www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

July 31, 2015, 5:10 AM EDT



Two More Trophy Haddock to Add to the List

The digital images above were taken during the marathon fishing trip of June 18, 2015. The picture on the left shows Norman Leger (MA) holding our largest haddock of the fishing season so far. At 7.75 pounds it tops our second largest haddock by a half a pound. A great Maine state trophy, Norm caught this fish late in the day. The shot on the right is a picture of Ron Tarentino (MA) holding his 7 pound Maine state trophy haddock. There were quite a few big haddock caught this trip but none bigger than the ones show above. Plus, the weather was fantastic. Hard to find good weather and good fishing on the same day. But sometimes this does happen. It's happened quite a few times this season!




The new recreational fishing rules came out officially on April 28, 2015. They appear below.:





These regulations could have been much more onerous for the recreational angler and the for-hire fleet. If you ever see Frank Blount in Point Judith, RI (he owns the Francis Fleet) you want to make sure you thank him for the help he provided at the Council level to keep us in the fishery.

Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston, Captain Jared Keniston, Captain Bryan Lewer and I ran the annual Ultra Marathon Invitational offshore trip today.

At 10:00 PM EDT the air temperature was 74F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility was good in much haze over the ocean.

There was no wind as we left the gate to Perkins Cove and the ocean's surface was calm. I spent a half hour or more organizing the helm so that everything was in place for the first spot. Then I turned the wheel over to Ian who steered the Bunny Clark the rest of the way to our destination. I took the helm back just before dawn. We were only a few miles from our destination at that point. The ride out had been uneventful. An hour out we had picked up a light southerly wind with a chop just large enough to throw up a bit of spray from time to time. The visibility was good in haze and the sky was clear.

On the grounds, the wind was light from the south. Seas were chops of less than a foot. The air temperature was 61F, we saw a nice sunrise, the visibility ranged to about ten miles in haze and there was very little tide (current). The wind and seas remained the same until about 10:00 AM when we got a slight shift in the wind direction. The wind blew out of the south southwest and then, later, southwest. Wind speeds increased to fifteen knots or more and seas increased progressively with the wind. During the ride home we had fifteen or more knots of southwest wind with seas in chops of three feet, more or less. The tide (current) went from light to strong and then moderated somewhat near the end of the fishing. The air temperature reached a high of 67F. The sky was clear until late afternoon when a fog rolled in. We carried thick fog for the last two hours of the fishing and through the first fifteen miles home. After the fog, the visibility improved to over fifteen miles. And the sky became mostly overcast for the last fifteen miles home. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.8F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 61F).

The fishing was very good overall. This trip is not designed as a slaughterfest but we did have some excellent fishing at times where it was a fish a cast. Most of the time I did some exploring and fished in places you can't fish on any normal trip. What I wanted to see was some of our biggest fish of the year, have some good fishing and land some larger than normal haddock. This we did. The trip could have been better if we caught more haddock as we didn't get the bag limit. But you can't do everything. Even an Ultra Marathon day is never long enough!

Most legal fish landed were pollock but we only caught them incidentally, never the target species today. In fact, we've caught more pollock on the day trips than we caught today. And bigger ones too! Legal landings also included white hake, haddock and cusk, in that order. All our biggest hake of the season were caught today including many trophy sized fish. Our four biggest cusk of the season were also caught today including one just over 26 pounds. And we caught our largest haddock of the season. I managed to stay away from most of the cod areas. We only saw one cod before 11:00 AM. We might have released twenty-five market cod to 12.5 pounds by the end of the trip. We released over twenty dogfish, mostly caught off the edges and in the deeper water. Drifting was the method for all but one spot where we anchored for a short time. All terminal gear worked well.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. The "frequent flier list" included Dick Lyle (PA), Dave Miller (MA), Bryan Lewer (FL), Steve Selmer (NH) and Jon "Griff" Griffin (MA). And, as I mentioned, quantity wasn't the object today. Steve LaPlante (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 44 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the largest hake the Bunny Clark has landed for a couple of years and it is the largest hake that Steve has ever caught. I believe his largest hake was 29 pounds before this. I took a picture of Steve with his giant hake. This digital image appears on the left. Some of his other good fish included an 18 pound Maine state trophy cusk, a 14 pound Maine state trophy cusk and another Maine state trophy white hake of 28 pounds! The 18 pound cusk is the Bunny Clark's third largest cusk of the season to date. He would have also had a 15 or 16 pound pollock (the largest of the day) if I hadn't knocked it off the hook with a gaff!

Adam Towle (NH) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 40.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This too is a weight we haven't seen on a hake in a couple of years. But I believe this is Adam's second or third largest as he has been very successful on the big hake with me over the years. I've included a digital image of Adam with his hake of today. This appears on the left. He looks serious in the picture but he his serious about having fun fishing! A couple of other notable fish of his included a 10.5 pound cusk and a 13.75 pound Maine state trophy cusk.

Jon "Griff" Griffin (MA) won the boat pool for the third largest fish with the third largest fish, a 37 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Griff has caught bigger hake. Some of his other great fish included the largest pollock at 14 pounds, a 15.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk, a 29.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake (Our first trophy hake of the season caught an hour before we saw our third white hake of the season!) and a 6.75 pound haddock, just a quarter of a pound shy of a Maine state trophy.

Other Angler Highlights: Dick Lyle (PA) got his line sawed off just as he was bringing a big fish off the bottom. Since it was pretty deep and a lot of line was out of his reel he didn't have enough main line to tie a leader to and had to abandon his favorite pole. We were in the middle of making two long distance drifts over a deep gravel edge. Right in the middle of the second drift, someone hooked into a rogue line that Captain Ian determined to be Dick's lost line. Not only was it Dick's lost line (a half mile from the start of the drift!) but I was able to tie it to the line (while Ian held it in his hand) on the reel of his favorite pole. And a fish was still on the jig at the end of the line! Not only that but he ended up landing the fish, a 34.5 Maine state trophy white hake, his largest fish of the trip! And there was all kinds of bottom dwelling animal life hooked to the exposed hooks of the treble where I could only assume the fish had tried rub the intrusion away from the corner of its mouth. Interesting to say the least. Dick went on to catch the most good sized cod of the trip. Some of his better fish included a couple of cod over 10 pounds, a 10 pound cusk, an 11.5 pound cusk, a 25.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 26 pound Maine state trophy white hake and a 17.5 pound white hake. All with just a jig on his line. I will miss not having him on the boat again for a while.

Paul Smegal (MA) caught the largest cusk double I believe that I have ever seen. His catch included a 26.25 pound Maine state trophy cusk and an 11 pound cusk, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! I would have thought that I would remember if we had caught such a double before. And I certainly haven't got it in any of the records I keep. This double is also the largest double keeper catch of the 2015 Bunny Clark season so far. The 26.25 pound cusk is one of the three largest cusk we have caught in four years and the largest cusk caught this year to date. In fact, I haven't heard of a larger one caught in New England! His second largest fish was a 23.5 pound white hake.

Katie Baumann (MA) caught a 21.25 pound Maine state trophy cusk. I took a picture of her holding her fish. This digital image appears in the upper right of this days entry. She also caught another cusk of 11 pounds. Her largest fish was a 36.25 pound Maine state trophy white hake, the fourth largest fish of the trip. I took another picture of Katie with her big hake alongside Griff and his big hake (third and fourth largest fish of the day). I could have arranged it better for the camera but C'est la vie. This other digital image appears on the lower right in this missive. Steve Selmer (NH) caught the most haddock. In fact, when we started to work on the haddock as a target species, Steve caught one right after the other. His two biggest haddock weighed 6 pounds each. His largest fish was a 25.25 pound Maine state trophy white hake. And he caught a 10 pound cusk. His largest cod weighed 11 pounds. Dan Killay (VT) had a problem catching the cusk. He had no problem, however, catching hake. His four best included a 24.75 pound white hake, a 32.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 20.5 pound white hake and a 31 pound Maine state trophy white hake. He caught plenty of other species of fish including pollock, haddock and cod. Ray Westermann (MA) caught a 35.25 Maine state trophy white hake, his largest fish of the year. He also caught a 12 pound Maine state trophy cusk. He also took a bunk for about two hours or more. I believe he had quite a bit of fun the day before. Too much fun? According to Ray, there is no such thing. Dave Miller (MA) caught the most cod after Dick. His two best weighed 11 and 12 pounds. His largest fish was a 30 pound Maine state trophy white hake. But he also caught a 20 pound white hake and a 29 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Dave Gray (VT) caught two cod of 10 pounds each. He was shut out on the big hake, a first. His largest haddock weighed 5 pounds. Bryan Lewer (FL) landed the hardest luck of the day award. He lost the most big fish, lost the most jigs and seized his best reel up in the process. His largest fish was a 27.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. He also caught the largest cod at 12.5 pounds. And he caught the largest haddock of the day with an 8.25 pound Maine state trophy. This is the Bunny Clark's largest haddock of the fishing season so far.

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility was poor in fog along the shore. The fog didn't last but an hour and then cleared out. At 7:00 AM, the sky clouded up and it started to rain. Twenty minutes was all it rained for. Then it remained overcast and rained lightly again, stopping before it even started. By 9:00 AM, the rain was over. During the afternoon we dodged a few showers that went south of us and north of us. It didn't rain here. After some southwest wind in the morning, the wind went light for the rest of the day. The sky turned out sunny for the afternoon. The visibility was good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 59F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots or better to start. Seas were two feet and a mixture of left over chop and an active one foot wind generated chop. The wind and seas calmed down all day. The sky was overcast for the trip. The air temperature reached a high of 67F. It was warm. The tide (current) was strong in the morning but moderated after noon. The visibility ranged from one to five miles in fog and haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60.1F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was good overall. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Many were just legal. Overall the total count was two sub-legal haddock for every legal one. Legal landings also included eighteen pollock and one whiting. They saw the most dogfish of the season so far today. Ian had a count of thirty-five released. Twelve market sized cod were also released. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well but jigs had a slight edge.

Tom Morrin (NY) was high hook with ten legal. He never caught a fish of 10 pounds or more. Kellen Wolfe (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. He also caught the second largest fish of the trip, an 11.5 pound pollock. There were two fish that tied for third place, both 11 pounds. Jerry Suzor (MA) caught one, an 11 pound cod. T.J. Dabrieo (ME) caught the other, an 11 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Bobo Pourier (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Jonathan Knight (ME) landed the hard luck award for allowing the sea conditions to compromise his stomach. "Keeping it all in" was not the catch-phrase for Jonathan today.

