www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

February 24, 2015, 6:30 AM EST



Gill on a Bank

The shot above was taken on January 28, 2015, after the (so called) Blizzard of 2015. We had over two feet of snow with relatively little snow before it. So just in one storm I was able to shovel a pile of snow around the house well over the top of my head. My border collie, Gill, found his way to the top while I was shoveling out the Bunny Clark truck.




New Year's Day, Thursday, January 1, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 17F, the sky was clear, the wind was out of the southwest at a sustained twenty knots with higher gusts and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. At dawn, the wind hauled out of the west and blew over twenty knots all morning and into the afternoon. I believe the wind hauled more out of the southwest towards nightfall. The air temperature was cold in the morning. The highest temperature I saw today was 29F at 1:30 PM. The sky was mostly sunny all day. The visibility over the water was very good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 32F (with a low of 18F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 33F with a low of 22F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 31F (with a low of 9F).

I took the day off.

Friday, January 2, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 29F, the sky was clear, the wind was out of the west southwest at a sustained twenty knots with higher gusts and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. The wind stayed out of the west at twenty knots or more from the last two hours of the morning until about 3:00 PM, when a more northerly lilt was seen. There was much west in the wind until after sunset. The wind hauled out of the northwest later at night with gusts over twenty-five knots. The sky was mostly clear all day with some upper level clouds at mid-day. The air temperature got as high as 36F, at least, in Ogunquit. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 38F (with a low of 22F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 41F with a low of 31F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 36F (with a low of 17F).

I spent my day working at Barnacle Billy's restaurant, ordering supplies for the Bunny Clark and starting back into working on the Bunny Clark's Guestletter.

Saturday, January 3, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 16F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The air temperature stayed cold all day, never reaching the freezing mark. By noon, the air temperature had warmed to 23F. I believe I saw 29Fsometime during the mid afternoon. By 6:00 PM, the air temperature was 25F. The sky was sunny most of the morning but became overcast before noon. The sky stayed overcast for the rest of the day. Snow had started to fall around 5:00 PM. There might have been an inch of the white stuff on the ground by 8:00 PM. The wind was light out of the north in the morning. There was no wind in the afternoon. The wind went from zero to about twenty knots in twenty minutes around 7:30 PM. It was gusting to almost thirty knots out of the east by 8:00 PM. The wind never blew any harder than that to my knowledge. The visibility was very good to excellent during the day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 34F (with a low of 14F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 37F with a low of 22F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 26F (with a low of 10F).

I spent most of the morning riding my bike before the expected inclimate weather expected for tomorrow. During the afternoon I worked on preparing myself for the Guestletter.

I learned that my mother, Bunny Tower, wanted to give another $1,000.00 to the Jimmy Fund through me and my involvement with the Pan-Mass Challenge. I found this out yesterday. Her wish was to add it to the 2014 total. She had written the check out on December 27th. I called down to the head office in Needham, Massachusetts but was unable to confirm if that was possible. For now I'm adding it to this years fund raising total. That would make my total the third largest amount I have raised in a season in the eight years that I have been involved in the event. Thank you, Mom, I very much appreciate your choice of emissaries and the cancer curing world appreciates all the support it can get!

Sunday, January 4, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 31F, the sky was overcast, it was raining, we had two inches of slushy snow on the ground, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility was fair in precipitation. The sky remained overcast all day. It rained light but steady most of the morning. Rain was intermittant in the afternoon. The wind hauled out of the north by 8:00 AM and then dropped out altogether for most of the late part of the morning and into the afternoon. When we did have wind again it was out of the west and only about ten knots going into the evening. The Town of Ogunquit had run out of salt and sand so the rain falling on a ground that had been well below freezing for three days created very slick driving conditions. In fact it was easier to drive on the roads (with 4 wheel drive) than it was to walk on them. I noticed these conditions at 9:00 AM when I left the driveway and slid across the other side of the road while trying to stop! The air temperture got into the high 30s but I never did see the predicted mid 40s they were talking about. The visibility never got that good because as soon as it stopped raining the fog rolled in along the coast. It was fairly foggy until after dark. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 35F (with a low of 23F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 52F with a low of 35F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 38F (with a low of 26F).

I had a very busy day in the office today. It started at 6:00 AM and, except for lunch, didn't get out until 6:00 PM. I worked on a wedding reception extraviganza for two hours that's taking place at Barnacle Billy's, Etc in the fall. I had a lot of organization items to work on for both restaurants and the Bunny Clark. Plus, I was working on the Guestletter, particularly all the database, spreadsheet materials and graphs I use to write it.

Also, I was reminded that there is a webinar public hearing on the proposed opening of the closed areas hosted by the New England Fishery Management Council between 3PM and 7PM tomorrow. Officially, it's called the proposed OHA2 (Omnibus Habitat Amendment). You can register to share your opinion (which I hope you do) by going to this link. Call-in Info: 646.307.1706 | Access Code: 911-628-108.

I am reminded by Priscilla Brooks from the Conservation Law Foundation that:

"1. Our struggling fisheries and their habitat need more protection, not less.

2. All existing closed areas should remain closed, including the important Cashes Ledge Closed Area.

3. Trawls [draggers] and dredges should not be allowed into protected areas.

4. Habitat for spawning and prey species must be protected."

I agree 100%. I hope you will join in with the webinar later this afternoon.

Monday, January 5, 2015

At 4:00 AM EST the air temperature was 38F, the sky was clear, there was a full moon handing just over the tops of the trees in the western sky, the wind was blowing out of the west at about twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. By 6:30 AM, the air temperature had dropped to 34F. The air temperature dropped all day reaching the freezing mark by noon or before. The air temperature was in the 20s by mid afternoon and 20F by 7:00 PM. And it was windy. By noon, the wind was blowing out of the west at thirty to forty knots. This kept up until sunset but blew a little harder after that. I would like to have known what the strongest wind gust was. The sky was clear with clouds all day. The visibility was just good over the ocean with spray created by the many white caps over the near shore area marching out to sea. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 41F (with a low of 9F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 50F with a low of 17F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 40F (with a low of 11F).

Today was a day of meetings. At 8:00 AM, Deb, Jared Keniston, Ian Keniston and I went over the game plan for the upcoming Bunny Clark fishing season. By 10:30 AM we had finished with the schedule and rates for the 2015 season. Generally, we have gone with the same schedule as did last year. In other words, marathons will again be on Tuesdays and Thursdays all year except in July and August. This means that the extreme day trips will be Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday for the season except in July and August. What we also decided was to allow marathon trip charters on Mondays and Fridays. Those days are normally set up as an extreme day trip. But if the date is available (no anglers booked) and a group wants to get the whole boat for a marathon trip on one of those days, as long as it's not in July or August, we can accommodate you. I will not be the captain on Mondays or Fridays. I will post the new schedule and rates as soon as I can, hopefully today.

I will be registering for another go at the Pan-Mass Challenge tomorrow. Sign up starts at 9:00 AM. At the end of the 2014 I had passed on a total of $207,136.77 to the Jimmy Fund since I started being involved with the event in 2007. All of this money thanks mostly to you! Hopefully, I will be close to a quarter of a million dollars by the end of 2015. Time goes by so fast. It seems like I just got involved yesterday!

The rest of the day was spent ordering, working at the restaurant, on the phone and on the email. I also worked on the Petrel and the skiff to prepare them for below freezing temperatures, this while the air temperature was still above freezing.

The last part of the day was spent on the Webinar with the proposed OHA2 (Omnibus Habitat Amendment). That was a disappointment. I commend the work of Michelle Bachman and Andy Applegate. But it is very complicated for the layman to understand. Hell, it's complicated for anyone to understand if you don't know the implications of each proposal within and the fishing mechanics of all the different fisheries involved. Michelle did a good job of presenting the material. The graphics were well done. But it was still complicated. When I finally got a chance to speak, my microphone didn't work. I've been using it all week with no problem. During the webinar - nothing. Afterward I tried to make a few calls through my Gmail account and it didn't work there either. I never did get it to work! That was frustrating and time consuming. I did write an email, putting my concerns in words on electronic paper. And I will probably attend the hearing in Portland, Maine on Wednesday night. We'll see.

Tuesday, January 6, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 11F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the west at twenty knots with higher gusts and the visibility was fair to good over the ocean in some sea smoke. The sky stayed overcast all day but no precipitation was ever seen. The air temperature remained cold. I don't believe the air temperature ever got out of the teens. The highest air temperature I saw was 18F at 2:00 PM. The wind blew out of the west all day, the hardest in the morning. After noon, the wind started dropping. The westerly wind was ten knots by 5:00 PM. The visibility was very good to excellent after the sea smoke left sometime before noon. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 17F (with a low of 3F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 18F with a low of 15F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 15F (with a low of 1F).

My day was filled with orders, engine replacement logistics and working on the web site. By the afternoon, I had completed the 2015 Bunny Clark fishing schedule, rates and rules. I posted this at 3:30 PM or so.

Sometime after 9:00 AM, I signed up for the Pan-Mass Challenge again. It will be a few days before I put the my new PMC update on line. But I will be starting the fund raising all over again here pretty soon.

Also, there is a Federal hearing on the proposed Omnibus Habitat Amendment (OHA2) in Portland, Maine between 6:00 PM and 8:00 PM at the Holiday Inn By The Bay Portland. If you want to speak up against opening the closed commercial groundfish areas in the Gulf of Maine, this is a good forum to speak. I will be there.

Wednesday, January 7, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 11F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten to fifteen knots and the visibility was fair to poor over the ocean in sea smoke. The wind blew out of the west all morning at speeds of about fifteen knots, more or less. After noon, the wind hauled out of the northwest and blew up over twenty knots. By sunset we had sustained winds of thirty knots or better with gusts up to forty knots at times. The sky was mostly sunny in the morning and the early part of the afternoon, overcast the later part with a dusting of snow late afternoon and clear skies after sunset. The air temperature was warmer today with the high somewhere in the mid 20s. The visibility was excellent after the sea smoke disappeared around 10:00 AM. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 25F (with a low of 1F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 26F with a low of 4F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 22F (with a low of -4F).

I worked at the restaurant most of the morning. We had a meeting there from 10:30 AM until noon. After lunch I worked on what I would say at the hearing in Portland this evening. I ended up with a three page itemized list to talk from. At 5:00 PM, I headed to Portland armed with a banana, a bottle of water and my paper. The hearing room in Portland was fairly crowded. I didn't count but I would suspect that fifty people were there. Once there I realized that what they wanted at the hearing was not what I had written down. They wanted more specifics about each part of the amendment. So, when I did speak, I never used what I had written. And, basically, all I said was that I believed that the status quo (keeping the closed areas the way they are now) was most beneficial to the fishery. That, in these times where our groundfish stocks were in trouble, the last thing we needed to do was to open the areas that brought us the haddock and contained spawning areas for four of our major groundfish species. I got home just as the Bruins/Penquins game was getting under way.

Thursday, January 8, 2015



The digital image above was taken a little before 8:00 AM with my iPhone. I was on the Marginal Way (Ogunquit's mile long foot path along the shore.), about an eighth of a mile east of Perkins Cove looking east. It was -8F. You can see the sea smoke marching east. And you can see what appears to be a fog bank on the horizon but what is actually sea smoke build up. The sky was cloudless when I took this picture.

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was -7F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at fifteen knots and the visibility was fair to poor over the ocean in sea smoke. The air temperature dipped to -8F before making the climb toward the 0 mark. And it didn't get there until around noon. In fact, the highest air temperature I saw was 13F (I'm sure it got warmer before midnight). That happened at 3:00 PM. Sea smoke was evident all day, something that rarely ever happens. The wind blew out of the northwest all morning. When the wind hauled out of the west at noon, the air temperature started warm more quickly. Just that edge of wind off the water made the difference. By sunset, the wind was almost out of the southwest. By 7:00 PM, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at over twenty knots with gusts to thirty knots. The sky was clear all day, cloudless, becoming overcast after dark. The visibility over the water was poor in sea smoke. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 17F (with a low of -9F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 19F with a low of -1F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 17F (with a low of -9F).

I spent the day on licensing, mostly. I also spent time at the boat and watched Dave Pease, with help from Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston, take the final steps in hauling the engine out of the Bunny Clark. Later, they placed the engine aft on the deck. On Monday, the boat will be hauled out of the barn, a crane will pick the engine up off the deck and set it on the ground and then the Bunny Clark will be put back in the barn to get the boat ready for the new engine. A lot of work, a lot of time and a lot of money.

I took two shots of the crew in the throes of lifting, below. My camera the iPhone again. Handy little bugger. The shot on the left shows Ian with the come-along while the shot on the right shows Dave Pease and Jared with the chain-falls.


I also spent some time today making a formal comment on the Omnibus Habitat Amendment 2 (closed conservation fishing zones question). Basically, I reiterated what I said last night but in a more concise fashion.

Friday, January 9, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 18F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at fifteen knots and the visibility was fair to poor over the ocean in sea smoke. By 6:00 AM, the sky had become overcast. By dawn, it was snowing lightly. It snowed lightly most of the morning giving us an inch or more of snow before it was finished before noon. At noon, the sun came out and the sky cleared. The sky was mostly clear for the rest of the day. The air temperature warmed to a high of at least 28F. The wind blew out of the west southwest from 6:00 AM until about noon. Wind speeds were about thirty knots more or less. After noon, the wind hauled out of the west and diminished to about twenty knots, average speed. The visibility was good by noon, poor in the snow fall and sea smoke. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 29F (with a low of 17F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 30F with a low of 19F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 27F (with a low of 11F).

