www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

May 28, 2015, 3:10 AM EDT



Two 7 Pound Trophy Haddock on the Same Trip

The digital images above were taken during the marathon fishing trip of May 14, 2015. The shot on the left is a picture of Brien Erwin (VT) holding his 7 pound Maine state trophy haddock while the shot on the right is a picture of Jon "Griff" Griffin (MA) holding his 7 pound Maine state trophy haddock. Both fish were spawned out female haddock with big frames. However, Brien's fish was longer than Griff's but Griff's fish had more thickness through the tail. We caught a lot of haddock on this trip as we have every trip this season so far. On this day, though, there were only three haddock under seventeen inches and many more haddock over twenty-four inches. We had no problem reaching the haddock bag limit on this trip.




Tuesday, April 28, 2015

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 43F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The wind was the salient feature this morning for the first few hours. The air temperature seemed colder than normal because of the wind. By 8:00 AM, the sky was mostly clear. By noon, the wind had dropped substantially after a morning where some northeast gusts were in the twenty-five to thirty knot range. For most of the early afternoon the wind was light from the north. Right around 4:00 PM, the wind hauled out of the northwest and started to blow hard again. At 6:00 PM we had gusts over twenty knots. The air temperature, although cool in the morning, rose to 64F. I was surprised how nice it was. The sky stayed mostly clear all day with zero rain. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 44F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 64F with a low of 42F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 63F (with a low of 43F).

This was another day of running around between the Bunny Clark, the restaurant and moving forward to the first fishing trip. The fuel line problem was solved by the afternoon as well as the blower installation.

In the morning, I went down there with my dog, Gill, just as they were starting to work in the Yard. I went over different parts of the "fix" with Vic & Bob, the guys actually completing the job. In the meantime, Gill was sniffing around the floats. In one area, the tidal current had pushed the floating sea weed to collect in a corner between two floats. There must have been something else with the sea weed because Gill was sniffing around it intently. Apparently, Gill also thought that he could walk "on" the sea weed. So, before I could stop him, the dog became part of the sea weed, his head sticking out in the mat of weed like some other piece of flotsam. The look on his face was not pleasant as he couldn't figure a way to get out of the water. Of course, I was pretty close to him. I just reached down, got ahold of his collar, grabbed his forelegs and hauled him out, a soaking wet dog. It was a while before I could get him sorted out and into the truck. He was a very happy dog to be out on dry land.

So another day of running around like yesterday. All the boat projects were done by the afternoon including procurement of an updated Light List, a bottle of aspirin and a Coast Pilot.

The new recreational fishing rules came out officially today. They appear below.:





These regulations could have been much more onerous for the recreational angler and the for-hire fleet. If you ever see Frank Blount in Point Judith, RI (he owns the Francis Fleet) you want to make sure you thank him for the help he provided at the Council level to keep us in the fishery.

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 49F, the sky was overcast, there was a light wind from the west and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The sky stayed mostly overcast all day. There were some breaks of blue sky but very temporary sun, when there was some. The wind was light and variable in direction all day. The ocean was calm. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature made it to at least 60F as a high temperature for the day. If there was any rain at all it was just a light sprinkle. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 45F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 54F with a low of 48F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 38F).

Ian Keniston, Jared Keniston, Micah Tower and I met on the Bunny Clark at Kittery Point Yacht Yard at 7:30 AM. We checked the boat, all engine systems and stowed items to get the boat ready to sail to Ogunquit and Perkins Cove. After we put all the electronics into the operating position, we tried everything. We had a minor glitch with the single side band (SSB). This caused me concern so I had Vic Togliatti (from the Yard) to look in on it. In the meantime, Jared, Micah and Ian went off to do other boat related things until Vic was ready. We resolved the problem an hour later.

Ian, Micah and I took the B.C. up the river to home. Jared drove one of the trucks back.We must have left the dock at a time before 10:00 AM. It was smooth sailing all the way to Perkins Cove. There were no engine issues. In fact, the engine runs smoother and quieter than the other engine. And being a tier 3 engine, there was no engine exhaust. I was very impressed with the engine and the installation. David Pease is the best. I always knew that but I had to say it again. I took a shot of the boat coming down the channel into Perkins Cove with my iPhone. The digital image appears below.:



My son, Micah, broke tradition by taking the wheel at the half way point, bringing the Bunny Clark into the Cove and making a perfect landing, stern to, on the dock at Barnacle Billy's restaurant. Usually, I take the boat to the dock myself. I can tell you that I couldn't have done a better job.

For the rest of the day, Jared, Ian and Micah worked on the Bunny Clark. I spent the next three hours working in the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. I had to draw up the new menus and work on pricing. I also had a few other things to do up there as well. After I got that all straightened away, I rode my bike over to KPYY to pick up my truck. The rest of the evening I worked at Barnacle Billy's until after closing time.

Thursday, April 30, 2015

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 43F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. There was no wind to speak of all day. The ocean remained calm and winds were very light and variable in direction. The air temperature warmed to at least 60F. The sky was clear all morning and partly cloudy in the afternoon. It never rained or even looked like it was going to (although it did in Portland in the morning for a few sprinkles). The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 41F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 55F with a low of 44F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 64F (with a low of 46F).

I started the day meeting Micah Tower at the house at 4:30 AM shortly before heading down to the Cove to attack the moorings. We had to dredge up the Petrel's (our lobster boat) mooring, find the Bunny Clark mooring and buoy off Goat's Cricket mooring. Goat runs the Finestkind Scenic Cruise boats off our dock at Barnacle Billy's. We got all that squared away by 6:00 AM. The rest of the day was spent getting myself and the Bunny Clark ready to take the first trip tomorrow, working on last minute items germain to Barnacle Billy's, Etc first opening night and working at Barnacle Billy's itself.

By 4:00 PM, I had worked at Barnacle Billy's for four hours. Most of the rest of the evening was spent getting the satellite phone working. In January I had suspended service on the phone because I wasn't planning on using a boat that needed it. What was strange was that I had forgotten that I had done that - until about 5:00 PM! So from 5:00 PM until 6:30 PM, I was on the phone with sat phone service trying to get my phone on line before midnight. This so I could have communications ashore in case I had problems with the new engine. Surer than not, had I decided not to reinstate my sat phone, I would have had some engine problem that I needed it for. By 8:00 PM, I knew I would have service on the boat for the trip.

Friday, May 1, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston, Captain Jared Keniston, Captain Alec Levine and I ran the first Bunny Clark fishing trip of the 2015 season today, an extreme day trip.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 44F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light from the east, the ocean was calm and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

The ride to the fishing grounds was uneventful. At the ten mile mark, the wind freshened out of the northeast. The velocity was about ten knots. In fact, I don't believe we had any more than twelve knots of northeast wind all day. After noon, the northeast wind dropped to about five knots, barely turning over a white cap. The wind hauled out of the south southeast for the ride home. This new wind averaged about ten knots all the way back to Perkins Cove. Seas all day were chops of two feet or so over rolling sea swells of three to five feet. The sky was clear all day with few clouds (after 8:30 AM). The air temperature ranged from 42F to 44F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 44F after a low of 41F. The visibility ranged to about twenty miles in some haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 55F (with a low of 39F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 49F with a low of 39F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 59F (with a low of 39F).

The fishing was very good overall. Legal landings included mostly pollock, followed by haddock. Everyone caught their legal limit of haddock today. In fact, the last legal haddock we could legally take was caught just before we were about to leave for home. We didn't catch a lot of cod. But the cod we did catch were bigger than last year at this time and were all resident fish. To me it looked like these cod had over-wintered on the grounds where we fished today. We also caught nine legal redfish. Drifting was the fishing method of the day. All terminal gear worked well.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. If I were a betting man I would have put my money on Jay Staton (ME) for catching the most fish, both legal and sub-legal (mostly sub-legal). But I have no way to confirm this. Suffice it to say, it seemed like Jay had a fish on the line at any given time during the trip. He did catch the first fish of the year, a sub-legal cod. I took a picture of Jay with said fish. This digital image appears on the left. Nigel Jones (Wales) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the two largest fish, a 13 pound wolffish and an 11.5 pound cod. These were the two largest fish of the trip. Of course, both fish were returned back to the ocean alive. I would have taken his picture with each fish if I hadn't felt like I was compromising the fishes survival. Mike Verges (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 9.5 pound cod. He also caught a cod of 9 pounds and another of 8 pounds. All three fish were returned back to the ocean alive.

