forward to seeing at this event. One thing about the PMC, it seems to be a gathering place for the most wonderful, caring and thankful individuals. It's an example of the best of humanity all in one place.

Beers are followed by dinner, provided under tents in back of the Host. I always bring a plastic bag in which I ladle pasta and bring it back to the room for breakfast at 4:00 AM the next morning. I was in bed by 7:00 PM. It's always the best night sleep, and the longest sleep, I get all summer.

Saturday, August 4, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

Ashore, the air temperature readings for the day in three places were as follows: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 73F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 67F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 67F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or two. The high air temperature for the day was 73F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The sky was sunny in the morning, overcast in the afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 69F.

The fishing was very good with the moderate seas, tide, wind and few dogfish. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was just about 50/50, legal fish to sub-legal fish with the edge going to the sub-legal fish. Legal landings also included thirty-two pollock, seven cusk and a mackerel. Released fish included twenty dogfish, thirty-six cod of 5 pounds or more and a few small cod and pollock. Drifting was the only boating method used. All terminal gear worked well.

There was no mention of high hook. John Smith (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 13 pound cod caught by Howard Deuso (NH). Howard also caught a cod that weighed 10 pounds. Peter Grant caught the third largest fish, a 12 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Paul Kostopoulos (CT) - a long time PMC sponsor of mine - caught the fourth largest fish, an 11 pound cod. Josh Colpritt (ME) landed the hard luck award for not being able to deal with the motion of the ocean.

The rain and thunder shower threat/conditions eliminated the chance of taking an evening trip.

While I was involved in the first day of the PMC event, Charlie Borgstrom (MA) sponsored me in this years Pan-Mass Challenge with a $100.00 donation in the form of an "egift" through the PMC site. Charlie (and his dory mate, Olympia, are actually from Sturbridge, Massachusetts where the ride starts. I see them at Barnacle Billy's most Wednesdays or Thursdays for lunch.Thanks, Charlie (and Olympia). I appreciate your thoughtfulness and generosity very much!

First Day of the Pan-Mass Challenge Event, Saturday, August 4, 2018, leaving from Sturbridge, Massachusetts with a finish at MMA, Bourne, Massachusetts.

I have to preface this paragraph by telling you that every year I look forward to meeting Steve LaPlante (CT) and Dave Miller (MA) outside the Host Hotel sometime before 5:00 AM. On last years ride, I was a little late. And I was approached by one of my friends who wanted me to put a bag on a truck destined to arrive at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy (MMA). This whole scene made me too late to get our annual picture except for me taking a digital image of Steve and Dave standing for the National Anthem at the starting line. Tradition sidelined! At the time, I told myself that that wasn't going to happen again. So this year, Hez, Abby and I found Steve and Dave at the normal place with plenty of time to take our annual digital image in front of the Host Hotel. I knew, after that, that it was going to be a great event despite the weather later in this day's ride. Below is the shot that was taken which I digitally enhanced for this site. The digital image shows (from left to right): Abby Mitchell, Steve LaPlante, yours truly, Dave Miller and Paul "Hez" Haseltine. "Tradition", as Dave always says. Means a lot. But means a whole bunch to me that they meet us here at the start every year. Thank you both soooooo much!



I had planned, the night before, to take a different tack on my riding this year. Normally, I got up in the front, raced the whole way (with one stop), trading wheels with whomever was faster and getting into MMA at 10:30 AM or 11:00 AM. That way I had the whole place to myself, being one of the first to get in. That has caused me problems in the past. Two bad crashes and none of the comradary that goes along with riding among people you really like and respect. So this year I decided to ride with friends I had made the first year I participated in this event and with some of their friends. They are all phenomenal athletes. So it wasn't as if we were lagging at all. But we did make a number of stops that I wouldn't have made otherwise. I felt a lot better this way, actually. I wasn't nearly as tired in the end. And it was much more fun.



The shot above is a "selfie" taken with my iPhone at the start line just before heading off. The line-up from left to right is myself, Hez and Abby.



This is another shot taken on the road into the sunrise this first day. Andy Carver is just ahead of me. We are about five miles down the road from the start. This, again, was taken with my iPhone.

I believe that we arrived at the lunch stop at 11:00 AM or thereabouts. This is seventy miles into a ride with forty miles to the finish. When we left that stop it started to rain. After ten miles it started to pour. There was no lightning associated with the rain and the air temperature was over 70F. So you didn't need a wind breaker or oil top. But after that ten mile stretch, I found too much water wicking off the wheel of the guy in front of me. It became annoying enough and a bit precarious. So I went off on my own for the next thirty miles. And I was proud of myself. I got into a rhythm and averaged 21 miles per hour in that time.



This shot above was taken by Andy Carver, the face right. I can be seen riding to his immediate right. Andy played professional rugby in the UK, where he was born and grew up before coming to the United States. He has a very successful industrial painting business in the Boston area. He's one hell of an athlete.



The shot above is another one that I took from my iPhone while riding. The rider in the foreground is Mike Parent (MA), another one of the riders I truly admire and respect not only for his fund raising abilities and athletic prowess but also for his strong family values, thoughtfulness and honesty. Great guy! He was also the guy I approached to ask if he wouldn't mind if I rode with his group that day. As usual, he was delighted with the request almost as much as I was looking forward to it!

I crossed the line without my friends at 1:00 PM at MMA. I parked my bike for the night, signed up for a massage for 3:00 PM and was delighted to find the floor of my dorm empty. This meant that even though I was two hours later than normal, I still got to have the shower all to myself! I couldn't believe my good luck! After a shower, I suited up in t-shirt and shorts and headed out the door on to the campus to find water for my water bottles to leave on the bike over night. It was pouring rain. In no time, the bottom part of my shorts were soaked. But I had packed a gift from Frank Blount, his Francis Fleet full kit, racing shorts and top. So I went back to the dorm room and put Frank's kit on underneath my oil top. It had pockets in the back of the jersey so I could keep my cell phone and wallet dry. I did get a hundred comments, though; "You haven't taken your riding stuff off yet?" Well, it was the start of a topic of conversation with individuals I was just meeting for the first time. After the massage, I got food and rounded up friends.