Desk work was in order until the Town office opened up so I could pay my yearly contributions. From there I went to boat. The engine had been moved to the deck where it will reside until Monday, assuming the weather is good enough to move the boat. I took a couple iPhone pictures while there. These appear below. On the left is the hole left where the engine resided. On the right is the engine on deck. The engine room will be meticulously cleaned, sanded, West Systemed and then Awlgripped (Awlgrip - a two part linear polyurethane paint, first developed for aircraft) white. It's been a while since I painted the engine room. It's hard to realize how big a hole the engine room is. But if you look at the float switch or the extra wooden two-by-fours you can probably get an idea. One of the other problems we had was lighting in there. Now with the new low draw LED lights available today, I'll be able to ring that engine room with them.


After the boat I had materials I had to pick up in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Afterward, I stopped for a bite at MacDonalds. Sadly, the MacRib was not available. But it did give me the opportunity to introduce Gill, our new border collie of six months, to his first cheezeburger. After I pulled out of the parking lot and started to head home, a white van, also pulling out of a parking lot, backed right into me, hitting me just after the truck door but directly into the side of the bed. So I ended up spending more time in Portsmouth than I wanted to. Had I been a horn person, I might have avoided the whole thing. But I didn't think of it until it was over. The estimate at the auto body shop (I have been frequenting all too often these days) was about $2600. Too bad you can't approach the insurance company before these things happen and give them a choice. In other words I could say; "Look I'm either going to get in an accident (that isn't my fault) or you can make a $2600.00 donation to the Pan-Mass Challenge, get a tax write-off and save yourself a lot of aggravation." That would have saved me a lot of time as well!

Saturday, January 10, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 15F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at twenty knots or better and the visibility was very good to excellent over the ocean. The wind blew out of the west at twenty knots or more all day. The sky was mostly clear and sunny. The air temperature was cold. The highest air temperature I saw was 22F. It might have been warmer but I didn't see it. There was no sea smoke along the shore today. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 24F (with a low of 10F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 24F with a low of 17F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 21F (with a low of -2F).

I spent the day taking notes and gathering information towards writing the Guestletter. This is a project that takes an enormous amount of time because, when I'm done, it gives me a status report with figures I can refer to for years to come. Most of my references come from the data I collect that resides in the folder of material I build before I start to write. When I started to fall asleep reading my own writing (last season's daily fishing "blog" that I write - here, this one) - and this happens frequently - I started working on building the reservation book. With the cold temperatures expected tomorrow morning, I suspect I will be doing the same most of tomorrow as well.

I finished working at 4:30 PM, just in time to watch the Patriots game from the seat of my bike hooked to a fluid trainer. Now, normally, I can only sit on a trainer for about a half hour. Even watching TV, it's too boring and certainly not as much fun as riding a bike on the road. Today I amazed myself with 62 minutes, one of the longest times I have ever spent on a trainer. I know guys who can spend three hours on a trainer. That is not me. That's really not me. And I think that the reason I could hang out so long this time was that the Patriots just made me feel (in the first half - I couldn't watch the second half!) like they were going stumble and bumble their way to a loss. I really do think that if they took the game a little more professionally they would win more games. Like I can't imagine that Brady throwing a hissy fit will really help his game as it progresses. But, hey, that's just me. I don't really care for football but I do like all sports and they are our team. I hope they can make it to the Super Bowl, the first day of Bunny Clark reservations!

Sunday, January 11, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 10F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at fifteen knots sustained and the visibility was good in some sea smoke over the ocean. The air temperature seemed to warm up more quickly this morning. Maybe it was me. Or maybe I'm just getting used to it. The air temperature was about 20F by noon. But it was only 13F at 8:00 AM, the time I usually jump on my bike and ride to Kennebunkport to join the Maine Coast Cycling Club. Between the cold and having too much work to do, I decided to bag the ride today. The sky was overcast from dawn until late morning, mostly clear for a while and then overcast, after noon, for the rest of the day and into the night. I did see the air temperature get up to 28F. Whether the temperature jumped a few degrees higher, I don't know, but I doubt it. At noon, the wind hauled out of the southwest. Initially, this wind was about ten knots. However, the velocity increased steadily until sunset when it was blowing a sustained twenty knots. Gusts reached almost thirty knots into the night. The visibility was very good most of the day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 26F (with a low of 7F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 33F with a low of 15F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 22F (with a low of -8F).

I took some time off for a couple of hours in the morning. Most of the morning was spent researching for the Guestletter. After lunch, I worked on building the reservation book until 4:30 PM.

At 5:00 PM, I took the dog, Gill, for a 2 mile run on the beach. I have tried taking him for 3 miles or better (on the beach) but have found that he does the tip & roll thing at that longer distance. I have a leash that belts around my waist which then leads to the dog five feet away. I know when he's about to do the tip & roll when he starts running behind me. Normally, he runs to the outside, beside me on the left. He generally looks at me with his tongue hanging out. I usually look down and try to encourage him. But when he does fall behind and I feel a little more pressure, I become wary. On the longer runs in the past he would get behind me, I would feel a bit of pressure and then a lot of pressure as he would dip his shoulder and go down on his back. I would look back and find the dog on his back with both feet up in the air as I towed him along (he wears a full body harness). He only weighs about 40 pounds (just the size of a good sized steaker). Of course, I would stop, he would get up to a sitting position and I would pet him and ask what was wrong. After I brushed all the sand off his back, I would encourage him. This would get him going again. The last time I ran over 3 miles, the tip and roll happened four times. I believe we were doing a 9 minute pace. From then on we have been running two miles, albeit at an 8 minute pace. But only two miles. He's been liking this a lot better. And there have been no tip and rolls for two weeks. This night we had only one period of running behind. But that didn't last too long with another bit of encouragement. After that we normally have ten minutes of playing, as we did this evening. And then it's back in the truck and back home. At some point I'm going to try him off his leash. I don't think this will happen in the near future.

Monday, January 12, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 30F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the west at fifteen to twenty knots and the visibility was very good over the ocean. At 5:30 AM, it started to snow. The snow particles (flakes) were very small. With just a dusting on the ground, it stopped at 7:00 AM. By 8:30 AM, it was snowing again. It snowed until about noon and then stopped. We might have had an inch, maybe two. The sky was overcast for the day. The air temperature warmed up to 33F, the first high temperature over the freezing mark since January 5th! The wind blew out of the southwest but only about ten knots ashore. Offshore, it blew over twenty knots at times. The visibility was good over the ocean in some haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 33F (with a low of 24F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 38F with a low of 33F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 32F (with a low of 20F).

Today was Bunny Clark engine day. I was on the phone quite a bit concerning different facets of the repowering process. That included ordering the new wheel (prop). At 10:15 AM, Independant Boat Haulers showed up at the barn to take the Bunny Clark out, hoist the old Volvo engine off the deck and place the engine on the ground. Here the engine will stay until I can find someone who might want it. The marine gear would be included in the sale. I took several pictures of the process. Some of these digital images can be seen below:



The scene above shows Jared Keniston, after the engine has been lifted off the deck, jockeying the engine around so there is a clear path up and over the rail.



This next shot (above) shows Jared and Ian Keniston (left) clearing the engine over the rail.



This shot has the engine between the Bunny Clark and the crane.



The engine is on it's way to it's temporary resting spot on the ground. Carl (left) and Rick (right) are making this happen. We were lucky this winter. Usually Rick is guiding fishing trips in Argentina in our winter. This winter he had too much to do to go down there.

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 21F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the north at twenty-five knots and the visibility was excellent over the ocean. The air temperature started to drop and bottomed out at 15F by 10:00 AM. Then the air temperature made a slow recovery back to about 21F (At 1:00 AM the air temperature was 32F!). I believe that's the highest air temperature I saw during the day. That was at 1:00 PM or later. The wind blew out of the north northeast most of the morning at over twenty knots. After noon, the wind started to back off. By sunset, the northerly wind was blowing ten knots at most. The sky was mostly clear all day. The visibility remained excellent with zero sea smoke. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 31F (with a low of -1F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 35F with a low of 15F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 30F (with a low of -6F).

After the morning update, I spent the rest of the morning in the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. Here I worked on a combination of restaurant stuff and taking notes for the Guestletter. Late morning I was informed that my endodontist had room to do a procedure (root canal) at 12:30 PM in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. I was scheduled for Thursday. Knowing that would give me more free time to work on boat stuff later this week, I agreed. I have been watching my number 15 molar dying over the last two years. It had been starting to bother me a month ago. I was pleasantly surprised how painless the procedure was. At 3:00 PM, I was headed back home. After answering emails for a half hour at home, I spent the rest of my work day down at the restaurant working on completing the reservation book.

I learned about my first Pan-Mass Challenge donation for the 2015 season today. The donation was actually made on January 11, 2015 as an "egift" through the PMC site from Joe Amato (NH). Thank you, Joe, for being the first to kick off my cancer fund raising season and for your generosity as well. I really appreciate it!

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 4F, the sky was clear, less than a half a moon was hanging well over the eastern horizon, the wind was blowing out of the north at ten knots and the visibility was fair at water level in heavy sea smoke over the ocean. By dawn, the sky was clouding over. An hour later, the sky was overcast. The sky remained overcast for the rest of the day. The wind continued to blow out of the north all day as well. But it never over-blew. Fifteen knots was the highest wind I saw today. The air temperature stayed below freezing all day, mid teens by morning and just over 20F in the afternoon. The visibility was very good all day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 24F (with a low of -6F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 25F with a low of 14F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 20F (with a low of -10F).

I spent the time from 8:00 AM until 2:00 PM working at the office in the restaurant, continuing with the reservation book and working on the Guestletter. From 3:00 PM until dinner, Deb and I were the lawyer's office (general house keeping - we haven't been to see a lawyer since 2007.).

Another thing I did (that took me two hours) was putting up my new Pan-Mass Challenge website. So now when I receive a donation I have a place to show it. There's more to it than most would think.

Thursday, January 15, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 25F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the north at fifteen plus knots and the visibility was fair over the ocean. There had been some precipitation (sleet) earlier. The sky stayed overcast all day. Later in the morning it started to snow. It snowed all day. But the snow was light and intermittent. It snowed into the night. I don't believe we got more than an inch overall. The wind blew out of the north northeast at ten to fifteen knots. The air temperature got up as high as 29F in Ogunquit. The visibility was fair in precipitation over the ocean. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 29F (with a low of 20F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 31F with a low of 25F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 29F (with a low of 15F).

Another day researching for the Guestletter kept me in the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. By being there, I was also able to answer the Billy's phone and complete some restaurant projects as well. Taking my lunch with me at noon, I took the truck to Portland to pick up the newly inspected Bunny Clark life raft. From there I went to Hamilton Marine to look at lights, manual engine control levers and sea strainers. At 3:40 PM, I met Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston at Barnacle Billy's where we took the life raft canister out of the truck and put it in the restaurant until we need it. For the rest of the day I worked on the reservation book.

For a nice touch, the dog (Gill) followed me in to Chase & Leavitt (where I have my life raft inspected) and lifted his leg on some charts that were in the back of the room. It was embarrassing. I dragged Gill over to the spot, scolded him for what he had done and then put him outside. About ten minutes later, as I was heading out the door, the phone rang. It was my wife. A fisherman (I assume) had seen the dog outside C & L and thought it was lost. So he called the number on the collar tag. Gill wasn't far from my truck but this guy didn't know. Now Deb was mad at me for "losing the dog". Sometimes you just can't win.

Joe Dressner (NY) became the second donor of the year to support my cancer fund raising with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The donation was $100 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC site. I emailed Joe my thanks. I got a nice email in return. I do appreciate this Joe, very much. All the best to you!

Friday, January 16, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 21F, the sky was mostly overcast, the wind was blowing out of the west at fifteen knots and the visibility was excellent over the ocean. The sky was overcast in the morning with some periods of sun. We had snow flurries at times. After noon, it started to clear and blow. The wind was out of the west most of the morning with wind speeds of about twenty knots. After noon, the wind hauled out of the west northwest and gave us sustained wind speeds of thirty knots with gusts almost to forty knots. It was very windy. The air temperature jumped over the freezing mark before the wind struck. After that the air temperature went south fast. By sunset, the air temperature had already dropped to 23F. The visibility was excellent over the ocean in the afternoon. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 38F (with a low of 6F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 38F with a low of 15F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 34F (with a low of 9F).

After I finished the update (on this page) here, I spent the rest of the morning at the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. The first couple of hours was spent on researching for the Guestletter. The time after that was spent working on restaurant issues. At 11:00 AM, auditor showed up, an annual thing. At that point I moved over to finishing up with the Bunny Clark reservation book. At 12:45 PM, I went for lunch. After lunch, I put away a metric ton of fuel pellets (Micah helped me). Once that was completed, I went back down to the Cove to finish up the reservation book. While there was still light, I went down and cleaned the skiff of snow and ice.

I received another $100.00 donation from Bill Parsons (NJ) supporting me in my cancer fund raising cycling event with the Pan-Mass Challenge. I was not expecting another donation so soon. And I was delighted to pull up the email to find it this morning. Thanks, Bill, very much. I very much appreciate your kindness, support and generosity.