Other Angler Highlights: Alan Swan (NH) caught the first legal fish of the 2015 Bunny Clark fishing season, today, a .75 pound redfish. Alan's largest cod weighed 8.5 pounds. He also caught the largest haddock of the trip (year) at 6 pounds. I took a picture of Alan with his large haddock. That digital image appears in this entry, right. Christian Swan (ME) landed the first cod I could weigh, a 5 pounder. Soon to be captain, our deck hand, Alec Levine, on a bus man's holiday, caught a 9 pound cod as his largest fish. He also released a 7.5 pound cod. His largest pollock weighed 7 pounds. Russell Mott (ME) caught several fish including a 6 pound cod and his haddock. Bob Holyoke (ME) caught the largest pollock of the trip at 9 pounds. I caught eight legal pollock in a row. I took a cast every now and then until the pollock struck. With Jared and Ian working the deck, I took the opportunity to fish until the pollock bite slowed. Brandon Haskell (ME) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for one slight tangle. I really had no one aboard who really qualified but I had to give it to someone!

I received several donations today supporting my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge. My sister, Meg Tower, donated $20.00 more to gift her fianc (Mike Remkiewicz) with a new Bunny Clark PMC theme t-shirt (she didn't have to as she has already give way more than expected), Nigel Jones donated $35.00 and Rich & Donna McGuinness (GA) gave a generous $50.00. Thank you all so very much for your help and support!

Saturday, May 2, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the first Bunny Clark full day fishing trip of the 2015 season today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 38F, the sky was mostly overcast, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable, the ocean was calm all day. The sky was overcast but clear up on the ride in. The air temperature ranged from 43F to 47F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 43F. The visibility was fair in a thick haze. Ian told me that, at most, they had a visibility of five miles. Ashore, the high temperature was probably around 56F only because of a persistent southerly wind. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 54F (with a low of 38F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 50F with a low of 39F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 73F (with a low of 32F).

The fishing was very good today, much like yesterday. Most legal fish landed were haddock followed by pollock. The bag limit on haddock was attained near the end of the trip. There were fewer 24" cod caught today than yesterday. All cod were released alive, of course. Legal landings also included six redfish. They released a small wolffish. They drift fished for the trip. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. He suspected it was Jack Judge (CT/ME) but he couldn't know for sure. If Jack was high hook then he was also the fisherman of the day. This because he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish of the trip, a 9.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was an 8 pound cod caught by Hughes Tierre (CT). Wayne McKinney (CT) and Roger Manning (CT) tied for the third largest fish of the trip. They each caught a 7.5 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Dennis Colon (CT) caught a 6.5 pound cod, his largest fish. Justin Bourque (CT) also caught a 6.5 pound cod as his largest fish. Sal DeSciscio (CT) caught a 6.75 pound cod as his largest fish. Dan Colon (CT) landed the hard luck award for not being one with the motion of the ocean.

Jack Judge donated $10.00 toward my fund raising efforts to fight cancer with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thanks, Jack. You always help me out and I appreciate it!

Sunday, May 3, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 39F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was light out of the south, the ocean was calm and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The weather ashore was very good today. The air temperature reached a high temperature in the lower 60s and there was very little wind all day, making it seem warmer. The sky was mostly clear and sunny all day.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at about ten knots more or less. Seas were chops of one to two feet over rolling sea swells of two to three feet. The air temperature ranged from 43F to 48F. The tidal current was light in the morning, stronger in the afternoon but not bad. The surface water temperature reached a high of 43.3F. The visibility ranged to over ten miles in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 62F (with a low of 40F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 67F with a low of 45F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 38F).

The fishing was very good again today, very similar to the last two trips. Most legal fish caught were haddock followed by redfish. The legal haddock bag limit was reached again today. Legal landings also included thirty pollock and one cusk. They released a wolffish and quite a few cod that would have been legal last season. In fact, all the biggest fish today were cod. They drifted fished all day. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. Dan Killay (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound cod, the second largest cod of the fishing season so far. The second largest fish was a cod of 8.25 pounds caught by Mike Kingsbury (VT). Steve Brown (ME) and Peter Grant (ME) tied for the third largest fish. Both anglers caught a 7 pound cod each. Ray Fotion (VT) landed the hard luck award for breaking the guides on his rod. The result was that the broken guides cut his line as he was reeling in the first fish of the day. He ended up losing the fish, his jig and some of his line!

Monday, May 4, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 45F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was good in some haze. Ashore, the air temperature rose to new high temperature levels, the highest of the year so far. At one point the mercury read 78F in Ogunquit. It seemed hot to me. The sky was sunny all day, the wind was light and the visibility was a little hazy looking from the shore.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to twelve knots. Seas were chops of a foot or two over long rolling sea swells of two to three feet. The sky was sunny all day. The air temperature ranged from 46F in the morning to 52F in the afternoon. The visibility was very good ranging to twenty miles. The tide was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 46.3F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 42F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 83F with a low of 49F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 42F).

The fishing was very good today, maybe excellent. Most legal fish landed today were pollock, by far. Haddock came in second. And the bag limit, again, was attained today. There were quite a few resident cod of a larger size than we have seen as of late. All cod, of course, went back alive. There were very few small cod. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well but most used jigs and cod flies.

Todd "Cat Killer" McDonald (NH) was high hook. He had nineteen legal pollock alone. John Russell (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound cod. This is the Bunny Clark's largest cod of the season to date. He also caught a 10.25 pound pollock, the Bunny Clark's largest pollock of the season so far. His third largest fish was a 10 pound cod. The second largest fish of the trip was a cod of 11.5 pounds caught by Rafik Bashara (MA). Rafik also caught the third largest fish, an 11 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Ken McLaughlin (ME) caught a 10.5 pound cod, a 10 pound cod and a 9.5 pound cod. John Baker (ME) caught a 9 pound cod, his biggest fish of the trip. Ryan Rivard (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.

John Russell donated a generous $60.00 to support my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. John supports me every year. I appreciate that very much. Thank you!

Tuesday, Cinco de Mayo, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the first Bunny Clark marathon fishing trip of the season today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 67F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was blowing out of the west southwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

The ride to the fishing grounds was a bit lumpy but not badly so. Our course took us almost directly into a three foot swell from the south. The wind was blowing about fifteen knots out of the southwest to start. But these winds diminished as we got closer to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the west southwest at ten knots or less. Seas were chops of a foot over a small southerly swell. Early afternoon saw no wind and calm seas. An hour later the wind hauled out of the south and blew less than ten knots. There was a very small chop associated with this wind. We carried light southerly winds all the way back to Perkins Cove. It was mostly sunny all morning. Around noon we got a couple of light rain showers as some dark clouds moved over us. But this only lasted for a couple of minutes, twice in an hour. The rest of the trip was partly sunny with no rain. The air temperature ranged from 51F to 53F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 46.7F. There was no drift until the last two hours of the trip. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 70F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 46F).

The fishing was good overall. It was good because of the large number of haddock that were caught. We reached the haddock bag limit with no problem whatsoever. It wasn't much better than good because we didn't see many other species of fish. Legal landings also included two pollock, one good sized whiting, fourteen redfish and four cusk. Three wolffish, one common eel pout and eleven decent cod were caught and released. There were a few small cod released as well. We drift fished all day. All terminal gear worked but bait and cod flies worked the best.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. It could have been a number of anglers. Ken Fowler (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound cod. Of course this fish was released alive. Sam Readinger (PA) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the third largest fish, a 7.25 pound Maine state trophy haddock. This is the Bunny Clark's first trophy fish of the season, the first haddock trophy this year and the largest haddock of the season so far. Ty Kashmiry (ME) caught the second largest fish, an 8 pound wolffish. Ty was not entered in the boat pool.

Other Angler Highlights: The last fish of the day was the second largest haddock of the trip, a 5 pounder caught by Jeff Johansmeyer (MA). Frank Noble (ME) landed the hard luck award for being the only angler to lose a jig today.