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. The wind on the fishing grounds the wind was light out of the southwest. The ocean was calm - too calm. The sky was sunny and clear for the trip. The tide was strong to moderate. The air temperature reached a high of 76F, the warmest afternoon trip of the season. The visibility ranged to over eleven miles in haze.

The fishing was fair overall. Despite the excellent weather conditions, the bite was off. It was a perfect day to be out there. Legal landings included a cusk and a mackerel. They released some sub-legal pollock, cod and a small wolffish. Anchoring was the first method as the tide was too strong to drift at first. The rest of the evening was spent drifting. Everyone used bait with some cod flies.

Brendan McLaughlin (MN) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4.5 pound cusk. Six year old Olivia Neal (MA) caught the second largest fish, a 2.25 pound cod. The third largest fish was a 1.75 pound wolffish caught by Rich Neal (MA). Brian Houde (ME) landed the hard luck award for the slight discrepancy between his good health and the motion of the ocean.

Malcolm & Kathie Jepson (CA) donated $50.00 to help in my cancer fund raising with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. This has become an annual donation for a few years. And I certainly appreciate it! Thank you both so much and I hope to see you in the near future!

Thursday, July 9, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind and the visibility was good in thick haze along the shore. It was a noticeably cooler day ashore. The high air temperature made it to at least 71F. And I doubt it got much warmer. It was a perfect day with very light on-shore breezes (east to begin with southerly winds in the afternoon). The ocean along the shore was calm all day. The visibility was good in haze. And the sky was clear in a hazy way with much sun after a mostly overcast morning. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 69F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 57F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at ten to five knots in the morning. Seas were a foot or more in chops to start. The wind velocity and the sea conditions dropped progressively with time. By noon, the ocean was calm with very little wind from the east. The ride home was calmer still. The air temperature ranged from 66F to 68F. The sky was overcast in the morning, clear and sunny after noon. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.3F.

The fishing was good overall, very similar to yesterday's trip. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. But today the cull was 50/50 shorts to legal fish. Legal landings also included twenty-two pollock, one redfish, four cusk and two whiting. They released eighteen market cod back alive. No dogfish were caught today. Drifting was the method. Only bait and cod flies were used today. No one tried a jig.

High hook was not mentioned. Nick Schoonmaker (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11 pound pollock caught by Jason Smith (NH). Chris Hock (CT) landed the third largest fish, a 10.25 pound pollock. Shawn Willever (PA) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines!

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. The wind at the dock was light from the south, the air temperature was 69F and the sun was shinning through a hazy sky. On the fishing grounds the wind was light out of the southeast and then south. The ocean was calm. The sky was overcast. It started to rain just as they were wrapping up the trip for the ride home. The tide was light to moderate. The air temperature ranged from 63 to 64F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze.

The fishing was fair overall. In fact, Captain Ian didn't think they were going to do well at all after the first half hour of the trip. So he weighed a squirrel hake of a quarter of a pound and two mackerel about as big around as your thumb. By the end of the trip, however, they did manage to catch a few cod and a cusk. They drift fished for the evening. Only bait hooks and cod flies were used.

Stacy Jones (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4.25 pound cod. It was weighed and promptly released alive. The second largest fish was a 4 pound cusk caught by Tyler Ortyl (OH). Mike Hunt (VA) caught the third largest fish, a 3 pound cod. Mike also caught a .75 pound cod before the bigger fish were caught. He weighed the fish thinking that might be the biggest of the evening.

Other Angler Highlights: Calia Wheaton (MI) caught a mackerel. Eight year old Izabella Blair (NY) caught a mackerel as well. A mackerel was also caught by Matt Belair (ME). Sean Brousseau (ME) caught the first fish of the evening, a quarter pound squirrel hake. Tammy Bickford (NY) landed the hard luck award for being the only angler to lose a bait rig. Plus, she was a New York Yankees fan!

I received three donations today sponsoring me in my cancer bike ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Those wonderful individuals and their donations included Mark Coleman (NY) for $30.00, Jim Roach (VT) for $10.00 and Katie Graichen (LA) for $18.00 (Katie worked for us for a few years as a reservationist, one of the best ones we ever had!). Thank you all for the support on this project. I appreciate it very much!

Friday, July 10, 2015, My Brother, Court, and My Sister, Cathy's 60th Birthdays!

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was overcast, it was raining, there was no wind and the visibility was fair in fog and haze along the shore. By 6:20 AM, the rain was done for the day. The sky stayed overcast until about 9:00 AM when the sun came out. We had sunny skies for the rest of the day. The air temperature reached a high of at least 81F in Ogunquit. And it was humid and hazy. So the air temperature felt warmer than it really was. Even Betsy & Sue wouldn't have liked the humidity and heat! The visibility ranged to ten miles or more in haze. The wind was light and the ocean was calm all day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 61F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 77F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 59F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west northwest at ten knots to start. Seas were chops of a foot or so. This wind diminished to light by noon. The ocean was calm from then on. The sky was overcast for the ride out but cleared once they got to the fishing grounds. The sky was sunny for the rest of the day. The tide (current) was strong to moderate today. This is not unexpected with the new moon right around the corner. The air temperature ranged from 62 to 70F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

The fishing was good overall. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. This time the legal haddock count was much higher than the sub-legal count. The ratio was four legal for every sub-legal haddock caught. Legal landings also included twenty-seven pollock and nine cusk. Seven dogfish and nineteen market cod were released to the ocean alive. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear fished about the same.

I didn't ask Ian who was high hook. Steve Bobotas (NH) caught the largest fish of the trip, a 15 pound pollock. The second and third largest fish were both caught by Ryan Bobotas (NH). Both fish were pollock of 14.5 pounds each. Rodney Miller (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the fourth largest fish (both Steve & Ryan were not in the boat pool), a 12 pound cod. This fish was released back alive. Rodney also caught a 10 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Lisa Miller (MA) caught the best double of the day. Her catch included a 10.5 pound pollock and a 7 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! Kris Greenlaw (MA) caught an 11.5 pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock, his two largest fish. Steve Reed (ME) lost a jig and a really big (we suspect) tuna. For this he landed the hard luck award t-shirt.

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. The wind on the fishing grounds the wind was light out of the southwest. The ocean was calm. The sky was sunny and clear for the trip. The tide was strong to moderate. The air temperature reached a high of 68F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze.

The fishing was good overall. But not so much for legal landings. There were quite a few fish caught but most were sub-legal pollock and cod. Legal landings included three cusk, eight mackerel and a cunner. Drift fishing was the method. Only bait rigs and cod flies were used.

Jim Young (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 5 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 4.5 pound cusk caught by Sean Brooks (NY). Jill Richardson (MI), Daniel Chartrand (QC) and Nick Mande (CT) all tied for third, all with their own individual cod of 4.25 pounds each.

Other Angler Highlights: Jean Falardeau (QC) caught (and released) a 4 pound cod. Shane McGrath (CT) landed a 3.25 pound cusk and the hard luck award. The hard luck award for constantly getting caught on bottom!

Steve Guilmet (MA) made me smile (because he always remembers) today with his annual $25.00 donation to my cancer fund raising project with the Pan-Mass Challenge. His is an annual donation which I appreciate very much. I've had many good fishing trips with Steve in the past. Thank you, Steve. This means a lot to me.

Saturday, July 11, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at ten knots and the visibility was very good to excellent over the ocean. The wind blew lightly out of the northwest for the early part of the morning after dawn and then died a quick death. There was no wind until after noon. The ocean was glassy. Around 1:00 PM, the wind hauled out of the southwest and blew lightly for the rest of the day. The air temperature was hot ashore today, 86F by my thermometer on one viewing. It was probably warmer than that. The sky was clear in the morning to mostly sunny in the afternoon. The visibility was very good with less humidity and haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 83F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 54F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at ten knots or less. Seas were a light chop to calm. It was a calm ride home without any wind at all. The air temperature ranged from 68F to 72F in the shade but it was hot in the sun. The tide (current) was moderate today. The sky was sunny and mostly clear. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles or more in light haze. The surface water reached a high temperature of 63.2F.

The fishing was good overall. The weather made the Bunny Clark a very stable platform indeed, the lack of wind and warm temperatures made it feel like summer and they caught fish all day. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. They were small on average but mostly legal. In fact, for every three haddock, two were of legal size. And this was the rule for the trip. Legal landings also included twenty-one pollock, a mackerel and a cusk. It was a huge dogfish day with over eighty dogfish released, double the most seen on a trip this season to date. Fifteen market cod were also released along with four wolffish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian told me that B.J. Webster was probably high hook. He didn't catch a fish as large as 10 pounds. But Ian didn't have a count. Wade Smith (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 12.5 pound pollock. There were two. Hal Flanagan (MA) caught one and Jerry Whitney (ME) caught the other. Hal also caught a 12 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Nick Schobinger (AZ) landed an 11.5 pound pollock, the first fish to come aboard today big enough to put on a scale. Steve Donaldson (VT) also boated a pollock of 11.5 pounds. Lisa "Princess" Webster (NH) landed an 11 pound pollock. B. J. Webster landed the hard luck award for fishing next to Princess, his Aunt. I only write what I am told!

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot. The air temperature ranged from 72F to 67F. The sky was clear with very few clouds and sunny. The tide was moderate. The surface water reached a high temperature of 63.3F on the fishing grounds. The visibility was over fifteen miles in haze. The fishing was fair to good overall. There were many fish caught but most were sub-legal. And the weather was perfect; it was pleasantly cool and the ocean was fairly calm. Legal landings included one cusk and seven mackerel. They released quite a few cod, many sub-legal pollock and one redfish. Drifting was the method. Only baited hooks and cod flies were used.

Patrick Healey (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.75 pound cod, released alive, of course. He also caught the third largest fish, a 5.5 pound cod. Jay Clement (MA) caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 6.25 pound cusk. Mary Boudreau (MA) landed the hard luck award for being frequently tangled and catching nary a single living thing!

Last night I went back to the Bunny Clark to change the engine oil, a routine that takes place once every two weeks. I have an oil changing pump hooked up directly to the engine but not hard wired to the house side as most systems are. I have alligator clips where I steal power off the back of an alternator. I got all my buckets in place but I could not get the pump to pump out the old engine oil. I was hoping it wasn't electrical because, then, i would have a boat problem. I pounded on the motor, I thought it might be out of prime so I went that route, I ran jumper cables from one of the two batteries I have in parallel to start the engine and I brought another small battery down as well. Nothing. Just a slow turning pump that sounded like it wasn't getting power. By 10:15 PM, I had given up.