Saturday, January 17, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 5F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at twenty knots more or less and the visibility was good over the ocean in sea smoke. By 7:00 AM, the air temperature had dropped to 3F and the wind had dropped somewhat. The was mostly clear all day with plenty of sun. It was cold all morning with temperatures finally reaching the teens before noon. Sea smoke was the rule for most of the morning. I never did see what I thought the high air temperature might be but I did note an air temperature of 21F at 1:00 PM. It could have been higher. By 4:00 PM, the air temperature had dropped to 19F but there was no wind. The wind blew out of the northwest after sunrise but had no teeth. By 9:00 AM, the wind had dropped to about ten knots. After 10:00 AM, there wasn't much wind at all. By 4:00 PM, the wind had hauled out of the southwest but it wasn't very strong. The visibility was very good after 11:00 AM. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 20F (with a low of -2F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 22F with a low of 9F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 20F (with a low of 2F).

I spent the day working on the Guestletter. I finished all the reading (of this boring update section of my web site) and notes by 10:30 AM only to find out that I had not made the last entry (of the specifics of the last fishing trip of the season) into the database. Of course, I had printed all the tables and made charts two weeks earlier. So I had to do all the tables and charts all over again after putting the last entry into the database, an extra hour spent on something I had thought I had already completed. After lunch I started on the mechanics of building the newsletter (outline, the largest fish of each species, etc. etc.). I finished around 4:30 PM.

I did take our dog, Gill, for a run on the beach. I've been trying to run at a slow pace every other day. At the same time I am giving the dog some exercise. This time I left him off the leash to run beside me. And he wasn't too bad. It was getting dark, being after sunset, when we ran. Gill, pretty much, ran beside me except for meeting a couple of dogs and owners half way up the beach. And, on the way back, he strayed a bit towards the dunes but still kept me in sight as I did him. At one point he ran up to me with what looked like a "hog leg", it was just a silhouette in his jaw. When I grabbed it I realized that it was the frozen head of a gannet broken off at the base of the neck, a sea bird that on very rare occasions you might see near shore. He only seemed interested to show it to me as he didn't go after it when I chucked it behind us. I have never seen a dead gannet on the beach. Probably it died of starvation since the mid-water herring trawlers have raped the resource unchecked for so many years. The herring is the main food source of the gannet.

Sunday, January 18, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 27F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at twenty-five knots sustained with higher gusts and the visibility was good to very good over the ocean. By 6:00 AM, the air temperature had risen to 29F (it had been 25F at 3:30 AM). The air temperature topped out at 45F. Or, at least, that was the highest air temperature I saw in Ogunquit. The sky was partly cloudy at dawn, looking like it was going to be overcast soon. However, overcast skies didn' t appear until about 9:00 AM. By 11:00 AM, it was misting rain. In fact, most of the afternoon there wasn't enough rain to put oil gear on. It did rain with more frequency after sunset. The wind blew out of the south at twenty knots for most of the day. By sunset, the wind had hauled out of the southeast and was picking up strength. Right in the middle of the Patriots game the southeast wind was blowing at twenty-five to thirty knots with higher gusts. This kept up until well after the game was over. The visibility was fair over the ocean from 11:00 AM and into the night. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 49F (with a low of 16F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 51F with a low of 20F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 47F (with a low of 15F).

I took the day off from both the restaurants and the Bunny Clark. The only thing I did was update this site, answer emails and bail out the skiff. I did watch the Rangers beat the Penguins as I ate lunch. And I watched the two NFL games. It was obvious to me that the Packers had no interest in going to the Super Bowl with their poor decisions in the second half of the game. And I stayed up too late watching the Pat's game. C'est la vie.

Monday, January 19, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 37F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at about twenty knots or so and the visibility was good to very good over the ocean. The wind stayed out of the west at twenty knots, more or less, all day. The sky was mostly clear all day with some clouds at times. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature ranged up to the mid 40s. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 49F (with a low of 35F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 46F with a low of 38F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 40F (with a low of 32F).

The was an organizational day. I never did get to the Guestletter as I had too Monday offerings to deal with. I did take a ride up to the Bunny Clark where Davd Pease and I went over the new engine beds, the new placement of the sea strainer, fuel line discussions, shaft discussions, cutlass bearing discussions, etc. & etc. The rest of the day I was on the phone at home in the office. The day's issues included the fire inspection at Barnacle Billy's restaurants, the satellite phone, Penn reel parts, the accident involving my truck, fuel tanks in Perkins Cove (an tomorrow's Selectman's meeting) and various other boring things that had to be dealt with. Although I accomplished a day's work it didn't feel like I got much done.



The picture above was taken of the engine room of the Bunny Clark. Since the engine was hauled out, this was a good opportunity to get the engine room prepped, sanded, prepped and painted. In the digital image, you can see that all has been sanded (much with a grinder) and is ready for painting. Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston did all the work. We have used white Awlgrip in the past and will use it again. Awlgrip is a two part linear polyurethane that has a very hard shiny surface that's easy to clean. Because it is so hard it can chip and doesn't lend itself to buffing out. But it's ease of cleaning makes it the best choice for a place like the engine room. Compare this to the picture I took ten days ago.

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 32F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at twenty knots with higher gusts and the visibility was excellent over the ocean. By 7:00 AM, the air temperature had dropped to 28F. The day was never really warm. In fact, I'm not sure if the air temperature ever broached the freezing mark during the daylight hours. The sky was sunny all day. The wind blew out of the west at twenty knots with higher gusts (one just making the 30 knot mark). The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 36F (with a low of 21F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 39F with a low of 27F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 33F (with a low of 20F).

The morning was a mix of engine research (fuel line specs, control levers, lighting, engine mount templates, sea strainers, etc.) and making sure both restaurants were up to code for the fire/liquor inspection tomorrow. I was involved in this from 7:00 AM until 1:00 PM. Instead of taking lunch, I made up a protein cocktail and jumped on the bike for thirty-one miles. On the bike I took seven phone calls and various texts, one of which was from a field appraiser (Hanover Insurance) who was looking at the damage done to my truck on January 9th. After I got home I got a call from the body shop that is going to do the work on it for me. With this call I firmed up an appointment to bring the truck in. I was able to work on the Guestletter for an hour before dinner. At 6:30 PM I attended an Ogunquit Town Selectman's meeting where I spoke in favor of fueling installation in Perkins Cove. I managed make it back home in time to plant myself down in front of the TV just before 8:00 PM to watch some of the Bruins game before retiring for the evening. They didn't look too bad. And I was happy that Tyler Seguin didn't factor into the game too much. I wish he were still with the Bruins.

I was informed yesterday that one of my favorite anglers passed on January 11, 2015. Jim A. Hall was his name. A great guy. And a true Mainer. In fact, more of a Mainer than I will ever be. He was from that part of the state that breeds honesty and integrity. He was both. And he was a lot of fun. He and David Symes started fishing with me about twenty years ago when big cod were a prevalent part of my catch and the target species. We caught so many big fish with them on one trip that Jim was actually glad when he broke off the "biggest cod of his life". He said that there was a limit to what a man should have on the end of his line. And, as I am so clearly reminded more frequently than I would like these days, there is also an end of the line. We referred to Jim as "that A. Hall". He got as much or more fun out of that expression than we did. Last year, he and Duke (David Symes) attended one of the two ultra marathon trips I offered last year. Their first ultra. They had a great time. And it was a wonderful trip. And it may be one of the last times we will be able to catch cod like that. So did Jim die at the end of the cod era? I hope not. And his memory will certainly be a happy one that will live on with me forever. I am a better person for meeting Jim A. Hall.

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 19F, the sky was crystal with nary a cloud in the sky, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility was excellent over the ocean. The salient feature of the day was the wind. There was none. And I don't believe the wind ever got any higher than eight knots on the day, probably less. The ocean was flat calm from sunrise until sunset with a few wind patches on a glassy surface. The air temperature never made it to the freezing mark on any thermometer I saw today. I think I saw 30F at the highest. Although, without the wind, the air temperature was nice standing in the sun. And it was sunny and clear all day. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 31F (with a low of 12F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 34F with a low of 22F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 32F (with a low of 13F).

I worked at the desk from about 6:00 AM until 8:30 AM. The normal stuff. At 8:45 AM, I met my brother at the Cove to wait for the Town's Code Enforcement Officer and fire specialists from the Department to inspect Barnacle Billy's (fire/liquor inspection). After 9:15 AM, I called the office and found that they had thought inspection was at 8:30 AM and had left just before I got down there. I never did find out who was right on the time. But they did agree to come back down. They inspected both buildings and found a half a dozen small items that can be fixed in a day. After they left, I called our electrician so that I could get those items that I would probably forget fixed on Friday. These included things like exit signs with only one light working (they have two), emergency lights with dead batteries (two), etc. I want to change all the exit signs to LED lighted ones so that we don't have to deal with that in the future. I also made a list of the other items so that when we opened all would be completed. I was done at 11:30 AM.

When I got home I had to rush around to get the truck down to York Corner Auto Body to get the truck bed replaced and repaired. I threw my bike in the back so I wouldn't have to be picked up. It was a nice day for riding with lack of wind and sunny skies. I was home by 2:00 PM. From there I grabbed some protein bars (in lieu of lunch) and headed to Portland. But this didn't happen until I could get the Bunny Clark truck going. When I went to start it I found I had a dead battery after the truck hadn't been started for two weeks. (I have some electrical leak somewhere - this is the second new battery in two years. The truck is a 2011.) The truck was down at my sister, Cathy's house. So getting that going took the best part of a half hour.

In Portland I had a list of items I needed for the boat. I'm experimenting with a new type of sea strainer. Plus, I'm changing over the lighting to LED where bulbs have failed. To do all the lights would be too expensive right now. I had to pick up new engine controls. And there were various little items I needed. All this at Hamilton Marine. I got home around 6:00 PM.

Thursday, January 22, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 26F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the north northeast at eighteen knots and the visibility was very good over the ocean as seen from one hundred feet or a little less. The sky started to clear after dawn and I assume it got sunny during the day. But I was inside in a meeting in Danvers, Massachusetts all day. The wind blew out of the north northeast in Ogunquit all morning with wind speeds to twenty knots (or less). The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 38F (with a low of 21F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 37F with a low of 29F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 36F (with a low of 15F).

After doing my normal between 4:00 AM and 7:00 AM, I jumped into the newly charged Bunny Clark truck and headed to a meeting with David Pease at the boat. We went over sea strainers and lighting. From there I headed to the Recreational Advisory Panel (RAP) meeting. The RAP is a Federal committee of the New England Fishery Management Council. We act as an advisory panel to the Council on recreational fishing issues. Since recreational anglers are allotted 33% of Annual Catch Limit (ACL), a lot of what we say and do is reflected in the regulations. However, on regulations specifically, we are held to what the best science available will tell us and allow us to do. And this means we are very restricted in what we really can do. So our real job is to find out how we can work things around for the benefit of the recreational angler and the conservation benefit without going over the ACL. It's tricky. And without representation from the Council (Frank Blount - Francis Fleet, Point Judith, RI is the Council representative on the RAP), we would not be nearly as effective.

We made a couple of motions and pushed forward a few consensus statements to the Council. I didn't write them down. But when I get the language tomorrow I will post them. The meeting lasted from 10:00 AM until about 5:30 PM. Going home I ended up missing the York exit and had to drive to Wells before I could back track south and get home! Sometimes I had myself!

One thing I will say is that under the regulations there will be no possession of haddock or cod until at least May 1, 2015. And this only if Framework 53 is in place by then. I would go into more detail here but all would be moot if something changed before then. I will say that there will be no possession of cod for any angler in the Gulf of Maine in 2015. The other thing I will say is that we are trying to get a four (4) haddock bag limit for the start of the fiscal fishing year, May 1, 2015. We are also asking for a minimum length limit of 17 inches. This went forward as a motion from the RAP today. The commercial limit is 16 inches right now. My feeling is that 4 haddock and seventeen inches will go through. I am an optimist. But I'm sure you knew that already!

When I got home tonight I found that Paul Kostopoulos (CT) had sent me a $250.00 donation supporting my efforts towards a cancer cure with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Paul has supported my cause for the last nine years that I have been doing it. And most of his donations have been this large. I am very grateful for his kindness and help. Thank you so much!

Friday, January 23, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 22F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility was excellent over the ocean. The sky was mostly clear all day with plenty of sun. The wind blew out of the west all day at ten to fifteen knots. The air temperature got over the freezing mark, at least, but I never did see a thermometer. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 35F (with a low of 17F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 37F with a low of 24F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 34F (with a low of 12F).

I spent the time from 7:30 AM until 11:30 AM at the Cove, at Barnacle Billy's in the office. We have two more days of electrical work to complete. This was one. And I was there to let Bridges Electric in at 8:00 AM. But I had a lot of desk work including revamping the Barnacle Billy's work order and answering vendor questions along with various emails on various subjects. After lunch, I rode my bike over to a meeting at the "Barn" where the Bunny Clark resides. We went over the placement of the new engine room lights, the new position with the new sea strainer and went over electrical questions. The meeting ended with parts and part numbers. When I got back home, I got on the phone to chase all these parts down. I hope to do so tomorrow.

As far as Recreational Advisory Panel (RAP) motions (suggestions) put forward to the Council, they appear below as promised. I'm not going into detail here. I'm just going to show you what we put up for the Council's review.:

1. The RAP recommends that the outreach component to recreational anglers regarding changes to the Gulf of Maine (GOM) cod and haddock management measures, currently underway by the Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office, continue and its impact on reducing non-compliance be considered when predicting recreational catches for FY 2015.