Ken Fowler (PA) sponsored me for my bicycle ride in the Pan-Mass Challenge today by donating $50.00 to the cause. Ken has supported me every year that I have been involved. This is my ninth season. Thank you very much, Ken, again. I very much appreciate it!

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 49F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over the ocean was good in some haze. Ashore, it was a very warm day with high temperatures in Ogunquit of about 75F or better. I never got a look at the thermometer but it was t-shirts and shorts weather all day. The wind was light, the sky was clear and sunny and the visibility was very good over the ocean.

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction all morning. The ocean was calm. After noon, the wind became established out of the southwest and blew up to ten knots. Seas were chops of about a foot, at most. There wasn't much of a swell today. The air temperature ranged from 48F to 53F. The sky was sunny all day. The visibility ranged to about twenty miles in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 50.2F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 42F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 70F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 38F).

The fishing was a little better than good today. And the catch was better than yesterday. Most legal fish landed were redfish, by far, the most redfish for a trip this season to date. A close second were the haddock. And there was no problem, again, to get the bag limit. Legal landings also included three cusk and three pollock. A few more cod were released today than yesterday. But the count wasn't very high and not nearly as high as if we were targeting them. One wolffish was also released. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. Alex Grammatic (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound cod. The second largest fish was a cod of 6.5 pounds caught by Don Stancil. Erica Frana (WI) caught the third largest fish and the biggest haddock at 5.5 pounds. Ted Harris (PA) landed the hardest luck of the day award (the "t-shirt") for being the only angler to lose a jig. The weather has been very good with only one or two people sea sick for six trips!

Thursday, May 7, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was clear with a fading full moon high in the southeastern corner, there was a light wind from the west and the visibility over the ocean was very good if not better than that.

There was a very little wind from the south on the ride to the fishing grounds. It was so little, in fact, there was hardly a ripple on the water when the sun rose. The ocean was calm all the way out. On the grounds, the wind stayed light all morning and into the afternoon. Sometime during the early afternoon, the wind hauled out of the south southwest. It started to freshen at about 2:30 PM. We had south southwest winds of ten to fifteen knots for the ride home. Seas were chops of a foot or more. There was not swell today. The air temperature ranged from 51F to 60F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 48.5F. The sky was sunny and mostly clear all day. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 46F). The air temperature of 84F breaks the record of 81F, the previous high temperature record in Portland, set on this date in 1957. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 39F).

The fishing was excellent from beginning to end. It wasn't so excellent that you couldn't get to bottom without getting a fish. But it was good enough for every angler to have a fish a cast from start to finish. Most fish caught were haddock, the most haddock we have seen on a trip this season so far. We caught our bag limit of haddock by the end of the day. But we could have had five times that many. Most legal fish landed were pollock. It was just shy of our best pollock count of the season. Most pollock were in the 2 pound range. But there were a fair number of 4 pounders. The largest pollock weighed 5.5 pounds. Landings also included three cusk and three redfish. We released one wolffish and twenty-four cod of twenty-four inches or better. Drifting was the method for every stop except the last two. We anchored over the last two spots. All terminal gear worked well but cod flies probably caught the most fish.

Joe Dressner (NY) was high hook. There was no doubt in my mind even though I didn't count his fish. It was non stop fish from the time we got there until it was time to go. Joe's largest fish was a 6 pound cod. Ken Fowler (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound cod. A quick weigh and the fish swam back alive. I can't say one bad thing about Ken Fowler! Jeff Gellatly (ME) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest, a 9 pound cod. The third largest fish was a 7 pound cod caught by Ted Harris (PA).

Other Angler Highlights: Tim Rozan (ME) caught the largest pollock of the trip at 5.5 pounds. He also caught many haddock. His largest cod weighed 5.5 pounds. Don Stancil (PA) caught the second largest haddock of the trip at 5.75 pounds. I took a picture of Don with his nice looking haddock. The digital image appears on the left. Don's largest cod weighed 6 pounds. Sam Readinger (PA) landed the largest haddock at 6.5 pounds. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest haddock of the fishing season so far. The largest haddock of the season was also caught by Sam on Tuesday! Ray Westermann (MA) caught the third largest haddock at 5 pounds. Ted Harris won the hardest luck of the day award for losing a jig. But he won the same award yesterday for the same thing! So I ended up giving the shirt to Herman Guyton (PA), who didn't deserve it but wanted it just the same!

Several anglers made donations helping me in my involvement with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Tim Rozan & Lewis Haselwood (MA) gave $40.00, Ted Harris donated $50.00 and Don Stancil gave a generous $100.00 to the cause. Thank you all so very much for helping me in the fight against cancer with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. It's an amazing place and 100% of your donation goes there for work on cancer research and care. Not a single penny goes to administrative expenses. That's because several businesses around the Boston area underwrite the whole bicycling event!

Friday, May 8, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F [The air temperature was 58F at 3:00 AM.], the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over the ocean was very good. At 6:00 AM, the wind hauled out of the northeast all at once to fifteen and twenty knots. By 8:00 AM, the northeast wind had become established at close to twenty knots. Seas were chops of two feet as seen from shore. The air temperature had dropped to 48F with the influence of the cold surface water temperature and an on-shore wind. The wind blew out of the northeast at twenty to thirty knots. Seas grew to about six feet in chops as seen from the shore. The sky stayed sunny all day. The air temperature was cold with the wind, not even making it to the mid 50s.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east northeast at fifteen to twenty knots with higher gusts. Seas were three to five feet or more in chops. The tide (current) was strong in the morning, moderate in the afternoon. The sky stayed sunny all day. The air temperature never moved from 50F all day. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen knots. The surface water temperature reached a high of 46.4F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 58F (with a low of 44F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 46F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 44F).

The fishing was very good to excellent. The only difference from yesterday, other than the weather and the trip length, was the number of haddock and pollock. There were far less haddock caught today. In fact, the total bag limit was not attained. It was close. And had they kept every haddock of legal length, they would have. There were more pollock caught today. It was the best trip of the year for pollock landings. Again, all the pollock were between 2 and 4 pounds, like yesterday. Legal landings also included four cusk and nine redfish. Nineteen cod were released. They anchored for almost every spot. They drift fished once. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. Joe Dressner (NY) had another phenomenal day but so did many. Tom Perry (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.25 pound cod. Scott Allison (NJ) caught the second largest fish, a 6.5 pound cod. The third largest fish was a 6.25 pound cod caught by Bob MacNeil (NH). I expected Dana Decormier (NH) to catch a big fish today. But his good luck Bruins hat blew off. And so did the luck I guess. His son, Jack Decormier (NH), landed the hard luck award for losing two of his father's jigs.

Scott Allison donated $25.00 to help me in my Pan-Mass Challenge cancer fund raising bicycle ride today. Thanks so much, Scott. Hope to see you next year or maybe a bit sooner!

Saturday, May 9, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light out of the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was fair in fog and haze. Ashore, there was no wind all day until the later afternoon when the wind started to blow out of the south. The sky never really got clear. There were always enough thin clouds and regular clouds to make it a soft lighting day. And the humidity was such that is seemed to draw the cold air off the ocean. The visibility was good but it was still very hazy with fog evident off shore. The air temperature never broached the 60F mark to my knowledge.

On the fishing grounds it was foggy all day. In fact, the visibility ranged from less than a mile to five miles at the most. The wind was light out of the southeast. The ocean's surface was calm over two to three foot rolling sea swells. The sky was overcast or appeared so with the haze and fog. The air temperature ranged from 46F to 50F. The surface water temperature reached a high temperature of 46.9F. The tide (current) was moderate. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 59F (with a low of 44F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 46F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 43F).

The fishing was very good. Most anglers had a fish a cast. But there were a lot of sub-legal fish. Most legal fish caught were haddock, by far. The haddock bag limit was easily attained. They caught half the legal pollock they caught yesterday. Legal landings also included nine redfish and one cusk. They released one wolffish and quite a few good sized cod today, bigger cod than the last few trips. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. Bill Socha (NH), however, was one of the ones that Ian would have picked had he had to guess. Bill's largest fish was a 7.5 pound cod and the first fish to weigh as a potential pool winner. Bryan LeBlanc (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.5 pound cod. This fish was quickly weighed and released alive (as were all the biggest cod today). The second largest fish was a 10 pound cod caught by Raina Bumpus (ME). She also caught an 8 pound cod. Adam Quimby (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 9.5 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Matthew LaClaire (MA) caught a 9 pound cod, his largest fish. Cindy LeBlanc (ME) caught an 8 pound cod. She also landed the hard luck award for having the nicest boots. There was no hard luck today. The fishing has been phenomenal since the start.