My dory mates, Hez and Abby, weren't so lucky. Abby had been having back problems. These had developed only a couple months ago, long after signing up for the ride. And she really wanted to do it. She wanted to go as far as she could. When and if she stopped, Bryant, her husband, was going to take over and ride in her name. It was slow going from the start with Hez and Ab. They stayed together but Abby wasn't feeling great from the start. So it was slow going to the first water stop. She was done by the second water stop in Franklin, Massachusetts. That's about forty miles into a one hundred and ten mile ride. I believe they rolled in at 10:00 AM or a little later. It had been spitting rain before they arrived. Bryant had showed up with his bike and the kids. Abby took the car and the kids back home. It was raining when Bryant took over with Hez. Somewhere along the way, Hez got a flat. Although Hez called out, Bryant didn't hear him and rode on without him. It was raining so hard that Hez could not effectively change out the tube. Thankfully, the PMC's "sag wagon" showed up and gave him a new tire and changed out the tube. It's unclear if Hez got lost before or after the flat. But he did get lost. He went a mile out of his way to get back on the right road again. It was raining so hard in the last two hours that it was hard to see, the puddles were so large in the road that he had to play jump and dodge with the cars and puddles and when cars did pass, it was like someone was throwing a five gallon pail of bath water on him. Yuck! I still don't know if Bryant went back or Hez finished alone. I do know that Hez didn't cross the finish line until 4:45 PM, almost seven hours in the rain. I was afraid that Hez was going to miss dinner. But he didn't. And we managed to have a couple of beers together as well. It was his worst time on a bike, ever, he admitted to me. It was easy to believe. But he was fine and he cleaned up pretty well, I might add! You certainly would have never known that he went through this ordeal if you had just met him an hour after the ride.

All three of us, Bryant, Hez and I were sharing a dorm room at the MMA. And we all retired around 7:00 PM.

Sunday, August 5, 2018

We canceled today's trip for lack of people, lack of a deck hand, to give Captain Ian and Anthony a break and because I was away at Pan-Mass Challenge weekend.

Second Day of the Pan-Mass Challenge Event, Sunday, August 5, 2018, leaving from MMA, Bourne, Massachusetts, finishing at Provincetown, Massachusetts.

This day I had no problems with getting ready, getting to breakfast and getting back on the bike. Hez left before just about everyone. My plan was to ride with Bryant who is, I would say, a little bit better (or faster) rider than I am. The air temperature was right around 70F and the sky was clear and going to be without rain. The cyclists I rode with yesterday and Hez, Bryant and Abby are part of a team of cyclists called Precision for Kids. They dedicate their funds to children's oncology and cancer research targeting kids. Every year they have a standard team kit. This years was so well done I would be surprised if they change it for next year. I am not part of their team so I ride with my Maine Coast Cycling Club kit.

Bryant and I left MMA after team Precision for Kids and Hez. Abby was home with the kids on this day. The plan was for Bryant and I to catch up with the team and Hez, who was riding solo to start. I took a lot of digital images from my phone for this ride. I consolidated a few for this page. I didn't start taking them until we got by the path running along the Cape Cod Canal which was foggy, fast and crowded. The shot below was taken after the Canal as we try to catch up to Hez and the team. It's a selfie I took showing Bryant on my wheel waving.



Bryant and I stopped at the first water stop, twenty-five miles in. But "the team" and Hez had already left that water stop. We stocked up on some food and drink and kept going. At the Brewster, Massachusetts water stop we caught most of them except Mike Parent and his crew. I took a "selfie" of Hez, Bryant and I. This is a tradition. It's usually a picture of just Hez and I but adding Bryant makes it more of a family link. See below.



Bryant and I rode off again. Bryant was leading a torrid pace so it was nice just to sit on his wheel. Yes, I did my share of leading. At the Hyannis, Massachusetts water stop we caught up to all of the team. After eating and taking on more liquids, we all rode out together sans Hez. This gave me an opportunity to take some pictures of the team with the team kits. These pictures appear in two shots below.





The shot above is a picture of team leader, Mike Parent (left), and Sam Berry (beard), two of the nicest guys you will ever meet. And great riders.

When we had about fifteen miles left until the finish, we formed a fast train, just a few of us, and, basically, raced until the end. Our average was up around 20 mph or a little more. I know that I led for seven miles of it paying attention to staying just above 20 mph and holding this as a steady pace. It was very fun and something I thought I might miss by taking a different approach to the weekend. I am a bit competitive. And this kind of ride feeds that spirit. Below is a shot of "the train" with me just a bit to the outside as the fourth wheel holding the camera/phone high above my head.



The last two miles we carried an average speed of 25 mph racing along side another team. As we rode through the long entrance path to the finish I couldn't help thinking how fast this weekend goes by. I rode right into the arms of Don & Lisa Johnson (MA) right after crossing the finish line. For the last three years (?) they have arranged their P-town vacation around the time of the PMC. They come over in their own boat. It is so great to see them at the end. Don started years ago fishing on the Bunny Clark with his father. His family has almost become part of ours since. Below is a shot of the three of us just after the finish.



After finishing, I bring my bike to an eighteen wheeler headed to Boston along with a truck full of other bikes. The bike are brought to Boston and set up at the Ferry Terminal for us to find when we get there. Then I grab my bag and set it up near a huge army tent that has been set up with a large group shower where I join many naked male bodies standing under row after row of shower heads. After I dried off, got dressed and stood at the exit I yelled; "Listen up! Group hug, everyone, group hug." I didn't hang around for a response.

From there I put my bag of belongings on the truck headed for the Boston Ferry Terminal. After that, it's the lunch tent set up beside the Provincetwon Inn. Below is a shot of the lunch tent that seems to extend to eternity.



I ran into Billy Starr, the founder, organizer and CEO of the PMC. I stopped to take a "selfie" of the two of us. He has done a great job over the many years running this thing. Extremely well done. This digital image appears below.



After lunch, a group of us, almost the whole team, walk to the Colony, an old bar at the base of the pier where we board the ferry to Boston. We have about an hour there together. A great experience and a wonderful group of caring unselfish individuals given the gift of a great bike ride in the middle of a busy summer. A reward to us for helping in the fight against cancer. And an epic ride to show everyone else on the outside that we do care about what we do.

The ferry ride back to Boston was uneventful, calm and happy. Just before docking, a Boston fire boat appears spraying water from all ports. A picture of the fire boat appears below. This marks the end of the PMC's obligations to us.



So I write a lot about the ride and the last two days, probably more than I need. And it might seem like I'm making the bike ride out to be more than it is. Certainly, it brings wonderful people together, probably the kindest more caring individuals you will find. But, as I tell everyone, it's just a bike ride. The main focus of all of this is to help those who have cancer and to find something that will help cure the disease for those in the future. If you sign up in order to do the bike ride, you are missing the point. And it may cost you some money, as the minimum you have to raise is $5,000.00 now. But if you go into it thinking that; "I think I can do some good here because I have a unique ability to get donations.", then I think you have the right attitude. That's how I felt. And I think I'm generating donations that the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute would not have otherwise. And that's the point.

I hope you enjoyed my writing on this. I will try to collect at least another $10,000.00 before the year ends. As most know, the fund raising doesn't stop until December 31, 2018 and cancer never sleeps. So I will be "on it" until the end. And thank you, all of you, who support me enough to allow me to enjoy a wonderful weekend. All the best to all.