2. For the purposes of reducing discard mortality on GOM cod and haddock, the RAP recommends prohibiting the use of more than two hooks per line while fishing for groundfish in the GOM. Only inline circle hooks may be baited. When using a jig or artificial lure, only single point j-hooks may be used (e.g., no treble hooks). Teasers, feathers, flies etc. may be used but count toward the use of no more than two hooks per line.

3. In light of no possession on cod and expected declines in effort (including consideration of Motions 1 and 2 and the consensus statements below), the RAP recommends that proactive AMs for GOM haddock in FY 2015 be a bag limit of at least 4 fish, a 17 inch minimum fish size, and closed seasons during wave 2 (March 1 to April 30) and wave 5 (September 1 to October 31).

4. The RAP recommends exploration of conservation equivalent proactive AMs to separate party/charter from the private modes in FY 2015 (e.g., Letter of Authorization (LOA) for charter boats to have a reduced season in exchange for an increased bag limit).

5. The RAP requests that limited access in the party/charter fleet be addressed in the next available Groundfish action.

RAP Consensus Statements:

1) The RAP feels that directed GOM angler trips will decline substantially in FY 2015 under no possession for GOM cod and the anticipated low bag limit for GOM haddock for the recreational fishery. The RAP feels that the change in effort between FY 2014 and FY 2015 would be at least a 50% decline. Data provided in Table 12 (Document # 4b, NEFSC/SSB, Recreational Catch and Effort Tables, dated January 14, 2015) supports this concern as declines in effort between FY 2013 to FY 2014 from the GOM cod and GOM haddock wave 5 (September 1 to October 31) closure were estimated to be a 85% decline overall.

2) The RAP feels that under no possession of GOM cod that party, charter, and private vessels will be much less likely to fish in areas known to have aggregations of cod and less likely to use equipment to target cod. The ability of anglers to avoid cod is not taken into account in FY 2015 recreational catch projections. Therefore, the RAP feels that cod bycatch would be greatly reduced from what is projected for FY 2015.

3) Recreational discards were not considered in the allocation of GOM cod and haddock. Discard mortality estimates are being used in recreational catch projections to determine potential accountability measures (AMs). The RAP recommends that this concern be considered when implementing AMs.

Saturday, January 24, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 29F, the sky was overcast, there was very little wind but enough to know it was blowing out of the southwest (At the same time the closest offshore weather buoy was giving fifteen to twenty knots.) and the visibility was excellent over the ocean. At 7:00 AM it started to snow. It was still snowing lightly and had the ground covered by 9:00 AM. It continued to snow all day. The air temperature started to warm to the freezing mark. But, before 10:00 AM, the wind hauled out of the north to stop any further temperature increases. By noon, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots or better, stronger as the afternoon progressed. It kept snowing after noon but not as strong as it snowed during the morning. The snow was fairly dry with bigger than normal flakes after the wind shift. Light snow continued periodically until sunset. The air temperature never reached the freezing mark to my knowledge. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 32F (with a low of 25F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 34F with a low of 31F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 32F (with a low of 17F).

After a run on the beach with the dog (just as it started to snow), I headed to Portland to pick up materials needed for the Bunny Clark engine work. I was back before noon to have lunch. I worked at the desk for a while along with some snow shoveling. That was my working day.

Sunday, January 25, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 31F, the sky was clear, there was about five inches of snow on the ground from yesterday's weather event, the wind was blowing out of the west at about fifteen knots (twenty-five plus at the eight mile mark - offshore) and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The sky was a mixture of overcast during most of the morning and sunny skies in the afternoon. The air temperature climbed over the freezing mark. The visibility was excellent. The wind blew out of the west northwest fairly strong with gusts up to thirty knots. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 37F (with a low of 11F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 38F with a low of 19F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 35F (with a low of 8F).

I worked at the desk on Bunny Clark stuff until about 9:00 AM. From then until 2:00 PM, I worked on Barnacle Billy's stuff, almost exclusively on temporary foreign worker forms and templates. In the end I emailed documents I had filled out to allow an eastern European student to see if he could get a visa to work for us for four months. He worked for us last season and wanted to come back. After a late lunch, I spent the rest of the daylight hours shoveling snow and getting things ready for the storm we are expected to get on Tuesday and part of Wednesday. Fingers crossed!



This picture was taken on my lobster boat, the Petrel a little after sunset. I was just finishing up the shoveling. The picture shows our dog, Gill, lying in the last bit of snow left to shovel.

Monday, January 26, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 8F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knot and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind steadily increased from the northeast all day. By noon it was averaging about fifteen knots. By sunset, the wind was a sustained twenty or more knots with gusts over twenty-five knots. We had light snow periodically during the day but mostly in the afternoon. The morning was mostly sunny. The afternoon was mostly overcast. There was no snow between 4:00 PM and 8:00 PM (when I went to bed). The air temperature never got above a value of 20F, that I saw, in Ogunquit. There was sea smoke on the ocean for the first two hours of daylight. The visibility was very good over the ocean when it wasn't snowing. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 20F (with a low of 3F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 29F with a low of 11F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 21F (with a low of -2F).

I spent the whole day working on new engine related stuff with the Bunny Clark and Bunny Clark winter repairs. I was at the Bunny Clark at 8:00 AM where Dave Pease and I went over a few more items. We are replacing the outside cutlass bearing. Dave showed me where fishing line, over the years, has gotten in there and scored the propeller shaft. Interesting. Also, Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston had prepped the engine room with West System epoxy and were starting to paint it white. From there I went to Navtronics to pick up grounding wire to bring back to the Bunny Clark.

By 9:15 I was back in the Cove at the Harbor Master's shack talking over storm logistics with Fred Mayo (our Harbor Master). Afterward, I was in the office at Barnacle Billy's with Sarah DeCoste and my sister, Cathy. We went over a few business related items. While there, Cathy mentioned that my mother hadn't heard her generator going off at the scheduled time and suggested I take a look. So, my next move was up to my mother's house. There I found the generator battery was as dead as a smelt. So I made some calls (one to NAPA - battery), went home for tools, took the old battery out and went back home to get Deb (my wife). Deb drove me to York Corner Auto Body where I picked up my truck that had been repaired perfectly. In fact, it looked so good that if it weren't so much money I would have had the other side of the bed done too! From there I went to NAPA to trade out batteries, to Greenleaves Chinese to have a quick lunch and then to my mother's to see if I could get the generator going.

I would say that the next two hours was spent at my mother's. I installed the new battery and was able to start the generator. I had made a call earlier to the company who originally serviced the generator on a plan that had been discontinued, I found out. This wasn't good. I had set my parents up on this plan a few years ago. But in the meantime their company structure changed and the plan no longer existed. And, to my knowledge, my parents weren't informed. So I was told I had to re-negotiate a new plan - something to do in the near future. In the meantime, the service tech (who initially couldn't come down and check out the generator) called and said he would be there at about the time I had the battery installed. And he was correct. The engine oil hadn't been changed for two years and the panel had issues. This was completed around 3:30 PM. I watched while Mark, the service tech, completed the job. The generator was operational and peace of mind was established.

I met my son, Micah, down at the Cove before 4:00 PM. I tied storm lines on the Petrel, our lobster boat. Afterward, the two of us hoisted the skiff out of the water and put it in the back of the Bunny Clark truck. I found a place to park the truck with the skiff in the back until the storm was to be over on Wednesday - at which time I will put the skiff back in. Then the two of us went around and shoveled areas to prepare for more snow. I ended up finishing the day at 5:30 PM having really accomplished not too much in the way of moving forward with the Guestletter. In fact, I haven't been able to do a thing with the Guestletter for quite a while now.

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 13F, the sky was overcast, it was snowing, there was two or three more inches of snow on the ground, the wind was blowing out of the north northeast at thirty-five to forty-five knots blowing what little snow we had into drifts and the visibility over the ocean was fair to poor in fine snow. The tide was very high in Perkins Cove at 4:30 AM and only a foot under the deck at Barnacle Billy's - so the rum punch area was fine. There was minor splash-over in the Parking lot every once in a while and very little surge in the Cove even thought weather buoy wave heights were reported at fourteen feet every eight seconds. By daylight, the snow came down harder driven by the strong winds. The air temperature stayed cold so it was almost better, when driving, to leave the heat off the winds so you wouldn't have to deal with frozen wiper blades.

By noon, we had at least eighteen inches of snow on the ground. The surge in the Cove had picked up but the boats had settled in nicely. It was still very hard to see with the blowing snow. The wind blew out of the north which really saved us from any coastal flooding in Ogunquit. If the wind had been out of the northeast, we would have had some serious problems. And, although I didn't believe it was going to happen, we did have gusts to sixty knots. I can't remember the last time I saw sixty knots. I can remember earlier times when I saw sixty knots (two times sustained) but not the last time. We never did totally lose power although it flickered off for five minutes at one time. The generator ran about ten times but never to bring power to the house. By nightfall, we had over two feet of snow on the ground. Some drifts were six feet but the snow was deep everywhere. And even with being plowed late in the morning I still got stuck halfway up the driveway late afternoon. The high air temperature that I saw in Ogunquit was 16F. I don't know when it stopped snowing. It was blowing so hard you could tell if it was snowing or that the wind was picking up the fallen snow. Seas twenty miles offshore were as high as thirty feet. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 17F (with a low of 11F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 19F with a low of 14F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 21F (with a low of 12F).

I would like to say that I got some work done. But I didn't. I did have two hours where I didn't have to shovel or worry about Perkins Cove. But I used that time to watch a video on Lance Armstrong. And once I started that video (Stop at Nothing - a BBC production) I couldn't stop. Steve Canizzo first told me about this video this summer. But I didn't have time to watch it at that time. How I thought to look at it today, I don't know. It's not that I have a reminder taped to my computer or anything. It was quite a video. Certainly if you are a Tour de France fanatic like I am you won't be able to start to watch it without seeing the whole thing.

At 3:00 PM, I started shoveling again, meeting my brother, Court, and sisters, Meg & Cathy, down at the Cove before 4:00 PM. Although it was high tide at 5:00 PM, you could tell that we weren't going to have any serious flooding. So a bunch of us including Mike Remkiewicz and Jeffrey Riccio, two of our best local lobstermen, shoveled the whole deck and the patio at Barnacle Billy's, the road storm drains, the doorway path, the roof and deck at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. It took us about two hours to do the job. I kept shoveling at that house until about 6:30 PM. I was done for the day after that.



This picture was taken at around 5:00 PM. At the time the wind was out of the north gusting to sixty knots. The scene is Bob & Joan LePage's (MA) favorite part of the deck at Barnacle Billy's restaurant. At that time the snow drift there measured four feet. The drift in the foreground by the fire egress gate is six and a half feet high. It was 13F at the time, a bit cold for steamers and a rum punch! You can see that the tide is just under the dock. If the ramp were there you would have to walk up it to get to the float at the other end! We are very thankful that the wind was out of the north instead of the northeast. Otherwise, it would have been a mess down there.

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 16F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the north at thirty-five knots with higher gusts and the visibility over the ocean was good at least. By 9:30 AM, the sun had shown itself. It remained mostly sunny for the rest of the day. Wind speeds went from almost forty-five knots out of the north northwest to fifteen to twenty knots out of the northwest at around 8:00 PM. When it was all said and done Ogunquit got somewhere over two feet of snow, one of the biggest snowfalls I have seen in recent years. There was very little surge in the Cove. The air temperature got up into the high 20s. If the air temperature got any higher I wouldn't have known. I never did check it. The visibility over the ocean by noon was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 26F (with a low of 7F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 24F with a low of 13F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 23F (with a low of 1F).

After getting most of this update finished, I started shoveling snow at 5:30 AM. I continued shoveling until 9:00 AM when I took a break, came inside, grabbed a coffee, finished the update section and then put it on line. Before 10:00 AM I was back outside shoveling out the Bunny Clark truck with the skiff in the back. Once I cleared enough snow to get my truck out, I drove down to the Cove to launch the skiff. Once it was in the water I skulled out to the Petrel to shovel her out and take all the storm lines off her. There was really not much of a surge. After shoveling the rest of the back of the truck out I headed home to grab a sandwich. I also had some calls to make and office work to complete. At 1:30 PM, I got a call from Hamilton Marine to say that my lights had arrived. So I jumped in the truck and drove to Portland. It was 4:45 PM when I returned. I'm all set to go back to work tomorrow.

Thursday, January 29, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 8F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at about eight knots and the visibility over the ocean seemed very good. At daylight, the sea smoke was obscuring the visibility at sea level looking east. But the sea smoke was gone by 10:00 AM. The air temperature climbed out of the cellar and was above freezing by early afternoon; or at least it felt like it. The sky was bright in a cloudless sky for most of the day. By sunset, the clouds had overtaken most of the sky - which became overcast not an hour later. The wind was light and variable in direction all day. The ocean was flat calm, a good day for sailing humans. The visibility was excellent by noon. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 30F (with a low of -3F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 32F with a low of 10F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 31F (with a low of -11F).

After I got the morning chores done and this update posted, office work took the rest of the morning. Bills, decisions, logistics and my mother's generator took the time from 9:00 AM until 11:00 AM. From there I headed to the Bunny Clark for a short meeting with Jared Keniston, Dave Pease and Ian Keniston. I also had some supplies to drop off. From there I had to drop my road bike off for repairs (Papa Wheelies, Portsmouth, New Hampshire). Some of the gears on that bike turned 60,000 miles by the end of this year, including the big ring. So that will probably have to be changed out. I had an appointment with the endodontist (also in Portsmouth) at 12:30 PM to finish the root canal project on number 15. I didn't get out of there until about 2:15 PM. From there I drove to the New England Fishery Management Council meeting at the Sheraton in Portsmouth. I attended this meeting until 5:00 PM.