Today, Saturday, I ran around trying to find an electrical pump that I could replace the old pump with. I did find one. Between trips I got down in the engine room and hooked it up to a power source to see what it sounded like. It sounded strong. After the B.C. left the dock, I went back up to the house, plumbed in a hose and soldered some new wire and alligator clips to the new pump. At 8:30 PM, I was down in the engine room installing the new one. I got completely finished except that I needed a reducer to go from 1/2 inch to 3/8 inch pipe thread. My brother, Court, called his best friend, Fred Fornier, and he brought his plumbing truck down at 9:30 PM to chase down a fitting which he did have. Perfect! By 10:30 PM, with Alec Levine's help, I had the new pump installed and the engine oil changed. It's the little things in life!

Sunday, July 12, 2015

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F warm, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at six knots and the visibility was good to very good in haze over the ocean. The wind blew out of the southwest about ten knots, more or less, along the shore. And it was hot and humid. The air temperature in Ogunquit got up as high as 91F, maybe higher. The sky was clear and sunny all day but it was not clear like you might see on a cold northwest day. The edges of the horizon up to the sky was pretty milky with haze. The visibility was fairly good, even though it was hazy. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 90F (with a low of 64F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 89F with a low of 72F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 92F (with a low of 60F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to eight knots, just enough to show a white cap or two or a one foot chop. The sky was sunny. The visibility was very good or over fifteen miles. The air temperature got up as high as 72.4F. The cool breeze made the air temperature very comfortable indeed. The tide was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63.5F.

The fishing was good overall. It could have been better but it was dogfish day on the Bunny Clark. Almost one hundred dogfish were caught and released along with the fish that were landed and the sub-legal fish that were returned. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock ratio was 50/50 legal to sub-legal haddock with no haddock bigger than 4 pounds. Legal pollock came in a close second to haddock landings, the most pollock that has been caught for a few trips. There were also two cusk that were caught and kept. The market cod count was about twenty-two that were returned alive. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Dennis Wilk (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock. He also caught a pollock that weighed 10 pounds. The second largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Chris Cote (ME). Glenn Wilusz (ME) caught the third largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Alan Carrier (ME) caught an 11 pound cod, his largest fish. It was weighed and quickly released. In fact, the majority of the cod today came from Alan's corner. If the cod that Alan caught were pollock, he would have easily been high hook today. Mark Cote (ME) caught an 11.25 pound pollock, his largest fish. James Lemmond (NH) landed the hard luck award for having the most tangled lines.

We did not run the afternoon trip today.

Monday, July 13, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 68F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility was fair to good or about seven miles in haze over the surface of the ocean. Ashore, we had very light winds from the east in the morning and easterly winds slightly stronger after noon. The ocean was calm all day. The air temperature was cooler after yesterday's heat. This mainly because the breeze was on shore off the ocean. The air temperature did get up to 80F but it didn't stay up there as long as expected and was already 73F by 5:00 PM. It was humid, mostly in the morning, but it was not as humid as yesterday. The afternoon was very comfortable. The sky was sunny all day. The visibility was good or better than that in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 77F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 64F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at no more than five knots in the morning. During the afternoon, the wind had hauled out of the east southeast and blew about five knots. The ocean was calm all day as it was along the shore of Ogunquit. The air temperature ranged from 68F to 73F. The sky was mostly clear and very sunny all day. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze.

The fishing was good to very good overall. It would have been better had it not been for so many dogfish. Ian stopped counting after a hundred of them were released. There were many tangles. But, for action, the fishing was excellent! There were many fish being caught all the time. Most legal fish landed were haddock (the bag limit attained with no problem. There were no big haddock today. Right behind them in landings were the pollock. Legal landings also included two redfish, three cusk and one whiting. They released thirteen cod that would have been keepers last season, nothing big at all. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

High hook? I didn't ask. Jim Wescom (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20.5 pound pollock. This is a tie for the Bunny Clark's third largest pollock of the season to date. Jim also caught pollock of 11 pounds, 14 pounds and 12.5 pounds. The second largest fish was a 16.5 pound pollock caught by Larry Colson (ME). He caught this as part of a double keeper catch that also included a pollock of 13.5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! This is the Bunny Clark's fifth largest double keeper catch of the season so far! Nick Quartararo (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. Nick caught the first double of the day. His double included a 12 pound pollock and a 6 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Bill Harding (ME) caught the first fish of the day to weigh, an 11 pound pollock. His largest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock. John Russell (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Wayne Statham (QC) caught a double that included a 12.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Two of his other good fish included a 10.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Bob Pine (ME) landed an 11 pound pollock, a 12.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock, his three best fish. Steve Brown (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, his best fish. He had to have caught his limit of haddock and then some, if I know Steve at all! Steve Browning (OH) caught an 11 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, his two best fish. Paul LaBrecque (ME) landed a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish of the trip. Mark Putvain (VT) landed the hard luck award for the most tangled lines! No wonder I never saw his name next to a big fish!

Jake Pine (NY) did me a solid today by donating $25.00 to my Pan-Mass Challenge cancer fund raising cycling event, due to go off on Saturday, August 1, 2015. To this point, I haven't raised as much as I have in most other seasons. And I certainly appreciate anything that I can pass on to the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Thank you very much, Jake! All the best!

Monday, July 13, 2015

Captain Bryan Lewer, Captain Bryan Tufts, (almost Captain) Alec Levine and I ran the Special Offshore Fishing Trip (SOFT) tonight.

At 10:00 PM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility was good in haze over the ocean. Going through the gate and into the open ocean was relaxing to see that it was flat calm with not a breath of wind. We did find some wind a few miles further out. But this wind was light from the southeast and there was really no chop associated with the wind. The air temperature was mild (in the mid 60s). The visibility was good.

After about an hour of organizing and filling out the initial part of the Federal Vessel Trip Report, I turned in and Bryan Tufts took over, steering us to the fishing grounds. It was a very smooth ride out without incident.

Tim Tuesday, SOFT, July 14, 2015

I was ready to go at 4:30 AM and took over the wheel at about that time. We were just a few miles inside the first spot I had planned to try.

On the grounds, the sky was clear in a hazy sort of way. The ocean was calm with a light wind from the southeast. The air temperature was 64F. The visibility ranged to about ten miles. The wind and sea conditions remained about the same all morning. Near noon, the wind picked up from the south to about ten knots with a one foot chop. The wind was stronger after noon, clouds started to roll in with a fog. The visibility changed to less than a quarter of a mile. The fog might have lasted an hour. Somewhere around 2:00 PM, the fog dissipated and it started to rain. The wind dropped a bit as well. The rain lasted a half hour followed by partly cloudy skies and then clear skies. We were headed home by that time. The ride home gave us south southwest winds of fifteen knots or better with seas in chops of two to three feet (more or less). The air temperature during the trip ranged to a high of 68F. The current ranged from light to moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.5F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 59F).

The fishing was excellent. It was essentially a fish a cast from start to finish. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Even when we tried to stay away from the pollock we caught pollock to some degree. The second most prevalent legal fish was the haddock. We had no problem reaching the bag limit - and then some. And we caught very few sub-legal haddock. Ten maybe? Most haddock were in the 4 pound range but we caught quite a few 5 pounders and a handful of 6 pound haddock. We caught no haddock over 6 pounds. The third most prevalent fish was the cod, the most cod from 7 to 18 pounds that I have seen on a trip this season to date. But it was a typical cod biting day as well. Legal landings also included many redfish in the 1.5 pound average size range with many just under the 2 pound mark and one 2 pound Maine state trophy, a whiting and six cusk. Besides the cod, we released twenty-two dogfish, broke off one blue shark, lost one good sized halibut, released three sub-legal halibut and returned two wolffish. I believe we are just stopping the offshore fishing trips at just the right time as it seemed the blue sharks showed up everywhere after noon without a single sighting before then. And the surface water is getting just the perfect temperature for them. I will not miss being out there with ravenous blue sharks. We drift fished and anchored depending on my focus per spot. All terminal gear worked great but bait worked best on the haddock and jigs caught almost all the bigger cod. Cod flies worked best on pollock and redfish.

High hook would have been impossible to determine today. The anglers were all so good and the fishing was so terrific, it could have been anyone. And whomever it was didn't have much more than the angler next to him or her. Fred Kunz (NH) won the pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18 pound cod. This is the third largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. The only other fish of his that I weighed was a haddock of his that weighed 5.5 pounds. And I don't believe that was his biggest haddock. Dan Wescom (VT) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 14 pound cod. Dan caught our only Maine state trophy redfish today. It weighed 2 pounds. I took a picture of Dan with his big red. This digital image appears on the upper left. He is also one of only three anglers who have fished on the Bunny Clark who have caught more than one halibut on one trip. Today he caught two, a 12 pound sub-legal halibut and a 4.5 pound sub-legal halibut. The 12 pounder is the largest halibut of the Bunny Clark season so far. I took a picture of Dan with the bigger halibut just before he released it. This picture appears on the right. He also shared the boat pool for the third largest fish with the sixth largest fish, his 12 pound halibut. The pool was shared with Dave Miller (MA) who caught a 12 pound cod.

The third largest fish was caught by Bryan Tufts who was not in the boat pool. This fish was a 13.5 pound cod. Bryan also caught a 10 pound cod before I stopped weighing fish. And I have to say that Bryan didn't stop working all day. When he wasn't fishing he was helping Alec fillet fish or he was cleaning or he was talking to me on the way back home (we had a lot to catch up on). The fourth largest fish was shared by two anglers. One was a cod and one was a pollock, both fish weighed 13 pounds. Rick Lemieux (ME) caught the cod and Jeff McGuire (ME) caught the pollock. Neither angler were in the boat pools.

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Brown (ME) caught the most haddock of the trip, most released. And he probably caught the most haddock of any angler on any trip this year as well. He fished with bait most, if not all, of the day. He also caught plenty of other fish species. Yoshito Umaoka (MA) caught the best double keeper catch of the trip. His double included an 11 pound cod and a 9 pound cod, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! One of his haddock weighed 5.5 pounds. Justin Philbrick (NH) caught a 6 pound haddock, the largest haddock that I weighed today. He also caught the largest wolffish of the trip. It weighed 10 pounds. And he caught a sub-legal halibut that weighed 4 pounds. Justin caught plenty of fish. Mark Lemieux (ME) would have shared in the boat pool for the third largest fish had he been in the boat pools. His 12 pound fish was a pollock. And I do believe he might have lost a legal halibut. Merton Thompson (MA) caught an 11.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Bob MacNeil (NH) caught an 11 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Donna Moran (NY) caught plenty of fish today and would have had a perfect day except for one thing. She lost her wedding ring over the side never to return! The ring wasn't just some ordinary wedding band either. It was very elaborate and special. For this she received the hard luck award! How could anyone beat that? The only fish of Donna's that I weighed was a 5.25 pound haddock.