After I met with Don & Lisa Johnson at the finish and we talked for a while, Don slipped me a generous $50.00 donation to the Pan-Mass Challenge from the Johnson family. I'm sure they wanted to make sure I got through the ride alive before giving me the check! Very much appreciated, Don & Lisa. And thank you so much for being there to greet me. Very special indeed.

Monday, August 6, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was cloudless with a crescent moon almost overhead, there wasn't enough wind to blow a candle out, the ocean along the shore was flat calm and the visibility over it was good. Ashore it was hot dry and dusty. Actually, it was hot, humid and hazy. The highest air temperature that I saw in Ogunquit, along the shore, was 95F. I heard customers in the restaurant telling me that their car thermometers were reading 99F or "over 100" but I never saw it. It certainly felt that way. But dew point was very high and it was humid. Eighty degrees feels like ninety-five when it's humid. The air was still in the morning but hauled lightly out of the west and northwest or west northwest. There wasn't much wind regardless. The ocean along the shore was calm. The visibility was good in haze. The sky was sunny and, nearly, cloudless all day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 96F with a low of 73F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 95F (with a low of 66F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 91F (with a low of 66F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at five to, almost, ten knots. Seas were chops less than a foot so it probably never blew over eight knots, in reality. The air temperature reached a high of 78F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a new high of 72F for this season on today's trip.

The fishing conditions were excellent, except for the dogfish, which brought it down to good to very good. If you like to catch dogfish, the conditions were excellent as everything else was biting too. The catching was very good to excellent, depending. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was 65/35 favoring the sub-legal fish. Not as big a percentage for legal haddock today. Legal landings also included twenty-eight pollock and three cusk. Released fish included one hundred and forty-seven dogfish, forty-two cod of 5 pounds or better, a few small cod and pollock and one wolffish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

I was told that Marko Morin (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a 14 pound pollock, the third largest fish of the trip. Myles Rounds (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20 pound pollock. He caught this as part of a double that also included a 5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The second largest fish was a 16 pound cod caught by Josh Doss (VT).

Other Angler Highlights: Mike Guskey (CT) caught the lone wolffish. It weighed 11 pounds. Darren Monks (MA) caught two good sized cod. One weighed 11.5 pounds. The other weighed 11 pounds. Scott Halliday (MA) tied with Myles for the largest double of the day with a 13 pound cod and a 12 pound cod. He must have thought that that was one big fish. Or at least he was probably hoping so! William Browning (OH) landed the hard luck award for losing two jigs.

I received several donations sponsoring my ride in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those individuals and their donations included: Ron & Robin Krause (MA) for a very generous $300.00 (Ron is going through treatments for his own form of cancer right now which makes this donation even more generous - I wish him the best of luck!), Rich & Sue Towne for a generous $100.00, Dick Fox (CA) for a very generous $250.00 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC site and Darren Monks for a thoughtful $25.00. Thank you all so very much for your contribution and generosity. I so very much appreciate your help and support. After this last weekend, it would be hard to describe what all this means to someone with the disease. Thanks again!

Tim Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Miki Alroy and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 77F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was light from the northwest, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was good, at least.

The wind was very light out of the northwest when we left Perkins Cove. But the wind hauled westerly before we were even a mile out. We carried light westerly wind almost the whole way to the fishing grounds. The wind was out of the southwest, five miles from out destination. We carried southwest winds of two or three knots before the wind came out of the south and stayed out of the south for the rest of the day.

On the fishing grounds, the ocean was flat calm with a light wind ripple and then a one foot chop from the south on the way home. The air temperature reached a high of 77F. The humidity increased as the day went on. It was hot in the sun without the wind. The tide (current) was moderate but with the wind - perfect for drifting. The sky was mostly clear. The surface water temperature reached a high of 72.6F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 95F with a low of 77F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 93F (with a low of 68F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 93F (with a low of 71F).

The fishing conditions were perfect with very few dogfish, manageable tangles and calm weather with easy fishing and a great bite, excellent to be exact. The catching was very good. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far, followed by pollock. It was a great day for pollock. The haddock cull was about 50/50, legal fish to sub-legal fish, favoring the sub-legal fish. Legal landings also included a redfish and five cusk. Released fish included forty-one cod of 5 pounds or more, seven dogfish, a few small pollock, a few small cod and three smallish wolffish. We drift fished all day. All terminal gear worked well.

Mike Horwitz (NH) and Tim Williams (CT) were high hook with the most legal fish. At least one of them was. I know that Mike had twenty-one legal fish exactly. Tim could have had more. I'm not sure. Things aren't always as they seem. Mike won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 23 pound pollock. This is the largest pollock that Mike has caught in at least ten years. This pollock is tied for the Bunny Clark's sixth largest pollock of the season to date. Mike caught his limit of haddock. Tim Williams caught the second largest fish, an 18 pound pollock. Tim's largest cod weighed 11.25 pounds. Tim also caught a 13 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip. The third largest fish of the trip was a 14 pound cod caught by Dan Kelley (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Arne Halvorsen (ME) caught an 11 pound cod right off the bat and led the boat pool for the better part of an hour before Tim caught his 18 pound pollock. Bob Hescock (VT) caught a 9.5 pound pollock around that time which was our third largest fish, then. Jerry Agresti (FL) and his eight year old grandson, Jaiden Agresti, double-teamed on the largest haddock of the day at 5.5 pounds. The second largest haddock today was a 5 pounder caught by Jake Kingsbury (VT). Troy Kingsbury (VT) caught an 11 pound cod, his largest fish. Dan Moochler (VT) caught a 10 pound pollock right at the end of the day. Ted Rounds (VT) probably caught the most haddock. It seemed that every time I turned around there was another haddock on the deck for me to put in his box. Frank Maccarrone (ME) landed the hard luck award for having parking issues in the morning. I had to give the shirt to someone! And no one really had any hard luck today. Tangles were relatively few.

Miki Alroy and I ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather was beautiful. The wind was light out of the south southwest. Seas were chops of less than a foot over a left over two foot seas from chops left over from a stronger wind only two hours earlier. The air temperature reached a high of 77F. The tide (current) was very light. The sky was mostly clear but you could see small low pressure cells moving from the west to the south and north of us. The visibility ranged to over fifteen miles in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 71.5F.

The fishing was very good, conditions wise. There was very little tide, the dogfish were few and the sea conditions weren't bad. The catching was good. Landings were fair to good. Legal landings included six pollock, four haddock, two mackerel and a cusk. Released fish included fifteen or more pollock, zero cod and eight dogfish. We anchored on for every stop. Only bait or a combination of bait and cod flies were used.