When the Bunny Clark showed up at the dock, Bruce Woodfin (Power Products, Wakefield, Massachusetts) showed up as well. He was here to help us change the suction line from the starboard oil pan port to the port side oil pan port. The difference was that the port on the port side had a suction tube going to the bottom of the oil pan. I had tried to change the oil a week ago only to find out I was pulling the air off the top of the oil in the pan. We could have changed it over ourselves but I didn't want to void the warrantee on the engine. And, if we got in a mess, Bruce would have bailed us out. Once the oil pump suction tube was in the proper position, changing the oil was a breeze. We did have quite a bit of a problem changing the oil filters. I didn't have a filter wrench that was narrow enough to get between the oil drip pan and the bottom of the filter. But for the might and brawn of Jared Keniston, all would have been lost. Instead, between the two of us (mostly Jared) we got the filters off and new ones on. Monday I will be visiting NAPA.

Mother's Day, Sunday, May 10, 2015

The Bunny Clark had the wooden anchors out today. For the past several years we have taken Mother's Day off. So it will be today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the sky was clear with a half moon hanging high in the southern sky, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in fog and haze. As the sun rose, the fog rolled in. The fog stayed with us until about 9:00 AM. The sky remained a hazy clear for the morning. By afternoon, there was a clear sun but the sky was still a bit milky at times. The air temperature soared up to about 85F. It felt warmer and it might have been. The wind blew lightly out of the south. The visibility was good over the ocean after the fog lifted. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 89F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 90F (with a low of 59F).

I spent the day at Barnacle Billy's restaurant all day. We were short staffed today. And we recorded the best lunch we have ever had in the history of the restaurant. So yours truly was in the dish room (we call it the bilge) clearing trays, running silverware, cups and bowls up front and trying to manage the garbage barrels. My brother, Court, never got a break either and spent time scooping ice cream cones. And Court closed (the last one out) last night. But the weather was perfect. It couldn't have been better for Mother's Day. And everyone seemed very happy. I ended up finishing the day by working in the office completing the orders for tomorrow. I got home at 8:00 PM.

Bob Munroe & Linn Burgess (MA) sponsored me in my Pan-Mass Challenge cancer fund raising bicycle ride today, the 192 mile event due to start on August 1, 2015 at Sturbridge, Massachusetts. Bob & Linn each gave me a donation last year. Bob has been a sponsor for years. Thank you both so very much for your support. I appreciate it very much!

Monday, May 11, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility over the ocean was fair in fog and haze. By sunrise, black thick fog had moved in along the coast. At 7:30 AM, the fog was still thick along the shore. The air temperature had dropped to 57F by 8:00 AM. The sky stayed overcast all day. The fog got thicker at 9:00 AM but was joined by a fifteen knot northeast wind. We never did see any more rain. But it was misting so much in the morning, you would have gotten soaked riding through it on a bicycle - as I did. After noon, the fog drifted off shore, the wind dropped but the air temperature never got much higher than 57F.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east northeast at fifteen knots, more or less. Seas were chops of two to three feet. By noon, the wind was slacking. Winds continued from the east northeast at five to ten knots with seas in chops of a foot or two. The sky was overcast all day. The air temperature ranged from 48F to a high of 53F. The visibility in the morning ranged from a half mile to two miles in fog. After noon, the visibility improved to ten miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 47.6F on the fishing grounds. The tide (current) was moderate in the morning and strong in the afternoon. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 48F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 80F with a low of 50F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 73F (with a low of 51F).

The fishing was very good to excellent. Most fish caught, legal or otherwise, were haddock, everywhere. The bag limit was attained with no problem. Legal landings also included twenty-three pollock and nine redfish. They released a few cod of market size to 9 pounds. Two wolffish were also released. They drift fished and anchored. Anchoring was the best today, a first for this season. All terminal gear worked well but bait caught the most fish.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. Mark Girard (CA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound cod. This fish was released alive right after being weighed. Jake Jessop (UT) caught the second largest fish, a 7 pound cod. The third largest fish was a 6.75 pound cod caught by Dixon Barlow (AZ). Carl Cox (AZ) landed the hard luck award for getting a bit queazy.

Mark Girard did me a solid by donating $40.00 towards my fight against cancer with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Mark's sister, Deb, is fighting for her life against the disease which always brings it right home. I appreciate your support, Mark, and I thank you very much.

Tim Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 49F, the sky was overcast, it was drizzling (not quite raining), the wind was blowing out of the northeast just shy of ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair in fog and haze.

When we passed through the gate to head out to sea we had a bit of hubble along the shore. But a mile out we left all that. The wind was light from the northeast. The ocean was fairly calm. We went through a few rain showers on the ride out. We never saw any rain on the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind started out light from the northeast. Then there was no wind. The wind hauled out of the south southwest late in the afternoon. The ocean was calm the whole day on the fishing grounds. The wind speed increased to ten knots or better with a one to two foot chop on the ride back. Most of the day was spent in the fog. At times we had fifty fathoms of visibility. Near the end of the fishing day we had about five miles. We had better visibility on the ride back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature ranged from 48F to 52F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 48.2F. The sky was mostly overcast or it seemed it with the fog. We did see some sun from time to time in the afternoon. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 47F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 87F with a low of 48F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 50F).

The fishing was good in the morning but the bite was off a bit. This was probably because it was so calm. There was no lack of fish on the sounding machine. In fact, I saw more pollock today than I have seen on any trip this season. And we landed more legal pollock today than any other trip this season. Most legal pollock were in the 2 to 3 pound range. There were a few from 4 to 5 pounds. Legal landings also included the boats bag limit of haddock, thirty-five redfish and a cusk. We released three wolffish and twenty-three cod back to the ocean alive. We drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well but bait and cod flies worked the best.

Mark Girard (CA) was high hook with the most legal fish and the most fish, period. The largest fish of his that I weighed was a 6.5 pound cod. His largest haddock looked to be about 4 pounds. He gave away quite a few pollock. He was probably high hook yesterday with Captain Ian as well. And Mark admitted to me that he has never caught so many fish as his did with Ian yesterday. (Chopped liver anyone?) Chris Tankred (OH) caught the largest fish of the trip, a wolffish of over 12 pounds. However, in order to win the boat pool you have to boat the fish. It was lightly hooked in the lip. So the only way I was going to get it was to lift it over the rail (It's illegal to keep/kill wolffish). In so doing, the hook pulled out and the fish swam to bottom. Chris also caught one of the three largest pollock at 5 pounds. His largest fish was an 8 pound cod, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Dewey Kerns (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 9.5 pound cod. He also caught two of the three largest pollock. Both pollock weighed 5 pounds each. Ed Smart (NY) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the third largest fish, a 9 pound cod. Ed also landed the hard luck award for losing three Bunny Clark jigs!

Other Angler Highlights: George Smart (NY) caught a 7 pound cod which he was happy to release. He wasn't his normal tangling self! I almost think that Bob Foster (NY) tried to get him involved in more than George's share of tangles. Most of the time Bob's line was tangled with George's! Greg King (NY) caught a 5.5 pound cod, one of the first fish I weighed today. Moose Monahan (NY) caught a 5.25 pound cod and the second largest haddock, a 5 pounder. Andrew Kerns (PA) caught the largest haddock of the trip at 6.75 pounds. This is also the second largest haddock of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date.

I received four donations helping me in my fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. George Smart gave a donation of $3.00, Ed Smart gave $10.00, Ed Smart, Jr. donated $25.00 and Mark Girard gave a very generous $60.00 after donating $40.00 yesterday! Thank you so much for your support in this project. The help this provides in cancer research is enormous.