I received a wonderful gift, an "egift", in the form of a generous $200.00 donation from Bill Parsons (NJ) supporting me in my cancer ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thank you so much for your help, Bill. I very much appreciate your sponsorship and kindness!

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 68F, the sky seemed overcast, there was no wind and the visibility was poor in dense fog along the shore. The fog cleared away by 7:30 AM. The sky was mostly cloudy for the morning and through the afternoon. We had showers go by Ogunquit on either side most of the day. At 11:40 AM, it poured rain for about fifteen minutes. We got the edge of a shower around 1:00 PM for a light sprinkle and another just a bit later. We had some sun. And the sky cleared during the late afternoon/evening to give us sun until sunset. The wind was light all morning, east in the afternoon to ten knots and northerly at fifteen knots or better after 8:00 PM. The visibility went from poor in fog to good in haze by mid morning, better by afternoon and excellent by 9:00 PM. The air temperature reached a high of at least 82F in Ogunquit. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 55F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction. The ocean surface was calm over rolling sea swells of two feet from the southeast. It was hot and humid with air temperatures ranging from 68F to 74F. The sky was overcast for the first hour and the last hour of fishing. The sky was sunny otherwise. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility was fair to poor in fog during the morning with clearing after noon. Afternoon visibilities ranged from five to ten miles in thick haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.8F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was good overall, maybe better than that. Most legal fish landed were haddock and pollock, in that order. The count was close. Legal fish were smaller in general today. The haddock cull was two to one legal to sub-legal haddock. Legal landings also included one blackback flounder, a cusk, one whiting and a monkfish. They released twelve market cod back alive, forty dogfish and a few sub-legal pollock and haddock. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

High hook status was shared between Dave Kirby (VT) and Daniel Kirby (VT). One of the two was high hook but both landed more fish than anyone else on the boat. Dave won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. Daniel's biggest fish was a pollock that weighed 10 pounds, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Brian Tufts (VT) and Mark Konish (NC) caught fish that tied for the second largest fish of the trip. Brian's fish was a 10.5 pound cod, the largest cod of the day. Mark's fish was a pollock that weighed 10.5 pounds. Vinny Mancuso (NY) landed the hard luck award for getting a bit "green around the gills".

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds the wind blew out of the east at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less over two foot rolling sea swells from the southeast. The sky was sunny for the duration of the trip. The air temperature reached a high of 70F. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze.

The fishing was fair to good. Most legal fish landed were mackerel, fourteen in all. They also caught two cusk. There were plenty of sub-legal pollock and four sculpins released. Only ten cod were caught (and released). Drifting was the method. Only bait and cod flies were used.

Tom Franzoni (VT) was high hook with two significant fish. One of the fish was an 8 pound cusk, the largest fish of the evening and the pool winning fish. He also caught the fourth largest fish of the trip, a 6.25 pound cod. Breanna Franzoni (VT) caught the second largest fish, a 7.75 pound cod. The third largest fish was a 7 pound cusk caught by Jean Bourbonnais (QC). Amanda Pockett (VT) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler.

Three donations came in today sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising event called the Pan-Mass Challenge. Those persons and their donations included Ralph & Eleanor Small (NY) for a generous $100.00, Bob Franzoni (VT) for $5.00 and Charlie & Linda Nickerson (ME) for a very generous $250.00. Thank you all so very much for your support. This means a great deal to me but more to those on the other side of health.

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen to twenty knots after sunrise but was already diminishing by 10:00 AM. By noon, winds were light out of the east northeast. Eventually, the wind hauled out of the southwest before sunset. The air temperature was coolish all day giving the impression more of a warm fall day instead of a summer one. The highest air temperature I saw was 75F. The sky was sunny and clear all day. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 68F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 48F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen to ten knots out of the northeast. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The wind dropped so that by the last half our of fishing the northeast wind was five knots and seas were calm. The tide was moderate. The sky stayed clear. The air temperature ranged from 62F to 64F. The visibility was excellent. The surface water reached a high temperature of 60.4F.

The fishing was very good to excellent. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-four haddock (with only eleven sub-legal haddock returned) and one cusk. They released nineteen dogfish, two wolffish, fourteen cod of market size and two sculpins. They anchored for every stop because of the wind and a moderate current. All terminal gear worked well but cod flies worked the best.

Wade Smith (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.5 pound pollock. He might also have been high hook. Some of his other good fish included two pollock of 15 pounds each, a 12.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 18 pound pollock caught by Lance Wyche (TX). Some of Lance's other fish were a double keeper catch that included a 12.25 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time, a 15.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Christopher Quinn (NY) caught a 17.5 pound pollock, the third largest fish of the trip. He caught this fish as part of a double that also included an 11 pound pollock! Another of Christopher's good fish was a 12.25 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Wayne Miller (NH) caught the largest haddock we have seen in some time. It weighed 6 pounds. Don Quinn (NY) caught a 14 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. Joe Quinn (NY) caught a double that included an 11 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. Jonah Martineau (ME) caught the largest cod at 13 pounds. Eddie Quinn (NY) boated a 13.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Nate Moreland (CT) took one for the team and did a little chumming, I'm sure, to benefit the fishing of the other anglers aboard.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. The wind had hauled out of the southwest by the time they reached the fishing grounds. Wind speeds varied from ten to five knots. Seas were chops less than a foot. The sky was clear. The air temperature reached a high of 62.9F. The tide was light.

The fishing was good but it was just about all mackerel, over a hundred total caught, mostly released. They also released half as many pollock of sub-legal size, four sculpins and a couple cod. They alternated between anchoring and drifting. No jigs were used, just bait rigs and cod flies.

Joann Lane (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a cod of 6 pounds. This fish was released, of course. Henry Person (PA) landed the hard luck award for getting the single most tangled reel of the week!

I received a $50.00 donation towards my Pan-Mass Challenge cancer fund raising bike ride today. The donation was from Todd Joeseph Tanner. Thanks so much, Todd. I appreciate you going out of your way to support me in this project.

Friday, July 17, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the north and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew lightly out of the northeast or east most of the day. During the late afternoon, the wind hauled out of the southeast. All the winds were light. The ocean remained calm along the shore all day. The sky was clear with a bright sun. The air temperature was cool. It felt even more like a warm fall day than it did yesterday. And I don't believe the air temperature ever made it as high as 75F. I actually never saw it higher than 73F. The visibility was very good in some haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 48F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at five knots in the morning. By late morning the wind had gone light and variable in direction. The ocean was calm for the whole trip. The sky was clear. The air temperature ranged from 64F to 69F. The tide was light to moderate. The surface water reached a high of 62.1. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in some haze.

The fishing was good to very good overall. They were close to the boat bag limit but never made it. In actuality they probably would have made it if every haddock of seventeen inches or better was kept. Haddock, by far, was the most prevalent legal fish. Legal landings also included thirty-two pollock, three cusk, a redfish, a dab and two mackerel. They released eleven cod, twenty dogfish and two sculpins. Drifting was the method. Only one person used a jig today, Norm Herrick (MA). Everyone else used bait rigs and cod flies. All terminal gear worked well. But I believe they were so successful on the haddock count because there was so much bait being used.

Ed Brooks (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was shared by two anglers. Both fish were pollock of 11 pounds each. Stephane Boudreault (ON) caught one and Paul Domenichella (MA) caught the other. And they both each caught a 10 pound pollock as well! Bruce Beaupre (NH) landed the hard luck award for getting involved in the most tangles.

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots or less. The ocean was calm. The air temperature ranged from 66F to 64F later in the trip. The sky was a mix of clouds and sun. The tide was moderate. The surface water reached a high temperature of 63F on the fishing grounds. The visibility was over fifteen miles in haze.

The fishing was good to very good, our best evening trip of the season to date, by far. Most legal fish landed were cusk. Legal landings also included four mackerel and a squirrel hake. They released many sub-legal pollock, six sculpins, two redfish and two cod. Drifting was the method. Only bait and cod flies were used.

Matt Micciche (MD) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest was a 6 pound cusk. His second and third came in at 5.5 pounds and 5 pounds respectively. Kevin Kennedy (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.5 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a cusk of 7.25 pounds caught by eleven year old Peter Micciche (MD). Chris Beardsworth (NH) took third place with a 7 pound cusk. He also caught a cusk of 5.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Cassidy Palladino (NY) caught a 4.5 pound cusk. Kevin McNamara (ME) landed a 4 pound cusk, his biggest fish. Jason Babineau (MA) caught a cusk of 6.25 pounds and another of 5.25 pounds. Scott Palladino (NY) boated a cusk that weighed 5.5 pounds. Joe Nocciolino (NY) caught a 5 pound cusk. Mark Siebertsen (NY) landed the hard luck award for becoming the sole angler to catch nary a single legal fish. The many tangles he got into probably helped in his demise.

Saturday, July 18, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was overcast, it was raining, the wind was light out of the south and the visibility over the ocean was good in precipitation and some haze. Ashore, it rained almost continuously from early in the morning until about 9:15 AM. After that we intermittent light rain showers until 10:30 AM, when the rain stopped altogether. It never rained again for the rest of the day. The sky never cleared but remained overcast until very late in the day. The air temperature reached 76F at least. The moisture index was high making it quite muggy for temperatures in the 70s. The wind was out of the south at about ten knots along the shore. The visibility ranged from fair in rain to good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 48F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at fifteen to twenty knots. Seas were chops of three feet, more or less. It was rough for some. The air temperature hovered around 63F all day. They experienced rain showers, heavy at times, for most of the early part of the morning. There was no rain after noon. The sky remained overcast for the trip. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged to ten miles in haze. The surface sea water temperature reached a high of 60.7F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was good to very good today. There were some who were incapacitated from sea sickness. Even with some non-participants landings were high. Most legal fish landed were haddock followed closely by pollock. And that was it; only two species of legal fish were caught today. Released included twenty-one market cod, two sculpins and seven dogfish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Brian Murphy (NH) was far and away high hook with the most legal fish today. His largest fish weighed 14 pounds, a pollock, the third largest fish of the trip. Another of his fish was a pollock that weighed 12 pounds. Brian Disorda (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15.5 pound pollock. Marian "Merv" Murphy (NH) landed the second largest fish, a 14.5 pound pollock. She also caught a pollock that weighed 12.5 pounds. Her legal fish count was ten.