The McNiff (MA) family stole the show today. Tom McNiff was high hook with the most legal fish, his best a 2.25 pound haddock. But he did tie for third largest fish with a 2.5 pound pollock. During the last minute of the fishing, Brandon McNiff, his son, won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound cusk. This is the largest cusk we have seen on the boat since last Tuesday! Sheila McNiff, Brandon's Mom, caught the second largest fish, a 3.25 pound pollock, and was leading the boat pool until Brandon appeared on the scene!

Other Angler Highlights: Adam Rosenblum (NC) caught two pollock in a row weighing 2.5 pounds, to tie with Tom for third place. Ten year old Riley Florek (MA) caught a 2.25 pound haddock. Kathy Evens landed the hard luck award for attaining high hurler status!

I Received several donations sponsoring me in last weekend's Pan-Mass Challenge today. The event is over but the fund raising, and cancer itself, never stops. And, for me, I try to generate donations until the end of the years. Today's list of wonderful individuals and their donations are as follows: Marianne Alroy (MA) for $25.00, Bohdan Klucznyk (NJ) for $25.00, John Dolan (NC) and Ron & Cathe Robichaud (FL) for $25.00 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC site. Thank you all so very much for thinking of my and my continuing cancer project with the PMC. I very much appreciate your help and support.

Wednesday, August 8, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Miki Alroy ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 72F, the sky was clear with a sliver of a moon hanging high off the eastern horizon, there was no wind, the ocean along the shore was flat calm and the visibility over it was good, at least. The day warmed up quickly again. But it didn't warm to the degree that it did yesterday, thank God. It was less humid as well. The sky was mostly hazy clear with a full sun all day. The air temperature high that I saw today in Perkins Cove was 82F. The visibility was good. The wind blew lightly out of the north northwest most of the morning and then went calm along the shore with no wind. The wind came up lightly out of the southeast. There was a time in the morning when we had fog. This was around 7:00 AM. It lasted about a half hour before disappearing. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 74F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 69F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 71F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light variable in direction. The ocean was calm all day. The air temperature reached a high of 79F under the canopy top. The visibility ranged from five to ten miles in haze. The sky was clear and sunny overhead. The tide, current, was light. The surface water temperature reached a high of 74F.

The fishing was excellent, pretty much. They did get a few dogfish but not enough to spoil the fishing. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. There wasn't another species even close in count. The haddock cull for keepers/shorts was about 50/50 with the nod going to the sub-legal fish. Legal landings also included twelve pollock, two cusk, a whiting and two big mackerel. Released fish included eighty dogfish, five cod of 5 pounds or greater, a wolffish and a few small cod and pollock. Drifting was the only method available to Ian. All terminal gear worked well but the edge went to bait with the haddock.

Fred Kunz (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest was an 8 pound pollock, the third largest fish of the trip. Scott Daly (ON) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11 pound pollock caught by Kenny Ziniti (NH).

Other Angler Highlights: Chris Rymes (NH) caught a whiting that was over 3 pounds, a Maine state trophy by definition. However, Ian was so caught up in the action, he didn't find out about it until after it had been bled and on the cutting table. But it was definitely over 3 pounds. This is one of our four largest whiting of the fishing season so far. Will Kinne (MA) landed the hard luck award for being one of the highest of the hurlers. Apparently there were a couple who were sea sick.

We didn't have enough warm bodies available to make up an evening trip.

I received two donations today helping me with my cancer fund raising with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those donors and donations included Fred & Betsy Kunz for a very generous $192.00 and Jim & Susan Slobard (IL) for a generous $100.00. Thank you so very much for your support and sponsorship. How did I manage to find so many wonderful people who feel as I do and believe as I do. Wonderful! All the best!

Thursday, August 9, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo were supposed to be running the full day trip today. Alas, the weather scared our summer guests from attending today's trip. So the Bunny Clark will remain at the dock until the evening half day trip. That trip is almost full.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 74F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, the wind was out of the southwest at less than ten knots, I could not see the ocean as the overcast skies made it too dark to see and the visibility over the ocean was good. Ashore, the wind blew lightly out of the southwest or west southwest. At times the wind might have been over ten knots. But not much over ten knots. The sky was clear all day. The visibility was good in haze. The air temperature in Ogunquit reached a high of 86F, at least. But it was not as humid. It was still a little too warm for me. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 90F with a low of 74F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 66F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 88F (with a low of 70F).

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM to 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at eight to twelve knots. Seas were chops of a foot or two. The air temperature reached a high of 80F. The sky was sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 72F.

The fishing conditions were not good for over half the passengers. This was because they were sea sick, the most individuals sea sick that I can remember hearing about for such good weather! I would expect this in fog and four foot chops but not on such a clear warm evening. The catching and landings were good. Legal landings included eighteen haddock and two pollock. Released fish included seven sub-legal haddock, a few small pollock and fifteen dogfish. They anchored for one stop and stayed there for the whole time they were fishing. Bait worked best for haddock.

Melissa Sapia (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 3.1 pound haddock. The largest fish was a 3.25 pound haddock caught by Annie Rosello (VA). She was not entered in the boat pool. She also caught a haddock that weighed 2.25 pounds. The third largest fish weighed 3 pounds. There were three other anglers who caught fish that weighed 3 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Mike Oggenfuss (PA) caught a 3 pound haddock, his best fish. Al Parrow (CT) caught a haddock that weighed 2.25 pounds. John Sapia (CT) caught a 3 pound haddock. Eleven year old Brendan Rosello (VA) caught a 2.75 pound pollock. Chris Amann (CT) caught the largest pollock weighing 3 pounds. Thomas Wutz (NY) was the high hurler of the evening and landed the hard luck award t-shirt for his malady.

Friday, August 10, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today. More later.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was mostly clear with some high clouds, the wind was out of the west at eight knots, the ocean was calm along the shore and the visibility over it was good to very good. The wind blew lightly out of the west, died out completely after noon and then hauled out of the south. Southerly winds were not enough to lift a flag. The air temperature rose to a high of 86F, that I saw. It was not as humid but with the wind so light, it felt more humid than it was or it felt warmer than the high temperature that I saw. The sky was sunny all day. The visibility remained good to very good. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 72F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 63F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 67F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at five knots or less. The ocean was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 81F, the highest air temperature that we have seen on the ocean this season so far. The tide (current) started out in the moderate category but was strong by the end. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in some haze. The sky was sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 72F.

The fishing conditions were good. It was too calm (good for humans, bad for the bite), the current was too strong and the dogfish were just a little too many. The catching was very good, excellent if you included dogfish. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock in the 4 to 5 pound range. Legal haddock came in a second place today. The haddock cull was about 50/50, legal fish to sub-legal fish. Legal landings also included four redfish, three cusk and a white hake. Released fish included six cod over 5 pounds, seventy-five dogfish, a blue shark, quite a few small pollock and a handful of small cod. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

The Canadian family of Abbott all tied for high hook. The family included the patriarch, Colin (ON - a hugh Habs fan), Robert (ON) and Allison (MAN). They didn't land anything of size (except for Robert) but they sure did land a bunch. Shawn Lynch (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. There was a tie for second place with two fish of 10 pounds each. One fish was a cod caught by Robert Abbott. The other was a pollock caught by Meghan O'Neil (NH).