The Council meeting in Portsmouth was important to us because they were considering the motions the Recreational Advisory Panel (RAP) made. Frank Blount, the RAP's Council representative (and owner of the Francis Fleet in Point Judith, RI), read off all the motions (that I presented to you in the January 23rd entry). Every motion and consensus statement passed the muster of the Council except for separating party/charter vessels from the recreational angler. I think most Council members saw this as an attempt by the for-hire fleet to split the sub-ACL (total cod & haddock yearly allotment given to the recreational angler in general). It was also a bit confusing, the Council didn't have a lot of time and I think they thought that pursuing this avenue would take too much time. Those aren't good reasons but I don't think the Council members knew how to take this motion and didn't have time enough to digest it.

The thing that most concerns me is that John Bullard, the Regional Administrator of our local National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in Gloucester, Massachusetts, had concerns that these motions wouldn't cut it. And this is the reason. He thinks that qualitatively these motions don't scientifically cut effort on the cod population enough to allow us a bag limit of haddock. In other words, the more we stay on the fishing grounds catching haddock, the more likely it is that we will catch cod. And cod the recreational angler catches will be counted against the small sub-ACL we have been given. And we might exceed it. And we can't exceed the cod sub-ACL. Our argument is that because the recreational is going to have a much reduced effort (less passengers, less trips, less incentive to go fishing for groundfish) we won't be on the fishing grounds as long anyway. We also feel that gear modifications will also do the trick - which I believe they will. But the NMFS argues that there are no proven studies on cod with the use of the circle hooks, nor has it been peer reviewed. So NMFS feels it will be accepting these motions in good faith. And good faith doesn't cut it with them. They want a guarantee. They want proof. And they want statistics and models to prove it. Of course, the bottom line, to me, is that the recreational angler didn't create the problem (anyone with any fishing common sense knows this) and the recreational angler with all the restrictions in the world won't bring the cod population back. That alone should be reason enough to give the recreational angler a four to six haddock bag limit and the benefit of the doubt. My take, of course.

So, essentially, the Council rubber stamped the motions produced by the RAP and sent them on to NMFS for approval. If the NMFS accepts them as ideas that will produce less fishing on cod, less catching of cod and less killing of cod then I think we will have a four (or more) haddock bag limit with a minimum size of seventeen inches. If the NMFS does not feel that these ideas go far enough to limit the take of cod then we could see any number of new restrictions which could include: changes in the fishing season, very little or no possession of haddock or, even, a restriction in the areas we can fish.

The good news is that, regardless of the regulations, I will still have a fishing vessel with a brand new engine and bank payments. This reminds me of that joke about the first lobsterman to win the lottery in Maine. The Portland Press Herald immediately sent a reporter up to Eastport, where the fisherman lived, to get an in-person interview. The first question the man was asked was; "What are you going to do with all your money?" His reply; "I'm just gonna keep fishin' til it's all gone!"

Friday, January 30, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 32F, the sky was overcast, there was a light misty rain that was freezing on vehicles and trees, the wind was blowing out of the south at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good. For most of the morning, the wind was very light with light snow falling straight down. The air temperature hung around the freezing mark or above so all the snow hung on the trees. It looked more like Ketchum, Idaho than Ogunquit, Maine. And I knew Ketchum very well for one winter. The sky remained overcast all day. And there was never a period where the snow wasn't falling, albeit, very lightly. At the end of the day I measured about four or five inches. Around sunset, the wind hauled out of the northwest and started to blow, the air temperature started to drop and the snow that had looked so beautiful covering every branch of every tree was blown off leaving bare branches in the dark. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 32F (with a low of 21F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 34F with a low of 19F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 32F (with a low of 15F).

I spent until 9:00 AM working at Bunny Clark Central, getting ready for the first day of bookings, finishing my daily report, answering emails and on the phone. By 9:15 AM, I was down in the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc working on restaurant stuff. I finished there at 12:30 PM. I had a quick lunch at home and then spent until 4:15 PM working on the Guestletter. I left my work half way through figuring out the fisherman of the Bunny Clark year. At 4:15 PM, I headed out to start shoveling snow. I finished that at 6:15 PM.

Saturday, January 31, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 11F, the sky was overcast, light snow and blowing snow was noted, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at thirty knots with higher gusts and the visibility over the ocean was fair to poor in snow and some sea smoke. After I shoveled last night we had received almost two more inches of light loosely packed snow. The wind blew out of the northwest at twenty-five to thirty knots with higher gusts all day. And it was cold as well. So the wind made the air temperature seem frigid. The highest air temperature that I saw was 18F in Ogunquit. The sky was sunny all day. The visibility was excellent most of the day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 22F (with a low of 7F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 21F with a low of 11F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 15F (with a low of 4F).

Except for some minor shoveling of snow, I stayed at the desk and worked on the Guestletter all day. I had completed all my research by noon. After lunch I started setting up the Guestletter for the Internet.

Deb spent the afternoon getting the reservation book ready for the first day of reservations.

Super Bowl Sunday, February 1, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 8F, the sky was clear, the wind was barely blowing out of the west (eight miles off shore it was blowing twenty knots) and the visibility over the ocean was good in what looked at the time like sea smoke. The sky stayed clear until after sunset when overcast conditions took over. The wind blew out of the northwest at about twenty knots, more or less, the whole day. By late afternoon, it had died out substantially, enough so that I knew ice would be forming in the Cove overnight - and I didn't want to tie storm lines on the boats if the ice breaker was going to have to be working in the morning to break it up. The visibility was excellent by 9:00 AM. I never did look at a thermometer today but it felt close to (but under) the freezing mark for a high temperature in Ogunquit today. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 26F (with a low of -1F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 30F with a low of 12F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 22F (with a low of 1F).

Deb got up at 11:30 PM last night to get ready for the phone to ring at midnight. I forgot to shut off the phone upstairs so I didn't sleep after the first ring. At 12:30 AM, I decided to get up, make myself a coffee and ask Deb if she wanted me to take over. I did so at 1:00 AM. The phone was busy with call waiting when Deb had the phone for the first hour. After that it slowed down quite a bit. It was definitely slower than last year. But it wasn't bad. Deb got up again at 6:00 AM and took over by 6:30 AM. The rest of the day reservations came and went. Around noon we had a good bunch of reservations come all at the same time. Reservations came in at a normal pace until the first period of the Super Bowl. After that the phone stayed quiet - as it should.

As for my place in the work day, I was dead tired by 8:30 AM and could not concentrate on the Guestletter that I was trying to work on. Actually, I was felt I might have been doing more harm than good. So I backed away from that project and took a nap. I fell dead asleep until 12:30 PM! So I guess I was more tired than I thought I was.

After a later lunch than I wanted during which I watched the Capitols/Blues hockey game, I worked on getting the house, yard, boat and restaurants ready for the impending snow storm tomorrow. I skulled out to the Petrel and went aboard her to make sure things were okay there. And I did tighten up a storm stern line that I usually run loose during good weather - just in case.

I made an attempt to watch the Super Bowl, getting through the first two periods in the process. I ended up going to bed after that. I am not much of a football fan. But I do like the Patriots and that whole organization, a class act for sure. I enjoyed all of what I watched. But I was tired and I tend to jinx the teams I watch. So I wasn't thinking of me but all the Pats fans who want to see a win and put the rubber stamp on Brady being the best NHL quarterback in history. If I had watched that game and they had lost I never would have forgiven myself.

The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute got a special gift from my sister, Meg, today as well. She donated $2,000.00 to help me with my cancer fund raising with the Pan-Mass Challenge. She had a special reason for doing so: "In loving memory of my dear friend Guy Woodward, who leaves behind the love of his life, his wife Candy, his children and grandchildren. This world will be a lot less bright without him in it!!" Guy was also a good friend of mine and worked at our restaurants as well. I must say, the especially generous donation and the kind words (and the fact that it was my sister) brought a tear to my eye. Thank you, Meg, for allowing me the privilege of being your conduit to such a wonderful organization. And thanks for doing so much to help those with cancer and for cancer victims in the future.

Monday, February 2, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 9F, the sky was overcast, a light snow was falling, it was just starting, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in light snow and minor sea smoke. By 7:00 AM, we had three inches of very dry snow on the ground, the wind had hauled out of the north at twenty or more knots and the air temperature had dropped to 7F. It was snowing hard at that time. By 8:00 AM, the air temperature had dropped to 6F. In fact, I looked at the thermometer quite often today and never saw an air temperature above 9F. It snowed all day, slowing down a bit after noon and picking an hour later. It snowed until a little before 8:00 PM before stopping. The snow fell today blown by northerly winds that gusted as high as fifty-five knots in Ogunquit. This was nearly as strong in gusts as the last storm. The wind blew a sustained thirty knots most of the time. But for a period of four hours in the afternoon it blew harder than that with frequent gusts to forty knots or better. The fact that the wind was from the north, like the last storm, saved the Cove from serious ocean water flooding for buildings near the water. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 12F (with a low of 3F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 31F with a low of 10F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 12F (with a low of 6F).

I woke up a midnight and checked my iPhone to see who had won the Super Bowl. And I was surprised to see that the Pats had won. Surprised because it seems that Seattle had pulled victory out of the jaws of defeat too many times to think otherwise. Plus, they have a great defense. So, after I went back to bed and got up at 4:00 AM, I spent part of the morning just watching TV to see how the whole game played out. Sometimes I think I get more enjoyment out of that than I do living and dying with every move during a game. Tom Brady was at Barnacle Billy's restaurant in 2006. My brother, Court (an avid football fan), talked with him for quite a bit during the time he was there. I was on the Bunny Clark running a fishing trip on that day. Court told me that Brady was a super guy. And my brother is a good judge of character (and characters). So I was glad for him, myself and New England that Brady won the Super Bowl with the Patriots. Sports fans have been gifted in New England for quite a while now.

I spent a significant amount of time running back and forth to the Cove during the day. And I spent about two hours shoveling snow. The rest of the time was spent working in the Guestletter.

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 3F, the sky was clear, we had over a foot of snow on the ground from yesterday's storm, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good or better than that in minor sea smoke. The wind blew out of the northwest at fifteen to twenty knots most of the day. By afternoon, the wind had dropped to about five knots out of the west. The air temperature stayed cold all day - or it felt that way. It did climb over the 20F mark but where it went from there I don't know. Maybe 22F? I do know it didn't reach the freezing mark. The visibility turned out to be excellent over the water. The sky was clear all day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 20F (with a low of 0F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 22F with a low of 6F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 22F (with a low of -7F).

After putting a new edition up on this site, I started right in on the shoveling. I would say that I put about three and a half hours of steady shoveling in. I did very little down in the Cove except for my skiff and some of my friends skiffs that hadn't been shoveled yet. I was going to skull out to the Petrel to shovel her out as well but the time ran out. And we are getting more snow shortly so I might as well wait for more.

I spent an hour and a half at Barnacle Billy's, Etc, mostly in the office. But I also went over a couple of inspection items that needed to be addressed with our carpenter, Jack Ladderbush. They are now involved replacing windows there. I have one more year on my window replacing project and it will be done.

After lunch I emersed myself in the Bunny Clark Guestletter, getting in a few more paragraphs and adopting a theme that will carry through it. I hate to stop and start this project. But one good thing that comes out of this is that I get a slightly different perspective every time I start again. Usually, the first half hour is spent rewriting previous paragraphs!

I gave up the Guestletter at 4:30 PM. I spent a while carrying bags of pellets into the house. After that I suited up and went for a 4+ mile run on Ogunquit Beach with our dog Gill. I had been doing shorter distances at a little over a 7 minute pace (3 miles, usually). With the dog off the leash Gill would get distracted and stray to the point where I couldn't see him. So we stayed hooked up for most of the run and I slowed the pace to 8 minutes. I'm not comfortable at 7 minutes anyway and I tend to get hurt. My upper body (breathing included) is very much is shape (from the bike) which makes me feel I can run faster than I really am able. I end up pulling some muscle or other. This has been happening all to frequently over the last few years. It's not like the bike where I can kill myself with very few after effects.

At 6:00 PM, I attended a selectman's meeting in Town. Barnacle Billy's, Inc.'s liquor and entertainment licenses were up for renewal. A representative from the company has to be there to field questions someone might have. So if there isn't a representative there they won't issue a renewal. All went well. The select board voted unanimously to renew our licenses. I was done in a little more than a half hour. We have a very good town manager. It was worth being there just to hear his report before we got to the license renewals.

Wednesday, February 4, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 13F (it was 6F at 3:00 AM), the sky was milky overcast, the wind was light out of the west and the visibility over the ocean seemed very good. The sky stayed overcast for most of the day with about an hour of sun in between. The air temperature topped out at 33F (or more) in Ogunquit. And it was funny how warm that temperature felt with the sun out, albeit, briefly. The wind was fairly light all morning with westerly winds. But this turned into a southwest wind that blew up to almost twenty knots (particularly felt on Ogunquit Beach). The visibility over the ocean was very good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 35F (with a low of -2F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 38F with a low of 14F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 31F (with a low of -7F).

After working on this site until a little after 7:00 AM, I went back to the Guestletter. I have only been able to spend about three or four hours a day on it. This seems like a lot from an outsiders perspective. But it really isn't when you consider that I'm writing it in HTML and trying to build a fairly unique Internet presentation. I'm probably about a third of the way through it with the hardest part behind me. I hope to get it behind me by the 10th of February. We'll see how it goes.