Other Angler Highlights: Dan Czyzewski (CT) caught a 13.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Randy Kirk (CT) caught the best double keeper catch of the trip. His double included a 12 pound pollock and an 8 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Jon Parker (NY) landed a 12 pound pollock, his largest fish. John Kosciukiewicz (CT) caught a pollock that weighed 13.25 pounds. Matt Jenkins (NY) landed the hard luck award for reaching high hurler status.

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. The ocean had two to three foot, mostly left over, seas. The air temperature hung around the 65F mark. The sky was overcast. The tide was moderate. The surface water reached a high temperature of 61.8F on the fishing grounds. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze.

The fishing was good for some and not so good for others (the motion of the ocean). Most legal fish landed were cusk but they did catch three cod that would have been of legal length had the rules of last season applied. Legal landings also included twenty-eight mackerel and two herring. They released quite a few sub-legal pollock. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Shawn Puffer (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. Two of his bigger cusk weighed 6.5 pounds, the second largest fish of the trip, and 4.25 pounds. He also caught a cod that weighed 4.75 pounds. Mike Puffer (CT) - unrelated - won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.5 pound cusk. The third largest fish was a 5.5 pound cod caught by Brian Williams (MA).

Other Angler Highlights: Altin Bicaku (CT) caught a 4.5 pound cod, his best fish. Natalie Serrano (MA) boated a 5.25 pound cusk, her largest fish by far. Leo Lamoureux (VT) caught a 4.75 pound cusk. Dave Williams (MA) was the (seriously) high hurler and won the hard luck award for the tough condition he ended up in. It was not pretty. Some aren't.

Brian & Merv Murphy sponsored me with a generous $100.00 towards my bike ride in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a charity event to raise money for cancer research and care at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Most people know it as the Jimmy Fund. The DFCI is helping two friends of mine newly diagnosed with two different types of cancers, both very serious. Donations of all sizes are greatly appreciated for my friends and others struggling to survive through it. Annual donations, like those from my favorite Murphys, go a long way to help. Thank you both so much for your continued support. I take this help personally and appreciate it so very much!

Sunday, July 19, 2015

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog along the shore. We had thick fog along the shore until almost 9:00 AM before it left us for good. That was about the time that the air temperature started to exceed the dew point. The sky was mostly sunny all day with clouds passing near, some pregnant with rain. The rain went north and south of for most of the afternoon. At 4:30 PM, we got our first rain shower. This was followed by more showers into sunset. Thunder showers followed after sunset with our first lightning storms of the year! It rained well into the night. The air temperature got up as high as 81F in Ogunquit. And it was humid so it felt hotter than it was. The wind was very light, out of the east to begin and then south, southwest and southeast, not more than five knots. The ocean along the shore was calm all day. The visibility was good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 64F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 90F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 92F (with a low of 67F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at five knots or less all day. The ocean was calm. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to a mile in fog. The sky seemed overcast but that might just have been the fog overhead. The air temperature stayed around 70F for the trip. The tide was light to moderate. The sea surface water temperature reached a high of 59.9F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was good to very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by quite a margin. Legal landings also included twenty-nine haddock, three cusk and one redfish. They released thirty-two dogfish and twenty cod of market size but no bigger than 9 pounds. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Jon Stephens (CO) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17 pound pollock. He also caught the best double keeper catch of the trip. His catch included an 8 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Steve Levine (ME) caught the second and third largest fish of the trip. These fish were a 13.5 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock. He might also have been high hook but he was too humble to admit it. I know that if he wasn't high hook or close to it, he would have told me so!

Other Angler Highlights: Matt Hebert (MA) caught the first fish worth weighing, a 10 pound pollock. Paul McCullough (NH) boated an 11.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Erik Peterson (ME) landed a 12 pound pollock, his largest fish. Seamus O'Doherty (AL) caught a 5 pound haddock, the largest haddock we have seen since the long offshore trips and possibly the largest haddock of that size we have seen all season.

I received two donations of sponsorship for my cancer cure ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a $25.00 gift from Ralph Trotto (MA). The other was a generous $100.00 from Gerry Ashworth (ME). Gerry was the last white man (to date) to win gold in the men's 4 X 100 meter relay during the 1964 Olympics. His 100 yard dash time was well below 10 minutes. He won it with Paul Drayton, Richard Stebbins and Bob Hayes. Bob Hayes was the fastest sprinter in the world at that time and, according to Gerry, was the reason they took gold that day. Anyway, thank you both for your donations to my cause. I appreciate it very much.

Monday, July 20, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 67F, the sky was partly cloudy, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was at least nine miles in haze. At 6:00 AM, the fog rolled in along the shore. The fog hung out there until at least 9:00 AM. It was gone after that. The day was hot and humid. The air temperature reached a high of 83F in Ogunquit. The sky was sunny and clear all day. The wind was light. The ocean was calm. The visibility was good along the shore. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 92F with a low of 70F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 91F (with a low of 67F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east southeast at ten to five knots for about an hour and then hauled out of the south and southwest. Wind speeds were very light. The day started out flat calm but then went flat calm after 10:00 AM. The visibility ranged to a quarter mile in fog for the first hour. After 10:00 AM, the visibility ranged to ten miles. The sky was clear all day. The air temperature ranged from 67F to 74F in the shade of the canopy top. The tide was moderate to strong. The surface sea water temperature reached a high of 62.9F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was very good to excellent. Most legal fish landed were pollock by quite a few. They had no problem getting the haddock bag limit for the boat either. So there were plenty of both species landed. Legal landings also included a cusk, two cunners, a mackerel and a herring. They released twenty-four dogfish, sixteen market cod, a sculpin and a barndoor skate, the first of the season and less than ten caught in the history of the Bunny Clark. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Wayne Statham (QC) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 33 pound barndoor skate. As I said, this makes less than ten barndoor skates we have seen caught in the thirty-three years fishing on the Bunny Clark. It's also one of the largest we have ever caught. I will have to look back later to see if it is the largest. They do get much bigger. As a kid I saw bigger ones caught dragging. Because of the closed commercial fishing areas they seem to be making somewhat of a come-back but you could never know that for sure by looking at recreational landings! They remain on the endangered species list so it was returned back alive. Captain Ian took a picture of Wayne (right) and Jared (left) holding this big skate. This digital image appears on the left. Some of Wayne's other good fish included two pollock of 13.5 pounds each and a pollock of 10 pounds. Wayne's two bigger pollock were the third and fourth largest fish of the trip.

Dave Sands (NH) caught the second largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. Dave also caught a pollock of 11 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Jeff Rounds (VT) caught an 11 pound pollock, a 12 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock, his three largest fish of the trip. Trevor Sands (NH) caught an 11 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock. Mike Kennedy (VT) landed a 10.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Chris Chiapponi (CT) caught a double keeper catch that included a 13 pound pollock and an 8 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! Chris also boated a pollock that weighed 11 pounds. Jim "Chip" Chiapponi (CT) also caught a 13 pound pollock, his largest fish. Chip also caught a seeder of about 2 pounds or better. This is a female lobster holding eggs under the tail. Ian took a picture of Chip with his catch. This digital image appears on the right (Chip is modeling his 2013 Pan-Mass Challenge t-shirt available through the Bunny Clark! Never realized he was such a handsome devil!). This is one of only two lobsters we have caught this season. Normally, we might catch one a year. Mark Carter (CT) caught a 10.5 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Tom Cook (VT) boated a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Nick Chaves (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer. And, yes, he caught a few legal fish as well!

Tim Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Alec Levine and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky appeared overcast but it might have just been fog overhead, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog along the shore.

It was foggy going through the gate at the entrance to Perkins Cove. We carried the fog all the way to the fishing grounds. The wind was very light out of the northeast right from the very beginning. There was a left over one to two foot left over chop from some previous wind. Or maybe it was just the tide. But there was very little spray on the way to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, seas were less than a foot. Winds were light from the northeast. Except for an hour or less where we could see five miles or so, it was foggy all day with a visibility at most a hundred yards. The air temperature ranged from a low of 66.5F to a high of 68.5F The sky was The sky was overcast until about 10:00 AM. We saw the sun through the fog for most of the trip and all the way back. The tide was moderate all trip. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.8F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 70F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 61F).

The fishing was very good overall. We had fish coming in all the time, from the moment we started. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-three haddock, a whiting and three mackerel. We released ten cod from 6 to 11 pounds. We also released about thirty-five dogfish. Drifting was the boating method of catch. All terminal gear worked well.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. But I can tell you that it was either Steve Dickmann (MA) or Ed Vanlinten (NH). There was no question about it. James Parry (QC) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 21 pound pollock. This after losing a pollock of over 15 pounds on the surface not fifteen minutes earlier! This fish ties the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the fishing season to date. And I believe that this is James' largest ever pollock. The second largest fish was an 18 pound pollock caught by Adrian Yde (NC). Ralph Small (NY) caught our third largest fish, a 17 pound pollock. Ralph also caught the most haddock for an angler today. Six of his haddock were keepers.

Other Angler Highlights: Thirteen year old Darren Pratt (NH) caught our first good sized cod of the trip. It weighed in at 9 pounds just before we released it. Ed Vanlinten caught an 11.5 pound pollock as his largest fish. Some of his other fish included an 11 pound pollock, a 10 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock. Steve Dickmann caught the largest cod of the trip at 11 pounds. Steve's largest fish was a 14.75 pound pollock. He also caught a 10 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. Al Severson (NJ) boated a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. He caught a couple really good haddock. Jim Garrido (NC) led the boat pool mid trip with a 15 pound pollock. Sniffy Elliot (ME) landed an 11.5 pound pollock as her largest fish of the trip. She caught a lot of legal fish. Mark Konish (NC) caught a 13.5 pound pollock. This might not have been his biggest as he also had one I didn't weigh that looked about the same size. Bill Elliot (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, a 12 pound pollock and a pollock that weighed 13.5 pounds, his three largest of the trip. Lance Duquette (VT) boated a 14 pound pollock, his largest fish. Pete Tartamella (CT) landed a 14 pound pollock, his largest fish. And I have to mention Ralph Small one more time. He landed the hard luck award today for losing two jigs! I think he lost them both on big fish.

Alec Levine and I ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. At the dock it was hot, hazy, foggy and still. The ride to the fishing grounds was much the same as it was this morning with less for seas, warm temperatures, foggy conditions and light winds out of the east. On the grounds, the wind was light out of the east for the first half of the trip and then light out of the southeast for the last half. There was no wind at all for the ride home. The ocean was as smooth as glass. It was foggy for the whole trip with no more than one hundred yards of visibility. The air temperature was about 65F, more or less. We had very limited views of the sun through the fog. The tide (current) ranged from moderate to very light.