Other Angler Highlights: Ian Vosgien (NH) caught the largest white hake we have seen since mid July, a 9 pounder, a sure sign of fall coming. Shawn O'Neil (NH) landed the hard luck award for losing a jig after a long battle with a blue shark.

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM to 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots or less. The ocean was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 79F. The sky was sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 72F.

The fishing, catching and landings were very good this evening. This trip probably caught more haddock on an afternoon trip than any other Bunny Clark half day trip in history. If we did catch more, I don't know when it could have been. When she was launched, in 1983, we were losing our haddock. We would see them on Jeffrey's Ledge. But, even there, there were not a ton of them like there is now. From 1986 until 1994, the haddock were missing from our fishery except for the occasional few haddock that were caught well offshore. Even in the mid '70's, I don't think we have had an evening trip where we caught so many haddock, on my other boat, the Mary E. Almost every fish that was caught tonight was a haddock. Most anglers didn't want that many fish. So anglers who didn't catch as many ended up with extra fish to take home. A good thing. The only other legal fish landed were three mackerel. Released fish included twice as many short haddock as were kept, fifty-six dogfish and a couple small pollock. They anchored and drift fished. Everyone used bait. There were only three cod flies used.

Ian couldn't keep track of the angler who caught the most legal fish. Too busy. Kassey Wilda (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 3.5 pound haddock. The second largest fish was a 3.25 pound haddock caught by John Williams (MA). Al Parrow (CT) came in at third with a 3 pound haddock. Al caught twelve haddock in all this evening!

Other Angler Highlights: Jon Ciottone (CT) caught a 2.25 pound haddock, the first fish to be weighed his evening. David Knecht (PA) caught a 2.75 pound haddock. Dan Rosa (CT) also caught a 2.75 pound haddock. Kelly Mazzone (CT) landed the hard luck award for losing her only legal haddock over the side. The fish swung over the boat, over the side, over the boat and dropped off the hook when the fish swung on last time over the surface of the ocean. You must not lose control if you want to manage your destiny!

I received two donations today sponsoring me in my quest for a cancer free world with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Roger LaVallee (VT) was one for a generous $40.00. Linn Elko (VT) was the other for $25.00. Thank you both very much for your generosity and for supporting me in this endeavor. I very much appreciate your help.

Saturday, August 11, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was very light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, the sky became overcast shortly after sunrise with clouds moving in from the south. Rain was on the way. Our first drops of rain showed up at 12:10 PM. And that's all it was for the next hour. After 1:00 PM, we started to get a steady rain. It rained periodically throughout the day and on into the night. The wind was very light all day today, from the northeast and, then, south or southeast. The air temperature reached a high of 70F, that I saw. The visibility deteriorated with the precipitation. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 69F (with a low of 59F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of one to two feet. The air temperature reached a high of 71F under the canopy top. The sky was overcast. They had occasional light rain. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from ten to twenty miles in some haze and precipitation. The surface water temperature reached a high of 70F.

The fishing was very good; the sea state was fine, the dogs weren't too many and the current wasn't bad. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was 60/40 favoring the sub-legal fish. Legal landings also included seventeen pollock and two cusk. Released fish included thirty-two dogfish, two cod of 5 pounds or better and a few short pollock and cod. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked equally well.

Dumanni Williams (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock. And he caught the second largest fish, a 9 pound pollock. The third largest fish were two, both weighing in at 8 pounds each and both were cod. Jeff Kucka (MA) caught one and Charles Van (VT) caught the other. "Charlie Bo Tangles" Van landed the hard luck award for getting the worst and the most tangles.

I received a $20.00 bill from Brett & Melinda MacNutt (MA) for my part in the Pan-Mass Challenge today, which they support annually. Thank you so much for the gift, Brett & Mindy. Much appreciated.

Sunday, August 12, 2018

I canceled today's trip yesterday as we had only a couple of inquiries about today's trip. Summer people don't like the rain.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was overcast, it had been raining and was raining lightly now, the wind was out of the northeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in precipitation and haze. It rained light and steady until 11:00 AM and then backed off. But the rain didn't stop. It rained for the rest of the day, periodically. When it wasn't raining, it was misting. The wind piped up from the northeast and blew almost twenty knots, according to our closest weather buoy. This wind was not really expected. The wind backed off a bit by sunset and hauled more north northeast. The highest air temperature that I saw was 70F. The visibility over the ocean was good in haze but became fair in fog/haze after the wind backed off. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 64F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 64F).

I was very surprised to see the northeast wind blow as hard as it did. I was expecting more in the way of ten knots. But this wind was a steady fifteen knots by noon with seas of three feet marching toward the parking lot, looking a lot worse than it was, as is typical of northeast wind. I really was a good day to be tied to the float. Or, at least, that would have been the opinion of the prospective anglers.

I spent the day working at Barnacle Billy's but mostly in the office. I've been trying to catch up on work I couldn't do over the weekend of the PMC. In the evening, I was surprised by a text from Mike Parent and his family saying that they were going to stop over coming back from a wedding in the Portland area. I rode with Mike and his daughter, Marissa, during the PMC. He was coming back from Sam Berry's wedding, another person I rode with in the PMC. His other daughter, Sarabeth, and his wife, Nancy, were also with him. It was nice to see them in a different venue. But, really, just nice to see them.

I received two anonymous donations sponsoring my ride in this season's Pan-Mass Challenge. One donation was for $50.00, the other for $25.00, both from the sale of my annual PMC theme t-shirts that I have designed and made specifically to commemorate each years ride. All are unique to the year, each year's shirt is a different color and all have the motif of a fish riding a bicycle. Whomever you are, thanks for the support. I appreciate helping with the cancer thing more than you might realize.

Monday, August 13, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Micah Tower ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was overcast, it was misting just a little, the wind was out of the north northeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair, at best, in fog and haze. After 6:00 AM, the fog rolled into Perkins Cove. But it was in and out for the early part of the morning, offshore for most of the day and then back in Perkins Cove at 4:30 PM. The fog hung around on into the night. The wind blew out of the northeast in the morning. Wind speeds were up to fifteen knots at times. The wind backed off during the late morning to six or eight knots and then increased to fifteen knots or a little less for the rest of the day on into the night. We had no rain all day. But we had no sun either. The sky was overcast all day. The visibility was suspect over the ocean. The air temperature reached a high of 72F in Perkins Cove. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 74F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 75F (with a low of 68F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 66F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of one to two feet. The air temperature reached a high of 70F in the shade of the canopy. Of course, today, that's all they had was shade. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility ranged up to a quarter of a mile in fog. The sky was overcast. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

The fishing, catching and landings were all very good today. All three were just shy of excellent. Most legal fish landed were pollock followed by haddock. The haddock cull was 50/50 shorts to legal fish. Legal landings also included eight cusk. Released fish included four dogfish, seventeen cod from five pounds and up, two wolffish and a few smaller cod and pollock. They anchored almost all day. Cod flies caught the most fish. All other terminal gear worked well but not as well as the flies.