I spent an hour or so down at Barnacle Billy's restaurant, checking on the carpentry work and working in the office.

After lunch, I had to bring my truck over to my dealership in Portsmouth, Coast GMC, and drop it off. They have been very good to me over the years there. When York Corner Body Shop replaced the right side of the bed after being T-boned in Newington, the Line-X barrier protector wasn't replaced. All that was missing was the top rail. I like it there because I don't have to worry about scratching the rail to bare metal when throwing traps in the back or whatever. The dealership was going to take care of that for me. So I left the truck there, got picked up by my wife, Deb, and got forced into shopping at Trader Joe's.

Once back home I continued with the Guestletter. I quit about 4:00 PM so I could go for a bike ride and get some exercise in.

Also, with the reservations we have been getting the number one question we have been getting is: "Can we keep cod this season?" The answer is no, unless, by some miracle they change things. I don't think they will. First of all, the New England Fishery Management Council (that body who advises the National Marine Fisheries Service) won't go that route. This is because we are managed with a percentage of cod that we share with the commercial fishermen. There is such a small quantity of cod available - that the government will give us (called an ACL) - that just the recreational discards of cod alone (when you consider a 30% mortality rate for caught & released cod) might put us over the limit the recreational angler is allowed. And because the recreational angler was fortunate enough to not be included in the rolling commercial groundfish closed areas it is thought that recreational fishermen will have greater access to cod. And, quite frankly, the commercial fisherman, would like to have a larger percentage of the ACL. Right now the recreational angler has one third of the total while the commercial fisherman has two thirds.

The other question is: "Can we keep haddock?" The answer is yes, but not until at least May 1, 2015. The framework action that the National Marine Fisheries Service is trying to approve (it's actually a Council framework action, number 53) will allow us haddock and is expected to be in place by May 1st or the beginning of the Federal fiscal fishing year. If by some quirk the NMFS can't get this done by May 1, we won't be able to keep haddock until May 12. This is because we are now under the rules of an interim six month emergency action that started on November 12, 2014. The framework action supersedes the interim action as long as NMFS gets it in place on time. How many haddock will the angler get? The true answer is: I don't know. But I truly do believe that if the NMFS is thinking logically we will have a bag limit of four haddock with a minimum size limit of seventeen inches (17"). If the population of haddock is so high right now how come we don't get a larger bag limit? Because NMFS is under the impression that if we are allowed to stay on the grounds and catch haddock it will give us more of a chance to catch cod. Cod is the driver because the cod stocks are in such bad shape. What NMFS doesn't understand is that when we target haddock we don't catch many cod, our business has been cut back because we aren't able to keep cod so there won't be as many boats out there, if we can't keep cod we are not going to trying to find cod areas and we don't nearly have the impact on the cod stocks that the NMFS thinks we have.

I hope I explained this in a way that will allow you understand the upcoming fishing regulations as it relates to cod and haddock. All the other species are under the same regulations they have been for the last few years.

Thursday, February 5, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 32F (it was 6F at 3:00 AM), the sky was overcast, it was snowing, there was two inches of new fluffy snow on the ground, the wind was light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was fair to poor in snow. It snowed most of the morning and stayed overcast for the whole morning. After noon, the snow stopped and the sun came out. My mid afternoon, the sky was clear. At the end, I would say we had four or more inches of snow. The wind hauled out of the west after sunrise and then northwest during the late morning. By mid afternoon, the wind direction was north northwest. Wind speeds ranged from fifteen to twenty-five knots. Sustained winds were generally about twenty knots. The air temperature got up above freezing. 34F was the highest air temperature I saw. After noon, the visibility was excellent. The air temperature had dropped to 18F by 5:00 PM. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 34F (with a low of 4F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 36F with a low of 7F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 32F (with a low of 2F).

After editing this site and uploading it to the server, I called Ian Keniston at the Bunny Clark. They had a list of supplies they needed (#8 bonding wire, elbows, a pump, etc). So I got the list, compared prices, found the best ones at Hamilton Marine, Portland, Maine (knowing I could bring the items back if I needed to) and got the truck ready to drive up in the snow. I started out at 9:30 AM but got caught in stopped traffic in for at least a half hour before I could get on Route 95 (turnpike). There had been a crash before the Wells exit and trailer trucks and cars were being re-routed to Route 1 around it. I was in the middle of it. I finally got to Portland on roads with snow that were actually better than expected without much traffic (once I got to Route 95). I picked up the order and headed back.

By the time I got back to the Bunny Clark, it was 12:30 PM. Times flies for me. We discussed a few things. And then it was time to head back. I had stopped on the turnpike to get a Whopper from Burger King. So I had eaten lunch. But, because I ate where I did, I was aware of it for the rest of the day. At 2:30 PM, I started shoveling snow. The house, a bit of the restaurant and the Petrel took me exactly two hours. And I can tell you that I'm getting better at this! I called it quits for the day after the shoveling.



The shot above was taken from the helm looking aft. It shows the freshly Awlgripped (linear polyurethane paint) painted engine room, the shaft coupling, a can of Polar soda and the engine room lighting. It also shows a part of Ian Keniston painting (enamel green) the oak rub rail. I think that by the time we receive the engine, we will be ready to place it.

Friday, February 6, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was -1F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at ten to fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair in sea smoke close to the surface. The sky was sunny all day but the air temperature remained cold. By late morning, the air temperature was in the teens after bottoming out at -6F before taking the climb back up. I never did see what I thought might be the high for the day but I did see 18F. The wind blew out of the west most of the day with light winds in the morning and westerly winds of fifteen knots or better later in the afternoon. The visibility was excellent after 10:00 AM. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 19F (with a low of -9F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 21F with a low of 5F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 21F (with a low of -3F).

The day started like all others. At 9:30 AM, I chaired a managers meeting at Barnacle Billy's to go over returning employees and award them the positions they wanted. These individual decisions were made by the managers of each of the two restaurants depending on where the employee worked. A couple of them work at both places. And a few will work at Barnacle Billy's (original) before they switch over to Barnacle Billy's, Etc. a month (or so) later when that restaurant opens. I basically rubber stamped every decision that was made. The management staff here is a wonderful bunch and make it really easy for me to make decisions. No one person can do it all. And if I come across as doing a great job (God forbid), it's because of their good work. Needless to say, it was a fruitful meeting.

Deb had prepared a sandwich for me that I had placed in the truck for my next move. And this move was to Dave's Boat Shop (the "Barn"). I ate the sandwich on the ride, the twenty-five minutes it takes to get there. I met Dave there, along with Ian & Jared. We talked for a bit and then Dave and I headed for Wakefield, Massachusetts to Power Products. One of the Volvo engines, like the one I am getting, had arrived there the day before. I wanted to have Dave and I look at the engine together so we could better know what to change before our engine arrived. Bruce Woodfin, the salesman, met us at Power Products. I would say that we went over the engine for about an hour and a half. It was a very good experience, we were treated very well and I was much more comfortable with Dave there.

After dropping Dave off and going home, I commandeered my wife into taking me to our car dealership where my finished truck was waiting to be picked up. I ended up back home at 5:30 PM.

Saturday, February 7, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 16F, the sky was partly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten to fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The sky maintained it's partly cloudy status until well after sunrise. I'm not sure when the sky started to cloud over. But, by 10:00 AM, the sky was overcast. The wind blew out of the west at fifteen knots or more until then. After 10:00 AM, the wind speed dropped to five or ten knots. At 2:30 PM, the wind hauled out of the southwest and started to blow to fifteen knots almost immediately. This continued (fifteen knots, more or less) into the night. The air temperature got up into the high 20s. The visibility was excellent most of the day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 28F (with a low of 8F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 29F with a low of 16F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 29F (with a low of 1F).

From 2:30 AM until 9:00 AM, I spent reading (a novel), watching movies (HBO) and finishing this entry. From 9:00 AM until just shy of 2:30 PM, I worked (writing and editing) on the Guestletter. From there, Deb & I hitched a ride with Hez & Jo Haseltine to Amsbury, Massachusetts to celebrate my grand nephew's birthday. My sister, Meg, was there with the best lobsterman I know, Mike Remkiewicz. And it was hosted at Bryant & Abby Mitchell's house. The lucky boy was six year old Landon. His younger brother, Wyatt, was there. Wyatt was born with cystic fibrosis (CF) which kept him in Children's Hospital, Boston, for the first few weeks of his life. He's two and a half and doing well. But this is the honeymoon phase of the disease. At five years old he may be faced with new challenges. I'm praying that they are slight. Anyway, it was a fun time with a wonderful part of my family. We were back home by 5:30 PM.

Last week I took the dog, Gill, to the barn with me to talk over a few things with Jared Keniston and Ian Keniston. Normally I don't let the dog in the barn because he tends to be a biological tack cloth and picks up all the paint dust (on his white hair) from sanded surfaces around the boat. And there are plenty of those - getting less every day. It can take quite a lot of time to clean him up. But the scene seemed safe enough. After my conversation with Jared & Ian, Gill and I jumped in the truck and headed back. I looked at the dog and figured that he had done pretty well, just a few green paint dust spots that I could easily clean up before Deb got to see him. I needed to talk to the harbor master, Fred Mayo, because I needed to know his ideas on breaking ice and tying on storm lines. So I stopped in the Cove. During the conversation he looked down at Gill and asked what happened to his whiskers. Indeed, the whiskers were gone, with one stray one curled up at the end. In fact, some of his hair was missing too. Then I realized: the salamander in the barn. Gill must have poked his head around the hot end when I was talking with Ian & Jared and looked in at the hot cherry red part. It would only have taken a second to get the results, burning his whiskers off. But I never heard a yelp or a bark. So I told Fred not to breath a word to Deb. But that didn't matter. After I got to the house, I went up to the office. Meanwhile, my son showed up at the house and asked Deb; "What happened to Gill's whiskers?" Needless to say, we didn't get through the barn experience un-tainted this time either. And this was harder to explain than the paint dust.

Sunday, February 8, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 20F, the sky was overcast, it was snowing, about three inches of snow had fallen since just before midnight, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at a speed over twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean was poor in blowing snow. At 1:00 AM (the dog woke me up chewing on a "Nylabone" on our hard wood floor) the air temperature was 26F. By 7:00 AM, the air temperature had dropped to 15F. The snow stopped falling at about 9:00 AM. At 9:40 AM, we saw the sun come out. We saw the sun for at least an hour. The sky didn't really clear but you could see the golden orb through the clouds. After noon, the sky became overcast again but it didn't start snowing again until at least 7:00 PM. The air temperature dropped to about 12F and stayed there for most of the day, dropping lower (10F) after sunset. The wind kept blowing out of the north after hauling out of that direction before noon. The wind had more north in it even when it was blowing northeast before daylight. Wind speeds were twenty to thirty knots all day. The visibility was good from noon until sunset. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 22F (with a low of 9F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 29F with a low of 13F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 24F (with a low of 11F).

I spent all day in the house. I did jump in the truck and take a spin around the Cove just to make sure things were okay. But there was no call to do so and I didn't find anything even remotely wrong.

What I did do, except for watching the St.Louis/Chicago NHL game, was work on the Guestletter all day. I worked a solid six hours on it before giving up. I can only sit at the computer for so long. At the end of the Guestletter session I had been on the computer for nine hours. And, no, I didn't watch the Bruins game but two minutes. They haven't had good luck with Montral this year and I hate to watch my team lose. Doesn't help with sleeping. Plus, the game keeps me up past my bed time!

Monday, February 9, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 9F, the sky was overcast, it seemed like it was snowing, about four more inches of snow was on the ground/truck, the wind was blowing out of the north at thirty knots (more or less) and the visibility over the ocean was poor in blowing snow. It snowed on and off all day. In the end we received about a foot over the last two days. The wind blew a sustained thirty knots all day with gusts up to forty knots. The air temperature remained cold. I saw a high of 12F. If the temperature got up any higher I didn't see it. The visibility over the ocean was poor in snow, seas smoke and spray. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 15F (with a low of 10F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 25F with a low of 14F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 17F (with a low of 11F).

I finished my update after a few morning chores. By 9:00 AM, I was headed to the dentist's to get the recently root canaled crown filled. There was a temporary filling of softer material there for a week just in case I had problems. I hadn't. In fact, I never had any pain through the whole two plus week period. From there I came home and continued working on the Guestletter through lunch. At 1:00 PM, I got a call from Jackie Ladderbush, our carpenter (the carpenter, the man) down at Barnacle Billy's, Etc., telling me there was a problem with the furnace. Sure enough it was off, a pipe to the expansion tank had frozen and burst and the building was getting cold. I made a few calls, was able to get someone down there and got my brother, Court, down there as well. Once things were underway, my brother agreed to stay down there while I went back home to start shoveling snow. And shovel I did. For two hours. And that was about the same time that the furnace started running again (thank God!). That would have been a mess. We had to get a plumber down there as well as the oil people but damage was limited to the furnace room area. I'll have to keep a better eye on it in the future. I normally check it out every morning but hadn't been doing so because the carpenters had been down there. And they did notice it. Had I been checking it we would have caught it in plenty of time. I did an hour more of shoveling before calling it quits at 5:30 PM.