The fishing was good but there were very few legal fish landed, eight in all. Legal fish included three cusk and five redfish. We released fifteen cod, two cunners and forty or more sub-legal pollock. Both drifting and anchoring were tried. Anchoring seemed to work best. Only bait and cod flies were used. Bait worked best.

Tracy Smith (ME) and her mom, Marcy Smith (ME), were high hook with the lions share of legal redfish and fish. Their two best ones were redfish of about a pound each. Adam Harris (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 5.25 pound cusk caught by Chris Routhier (MA). Chris also led the boat pool for a while with a cod of 2.5 pounds. The third largest fish was a 5 pound cusk caught by Phil Beninson (VT).

Other Angler Highlights: Lexi Goumes (NH) caught the first fish I could weigh, a 2.5 pound cod. Guy Chalifoux (ON) caught and released a 2 pound cod and a 2.5 pound cod. Thomas Fontaine (QC) caught a 2.25 pound cod. Eline Forward (MA) caught a cod of 2.5 pounds. I thought Yvan Fontaine (QC) might win the pool with a 2.75 pound cod. Eight year old Eli Goumas (NH) landed the hard luck award for catching nary a single living thing with his rod & reel!

I received three donations sponsoring me in my cancer ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. These individuals and there donations include Marcy Smith for a generous $75.00, Eli Goumas for $25.00, Vivian Bram (MA) for a generous $50.00 via "egift" through the PMC website and Mark Konish for $25.00. Thank you all so very much for your help. It would be wonderful to beat the cancer thing. But, in so doing, there will be many more medical discoveries for other parts of health care. I truly believe in this. I'm glad you believe enough in me to support it.

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility was better than ten miles (looking at Boon Island). It stayed nice all day. The sky was cloudless until 10:00 AM, when the first light puffy clouds appeared. By 4:00 PM, we had a low pressure cell with clouds pregnant with rain go by to our south following the York River. The wind blew out of the west northwest at ten to fifteen knots or so. Some gusts were a skosch higher and blew an umbrella over at the Finestkind ticket stand. The ocean was calm along the shore. The air temperature got up to at least 81F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 60F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest to west at five knots or less to begin, died out and then hauled out of the southwest. Neither wind blew over five knots. The ocean was calm for the whole trip. The sky was clear and sunny. The air temperature ranged from 68F to 72F in the shade. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The visibility ranged to over twenty nautical miles. The surface water reached a high temperature of 62.5F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was very good to excellent today. Most legal fish landed were pollock followed by haddock. All the biggest fish of the trip were caught by five anglers. No one else on the boat caught a notable fish or a fish of 10 pounds or better. The only other legal fish caught were three cusk. Released fish included eight market cod, one barn door skate, two dogfish, a blue shark and one bluefin tuna (unintentional). Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well today.

Mark Konish (NC) was the star of the day. I don't know if he was high hook but he very well could have been. He caught the most "counters" of the day. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish of the day, a 21.5 pound barndoor skate. This is the second and second largest barndoor skate of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. It's also only the eleventh barndoor skate that has ever been caught on the Bunny Clark since it's launch in 1983. The barndoor skate is listed on the endangered species list. The species has made a comeback as of late due to the closed commercial fishing areas that excluded mobile gear (trawlers) starting in 1996. We are just starting to see the true benefits of the closed areas now. Anyway, Captain Ian took a picture of Mark and his strange skate. This digital image appears on the left. Mark also caught the largest haddock of the week at 5.5 pounds, a pollock of 10.75 pounds and an 11 pound pollock. It was a good day to be Mark Konish!

Chris Hay (NY) caught the second and third largest fish of the trip, a 13.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Alec Levine, on a bus man's holiday, landed an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. Peter Targel (CT) caught a 10 pound pollock, his best and biggest. Gordie Kalisz (NY) landed an 11 pound pollock, a 10 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock, his three best fish. He might have won the boat pool had he landed the bluefin tuna he hooked. Ian had everyone reel up so he could chase the tuna down. But even in so doing, the fish was taking more line off the reel than Gordie could get back. In the end, the line broke at the dropper loop holding the fly on the leader line. For the loss, Gordie collected the hard luck award!

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. The wind had hauled back out of the west northwest by the time they started for the fishing grounds. Wind speeds varied from ten to five knots. Seas were chops of a foot over rolling sea swells of two feet. The sky was mostly clear but sailed beside a low pressure cell with rain as this system headed down the York River and out to sea. They didn't get the rain but they did get the wind (up to fifteen knots for the time). The air temperature reached a high of 70F. The tide was strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.7F.

The fishing was slow. Ian called it a bad choice of fishing spots. I call it the luck of the draw. The only legal fish caught were two cusk, a mackerel, a sculpin, a sea raven and one redfish. And there were very few sub-legal fish caught. Sub-legals included one pollock and seven cod. They anchored for every stop. All bait was used.

Nine year old Logan McCarthy (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.25 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 5 pound cusk caught by Tori Sanchez (NY). A 2 pound cod was the third largest fish but Ian didn't get the name of the angler. Isabel McCarthy (VT) landed the only other desirable legal fish, a .4 pound redfish. Hope Sharps (NY) landed the hard luck award for being the high hurler of the night. I caught her getting off the boat with the hurling bucket in her hand. I told her she could leave the bucket here if she wanted. Her reply; "I might need it again before I get to the car!" Ouch!

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was light out of the northwest the ocean was flat calm and the visibility was excellent over the ocean. The sky was cloudless until 10:00 AM, when the clouds started to show. The sky was mostly sunny afterward but it was also dotted with cumulous clouds as well. And we did have one cloud set that was full of rain but hit the ocean via Wells instead of passing through Ogunquit. The wind blew out of the west northweast up to fifteen knots along the shore. After noon, the wind turned westerly but only five knots or so. The air temperature topped out at 80F at least. But there was less humidity today. The visibility was very good to excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 53F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west northwest at ten to five knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less. The sky was sunny all day with few clouds. The air temperature ranged from 68F to 73F. The tide was light to moderate. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63.4F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was excellent. Most legal fish landed were pollock followed by haddock. The pollock and haddock (particularly the haddock) were bigger today. The only other legal fish that was seen today was a mackerel. Released fish included eleven market cod to 12.5 pounds and ten dogfish. Drifting was the medium and the message (sometimes Nietzsche is peachy even in fishing). All terminal gear worked well today.

Ian thought that Lou Schoenig (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. It was difficult to nail it down today as many legal pollock were being released that couldn't really be counted. Lou's two best fish included a 14.5 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. The 14.5 pound pollock was the third largest fish of the trip. Lou likes to tell me that the Bunny Clark is the boat to go on to catch a lot of fish. I think that Lou makes the boat look that way! James Rauch (MI) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.25 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 16.5 pound pollock caught by Tom Henry (MA).

Other Angler Highlights: Lucas Rauch (PA) landed a 13 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, his two largest fish. Carmen Damiano (NY) caught a 14 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also landed the largest haddock we have seen in two weeks. It weighed 6.5 pounds, just a half pound shy of a Maine state trophy. Frank McCathy (MA) caught a 14 pound pollock, his largest fish. Greg Bobotas (TX) caught the largest cod. It weighed 12.5 pounds. Ally Fuehrer (ME) landed an 11 pound pollock, her largest fish. Ally and her father, Rob, had a hard time finding the bigger ones today! Bob Cheeseman (FL) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick? Now that I do not believe! Must have been something else I'm not privy to.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. The wind was light and variable in direction on the fishing grounds. The ocean was calm. The sky was mostly clear but they did a light rain for five minutes from a passing small local system. The air temperature reached a high of 69.4F. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.7F. The visibility ranged over twenty miles except during the short rain shower.

The fishing was good. Lots of fish were caught, mostly sub-legal. However, they did have a fair number of legal fish including eight cusk and eighteen mackerel. They released four cod that would have been big enough to keep by last years rules. And they caught (and released) quite a few other cod smaller cod and quite a few sub-legal pollock. Drifting was the method. Only bait and cod flies were used.

Mike Winters (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound cusk. He also caught a 5 pound cusk later in the trip. The second largest fish was a cusk of 8.5 pounds caught by Bruce Raiken (NJ). Mike Crowe (NH) landed the third largest fish, a 7.25 pound cusk. Mike also landed a cusk of 6 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Eight year old Jack Kidd (NH) caught a 3.75 pound cod, the first fish of the evening to be weighed. Tom Collins (MA) landed a 6 pound cusk, his best fish. Ten year old Connor Wiseman (QC) released a 6 pound cod. Robert Wiseman (QC) released a cod of 7 pounds. Ken Shearer (MA) landed two cusk. One weighed 5.5 pounds. The other weighed 5.25 pounds. Will Callif (NH) & Mike Kramer (NY) shared a 6.5 pound cod that was released. Eight year old Brendan Collins (MA) landed the hard luck award for? Brendan fished with a broken finger for the trip and still out-fished his father. Way to turn hard luck into good luck!

I received several donations today sponsoring me in a bicycle ride called the Pan-Mass Challenge in the quest for a cancer free world. These individuals and their donations included: Marty Nephew (NY) for a generous $50.00, Rick & Sue Towne (NH) for a generous $100.00 and Joe Dressner (NY) for a generous $50.00 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC website.

Friday, July 24, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was light out of the northwest, the ocean was calm and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The sky stayed nearly cloudless until 10:00 AM. From then on we had a series of local low pressure cells, clouds and rain sweep to the coast and then out to sea. Ogunquit got the briefest of light rain showers while York to the south of us and Kennebunkport to the northeast of us got several downpours. We eventually got a little shower at 5:00 PM that ended shortly. There was no wind associated with these cells. And we never saw rain again for the rest of the evening. There was very little wind all day today. The ocean was calm. The high air temperature never reached 80F today. The visibility was very good without the showers. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 54F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was variable in direction and light. The ocean was calm. The sky was sunny with few clouds (until the ride home). The air temperature was hot in the sun. In the shade the air temperature ranged from 70F to 76F. The tide was light to moderate. The visibility ranged over twenty miles. The surface water reached a high temperature of 65.4F.