Art Kemler, Jr. (PA/ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was an 11.5 pound cod. Dan Killay (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17.5 pound wolffish. I never did ask Dan if that was his largest wolffish. But, this year, so far, it's the Bunny Clark's second largest wolffish of the fishing season. Dan also caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 13.5 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 12 pound cod caught by Buzz Leonard (ME). Buzz caught some other nice cod including an 11 pounder, a 10 pounder and a 10.5 pounder. Buzz and Dan were second hook, with the second most legal fish of the trip. It was too close to tell exactly who it really was. And both were close in count to Art. Art had the edge.

Other Angler Highlights: Brian Melda (MA) caught the other wolffish, a 10.5 pounder. Ian told me someone had a large halibut on the line. It ended up breaking off the leader of a bait hook. Ian could not remember the man's name. Drew Marquis (VT) was, by far, the high hurler of the trip. He was sick the moment the boat was on the high seas. And he was sick for the whole trip. For this he landed the hard luck award.

I received three donations sponsoring me in this year's Pan-Mass Challenge. Those anglers and their donations included Mike Kelso (NY) for $25.00, David Yerke (NY) for $25.00 and Ray Vailancourt (OH) for $25.00. Thank you all for your support and help. You never forget to donate every year. And I appreciate that very much!

Tim Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Miki Alroy and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was overcast, it was raining quite hard, the wind was out of the northeast at seven knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair to, almost good, in haze.

As soon as we got out of the gate, we ran into fog. The rain had long since stopped. The northeast wind, at that point, had dropped to about five knots with a one foot chop. We carried the fog all the way to our destination. The wind dropped out by the time we were half way out. The ocean went calm. With eight miles left to go we started to see a little bit of southerly wind. Maybe three knots of wind at the most.. At the time, we also saw a bit of sun through the fog. The air temperature was 72F.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew very lightly out of the south for a while. An hour later there was no wind at all. The ocean was flat calm for the last two hours of fishing and all the way home. The air temperature reached a high of 76F. The humidity increased as the day went on. It was uncomfortable without the wind. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The sky seemed overcast but it was probably the fog. We had no rain for the whole trip. The visibility ranged from a hundred yards, maybe, to a quarter of a mile at most. The surface water temperature reached a high of 69F.

By 5:30 PM, ashore, it started to rain. There was no wind with it. But it did pour for a while. The sky was sunny by 6:10 PM but we had another round of showers later. There was no thunder and lightning associated with the rain. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 80F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 68F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 65F).

The fishing conditions were not good for the first hour. The tide was too strong even though the sea state was perfect. There were no dogfish but we had quite a few tangles anyway. Overall, I would rate the fishing in the good category as the tide moderated later in the day. The catching was excellent. Landings were good to very good. There were a lot of small fish today. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-seven pollock and twenty-six cusk. Released fish included twenty-three cod over five pounds, three dogfish and quite a few sub-legal pollock and a handful of small cod. We drift fished mostly but anchored once. Bait and cod flies caught the most fish.

Joe Sweeney (CT) was high hook with the most legal fish, mostly haddock. Close behind him in second place was Tom Daigle, Sr. (NH). Joe was fishing on the very stern with a bait rig while Tom was fishing in the very bow with a jig stick, jig and fly. John Kick (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish came in at 10 pounds. There were two, both cod. Chris Bibineau (NH) caught one and Mark Doody (CT) caught the other. Mark Also caught a 9 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Vanessa Wolf (PA) caught the largest haddock of the trip. It weighed 6 pounds, the largest haddock we have seen since the Ultra Marathon in mid July. I took a picture of Vanessa with my iPhone. This digital image appears on the left. Twelve year old Ezra Ferrari (MA) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the trip. He actually got better later in the day and caught some nice fish!

I received four donations supporting me in my ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today, a cycling event to raise money for cancer research with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts that I completed the first weekend of this August. The donors and their donations are as follows: Mark Doody donated a generous $40.00, Craig Wilson (NY) donated a generous $50.00, Ed Parrow (NY) and Brian Aiken (NY) collectively donated a generous $50.00 and I also received an anonymous donation of $30.00. Thank you all so very much for your support and generosity. I very much appreciate your help.

An afternoon trip had been scheduled for this evening but the rain showers scared all but four anglers away. So we canceled the trip yesterday afternoon.

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Miki Alroy ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was overcast (or it seemed to be with the fog), there was no wind ashore and the visibility over the ocean was poor in dense fog. The fog along the shore stayed dense for a couple of hours anyway. It was so thick it looked like it had been raining. Everything was wet. The fog started to back off at 8:00 AM and was still along the shore at 9:00 AM, but far enough off so that you could see the water along the rocks. The fog backed off at least a mile or more from shore after that. The sky was overcast all morning, sunny after noon. I did not look at the air temperature today. But it was hot and humid or, at least, very warm and humid. The wind was light and variable all day. The ocean was flat calm with wind patches that were variable in direction. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 70F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 68F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 69F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction. The ocean's surface was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 76F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to a half mile in fog. The sky seemed overcast for the trip and probably was. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing conditions were very good. The tide was fine, the weather was excellent and the sea state was excellent. The large number of dogfish kept the fishing conditions from being excellent. The catching was very good. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was about 50/50 legal fish to short fish, the edge going to the legal fish. Legal landings also included eight pollock, of good size and two big mackerel. Released fish included one hundred and twelve dogfish, five cod of 5 pounds or better and a very few small cod and pollock. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Ed Olsen (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18 pound pollock. Ed's largest cod weighed 10.5 pounds, the largest cod of the trip. The second largest fish was a 17.5 pound pollock caught by Kent Libby (NJ). Seb Olsen (VT) caught the third largest fish, a 15.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: John Libby (NJ) landed a 14 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish caught today. Vincent Cavalieri (VT) landed the hard luck award for reaching high hurler status.

Captain Ian Keniston and Miki Alroy ran the afternoon half day (4 PM to 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot. The air temperature reached a high of 81F. The sky was sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from three to five miles in thick haze and some fog. The surface water temperature reached a high of 70F.