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 12F, the sky was overcast, it had stopped snowing, we received about two more inches of the white stuff, the wind was blowing out of the north at twenty plus knots and the visibility over the ocean was good, it seemed. The sky stayed overcast most of the morning but was clear for the rest of the day with a bright sun. Frankly, I wasn't used to the brightness of it. The wind blew out of the north at fifteen to twenty knots most of the day. After sunset, the wind died out to nothing. The air temperature warmed up to the freezing mark, at least. With the sun it actually felt warm out. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 30F (with a low of 11F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 30F with a low of 14F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 36F (with a low of 15F).

I started this report earlier than normal because I knew I was going to have a busy day today. By 7:00 AM, I was shoveling out the skiff so I could get out to the Petrel (our lobster boat). Once there, I shoveled her out and took off the four fire extinguishers that needed to be inspected. I went ashore, tied up the skiff, brought the extinguishers to the warmth of Barnacle Billy's, Etc and then drove to the Bunny Clark. I had a parts conversation with Dave and my crew and picked up the Bunny Clark's fire extinguishing system. Those extinguishers were brought to Barnacle Billy's as well. I completed some desk work at the restaurant while I waited for the inspector (Dan) from Interstate Fire to meet me. That happened at about 11:30 AM. It took about a half hour to inspect, weigh and fill (for one extinguisher) the bottles.

After Dan left, I met Richie Jeffers so we could go over the lounge tiled floor behind the bar at Etc. Initially, I was going to do just part of the floor (water has been leaking into the base under the tiles) but after talking to Richie I decided to do it all and get it out of the way so we wouldn't have to be addressing it again next winter. Jack Ladderbush, then, wanted to get right to it. So I called the electrician to take the dishwasher out (it was hard wired) and contacted the plumber to remove the sink and some of the plumbing. Nothing is ever easy.

Lunch and shoveling was next. I shoveled snow for about two hours. From there I had to drop the newly inspected extinguishers off at the Bunny Clark. Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston had just painted the deck and smell of toluene was thick in the air. So I dropped off the extinguishers at the threshold. From there I went to Papa Wheelies to drop off my cyclocross bike. This is a yearly thing where I have the bottom bracket bearing changed and everything checked and replaced as needed. From there I went back to Etc to get the fire extinguishers for the Petrel so I could put them back aboard in place (taking the dog in the skiff is always fun for him). And then it was home to do a little more shoveling of snow. I still have about an hour's worth to do. But I'm saving that for tomorrow during a break with the Guestletter.

I received a very generous $200.00 donation from Richard Payeur & Elinor Kostanski (FL) sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising cycling event with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Richard & Elinor have generously supported me in this event since I started in 2007. Thank you both so very much. I do so appreciate the help!

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 14F, the sky was partly cloudy, there was no extra snow on the vehicles in the yard, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at twenty knots (more or less) and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The sky was partly sunny and sunny all day. The wind continued to blow out of the northeast all morning with gusts over thirty knots. By noon, winds were tapering off with twenty knots gusts, max. There was very little wind when I went for a run on Ogunquit Beach at 5:00 PM. I never did look at the air temperature until it was time to go for that run. At 4:30 PM it was 22F. The air temperature felt cold all day. The visibility would have been good over the ocean if it hadn't been so rough, particularly in the morning. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 23F (with a low of 7F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 25F with a low of 14F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 26F (with a low of -5F).

I spent the whole day running back and forth between Barnacle Billy's, Etc. restaurant and the home (Bunny Clark) office. I was trying to get the Guestletter done but kept having to go to the restaurant to open doors or check bills or consummate an advertising deal or, or, or. It seemed never ending. I did get a solid three hours in during the afternoon. And I got more done than expected in the morning. I stopped working a little before 5:00 PM.



And here's a sight you don't see every day. One of the carpenters down at Barnacle Billy's, Jamey Jennison, was having a lunch break when he noticed an eagle flying around. Thinking something was up, he took his iPhone out of his pocket and took a picture just as the eagle flew down and grabbed a mallard duck off the edge of the ice in Perkins Cove. As you can see, the shot is perfectly timed. When Jamey told me what he had I asked him if I could use it on this web site. So here it is above.

Thursday, February 12, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 12F, the sky was overcast, the wind was northerly but light and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. At sunrise, we had clear skies to the east with a thin cloud cover over head. It didn't last. By 9:00 AM, the sky was overcast and it was snowing very lightly with big flakes. The snow kept up sporadically all day long and snowed into the night. There was zero wind all day long with a flat calm ocean along the shore over rolling sea swells of at least 5 feet. The air temperature didn't seem as cold today without the wind. The highest air temperature reading I saw in Ogunquit was 26F. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 20F (with a low of 3F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 30F with a low of 16F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 22F (with a low of 1F).

I stayed inside working on the Guestletter most of the day, finishing the initial draft by 5:30 PM. Finally! I took a break and completed an hour of shoveling around the house and at my sister, Cathy's, house. And I had to check on things at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. a couple of times. But most of the day I was sitting at the desk, drinking too much coffee and letting everything else go in favor of the Guestletter.

And we have another storm coming up the coast for the weekend. If the same pattern persists, the wind will be mostly out of the north. And that is pretty much what it seems to me with air temperatures below 0F. If we get over a foot of snow in this one it will be a true blizzard. And we may see the snow banks around here at historical highs. For a winter it hasn't been particularly snowy since we had none in November, December and half of January. But, at this rate, these storms are making up for lost time.

Friday, February 13, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 7F, the sky was crystal, we had another inch of snow on the ground, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at twenty-five plus knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good with very little sea smoke. The lack of sea smoke is a bad sign. It means the water is getting pretty cold. Indeed, the Cashes Ledge buoy is now showing surface water temperatures equal to the lowest reading that buoy has shown in thirty years (at this time of year). And it seemed like it happened over night! The sky remained sunny all day. The wind was strong out of the northwest with wind gusts to twenty-five and thirty knots ashore. Sustained winds were about twenty knots. The air temperature was cold. I'm not sure what the highest reading was in Ogunquit. I saw 16F at one point. The visibility was very good overall. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 17F (with a low of -4F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 22F with a low of 7F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 14F (with a low of -2F).

After finishing here on this "blog" and doing a complete proof on the Guestletter, I headed down to Barnacle Billy's, Etc. There I met Stu Dunn, our bar manager. We had to take up all the tiles behind the bar in the lounge to get at the water damage underneath. In so doing we had to take everything apart. I wanted to talk to Stu about improving the bar so that when we put shelving & sinks back in it would be more efficient back there. I worked down there from 10:00 AM until 12:30 PM.

Knowing the tide was perfect for running on the beach, it was cold and windy (but sunny), I hadn't eaten yet and the thought that I might not get a chance to run unless I went now, got Gill (our 14 month old border collie) and I prepared for it. Except for being cold and windy, it was perfect running right near the water. It was icy closer to the dunes. And Gill stayed with me the whole time. There was not another person there for the whole three mile run. So no distractions for the dog and no dead skates or birds either. I was back for lunch at 1:30 PM.

After lunch I worked on the Guestletter until I got it to the point where I could print it and present it to my proofers (Deb, my mother, Jared & Ian). I was done by 5:30 PM.

Saturday, February 14, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was -3F, the sky was crystal again, a crescent moon was hanging over the eastern horizon, there was very little wind puffing out of the west and the visibility was fair to poor over the surface of the ocean in sea smoke. By 6:30 AM, the air temperature had dropped to -6F (it was -1 at 3:00 AM). The sky was sunny for the first couple of hours after sunrise. After that the sky started to milk over. By noon, we had overcast skies and an air temperature of 24F. There was no wind all day with a flat calm ocean. I would have loved to have been out there fishing at noon. Before that it would have been too cold. We had a very light snow in the early afternoon, so light it almost seemed that it wasn't snowing. After sunset, the snow picked up. So did the wind. But only about fifteen knots or so. The wind was northeast at twenty knots at 10:00 PM. We don't feel northeast or north northeast at the house. So it seemed like no wind at all. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 16F (with a low of -8F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 30F with a low of 3F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 16F (with a low of -7F).

I started my day by shoveling, after I completed the fishing update and an hour core stuff. Knowing that it was going to be cold all week, I saved an hour of shoveling near the house for today. I've been too busy during the week when vendors and advertisers are trying to take all my time while I'm trying to get other things done. Luckily they go to sleep on the weekends.

I wanted to move my old Porsche out of the garage. That didn't happen. The battery was dead as a smelt. So in the process of digging my charger out of the corner of the garage where I keep it, I noticed my freezer had shit the bed. 1000 pounds of clams at almost $2/pound were ruined. So I hooked up the charger to the battery after I disconnected the leads and got that going. Afterward, I got a bunch of fish boxes out and started loading them up with spent clams. Each box must have weighed 140 pounds. But, with Deb's help, we levered them into the Bunny Clark truck. The B.C. truck has a longer bed than my black one. Then off to the transfer station. I was sorry to see all those clams go. Now I have to either fix the freezer or replace it. It would be hard to replace and holds exactly 3400 pounds of clams with every space utilized. If the dimensions of a new one are even slightly different, I could lose space for 6 or 700 pounds. Anyway, enough of that. I'm going to wait a while before I do that. I've got some research to do.

By 11:00 AM, the clams were dumped, the battery was still charging and I had to check on the restaurants and tie storm lines on the boats. The restaurants were fine. The Cove was loaded with one inch ice plates that didn't find their way out of the Cove after the harbor master broke ice at daylight. So it was tough getting the one storm line I needed to tie off the bow, out to the Petrel. My dog, Gill, was right with me. He stays so close to me in the stern that sometimes I hit him in the head with the oar while I am skulling. My son, Micah, and Alec Levine were also getting in a skiff to tie storm lines off Mike Parenteau's lobster boat, the Eileen K, just shortly afterward. Micah took this picture, below, from the float off the town dock with his iPhone.



When I finally plowed the skiff through the ice to get to the Petrel, I realized I would be better served going to Kenneth Yorke's boat, the Sarah Beth, first. So I pulled myself along the port side of the Petrel until I had to skull again. Meanwhile, Kenneth was already there. When I was just about to Kenneth's boat, Micah and friends were passing between me and the Petrel. Gill recognized Micah (who he absolutely loves). But I wasn't paying attention until Kenneth said; "That dogs wants to go to Micah." Looking back, I had to tell Gill to get back in the boat. Next thing I know Kenneth shouts; "He went in!". I looked back again and, sure enough, the dog was in the water with it's eyes bugging out about an inch further than they normally are dog-paddling toward shore! Can you say panicked? He looked like he didn't know where to go until I called his name and he swam to the skiff. Whereupon I grabbed him by the collar, hooked on to the base of his legs and hauled that soaking wet thing into the skiff. I think that all thoughts of Micah completely left the dogs mind as he shook a couple of times and layed down flat in the middle of the skiff looking up at me.

I ended up tying the boats off. Kenneth offered to finish my jobs so I could get the dog in but it wasn't going to take me much longer anyway. And I wanted to cement the feelings into the dog so he wouldn't do it again. To Gill, who has never been in the ocean before, I'm sure he thought he could walk on the ice over to Micah. Well, now he knows. When we got back to the truck, I had to sacrifice one of the dry passenger seats to the dog who curled up immediately on the ride home. I got him out of the truck and spent a while detailing the drying of the dog before I would let him in the house.

After lunch, I took the pellet stove apart and detailed that as well. Once I got it going again, I brought Gill over to lie in front of it. He wanted nothing to do with it. Next, I worked on the Porsche, hooking the battery cables up and starting the car. I let it run for about a half hour. From there I went down to the Cove, did a little work in the office and washed all the fish boxes in the Kitchen. I wanted to get that clam juice smell off of them. I set them up to dry and pick up later tomorrow. I got home just in time to jump in the truck (3:20 PM) to drive to the movie theater to see American Sniper with Deb. When we came out, 5:45 PM, there was two inches of snow on the truck.

Sunday, February 15, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 14F, the sky was overcast, it was snowing and blowing drifts (it was calm around the house until 3:00 AM), the wind was blowing out of the north at thirty-five sustained with gusts to fifty knots and the visibility was poor in blowing snow. By daylight, the snow had stopped the air temperature had risen a couple of degrees and we had a minimum of 17" of snow on the ground. I measured it everywhere and got readings of 19" to 21" but I also got a few readings of 16". I started working in the snow at 5:00 AM, checking the Cove out and making the necessary calls, one to my plowing guy, Cam Bannister. After Cam was gone I started shoveling. Three hours later my wife, Deb had breakfast for me! At 9:30 AM, the snow had stopped, the wind was our of the north northwest at thirty knots and the ocean was feather white with chops. By 11:00 AM, there wasn't much difference in the weather except that the air temperature had risen to 22F. And I believe that was the highest air temperature of the day. The air temperature started to drop after that. I saw 16F at 3:00 PM. The wind howled all day. After noon, the wind stayed out of the northwest into the night. It blew about thirty-five knots with higher gusts and some lulls. The visibility was poor in blowing snow. And there were so many white caps on the ocean as to make the whole ocean look grey and white. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 19F (with a low of -1F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 20F with a low of -2F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 30F (with a low of -5F).

I spent the day shoveling: the boat, the skiff, the yard and the restaurants. I came up with a grand total of five and a half hours of shoveling. And that's about all I did.

Monday, February 16, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was -4F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west northwest at twenty-five knots (more or less) and the visibility was good in some sea smoke, fair close to the ocean's surface. The air temperature stayed cold all day. At 11:00 AM, it was still only 9F. It did warm up to 18F by 2:00 PM but then started dropping again. The wind blew out of the west all day with twenty-five knots or better sustained and gusts to thirty-five knots. It never backed off all day. And it was still blowing hard after sunset. The sky stayed sunny all day. The visibility was very good after 10:00 AM. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 21F (with a low of -3F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 19F with a low of -3F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 15F (with a low of -5F).