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind was out of the west or west northwest in the morning. By noon, the wind was out of the northwest. Later, the wind blew out of the north. Wind speeds ranged from fifteen to twenty knots with higher gusts ashore. The sky was brilliantly sunny all day (as compared to the last few), the air temperature rose to the high 60s and the visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at fifteen knots, more or less. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The sky was sunny all day. The air temperature ranged from 52F to 56F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 48.4F. The visibility was excellent. The tide (current) was strong in the morning and moderate in the afternoon. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 44F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 69F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 37F).

The fishing was good to very good overall, very similar to yesterday without pollock numbers. The fish, overall, were smaller today except on the last spot. That was where they caught their largest haddock and cod. Most legal fish landed were haddock. Again, the bag limit was attained without any problem. Legal landings also included thirteen pollock, two cusk, eight redfish and two mackerel, our first mackerel of the season. They returned twenty-one cod of fair size today. They alternated between drifting and anchoring. Bait seemed to do the best today.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. Gary Delphia (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the two largest fish, a 9 pound cod and a cod of 8.75 pounds. He caught the two largest fish of the trip. The third largest fish was a 6.5 pound cod caught by Jim Reilly (MA). Dody Bleau (VT) caught the largest haddock at 6 pounds. Brien Erwin (VT) landed the hard luck award after his own reel died on the first spot.

There were several donations made sponsoring my cancer cure ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Brien Erwin gave $25.00, Gary Delphia also donated $25.00, Dody & Nicki Bleau gave a generous $60.00 and that most excellent elder distance runner, Jim Reilly, donated $30.00. Thank you all so very much for the help you give to those with cancer and future cancer patients. You humble me with the support you give.

Tim Thursday, May 14, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F (the air temperature dropped to 45F by 4:00 AM), the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

We had an excellent ride to leeward on the way to the fishing grounds. Winds started out from the northwest at five knots and then hauled out of the north at ten knots or a little more. The sky was crystal clear, the air temperature was cool (45F) as we cleared the gate but the visibility was excellent. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at ten knots or better most of the morning. Seas were chops of about two feet. The closer we got to noon, the less wind we had. A little after noon, the wind let go altogether and left us with a calm ocean. We had a light southerly wind for the ride home with calm seas. The sky was cloudless all day. The air temperature ranged from 50F to 53.5F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 47.9F. The visibility was excellent. The tide (current) was moderate in the morning and light in the afternoon. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 40F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 69F with a low of 49F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 32F).

The fishing was excellent overall. We started the day getting into the small legal pollock and smaller haddock like we have been just about every trip this season. On my third move I ran over a bunch of bigger pollock. I stopped on them and for over two hours we caught pollock from 7 to 12 pounds average as fast as we could get a line down. There were many double keeper catches including all our biggest doubles of the season so far. I stopped weighing pollock of 10 pounds or less about fifteen minutes into the blitz. Most legal fish landed were pollock, far and away more than we have caught on any other trip this season - so far. After the pollock we found a mix of pollock and bigger haddock. For the last two hours of the day I couldn't find a pollock but we kept catching larger than normal sized haddock, collectively our largest haddock of the season. Legal landings also included six whiting, three cusk, one redfish and our bag limit of haddock. We released six cod that would have been legal at this time last year. We also released one wolffish that might have made the 8 pound mark. We drift fished most of the day. We tried anchoring once with very little fishing success. All terminal gear worked well but bait caught the most haddock and cod flies caught the most pollock.

Dody Bleau (VT) was the high hook of the trip with the most legal fish. Some of his fish I weighed included a 10 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. The 14 pound pollock tied with a 14 pound pollock that Brien Erwin (VT) caught for the third largest fish of the trip. Brien won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. He caught this pollock as part of a double keeper catch that also included a 10 pound pollock. To date, this is the second largest double keeper catch of the Bunny Clark fishing season. Brien also won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish of the trip, a 15.75 pound pollock. His two largest pollock are the two largest fish caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. Brien caught this 15.75 pound pollock as part of another double keeper catch along with his 14 pound pollock, mentioned previously. This is the largest double keeper catch of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. I took a picture of Brien with his big double keeper catch. This digital image appears on the left. He also tied for the largest haddock of the trip with a 7 pound Maine state trophy, only the third trophy fish we have landed this season to date. It was a good day to be Brien Erwin!

Other Angler Highlights: Jon "Griff" Griffin (MA) landed the other 7 pound Maine state trophy haddock to tie Brien's fish. Griff's largest fish was a 12 pound pollock. Tim Rozan (ME) caught the second largest cod of the day at 8 pounds. Of course, all cod were released alive. I weighed only three other fish of Tim's. They included a 9.5 pound pollock, a 10 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock. Ray Westermann (MA) caught the first fish I thought I should weigh, a 6.5 pound pollock, a giant of a fish in my mind at the time. He also caught another pollock a couple minutes later that I figured would probably win the boat pool today, an 8.5 pound pollock. The last fish I weighed of his was a 10.5 pound pollock even though he caught a couple others that were probably bigger. Katie Baumann (MA) caught the third largest haddock of the trip at 6.25 pounds. Her largest fish was a 10.25 pound pollock. Gary Delphia (VT) caught the largest cod of the day at 10 pounds. His largest pollock also weighed 10 pounds. Nicki Bleau (VT) probably caught the most good sized haddock. I know she had six haddock of at least 5 pounds each, some went back alive. Her largest fish was a 10.5 pound pollock. Gary Delphia won the hard luck award for catching the most small fish when everyone else was catching nice sized pollock! No one had any hard luck today.

Several anglers, again donated hard earned money to sponsor me in my cancer drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Tim Rozan and Lewis Hazelwood (MA) gave $40.00 (Tim & Lewis did the same thing last week with the same donation amount!), Jon Griffin donated a generous $100.00 and Ray Westermann gave $25.00. Thank you all so very much for helping me in the cancer fight. So many people appreciate your support and help. Me included!

Friday, May 15, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 45F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The air temperature rose to 60F by 8:00 AM, the ocean was still flat calm and there wasn't a breath of wind, a perfect day for sailing humans in the Gulf of Maine. Winds continued to be light for the rest of the day. The sky, although clear and sunny in the morning, became overcast with a high thin layer of clouds that didn't block out the sun but did give it a milky texture throughout the afternoon. Closer to sunset, these clouds disappeared to allow the sun full access to the Cove. The air temperature reached 70F or better. The visibility was very good over the ocean.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of every direction today. But the wind velocity barely made two knots. The ocean was flat calm for the trip. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was very good or better, over twenty miles. The air temperature ranged from 52F to 58F. The surface water temperature broached the 50 mark for the first time this season. The highest surface water temperature they saw today was 51.6F. The sky was overcast. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 43F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 67F with a low of 48F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 34F).

The fishing was good to very good overall. It was really too calm get an excellent bite going. Ian found some bigger pollock but they wouldn't bite. Norm Herrick (MA) landed the biggest of the bunch at 5 pounds or so. In all they landed twenty-one pollock. Most legal fish landed were haddock. There too they didn't get the big ones we had during yesterday's northerly wind. And, just like yesterday, they didn't bite in the calm weather. They released two wolffish and a few market cod back alive. They drift fished all day; they had no choice. All terminal gear worked well.

Norm Herrick didn't get the recognition he deserved today. He used to release legal cod last year (and many years before with us) when we were able to keep them. Today he released quite a few cod over twenty-four inches but so did others. Maybe not as many as Norm released but release them they did. It's the law. Some were sad but most saw the value in it - in theory. So Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. Willie Reopell (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.5 pound cod. He also caught the third largest fish, a cod of 7.5 pounds. The second largest fish was an 8 pound cod caught by Joe Compipello (NY).

Other Angler Highlights: Bill Murphy (NH) released a 7 pound cod, his largest fish. Keith Weber (NY) also released a 7 pound cod. Wayne MacDonald (NH) landed the hard luck award because he caught the most sculpins (four) and because he had a few tangles. There was really no hard luck today. Ian had to push it to find a recipient.

Will Shapleigh (ME) came down to the boat after everyone else had left to give me $40.00 to help me in my fund raising cancer drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge. His grandmother is sick from it and not doing well. He appreciated my efforts. And I appreciated the compliment. Thank you very much. I am humbled as it's nothing that you couldn't do. I'm so very happy to pass the money on to where it can really be used to its best advantage.