The fishing conditions were nearly excellent. The ocean was fairly calm, the tide was no problem, there were few dogfish and the weather conditions couldn't have been much better. However, almost half the anglers on the Bunny Clark this evening were sea sick or not fishing because they didn't feel good! Neither Ian nor I could figure out why this was so. Never have we had so many anglers under the weather with such good conditions. So the fishing suffered because of it. There were just not enough lines in the water. The catching was very good. Landings were fair. The only landed fish today was the haddock. There were no other legal sized or legal specied fish caught. Released fish included a few small cod, quite a few small pollock and one dogfish. They anchored for every stop. Only bait and a few cod flies were used.

I know that there was one angler who caught three or more legal haddock. I didn't get his name. But he had a half a bag of fillets when he got off the boat. Bob Lawton (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 3 pound haddock. He also tied for the second largest fish, a 2.5 pound haddock. Ralph Papa (MA) also caught a 2.5 pound haddock. All the rest of the haddock caught this evening were haddock of 2 pounds each. There were quite a few of them. Dave Mordell (NY) was the high hurler for the evening. But he also attempted fishing. And he caught a good sized legal haddock, which swung over the deck and then back over the water, off the hook and swam back to bottom. Ian felt that Dave, indeed, deserved the hard luck award t-shirt!

Thursday, August 16, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Mark Blaisdell ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 73F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no wind ashore except maybe a very light west northwest breeze and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in some haze. The humidity was back again today but we really didn't feel it until 10:00 AM. The air temperature remained in the 70s by then so the dew point had to be lower. Otherwise, there would have been fog. By 1:00 PM, however, it was humid and the air temperature had reached 87F in Perkins Cove. We had a light westerly or northwest breeze in Perkins Cove all day. It remained sunny all day. The visibility remained good in some haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 91F with a low of 75F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 63F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 85F (with a low of 63F).

On the fishing grounds, there was no wind. The ocean was flat ass calm. The air temperature reached a high of 81F and it was hot. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility good in haze. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 70F.

The fishing was very good to excellent. The conditions were exactly like yesterday except they caught half the dogfish. So it was closer to a perfect score. The catching was very good as were the landings. There were far more fish caught today than there were yesterday. In fact, they caught double the number of legal fish today than they did yesterday. Most legal fish landed were haddock. The haddock cull was 60/40, legal to sub-legal fish, favoring the legal fish. Legal fish landed also included thirty-nine pollock, three cusk and four mackerel. Released fish included sixty-one dogfish, eight cod of 5 pounds or better, a wolffish that might have been 12 pounds or more and a few small cod and lots of small pollock. Drifting was the boating method. All terminal gear worked well today.

High hook would have been hard to determine but, by looking at the bags, I would say it was either Brian Murphy (NH) or Dick Lyle (NY). Ian wouldn't commit. Tom Daigle, Sr. (NH), who was second hook on the boat Tuesday, won the boat pool today for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish of the trip was a 12 pound cod caught by Sean McIntyre (NH). Marian "Merv" Murphy (NH) caught the third largest fish, a 10 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Remington Walls (MD) landed the hard luck award for losing a single jig. There very few hard luck award contestants today. And that's a good thing!

I received two donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today, an cycling event that was completed before noon on Sunday, August 5th. A ride for a cancer cure that I have now completed twelve seasons in a row and have collected over $300,000.00 in donations in that amount of time. Today's donations were a generous $100.00 from Brian & Merv Murphy and another generous $100.00 from John Kick (MA) in the form of an "egift" through the PMC site. John won the boat pool on Tuesday's trip. Thank you so very much for your help. Merv made the comment about my fund raising; "You rock!" Which, coming from her (from some of the best singer/song writers I know), really truly means something! I do so appreciate the support, both financially and mentally!

Mark Blaisdell, out of the kindness of his heart, was the deck hand today after eighteen years, the last time he worked for me. He was a little rusty but not too bad. And he has always been great with the people. Thanks, Mark!

Friday, August 17, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was light out of the north and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, the wind was light from the northeast or east. After noon, the wind hauled out of the southeast but this wind did not blow that hard either. The sky was clear all day but hazy clear starting at 5:00 PM. The air temperature reached a high of 75F, or at least that's the highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove. Out of the wind, the air temperature seemed much warmer. But maybe that was because of the added humidity as well. It wasn't as humid as yesterday but it was still humid. The visibility over the ocean was very good. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 80F with a low of 70F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 61F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at five knots or less. The ocean's surface was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 75F. It was very humid out there today. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 69F.

The fishing conditions were very good overall. I think the conditions would have been excellent but the tide was a little too strong for the conditions to reach that category. The catching was very good. Landings were good to very good, depending. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was 60/40 favoring the legal fish. Legal fish landed also included thirty pollock, thirteen cusk and six mackerel. Released fish included eighteen cod of 5 pounds or more, two wolffish and a few small cod and pollock. They didn't catch a single dogfish today. Drifting was the only method available. All terminal gear worked about the same.

Dave Piel (CT) was high hook with the most legal fish. He didn't catch a single fish over 8 pounds. Bob Piel (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19.5 pound pollock. Bill Kolo (CT) had been leading the boat pool all day with a cod that weighed 10.5 pounds. Bob caught his big pollock a half hour before it was time to leave the fishing grounds to go home! Bob's cod was the second largest fish of the trip. The third largest fish was an 8 pound cusk caught by Captain Frank Rogers (CT).

Other Angler Highlights: Nicky Martin (VT) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines, mainly because of her seating position on the boat.

The impending thunder showers scared the anglers off the half day trip tonight.

Saturday, August 18, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 72F, the sky was not quite overcast, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots (it had been blowing harder, earlier this morning) and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The wind hauled out of the west after daylight and blew out of the west with some gusts to fifteen knots ashore. Mostly the winds were light. The air temperature reached a high of 82F in Perkins Cove. Or, at least, that was the highest temperature value that I saw. It was raining before 4:00 AM this morning, it stopped and then started raining again at 6:30 AM. It rained for half an hour, lightly, and stopped. It rained lightly after that but not for long. After 1:00 PM, it rained lightly and then stopped for most of the afternoon. There was no wind with the rain. The sky remained overcast all day with low lying clouds. The visibility was good in some haze. It was a bit humid but not over-bearing. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 68F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 64F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west southwest at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of one to three feet. The air temperature reached a high of 73F under the canopy top. The tide (current) was very strong. They drift fished right into the wind all morning. The visibility ranged from five to ten miles in haze. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. It was humid. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68F.