The fishing was very good to excellent. Most legal fish landed were pollock followed by haddock. There was no problem reaching the boat's total bag limit of haddock today. legal landings also included eleven cusk. Released fish included twenty-two cod of small market size to 8 pounds and fifteen dogfish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

A collective vote put Travis Nephew (NY) into the high hook column today. His two best fish included a 12 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. The 13 pound pollock tied for the second largest fish of the trip with Don Bilodeau (NH) who also caught a 13 pound pollock and Keith Ross (NY) who also caught a pollock of 13 pounds. Don caught a 12 pound pollock as his second largest fish while Keith landed the best double keeper catch of the trip. His double included an 11 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Leo Reynolds (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17 pound pollock. He also caught a 12 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: "Jersey Tim" Hesselink (NJ) caught the first fish of the trip that was big enough for Ian to weigh, a 10 pound pollock. Bill Martel (ME) caught a 12.5 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Marty Nephew (NY) landed a 12.5 pound pollock, the largest fish he could catch today. Tony Brewer (ME) landed the hard luck award for losing a jig.

We didn't run an evening half day trip today.

I received a generous $50.00 donation and a nice letter from Rick Longwell (VT) sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising cycling event with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Rick and his mother, Ruth, spend many years fishing with me on the Bunny Clark in the days when cod of 30 to 50 pounds were not uncommon. It's been many years since Rick has fished with me. And I was very surprised (happily surprised) when he paid me a visit at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. restaurant the other day. The donation and thoughtful letter followed after. Thanks so much, Rick. I appreciate the support and I treasure the memories as much as you do.

Saturday, July 25, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind increased to about fifteen knots a couple of hours later but died down to about five knots or so after 10:00 AM. The wind continued to blow out of the northeast at ten knots or less for the rest of the afternoon. The sky was overcast all day but with zero chance of rain. By 4:00 PM, the sky cleared and the sun came out. The sky remained partly cloudy for the rest of the day. The air temperature might have broached the 71F mark but I can't be sure. With the wind, the air temperature had a fall feel to it all day long. The visibility ranged over ten miles along the shore. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 69F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 75F (with a low of 53F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten to fifteen knots in the morning and out of the east at ten knots in the afternoon. Seas were chops of two feet, more or less. The sky was overcast all day. The air temperature reached a high of 62F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged over fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60.4F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was very good to excellent. Landings could have been better had the dogfish not been so prevalent. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included quite a few haddock but they did not reach the boats bag limit. Legal landings also included a cusk. Released fish included nine cod, just under one hundred dogfish and a sculpin. Anchoring was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Jack Judge (CT/ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. Some of his fish included a 14.5 pound pollock, an 11.5 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock and a double keeper catch that included a 12 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Dan Merrow (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18 pound pollock. He caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch that also included another pollock of 18 pounds! This is the second largest double keeper catch of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. This fish was also the second largest fish of the trip. Dan also caught two pollock of 14.5 pounds each. Both fish were caught singly. Bob Wicihowski (NY) landed a 17.5 pound pollock, the third largest fish of the trip.

Other Angler Highlights: Laurence Gaudette (VT) caught the first fish of the trip large enough to weigh, an 11 pound pollock. Owen McNulty (VT) caught the largest haddock of the trip weighing 6.5 pounds. His largest fish was an 11 pound pollock. Kyle Greene (NY) boated an 11.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. John Thomas (NY) landed a 13.5 pound pollock, his best. Mike Duquesnoy (ME) caught an 11 pound pollock. Mitch Merrow (NH) caught two pollock of 12.5 pounds each. Nathan Thomas (NY) landed an 11.5 pound pollock. Brian Mattina-Chmiel (NY) boated a 13 pound pollock, his best fish. Ted Chmiel (NY) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick and for being part of the worst tangle of the day.

We did not run the afternoon half day trip this evening.

Sunday, July 26, 2015

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light out of the east and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind stayed out of the east through sunrise and around 9:00 AM. By the time I noticed the wind again it was before noon and the wind had hauled out of the southeast, light again. Later in the afternoon the wind increased to almost fifteen knots out of the south. The sky was overcast all morning and light rain and drizzle until 11:00 AM. For the rest of the day the sky remained overcast with no rain. The last hour or so of light before sunset we had clear skies and a warm sun. The air temperature was on the cool side of warm for most of the day. The highest air temperature I saw in Ogunquit was just over 70F. The visibility over the ocean was good all day.The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 60F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were barely a foot to start but increased to over a foot with white caps at about the time they were ready to head back in. The sky was overcast. The tide was light to moderate. The visibility ranged to five miles in haze. The air temperature reached a high of 64F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60.5F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-seven haddock and five mackerel. Released fish included a large number of sub-legal pollock, six dogfish and eleven cod of small market size. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

If I were a betting man, my money would have gone on David Archambault (NH) as the high hook of the trip. I never did find out who it was so I could be way off base. David landed the third largest fish of the trip, a 13.5 pound pollock. Some of his other good fish included a 10.5 pound pollock, an 11.5 pound pollock and two pollock of 13 pounds each. Sarah Valacio (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. Her second largest fish was a pollock that weighed 10 pounds. The second largest fish of the trip was a 14.75 pound pollock caught by Jon Archambault (MA). Jon landed a 12 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock as some of the better other fish that he landed.

Other Angler Highlights: Gil Valacio (NY) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Peter Grant (ME) boated a 10 pound pollock, his best. Josh Elder (NY) caught an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish of the trip. There were no big haddock caught today. They would have had a large one had Brian Blackadar (NH) not lost his on the surface! For this Brian landed the hard luck award. A trophy fish? Likely.

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two feet or so. The sky remained overcast for the trip. The air temperature matched the temperature on the fishing grounds earlier today. The visibility ranged to six miles.

The fishing was fair tonight. It wasn't the calmest night (a bit lower on the comfort index) and very few fish of legal or sub-legal size were caught. Legal fish included two cusk and four mackerel. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait.

Steve Gullion (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.5 pound cusk. Rocco Massaro (CT) landed the second largest fish, a cusk of 3 pounds. Conor Patenaude (NY) got sea sick and took the hard luck award.

Peter Grant did me a solid by donating $25.00 toward my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. I head to Boston to start this event on Friday morning. Thank you Peter. I appreciate your support very much!

We had a surprise visit from Maine's Marine Commissioner this afternoon, Pat Keliher. Pat and I have been friends for quite a while. But it was nice to see him eating and relaxing with his family/friends at Barnacle Billy's, Etc.

Tonight Deb, myself and my daughter, Halley, celebrated Halley passing her nursing boards today. So she is days from officially becoming an RN. It's hard to believe that that much time has gone by. And we celebrated by eating at my favorite restaurant, Barnacle Billy's!

Monday, July 27, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light out of the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog along the shore. Ashore, the wind was light and variable all day. The ocean was flat calm. The air temperature soared to a dry 80F, very nice. It was foggy all morning but burned off by 1:00 PM. The sky appeared to be overcast until 3:00 PM when a hazy sun appeared in the sky. By late afternoon, the sky was partly clear with a bright sun. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 63F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 86F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 65F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction. The ocean was calm all day. They fished in a dungeon of fog all day except for a period of a half hour where they could see as far as two miles. Most of the time the maximum distance was a half mile visibility. It was very humid. The air temperature ranged from 65F to 70F. The sky was overcast, or appeared so, for the trip. The tide (current) was very light. The surface water reached a high temperature of 63.1F.

The fishing was very good to excellent all day. There was never a dull moment. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far, followed by haddock (just shy of the boat bag limit). Legal landings also included our largest monkfish of the season (so far), four mackerel and one cunner. Released fish included about one hundred dogfish, one barndoor skate (again!), twelve cod of small market size and two wolffish. With the dogfish, the legal fish and the bigger pollock, it was very busy today, one of the busiest days of the year. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked great.

The vote favored Mark Cote (ME) for high hook with the most legal fish. The person closest to Mark in legal count was Chris Cote (ME). And for all intents and purposes, you could say they were high hook. Mark caught the third largest fish of the trip, a 16.25 pound pollock. Some of Mark's other fish included a 12.5 pound pollock, a 12 pound pollock and a 12 pound cod (released, of course). Chris caught the biggest double keeper catch of the trip. His double included a 13.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. He also caught a 13 pound pollock. And, I couldn't read Ian's writing, but he might have also released a 13 pound cod. Kate Cote (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 26 pound barndoor skate. This is the third barndoor skate of the season to date, the Bunny Clark's twelfth in thirty-two seasons and the second largest of the season so far. Captain Ian took a picture of Kate with her skate. The digital image appears on the left. Kate, in the picture, is on the left (of course). Jared is holding the fish. Kate also caught a pollock of 13.5 pounds. And just when you thought it was an all Cote day, David Martin (MA) caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 16.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish of the day.

Other Angler Highlights: Ken McLaughlin (ME) boated the largest monkfish of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. It weighed 9 pounds. Not big, by other standards, but certainly our biggest this season so far. Doug Towle (NH) caught the fourth largest fish of the trip, a 16 pound pollock. Some of his other notable fish included a pollock of 14.5 pounds and another of 11 pounds. Jay Haggett (VT) landed a double that included a 12.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. Greg Kidd (ME) boated a 13 pound pollock, his largest fish. Margaret Callahan (NH) landed a 12 pound pollock, her best. Krista Cote (ME) caught an 11.5 pound pollock, her largest fish. Mike Wicks (NY), one of the better fishermen of the day, caught two pollock of 11.5 pounds, an 11 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. Sean Kelly (NY) caught a 12 pound pollock. Mike Shirley (MA) caught a 14 pound pollock, his largest fish. Tom Greene (MA) didn't partake in the fun as much as he should have. He did, however, land the hard luck award for chumming the fish in.

Tim Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Soon to be captain Alec Levine and I ran the full day trip today.

At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was good (ten miles, at least). More later.

We had light southwest winds for the ride out to the fishing grounds. The ocean was calm, the sky was partly clear, the visibility was good and the air temperature was warm. On the fishing grounds, the sky was clear all day. The wind stopped as soon as we arrived there. The ocean was glassy calm over a hubble that seemed a cross between a chop and a swell. It could have been tide generated. Running into it you could get a minor spray. The visibility ranged up to fifteen miles in haze. The air temperature ranged from 67F to 76F. The tide was moderate all trip. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.8F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 86F with a low of 70F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 92F (with a low of 66F).

The fishing was very good overall. For most everyone it was a fish a cast all day. I would have labeled it excellent except that most of the fish we caught were sub-legal. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far, followed by haddock. We could have had the bag limit earlier but the average size today was very small. The ratio of sub-legal fish to legal haddock was about two to one. At the end of the fishing we had all the haddock we could legally take. Legal landings also included nine cusk and one halibut. Released fish included twenty-two cod of market size, seven dogfish, a wolffish and two sculpins. We also released quite a few sub-legal haddock and sub-legal pollock. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. It was one of three anglers fishing in the bow. John Andreychak (NJ) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 37 pound Atlantic Halibut. This is John's first halibut and the Bunny Clark's first legal halibut of the fishing season. I took a picture of John with his prize. This digital image appears on the left. He hooked the fish in the side. So it took forever, it seemed, to bring to gaff. But because of it's short runs to bottom, I knew what it was right from the start. However it was smaller than my prediction. John also caught an 8.5 pound cod and several pollock approaching 10 pounds.