Saturday, May 16, 2015

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 50F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. The wind stayed light all day, the ocean calm. The air temperature reached a high of 64F. The sky was mostly overcast with the very occasional peek at the sun later in the day. There were sprinkles here and there in the morning. It never did rain today like it did south of us in Massachusetts and Connecticut (it poured in the morning). But even in those states it dried up and was sunny in the afternoon. The visibility was good in haze.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at five knots, more or less. There was a small chop on the oceans surface, essentially making it calm all day. The sky was overcast. It didn't rain. The tide (current) was moderate. The air temperature was a mild 53F. The surface water reached a high of 49.6F. The visibility ranged to eight miles in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 48F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 46F).

The fishing was very good overall. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock were not the bigger fish we saw a couple of days ago. It was much like yesterday's trip. Unlike yesterday, they released quite a few market and large market cod today. Legal landings also included sixteen pollock and four cusk. There were also a few mackerel caught. In fact they had a couple of porbeagle sharks around the boat today. One took a line. But after a short fight, it got parted off. Don Johnson (MA) had one go after a fish on his line near the surface but the shark never grabbed it. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Jared couldn't tell me who was high hook. John Russell (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11.5 pound cod. He also released a 7.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 9 pound cod caught & released by Bethanie Johnson (MA). She also caught the second largest fish, an 8.5 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Don Johnson caught a 5.5 pound cod and a 6.5 pound cod, his two largest fish. Mark Fornier (VT) landed the largest cusk of the Bunny Clark season at 8 pounds. Hamid Mayhi (ME) released a cod of 7.25 pounds. Kevin Grant (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines.

I spent the day at Fairfield University, Fairfield, Connecticut watching my daughter, Halley, get pinned for the completion of her four year stint in the nursing program there. We will attend graduation proceedings tomorrow. Deb and I were very proud parents. My sister, Meg, and fiance, Mike Remkiewicz, rode down with us. It was a wonderful day for an old guy.

Sunday, May 17, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 50F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in black thick fog. By dawn, the fog had moved off shore and the day was warming up. The sky was still overcast and a few sprinkles of rain occurred. Around noon, the air temperature was already in the 70s and the sky was mostly clear. There was no wind all day. The ocean along the shore was calm. By 1:00 PM, the air temperature might have hit 80F. Right around 5:30 PM, the wind hauled out of the southeast and brought the wind off the water and fog. By 6:45 PM, the air temperature had cooled to 56F, there was dense fog along the shore and a light breeze from the southeast.

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction in the morning, very light from the northeast in the afternoon. The ocean was calm. The sky was mostly cloudy all day, sunny late in the trip and mostly sunny for the ride back to Perkins Cove. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to two miles in fog and haze. The air temperature ranged from 50F to 58F on the fishing grounds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 50.0F on the fishing grounds. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 48F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 67F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 86F (with a low of 55F).

The fishing was very good. Plus, during the time the fishing was the best, they had a whale show with many minke whales lunge feeding in the herring schools around the boat. All this took place in the fog. Plus, they were catching mostly haddock with some cod in the market category. While the whale show was playing, the haddock were biting and the weather was perfect, Dick Slocum (NJ) hooked into a porbeagle shark (mackerel shark). The shark had taken a fish that Dick was bringing up from the bottom. After an intense fight, they got the fish to the boat, gaffed it and tail wrapped it. Legal landings for the trip included mostly haddock. The three haddock bag limit per person was attained with no problem. The legal haddock were smaller, in general, than they have been. Legal landings also included the porbeagle, four pollock and a cusk. Drifting was the fishing method. Bait worked the best for catching.

I don't know who was high hook but if you include the cod over twenty-four inches, it might have been Dean Wolf (NJ). Dean also caught the second and third largest fish of the trip, a 10 pound cod and an 8 pound pollock. Dick Slocum won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 304 pound porbeagle shark. This is the largest porbeagle shark that has ever been landed on the Bunny Clark. The shark was cut up in pieces and then weighed, the figures added up to get the total weight. So, in fact, it was probably bigger had it been weighed whole. Steaks were made out of the shark and were taken home in bags. I never did ask if Dick took them all or if he distributed steaks to others. Of course, that was his decision to make.

Another Angler Highlight: Skyla Kroll (VT) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.

While all the excitement was going on in the Gulf of Maine, I was near Long Island Sound watching my daughter receive her Bachelor of Science in Nursing diploma from Fairfield University in Fairfield, Connecticut. Deb & I were pretty proud parents. I was delighted that she did so well there. Afterward, we had lunch at the beach house that she and her four roommates rented for the winter. So there were parents, friends and matriculators eating sandwiches on the beach. It was the first time I had seen Long Island Sound. It was hazy with the heat (it was 86F there) but I could see Long Island on the other side. And it was strange to see the different species of mollusks on the beach including oyster shells. A bit different than Maine waters. We drove back home during the late afternoon, getting home about 9:00 PM.

Monday, May 18, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 49F, the sky was mostly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots or better and the visibility over the ocean was good in some haze. The northeast wind lasted for about an hour after daylight and then started to die out. The wind direction remained out of the northeast but wind speeds were light. The ocean was calm along the shore after 9:00 AM for the rest of the day. The air temperature was cool. I think I saw a reading of 58F today. It might have been higher. The sky was mostly overcast with the sun peeking out every now and then. After 1:00 PM, the sun stayed out in a haze sky. The visibility was good in haze.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east northeast at five to ten knots. It was calm in the afternoon. There was a light chop over two to three foot rolling sea swells in the morning and not much of anything for seas and chops in the afternoon. The visibility was just shy of twenty miles in the morning and part of the afternoon. The fog rolled in late in the trip giving them a visibility of one to five miles. The sky was sunny all day. The air temperature ranged from 48F to 54F on the fishing grounds. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 48.2F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 61F (with a low of 48F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 58F with a low of 49F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 49F).

The fishing was very good overall. Most fish caught were sub-legal. But there were many. But most of all there were many haddock. In fact, all the legal fish landed were haddock. Nothing else. There were a few good sized cod released but no keeper pollock. Very few sub-legal pollock in fact. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well. There were whales everywhere again today. Many humpbacks and a lot of sei whales.

Ian didn't tell me who was high hook. I suspect it was Jack Judge (CT/ME). Jack won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.25 pound cod, released back to the ocean alive, of course. The second largest fish was a 10 pound cod caught by captain & deck hand, Jared Keniston. Chester Rowe (FL) caught the third largest fish, an 8 pound cod. Van Clark (ME) landed the hard luck award for reaching high hurler status.

Several people contributed to my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Some of these were anglers who's donations came in over the weekend. Those wonderful individuals and their donations included Jack Judge for $10.00, Billy & Yvette Busch (NY) in an "egift" for a very generous $300.00, John Baker (ME) for $25.00 and Don & Lisa Johnson (MA) for a generous $50.00. I very much appreciate all this support. These people donate money to this event through me repeatedly year after year. And I so appreciate that too. Thanks so much!

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I were supposed to be running the marathon trip today. We had not a soul booked. This is the first time a May marathon trip has ever not sailed for lack of passengers. Perception is everything in the service business.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light from the south and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The sky remained cloudy most of the day. By 3:00 PM, the sun finally came out and remained out for the rest of the day until sunset. We had rain before 7:00 AM. It rained lightly here and there until after 8:00 AM. And then it stopped for the day. The wind blew out of the south all day with wind speeds of ten knots or better. It never seemed like it was going to blow. I never did look at a thermometer so I can't tell you what the air temperature was except at the start of the day. The visibility was good overall, no better than that. Around 8:00 PM, the fog rolled in along the coast giving us poor visibility out to sea. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 49F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 65F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 49F).

I spent most of the morning working on updating my Pan-Mass Challenge page and depositing all the money I had collected for over a month. The last two hours of it I was on the phone working on the new engine in the Bunny Clark. Today's focus was on the ZF transmission. I needed special tools to change the oil after the break-in period. And I also needed gaskets, filters and oil as well. So I spent the rest of the afternoon getting all this together and learning about the reverse gear. The plan is to the change the oil on Saturday when I have more time. Once I got back from Portland, I took a shower and went in to work at Barnacle Billy's. I was done at 8:45 PM.