The fishing was good to very good. The strong tide, the few dogfish and the sea state were not the greatest. The catching was good to very good, as was the landings. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was 60/40, favoring the legal fish. Legal landings also included twenty-four pollock and two cusk. Released fish included twenty-six dogfish, twenty-two cod of 5 pounds or better and a few small cod and pollock. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Jerry Charron (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish caught. I don't believe he had a fish much over 8 pounds. Sheri Fister (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 37 pound barndoor skate. This is the largest barndoor skate that has ever been caught on the Bunny Clark, ever! The largest barndoor skate before Sheri's was a 33 pounder caught by Wayne Statham (QC) in 2015. They are still considered an endangered species so they can't be kept. Ian took a picture of Anthony holding this big skate with Sheri standing beside him. This digital image appears on the left. The second largest fish weighed 13 pounds. There were two, both cod. Armand Rousselle (ME) caught one and Tim Greene (MA) caught the other.

Other Angler Highlights: Peter Grant (ME) caught a 10 pound cod, his largest fish. Brian Robinson (NH) caught the largest pollock at 11.5 pounds. Joe Cresta (ME) was high hurler today and landed the hard luck award for his condition. It wasn't good. I heard he spent the day in the Hotel Bunny Clark. At least it wasn't a long marathon fishing trip!

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM to 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew lightly out of the southwest for the ride out. The ocean was calm. Two miles from the fishing grounds, the wind struck out of the northeast at twenty knots all at once but then backed off. Winds sustained at ten knots out of the northeast for the time they were out there fishing. Seas were two feet in chops, more or less. The air temperature reached a high of 71F. The sky was overcast. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles. The humidity was nearly gone. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

The fishing conditions were very good. There were no dogfish, the sea state wasn't bad and current was not bad. The catching was good. Landings were good. Legal landings included one pollock, four cusk, four squid and thirty-five mackerel. Released fish included one short haddock, two wolffish, one cod over 5 pounds and a few small pollock, cod and mackerel. They anchored for the evening. Everyone used bait. Some added a cod fly to the bait rig.

Josh Riley (NY) was high hook with three legal fish. Those fish included an 8.25 pound cusk, a 2 pound cusk and a 5 pound cusk. His biggest cusk was the second largest fish of the trip. Jim Sullivan (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.5 pound cusk. The third largest fish was a 7.5 pound wolffish caught by Keenan Beaudette (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Seven year old Ben Viscosi (NY) caught a 5 pound cod, the first fish that Ian could start with for the boat pool. Alex Jennings (NY) landed the only legal pollock. The fish weighed 3.5 pounds. A very frustrated Elliot Lacki (CT) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single fish (legal or sub-legal). He kept losing his bait!

Sunday, August 19, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Miki Alroy ran the full day trip today. Well, sort of. They reached the point in the trip where they had eight minutes to go to get to the fishing grounds when one of the anglers had an epileptic seizure associated with sea sickness. It lasted for much longer than was expected. These seizures take a lot of energy out the person having one. This one was so much longer that Ian thought it best to head back to Perkins Cove. And I agreed with him. Almost everyone else was thankful to go home as they were sea sick. So they never got to fish. And, truth be told, the Bunny Clark probably shouldn't have left the dock. Of course, hindsight is 20/20. It was not rough. But to get to the grounds you had to travel right into the seas, making it seem or feel much worse than it was. It wasn't even rough enough to slow the cruising speed. However, taking vacationers out in those conditions, particularly if they haven't been deep sea fishing before, sometimes produces the same results, minus the seizure. This trip would have made anglers very happy had it taken place in the spring or fall with seasoned fishermen. Hey, you will never know if you don't go! So we went backwards today. We will try to pick the slack up tomorrow!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the north at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good to excellent. The wind blew out of the northeast at speeds up to fifteen knots sustained with higher gusts. The wind hauled out of the east by mid afternoon and then dropped in velocity. By 9:00 PM, there was no wind in Perkins Cove. The sky was clear all day. The sun was bright with much less haze. The humidity was down. The highest air temperature that I observed was 73F. The visibility was excellent all day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 58F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 58F).

Meanwhile, I was on my annual "Labor Day Century Ride" with cyclists I only ride with once a year. It's a great ride, we take our time, stop to have breakfast and ride home. I was on my bike in Old Orchard Beach when Deb called me about Ian's plight on the high seas. Ian and Miki had everything under control but it still weighs on your mind. My mind. And I wasn't comfortable until the boat was back in Perkins Cove and I had found out everything worked out well - not so well in a business sense. I got back to Ogunquit at 1:00 PM after completing ninety of the most enjoyable cycling miles I have had this season. I was back on the job at Barnacle Billy's restaurants by 1:30 PM. I worked straight through until 9:30 PM.

I received two donations sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising cycling event called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The ride took place the weekend of August 4th but the fund raising continues until the end of the year and cancer never sleeps. One donation was a generous $50.00 from Jack Judge (CT/ME). The other was a $25.00 donation from Linda Palaza (MA). Thank you both so very much for support and your kindness. Having people like you behind me on this project just cements my resolve to keep doing this long into the future. Much appreciated!

Monday, August 20, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at five knots, you could hear the bell buoy clanging away in the cooler air and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew up out of the northeast at fifteen knots or so by 9:00 AM. This wind continued through the morning but started to back off after noon. At 3:00 PM, the wind was out of the east at six knots, just enough to ruffle a flag. There was no wind at 6:00 PM. The ocean along the shore was calm. The highest air temperature that I saw in Ogunquit was 75F. It still seemed a bit humid but the drop in air temperature sure helped. The sky was clear all day, nearly cloudless. The visibility seemed excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 74F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 56F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at fifteen to ten knots. Seas were chops of three to two feet that diminished during the day. The air temperature reached a high of 67F. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles. There was still a little haze. The sky was very clear and sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

The fishing conditions were very good, the catching was very good as were the landings. It was a great day for pollock. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included twenty-eight haddock and eight cusk. Released fish included twenty-four cod over 5 pounds, fifty-four short haddock, twenty-one dogfish and a few small pollock and cod. They drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well but cod flies caught the most pollock, as they normally do.

Jim Garanin (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish, a pile of, mostly, pollock. His largest fish was a 14 pound cod, the second largest fish of the trip. Mike Shirley (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 22 pound pollock. This pollock ties for the ninth largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Mike also caught a 13 pound cod, the third largest fish of the trip.

Other Angler Highlights: Ed Agoes (NH) caught the first fish that Ian could weigh. The fish was a 10 pound pollock. Ryan Delaney (MA) caught a 12 pound pollock, one of the bigger fish of the trip. John Russell (ME) landed the best double of the day. His catch included a 12.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. John's largest cod weighed 10 pounds. Andrew Evans (VT) caught a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Gilles Guenette (NB) landed the hard luck award for being a bit under the weather, as it concerned his equilibrium!

Tim Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Miki Alroy and I are running the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean along the shore was glassy and the visibility over it was excellent. More later.

I still haven't found another deck hand for the rest of the season, starting in August. Captain Ally Fuehrer is gone. Miki Alroy (ME) is helping us fill in the gaps for a while on a part time basis. If anyone is interested in the position, you can give us a call at 207-646-2214.









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