The second largest fish was a 20.25 pound pollock caught by Ed Roche (NJ). This is the largest pollock that Ed has ever caught. This fish becomes the seventh largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. I took a picture of Ed with his pollock. That digital image appears on the right. The third largest fish was a 14.25 pound pollock caught by Brian Aiken (NY). Brian caught the largest double keeper catch of the trip. His double included a 9 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Brian also caught a pollock of 13.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Robert Bogusz (NY) caught a 14 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also caught two keeper pollock doubles. Danielle Kuiper (VT) landed a 10 pound pollock, her largest fish. Steve Levine (ME) was one of the high hook potentials. If market cod were included, he definitely would have been. His four best fish included two cod of 9 pounds, a 10 pound cod and a 10.5 pound pollock. Matt Roche (NJ) caught a 14 pound pollock, his largest fish. Robert Kuiper (VT) boated a 9 pound pollock, his largest fish. Ed "Glen" Parrow (NY) caught the largest haddock of the trip. I didn't weigh it but I would guess that it was 5 pounds. Whitney Michaud (VT) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the trip.

Alec Levine and I ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. At the dock it was hot, too hot for me. On the fishing grounds, the wind was very light from the south. No more than two or three knots. The ocean was calm all evening. The sky was clear. The air temperature was about 72F the whole time. The tide (current) was moderate.

The fishing was fair. We caught not a single legal fish. Mostly what we did catch were sub-legal pollock, and about fifteen sub-legal (smaller than twenty-one inches) cod. We also caught one sub redfish and one sub haddock, the haddock caught on the afternoon trip this season. We drift fished once but it was too much. Anchoring was the method for the rest of the evening. Everyone but one fished with bait. The guy who fished with a jig, jig stick and a fly was high hook and won the boat pool for the largest fish.

Chris Ramage (NY) was the fisherman of the evening. He caught the most fish, by far, of anyone aboard and he caught the largest fish, a 3.5 pound cod. I believe he caught twenty fish, all sub-legal. There were two fish, both cod of 2.5 pounds, that tied for the second largest fish. Dylan Ramage (NY) caught one and Bobby Murphy (MA) caught the other. Lisa Birch (NY) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler. However, once over the side was it for her. She recovered. Fifteen minutes later you would never have know she was sea sick! I think it's the only recovery of the season so far.

I received several donations sponsoring me in my cure for cancer ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge coming up this weekend. Those individuals and their donations included Ed Parrow and Brian Aiken for $50.00, an anonymous donation of $100.00, Chris Ramage (NY) for $50.00 and young Aiden Ramage (NY) for $10.00. Thank you all so very much for your help and support in this project. It means so very much to those with the disease but it's also a very personal thing with me. I very much appreciate it.

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 68F, the sky was clear, there was zero wind, there was not a ripple on the ocean's surface and the visibility over it was good. Ashore, it was warm and calm all day. Actually, it was more like hot and muggy. The air temperature reached 87F at least, probably higher. The sun was out in a clear but hazy sky. The visibility was good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 88F (with a low of 63F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 92F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 96F (with a low of 62F). The high temperature in Concord today set a record for the highest air temperature recorded on this day. The previous record was 95F set in 1949.

On the fishing grounds, the wind variable in direction (when there was wind) and very light. Most of the day there was no wind and the ocean was like a glass table. There was also very little tide (current). The air temperature was hot. Captain Ian didn't look at thermometer today. The sky was hazy clear. The visibility ranged from five to ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.2F.

The fishing was good to very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, again, by far. Legal landings also included half the boats bag limit of legal haddock, three redfish and two cusk. They were hampered in landings by the large number of dogfish that were also caught, about one hundred or less approximately. They seem to come and go as we had very few yesterday. They also released four market cod and one barely sub-legal halibut. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Ron Alpine (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 25 pound halibut. I met Ron for the first time at Breton's Bike shop on Monday. We talked about deep sea fishing and I suggested that he go with us. The rest is history! This is Ron's first Atlantic halibut and the Bunny Clark's second largest of the fishing season to date. Ian realized it was sub-legal when it was beside the boat. To get the fish in he leaned over the rail and grabbed the lower jaw as you would a fresh water bass and brought it in the boat. He weighed the fish, measured it, took a quick picture and released it. The digital image with Ron holding his prize appears on the left.

Russell Mott (ME) caught the second largest fish, a 17 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 14 pound pollock caught by Kris Gentzke (NY).

Other Angler Highlights: Bob Best (NH) caught a 12.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, his two "best" fish. Sorry, Bob, I couldn't help myself. Shawn Lynch (NH) boated an 11.5 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock, his two largest fish. Justin Mallory (NY) landed a 13 pound pollock. Anthony Best (NH) caught a 12.5 pound pollock. Bob DeSantis (NY) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the dreaded mal de mer!

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots, more or less. Seas were chops of a foot over rolling sea swells of two feet. The sky was clear. The air temperature was a comfortable 70F. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze.

The fishing was good for catching fish, mostly sub-legal. Legal landings included four cusk, a pollock and a redfish. They released quite a few sub-legal pollock, three sculpins, a sea raven, eight cod and a mackerel. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait.

Marc St. Lawrence (VT) was high hook with two legal fish. His largest, a 4.5 pound cusk, was the third largest fish of the trip. Kyler Schmitz (VA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8 pound cusk. Twelve year old Camden Tavares (VA) caught the second largest fish, a 5.5 pound pollock. Colin Burgess (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines!

Peter & Kerrie Breen (MA) sponsored me with a very generous donation of $500.00 towards my ride in the Pan-Mass Challenge, the event starting in Sturbridge, Massachusetts on Saturday morning. The bicycling event, of course, is designed to raise money to fight cancer through the Jimmy Fund/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. This is the first time the Breen's have supported me in this event. And I am humbled at the seriousness with which they do so now. Thank you both so very much for your help!

I had two more sponsors for my Pan-Mass Challenge ride later today. One was Kevin Andros (CT) with a $20.00 donation. The other donation was from Blake & Pam Love (NH) for a generous $100.00 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC website. Thank you all so very much for your help!

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility was at least ten miles looking southeast out to seas. After 10:00 AM, we had a light southwest breeze along the shore. The sky was sunny for most of the day. Clouds started to roll in around 2:30 PM. It was raining lightly by 3:30 PM. The air temperature was very warm today with a high in Ogunquit of at least 85F, probably more. It was certainly hot, hazy and humid. The visibility ranged to seven or eight miles. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 91F with a low of 74F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 93F (with a low of 63F). On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or more over rolling two foot seas/swells. The sky was overcast, or appeared to be overcast in the fog. And fog was what they had all day in varying degrees. At times the fog would shut right in. They also had periods of two mile visibility. The best visibility was five miles. The air temperature reached a high of 68F. The drift was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61.6F.

The fishing was good to very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock. The haddock fishing wasn't as good as it has been. But, then, they caught the most dogfish we have seen this season so far too. So did the haddock not bite or were the dogfish so ravenous that the haddock didn't have a chance? That was the question. Of course, when you get dogfish, you also get tangles - which also slows the fishing down. Legal landings also included a cusk and a whiting. Released fish included six market cod, over one hundred dogfish and one mackerel. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

A Harris could have been high hook but I didn't get the official word. Krystin Morris (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17.5 pound pollock. She also caught a cod that weighed 10 pounds, the largest cod of the trip. The second largest fish was a 14.5 pound pollock caught by Dave Harris (MA). Dave also caught a 12.5 pound pollock. Sara Tackson (NH) caught the third largest fish, a 14 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: John LaBrecque (ME) caught a 13.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Donna Flood (NH) landed a 12 pound pollock, her largest fish. Jed Astbury (VT) boated a 13.5 pound pollock, his best. Jacob Sawyer (VT) landed a 10 pound pollock and a pollock of 11.5 pounds, his two largest fish. Donald Maynard (ME) caught a 13 pound pollock, his largest fish. Ezra Astbury (VT) caught the largest haddock of the day. It weighed 5.5 pounds. Emma Astbury (VT) landed the hard luck award for calling the fish names. "Ralph" was one of them.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. It was hot, muggy, cloudy and raining lightly ashore when anglers boarded the Bunny Clark for the trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of one to two feet over rolling sea swells of two feet. The sky was overcast. It rained lightly most of the evening. The air temperature remained at 70F. The tide was moderate to strong (into the wind). The visibility ranged from eight to twelve miles in haze and precipitation.

The fishing was fair to good. They caught plenty of fish. Most of the fish were sub-legal or mackerel. Over fifty mackerel were landed. Released fish included two cod, close to one hundred pollock and two sculpins. Drifting was the method. Only bait and cod flies were used.

Dan Santomero (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.5 pound cod, released, of course. The second largest fish was a 4 pound cod caught by eight year old Isaac Osinchuk (VT). Rosemarie Zoda (NY) landed the hard luck award for being the most soaked individual. There were too many anglers who were sea sick to pick just one!

While the Bunny Clark was out to sea, we had a micro-burst that hit Barnacle Billy's deck with the full awnings out. It went from flat calm and rain to forty plus knots of wind in an instant. People got soaked because they couldn't get off the deck quickly enough (the deck was full), one of the awning was broken so it can't be used until fixed and a lot of food was left behind. No one got hurt. But there were several patrons who helped to try to save the awnings will my brother, Court, and crew tried to roll the awnings back in. To those who risked their dry clothes to help: Thank you! Where was I? I was in the office next door working on menus.

I received two donations of sponsorship towards my cancer fund raising ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a very generous $300.00 gift from Richie & Barb Jeffers (ME). The other was a $25.00 donation from Sandy Magill (ME/MA). Paul Haseltine and I leave for Boston tomorrow in order to start the event on Saturday morning in Sturbridge, Massachusetts. I know Richie & Barb wanted to get me their donation before the start of the ride (it's a good luck thing - thank you very much!) but the fund raising continues until December 30, 2015. And, some years, I raise more money after the event than I do before it! Anyway, a huge thank you to Richie, Barb & Sandy for their support and to everyone else who has donated to this special event and cause! All the best to all of you!

Friday, July 31, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was light from the west and the visibility over the ocean was very good. More later.









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