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northwest ashore all morning. Wind speeds were about fifteen knots, maybe stronger. After noon, the wind struck out of the northwest or maybe west of northwest at twenty-five to thirty-five knots in gusts. It blew hard all afternoon. The morning saw air temperatures rise up into the mid 60s. These temperatures dropped somewhat after the wind shift. The visibility was excellent. The sky was mostly clear and very sunny.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at ten knots in the morning. Seas were chops of one to two feet. After noon, the wind hauled out of the west northwest and blew about twenty knots, more or less. Seas increased to about three feet, more or less. The sky was sunny in the morning but mostly overcast in the afternoon, clearing for the ride back to Perkins Cove. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature ranged from 50F to 52F. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 45F, very cold for this time of year. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 45F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 66F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 65F (with a low of 38F).

The fishing was excellent, probably the second most fish caught this year. However, most were sub-legal. It was an area we haven't tried this year yet. And there were a lot of cod. Most cod were small markets but there were the most sub-legal cod (last years fish) we have seen for a while. Once the wind piped up it was hard to move far enough away to get out of them. There were also many haddock and very many sub-legal pollock. But it was a fish a cast. Most legal fish landed were haddock. The bag limit was attained with no problem. Legal landings also included five pollock, two redfish and two cusk. They drift fished for most of the day. One anchor stop was made. All terminal gear worked well. It really didn't matter what you used.

High hook was pretty evenly divided among anglers. Tom O'Neil (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9.25 pound cod. Tom tied with Bob MacNeil (NH) for the second largest fish of the trip. They each caught a cod of 8.5 pounds. They also caught two cod of 7.5 pounds each.

Other Angler Highlights: Marty Buskey (NY) caught an 8 pound cod. Jeff Beaudoin (ME) caught a 7 pound cod, his largest fish. Of course, all cod were released. The ones that were weighed were weighed quickly and released alive. Tom Canning (NY) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines and for gapping a fly hook. Big fish? I didn't ask.

Two anglers today donated money to sponsor me in my bike ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge. This to help the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts find a cure for cancer and for cancer care. The donors were Bob MacNeil for $25.00 and Jeff Beaudoin also for $25.00. Thank you both so very much. I appreciate the support and help in this cause.

Also, Chris Uraneck was aboard from the Maine Department of Marine Resouces. He was there doing the recreational fishing survey. He counts fish, takes measurements, records what fish look healthy when released and those fish that don't and queries the anglers (frequency of fishing, where they are from, etc.). Everyone the DMR sends to us fits right in on the Bunny Clark. And it's always great to have them aboard. Plus, they give an honest assessment to what is actually going on out on the grounds. I looked into it last year and my opinion is that they get it, unlike some other states who's surveyors seem to over-hail continuously, much to the detriment of our fishery.

Thursday, May 21, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 45F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

When I got to the Cove at 2:30 AM, the usual time I get there for a marathon trip, the air was cool. I imagine it was even a couple of degrees cooler at Ian's house up back in Wells. But there was little wind. We found the same on the ride to the fishing grounds. The ocean was flat calm for the first two miles. From there the wind was light west northwest, a pleasant ride to the fishing grounds. The sky was starry and the visibility was excellent. On the grounds, we had about twelve knots of west wind with a chop of about a foot. The tide was strong in the morning, perfect for drifting in the afternoon. The sky was clear and sunny for the morning. High clouds gave us soft lighting in the early afternoon. It was a sunny ride home. The air temperature ranged from 49F to 52.3F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 48.6F. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 39F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 67F with a low of 45F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 72F (with a low of 36F).

The fishing was very good overall. It seemed like someone had a fish on most of the time but it wasn't nearly as good for fish in general as it was yesterday. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. In fact, even if we could have kept every haddock we caught it still wouldn't have come close to the number of legal pollock we landed. The pollock bite was on at sunrise. But we caught pollock everywhere we went. Most places the pollock averaged 2 to 4 pounds. But three spots the average was 6 to 13 pounds with some bigger ones. We caught a much bigger haddock today than we have been catching. Today's trip was very much like last Thursday's marathon. We did not catch any trophy haddock, however. The haddock bag limit was easily attained. Legal landings also included four redfish. We were able to stay away from the cod today. In fact, there was one spot I wanted to try but when I got there it was loaded with cod. We released twenty-one cod to 8.5 pounds.

The drift was fast in the morning but that only helped the pollock bite. The drift was perfect for haddock late morning and after noon. We tried anchoring twice with variable success. Not a single piece of bait was used today. We never killed a single clam! A first for this season. Cod flies caught the most fish. Jigs were a fairly close second.

Either Dan Killay (VT) or Chris Deschambault (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. I would have had to count their fillets to know for sure. Chris won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's largest pollock of the season to date. I took a picture of Chris with his fish. This digital image appears on the left. The fish would have looked a lot bigger if he hadn't been such a brute of a man! Fish fear him. He caught the second biggest double keeper catch of the trip. His catch included a 9 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Some of Chris' other fish included the second largest haddock at 6 pounds, a 9.5 pound pollock, a 10 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock. Dan won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. Some of his other good fish included a 7.25 pound cod (released, of course), a 12 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. Jason Ridolfi (NY) landed the third largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. Jason caught the two largest cod, an 8 pounder and an 8.25 pounder, both released. The only other fish of his that I weighed was a 10 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Larry Kabat (NH) caught an 11 pound pollock as his largest fish. His largest cod weighed 7 pounds. His largest haddock weighed 5.5 pounds. John Senia (CT) caught the first pollock that was big enough to weigh. The fish weighed 7.5 pounds. Two other pollock of his that I weighed included a 10 pounder and a 10.25 pounder. His largest cod weighed 7 pounds. Fritz Cybulski (CT) landed the largest haddock at 6.25 pounds. His largest fish was an 11 pound pollock. I also weighed a 9 pound pollock for him. John Senia landed the hard luck award for losing a jig.

Fritz Cybulski gave $25.00 to sponsor me in my Pan-Mass Challenge cancer killing bike ride today. Fritz has been a long standing regular angler of the Bunny Clark. We are proud that he chooses us. And I appreciate his support very much. Thanks, Fritz!

Friday, May 22, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the south southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. By 10:00 AM, the air temperature was 70F, the sky was clear and sunny and the wind was light. It was a mostly sunny day today with light winds and a calm ocean along the shore. The air temperature got up to 71F before dropped a skosch in the afternoon. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at eight to twelve knots. Seas were chops of one to two feet over a two foot swell from the southeast. The tide (current) was moderate. The air temperature ranged from 50F to 53F. The surface water reached a high temperature of 48.8F. The viability ranged over twenty miles. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 47F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 76F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 47F).

The fishing was very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock today. They did find a few pollock including some of the larger ones but it was sporadic as compared to yesterday. Legal pollock were a close second to the haddock. The haddock bag limit was easily attained. Legal landings also included nine redfish and six cusk. They released a handful of cod that would have been legal last year, mostly small markets but with two larger market sized cod. Drifting was the fishing method. All terminal gear worked well but not much bait was used.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. Jeff McGuire (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. He tied for the second largest fish with Mark Lemieux (ME). Jeff caught an 11.5 pound pollock while Mark caught an 11.5 pound cod. Of course, Mark couldn't keep his fish! Mark also caught a cod of 10.5 pounds, his second largest fish.

Other Angler Highlights: Dan Payne (ME) caught an 8.5 pound cod. Richard Foster (ME) landed a pollock of 10 pounds, his largest fish. Cliff Foster (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting a little queazy and for losing a jig.

Three individuals helped me fight cancer today with donations toward my efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge. One gift was $25.00 from an anonymous donor. The other was a generous $55.00 donation from Dan Payne. Yet one other was from Bill Parsons (NJ) for a generous $100.00 via "egift". Thank you all very much for your support. It means so much to so many.

Saturday, May 23, 2015

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 43F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at twenty knots with higher gusts and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The day was cool overall, particularly in the morning. The air temperature never got over 55F in the morning. After noon, the air temperature did rise to 61F. I'm not sure if that was the highest air temperature in Ogunquit but it was certainly close. The wind blew out of the northwest ashore at speeds up to twenty-five knots. The sky was mostly sunny, cloudless in the morning. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at twenty knots, more or less. Seas were about four feet (more or less) in chops. The sky was clear. The tide was very strong today. In fact it was against the wind making it nearly impossible to anchor and very uncomfortable on the drift! The visibility was unlimited. The air temperature never got above 48F. The surface water temperature never got above 45F today. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 39F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 65F with a low of 44F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 64F (with a low of 39F).