After a quick morning update, I made a few calls, rounding up individuals to deal with the extra snow in places we normally don't have to worry about. I had a few emails to initiate. Then I worked on the Guestletter which I ended up completing the final proof in the afternoon and posting it a little later. I was glad to have that finished. The rest of the day was spent running around, making sure things were progressing at the restaurant and working off a check list I made yesterday. I finished what I wanted to do by 5:00 PM.

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 5F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind to speak of and the visibility was very good over the ocean. Around daylight the wind hauled out of the northeast. It blew northeast all day but never got more than fifteen knots. By 5:00 PM, there was just a hind of northeast wind. The sky stayed mostly overcast all day with a hint of sun for part of the morning. The afternoon gave us overcast skies. The air temperature got up to at least 21F. I didn't notice if it got any higher than that. The visibility was very good or better than that. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 21F (with a low of 0F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 23F with a low of 10F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 25F (with a low of 2F).

The day was spent running around doing engine things. Many calls were made back and forth with Power Products in Wakefield, Massachusetts. Most of the concern was establishing a two alternator system as I had with the other engine. The new engine is set up for it but you have to buy a kit in order to do so. But that's better than making up your own brackets as we did with the previous engine. The question was; could I used my alternators off the old engine. After many back and forths, it was determined that I couldn't. But carrying on with the engine, I solved shaft coupling problems, hydraulic pump challenges and engine mounting challenges. It was a full morning of that. I traveled to the Bunny Clark to meet with Dave Pease, Ian and Jared along with the mornings journey.

The afternoon was filled with busy work stuff: putting in another Penn order, changing day sheets, inventory sheets, emergency check lists and dealing with the old broken freezer. At 2:30 PM, I drove over to Ocean Graphics to get the new LFT stickers made (I'm working around a star pattern this year and replacing the cod found on every previous sticker with another species.), the new PMC shirts designed (the color picked - emergency green), the new Tackle Breakers shirts (color picked - a new shade of darker green) and signs made (things for the restaurants). Ocean Graphics also does all the lettering on the Bunny Clark which will have to be done again this year. But we are launching a little later than normal so I wasn't pushing it at this time.

I also spent some time at the restaurant working on advertising and printing.

I was done by about 5:15 PM.

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 11F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind to speak of and the visibility was very good over the ocean. The sky was overcast all morning and into the afternoon. There was some sun during the early afternoon but that didn't last long. The rest of the day was overcast. It started snowing around sunset. It kept snowing on into the night. The air temperature was much milder than it has been after the cold morning. I saw a temperature of 28F. It could have been higher but I didn't see it. There was no wind all day. The ocean was calm. After 8:00 PM, the wind blew out of the east up to twenty knots, max. The visibility was very good until the snow started falling. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 32F (with a low of 6F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 29F with a low of 17F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 30F (with a low of -5F).

I worked in the office at the house from 5:00 until 9:00 AM. From the house, I went to the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. I worked there until about lunch time. After running home, I made myself some sandwiches and drove to Portsmouth to pick up the new fuel lines that had been made up for me. From there I drove to the Bunny Clark to drop the fuel lines off. I talked with Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston about other items while I was at the boat. They had just finished painting with Awlgrip and were outside clearing snow around the barn until the fumes cleared out a bit more.

On the way back to Barnacle Billy's, I stopped to pick up an electrical plug. A couple weeks ago I couldn't get the sound out of the computer in the office. Come to find out, Gill, our dog, had chewed the plug end off the power cord to the computer speakers. I was probably concentrating on something else while the dog was bored to death waiting for me. [Now, when Gill knows I'm going into the office, he will get out of the truck but he won't cross the street. He will just give me that blank stare no matter how hard I call his name.] It wasn't something very important so I kept forgetting about it when going by the hardware store. Until now. In the process of putting a new plug on, I crossed the wires in the plug itself. So when I plugged the speakers in again, I blew a breaker. Do you think I could find the breaker switch for that part of the office? I looked around for an hour. Finally, I called Chuck MacDonald and, together, we sleuthed it out. The reason I couldn't find the breaker (out of the six panels we have in the building) was because the company that put in the Point of Sale system had used a double breaker that had been used for something else and then marked it in pencil where I couldn't see it. Chuck had remembered something about changing breakers. And that was the main reason we found it. But we did. And now I know. Let's see if I can remember it! Something tells me I won't forget. That little episode took me until 5:00 PM. I can't blame Gill for that one.

Thursday, February 19, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 25F, the sky was overcast, we had approximately four inches of new snow on the ground, the wind was blowing lightly out of the west and the visibility was very good over the ocean. The had turned clear by daylight. The sky remained clear for most of the morning. There was also a slight rise in temperature to 30F. This, to me, would have made it feel like spring except for all the snow. After 2:00 PM, the sky clouded up and it started to snow. It snowed, sometimes heavily, for an hour or more giving us another inch of light snow. There had been no wind with a calm ocean until it started to snow at 2:00 PM. From then on, the wind hauled out of the northwest and blew about fifteen knots. By 5:00 PM, the wind turned westerly with sustained speeds of twenty-five knots. Strong westerly winds blew into the night. The visibility was very good until the snow. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 33F (with a low of 14F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 30F with a low of 10F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 28F (with a low of 7F).

I rolled out of bed at 3:30 AM, took care of business, my business, and walked downstairs to the sound of the sump pump droning on. And on. I had my suspicions. And they were confirmed after I got down into the cellar and took things apart. The water line leading out of the house (for the sump pump) was frozen somewhere along. Of all the years we have been living here this has never happened. And it's not good. This because even if we clear the line it will freeze again. The reason is that the ground is frozen which won't allow water to creep into the basement - it runs into the basement in the spring, like a small stream. With very little water running into the basement there is very little time that the pump runs. When it doesn't run under these conditions, with the heavy snow pack, it gives the pipe a chance to freeze. And freeze it did. I worked on it for most of the morning but never solved the problem. It looks like I will have to run another line from a temporary pump until it's warm enough to address. I can't do anything about it until tomorrow.

In the meantime, I elicited my son (Micah), Thacher Parenteau, Alec Levine and Sam Robichaud's help to shovel roofs and clear a path closest to the house where the sump pump is located. For two guys it took an hour to shovel a path close to the pump. In the meantime, I shoveled an area where the sump water exits. I could not find the end of the pipe, for whatever reason. Once those two things were accomplished, the guys shoveled the roof of the garage (it's flat), the roof over the work shop, the roof near the kitchen, the yard, the bulkhead to the cellar and around the generator. I wanted to make sure that if we had rain the house wouldn't come down around our ears. As it is, there are ice dams on all edges of the roof except the eastern side.

I also had a financial meeting that took an hour an a half with my mother, in the middle of all the hoopla and shoveling. And I had some time in the office as I normally do. It was a day of stepping back. You know, two forward and one back. Lately, it has seemed like one forward and two back.

Mark & Maureen LaRocca (NY) gave a very generous donation of $500.00 to support my fund raising charge with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Mark & Maureen have always supported me generously every year since I started. They feel as strongly about this as I do. And I certainly appreciate their help. Thank you both so very much!

Friday, February 20, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 6F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at twenty-five to thirty knots and the visibility was very good over the ocean. It was still 6F at 9:00 AM. It remained cold all day. The highest air temperature I saw was 14F at 2:00 PM. That doesn't mean the air temperature wasn't higher at some point. But it probably wasn't higher during the day. The wind blew all day, blowing the light snow off the tops of the snow banks and across streets. Wind speeds were twenty-five to thirty knots out of the west all day. The sky was clear. The visibility over the ocean was very good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 19F (with a low of 7F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 20F with a low of 5F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 16F (with a low of 2F).

At 8:30 AM, our plumber, Fred Fornier, dropped off a spare sump pump with hose enough to run a new lead out a basement window and to the ground outside. Bob Forbes and company (Katherine?) showed up and worked on the broken bait freezer. A capacitor had gone, allowing the fan to run but stopping the condenser from functioning. This unit was built in 1968! We'll see how she functions when the new capacitor arrives. Meanwhile, Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston were taking parts and materials out of the house to bring back and install on the Bunny Clark. They are getting ahead of things to get more done before the new engine arrives. We also had a meeting on different subjects ranging from ordering supplies to reel parts.

At 9:45 AM, I was free to work with my brother, Court, Chuck MacDonald and Richie Jeffers about the flooring behind the lounge bar at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. That took a half hour. I worked in the office there until lunch. A good part of the time was spent on advertising. This included finding some of the best pictures my daughter, Halley, took of Barnacle Billy's in full functioning seasonal swing.

I worked primarily in the office on Bunny Clark stuff until 5:00 PM, ending with a long conversation with Ian Keniston. It seemed like another day of stepping back. But, in fact, I did get some good things accomplished.

My sister, Meg, sent me a link to something you might find a bit funny or odd. This video was filmed partly at Barnacle Billy's four years ago. You will note that the Ugly Anne was still working out of Perkins Cove when this was filmed: Maine Man Song

Saturday, February 21, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 6F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at fifteen knots and the visibility was very good over the ocean. The wind stayed out of the west until daylight when it hauled out of the southwest. This change seemed to cause an increase in temperature more quickly than we have been seeing. By 9:30 AM, the air temperature was 19F. At the same time, the wind velocity was twenty knots. The sky was also starting to cloud over at that time. By noon, the sky was overcast and the wind was gusting to thirty knots out of the southwest. The air temperature had reached 27F by then. But I never did see the air temperature over 28F during the day. We saw the snow start falling at 3:30 PM. The snow was light until 5:00 PM when it seemed to be coming down hard. I never paid much attention to the snow after dark. The visibility was very good until the snow. At 5:00 PM, the visibility was about an eighth of a mile. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 34F (with a low of -1F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 34F with a low of 4F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 28F (with a low of -17F). The air temperature of -17 is a new low temperature record for the day in Concord, New Hampshire. The previous low temperature record was -13F set in 1993.

I spent the day organizing and running around. This after a slow start getting the update done. One thing I had to do was get the Bunny Clark truck looked at. The truck is a 2011 GMC. I've replaced the battery in it twice. Both times it was covered under warrantee. Both times they told me it was a fault battery cell. Now I'm having the same trouble again. I leave the truck for two days and can't start it. So I brought it over to the dealership today after explaining all this over the phone. I had a list of things I needed to get in Portsmouth so I combined the two. I like Saturdays because I don't get side tracked so much with people wanting something from me.

I received another nice donation from Bill Parsons (MA) sponsoring me in my quest for a cancer free world with the Pan-Mass Challenge. His donation was $100.00 via "egift" through the PMC web site. He also donated the end of last year for the 2014 season. Thank you, Bill. Very much appreciated.

Sunday, February 22, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 30F, the sky was overcast, there was a good three inches of light snow on the ground, the wind was light out of the west and the visibility was very good over the ocean. After closer inspection, we received about four inches of snow or just enough snow to plow and shovel. The air temperature and sunny sky were the salient features of the day. The air temperature went well above the freezing mark today. I saw 35F but it could easily have been warmer. There was no wind. The ocean was calm all day. The sky was clear after sunrise and remained so until I went to bed. The visibility was very good at least. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 35F (with a low of 21F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 39F with a low of 28F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 38F (with a low of 19F).

After getting all the computer work done (this update & emails), I started on the snow. It was a perfect day for shoveling and clearing snow. With the above freezing temperatures, zero wind and warm sun, it was a time to get the snow cover off places to remove ice. Although I had over an hour of shoveling at the house first, I detailed the boat (Petrel) for an hour. After a couple of hours, I went back to the boat and was able to remove all the ice as well. I was done with the snow project by 12:30 PM.

After lunch I started on my sump pump at the house. A couple of trips to the hardware store and two hours of plumbing and carpentry work and I had a new sump pump in place. I had to take a basement window out, build an insulated box around the window and run an exit line through the box to the outside. Then I made a dedicated breaker switch to that pump so we could control it from inside the house (it's a pain in the neck to go to the basement through the outside bulkhead all the time).

My day was done by 5:00 PM.

Monday, February 23, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 28F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the west at fifteen knots and the visibility was very good over the ocean. The reading of 28F was the highest daytime reading I saw. At sunrise, the sky cleared, the wind piped up to over twenty knots out of the west. By 9:00 AM, the air temperature had dropped to 25F and the wind was blowing out of the northwest at twenty-five to thirty knots. The northwest wind blew hard all day. By noon, the air temperature had dropped to 19F. The sky remained clear all day. The visibility over the ocean was very good. By 5:00 PM, the air temperature had dropped to 10F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 31F (with a low of -4F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 33F with a low of 4F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 28F (with a low of -5F).

Today was a mix of running around, organizing, phone calls, new engine stuff and typical Monday madness. By 8:30 AM, I was at the Bunny Clark in a meeting with Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston. I worked in the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. from about 10:30 AM to 12:30 PM. After lunch we had a meeting with lawyers - routine stuff.

I went for a run on the beach at 5:30 PM. It was almost dark but plenty light enough to see the color on the houses I ran by in Moody. Gill, the faithful, was by my side. Except for a dog distraction at the onset, Gill (our border collie) ran close by my side most of the way. It was only 9F but I dressed for it and was plenty warm enough. The sand was icy, though, as the receding tide had frozen before sinking into the sand.

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was -5F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at fifteen knots and the visibility was good over the ocean, fair closer to the ocean in sea smoke. More later.









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