The fishing was good to very good. About half the anglers were sea sick partially because of the odd fishing conditions, the chops in general and a bachelor party the night before. So only about fifteen anglers were fishing. Still, they caught a pile of legal haddock. Very few legal pollock today, four in all. They also caught a cusk. Sixteen cod were returned alive that would have been legal last season. Drifting, as mentioned, was the method. Bait worked the best.

There was no high hook today. Laura Sjolander (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 6 pound cod caught (and released) by Ian Croteau. Nick Sterne (OH) landed the hard luck award for, well, you know.

When the Bunny Clark came in, I was waiting with tools, oil and containers to change the reverse gear (transmission) oil. Because I hadn't installed a pump out motor, it took me a couple of hours. The break-in period was over so I had to do it. Now that it's behind me, I will figure out a way to make this much quicker next time.

Sunday, May 24, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 51F, the sky was partly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the west southwest at twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind blew out of the southwest to start and then northwest to west ashore. During the late morning, early afternoon, the westerly wind blew up to fifteen or more knots. The air temperature soared to well over 80F. After the air temperature reached 80F, I never looked at a thermometer again. But it felt almost too warm. The sky stayed sunny all day. The visibility was very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops and seas of two feet, more or less. The sky was mostly sunny all day. The air temperature ranged from 52F to 58F. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 48.2F. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 50F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 83F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 42F).

The fishing was very good, yet again. Most legal fish landed were haddock followed by pollock. The haddock bag limit was attained yet again. There were a few nice sized haddock. The pollock ranged in size from just legal (19") to 15 pounds. Legal landings also included nine redfish, one cusk and one mackerel. Twenty-eight market cod and three wolffish were released back alive. Drifting was the boat handling method employed while fishing. All terminal gear worked well but jigs and cod flies had a slight edge.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. But looking at the fish come off the boat I would say it was Ian Wood (PA). I have no idea. Just a guess. Ian won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. Some of his other good fish included the largest cod at 10.5 pounds, released of course, and a 12 pound pollock. Norm Herrick (MA/ME) caught the second largest fish, a 14.5 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 12.5 pound pollock caught by Calvin Cook (MD).

Other Angler Highlights: Larry Smith (MA) caught the largest haddock of the trip. It weighed 6 pounds. Stephanie Ordway (VT) landed the largest double keeper catch. Her catch included an 11 pound pollock and a 9 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Shawn Comstock (VT) landed the hard luck award for contracting the dreaded mal de mer.

Three anglers donated their hard earned cash to sponsor me in my quest to eradicate cancer with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. These anglers included young Ryan & Jason Capen (MA) for $20.00 and Ian Wood for $25.00. Thank you all for supporting me in this great cause. The DFCI is a wonderful place to go if you have cancer. And some of the best research in the world happens there. And it's right in our own back yard at Boston, Massachusetts.

Monday, May 25, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light out of the west southwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. By 11:00 AM, the air temperature was 82F and the wind was light. The air temperature went back up into the mid 80s today. The sky cleared by 9:00 AM and stayed sunny all morning. After noon, the sky clouded over but there were still some breaks with sun. Later afternoon, we had sprinkles of rain under slightly overcast skies. The air temperature dropped into the 70s after 5:00 PM. There was very little wind all day. The ocean was calm along the shore. The visibility was good in some haze. The wind started to blow out of the south near sunset.

On the fishing grounds, the wind out of the southwest at ten knots or so. Seas were chops over a two to three foot rolling sea swell. The sky was overcast for the trip. The air temperature ranged from 54F to 57F. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water reached a high of 49.5F on the fishing grounds. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 50F).

The fishing was very good overall. This has been the most consistently very good fishing season we have seen in a long time. Odd that it should come at the most restrictive time in our regulations history. Most legal fish landed were haddock by far. And, again, the bag limit was reached without a problem. Legal landings also included sixteen pollock, four redfish, three mackerel, one whiting and six cusk. Twenty-four cod were released alive. Drifting was the fishing method employed. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. John Russell (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11 pound pollock caught by Eric Johnson (MA). John Casey (MA) caught the largest cod of the trip at 10 pounds. The fish was the third largest of the trip, released, of course.

Other Angler Highlights: Brian Tilzer (MA) caught the largest haddock of the trip. It weighed 6.25 pounds. Joe Tilzer (MA) landed the hardest luck of the day award by getting sea sick.

Calvin Cook (MD) donated $40.00 to my efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge on behalf of James Cook (NC) and Trish Miller (MD). Thank you very much Cal. The effort and funding is well appreciated, as you know. Thanks!

Not So Tim Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I were supposed to be running the marathon trip today. We had not a soul booked - again, the second Tueday in a row. This is the only the second time a May marathon trip has not sailed for lack of passengers. Bad day at Black Rock - for me.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was overcast, there was a light sprinkling of rain, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The wind blew about ten knots out of the south all day along the shore. The air temperature soared to 90F, and possibly, beyond. At the very shore it was cooler than that with the wind off the water. But a half mile inland, it was brutal. The sky was mostly cloudy with some sun all day. It never rained again after that light morning sprinkle. The visibility was good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 91F (with a low of 58F). The value of 91F was only attained one other time on this date in the history of Portland weather keeping. And that happened in 2010. So the record is still 91F but it's held at two times instead of one. It might also be interesting to note that Portland weather keeping is only about 100 years old. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 87F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 91F (with a low of 63F).

I spent the day sick with flu like symptoms with one eye showing all the signs of conjunctivitis without the redness usually associated with the ailment. I had contracted this thing on the weekend of my daughter's graduation. But last night it took a turn for the worst with a coughing fit that kept me awake for most of it. So it was probably good that I didn't go fishing, not only for rest after being sick but also for the catch-up work I needed to get done for the restaurant and the Bunny Clark.

Today was the first day anything had been open for three days. So I was on the phone all morning with orders and the like. After lunch I took a nap and got back to it until 5:00 PM. I never did work today although my work at home took me to the restaurants and the boat for measurements and numbers. So despite how I felt (I did much better after the nap), I got much accomplished today. I am very much looking forward to feeling better and fishing on Thursday. Look out fish, here we come!

Not So Ian/Jared Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston were supposed to be running the extreme day trip today. We had nary an angler to make this trip possible. So the wooden anchors stay out for yet another day.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 71F, the sky was partly overcast, the streets were dry, there was no wind at the house but there was a light southerly wind off the coast and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze. The air temperature rose up to 82F in Ogunquit. It could have been higher further inland. In Perkins Cove, the air temperature dropped into the mid 70s when the wind kicked up. And the wind did around 3:00 PM. Most of the day the wind had blown out of the south at ten knots or so. By 4:00 PM, the wind was blowing out of the south at a sustained twenty-two knots with gusts to twenty-six knots. The sky was mostly sunny in a hazy sort of way all day. The haze made the visibility over the ocean good but no better than that. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 63F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 92F (with a low of 66F).

I spent the morning working on Bunny Clark stuff and office work at Barnacle Billy's. We decreased the price of lobsters today at both places so we were busy changing menus, prices in the POS system but I never got to change it on line. By noon, I was back at the restaurant doing my normal thing. I got out at 5:15 PM to start working on getting the Bunny Clark ready for tomorrow's marathon trip. It looks like I will finally get to go out on the boat tomorrow.

Tim Thursday, May 28, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I are running the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 68F, the sky was overcast, the wind was very light from the west southwest and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze. More later.

The full day trip on Saturday, May 30, has twenty-seven fishing places available, the Sunday extreme day trip of May 31 has eight fishing spots available and the extreme day trip of June 1 has fifteen fishing spots available. The fishing has been mostly very good to excellent. And there are lots of haddock around. And the bigger pollock are starting to show up. So don't miss the opportunity to be out enjoying yourself and catching fish. There are no fresher fish than the ones you catch yourself! To make a reservation you can call 207-646-2214.









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