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Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

July 30, 2016, 7:00 AM EDT



Our Two Largest White Hake

The digital images above were taken during the ultra marathon invitational trip on July 12, 2016. These shots were taken of the two largest hake of the Bunny Clark fishing season with the anglers who caught them holding them for the camera. The shot on the left shows Bryan Lewer (FL) holding his 40.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This picture was taken with an old Sony camera that loads floppy discs! The shot on the left is a picture of the ever popular (in Bunny Clark shots) Steve Selmer (NH) holding his 40 pound Maine state trophy white hake shortly after gaffing. I took this shot with an iPhone 6s. I could have used a better fill flash. But it still looks good. These are two of my best and favorite anglers.




Tim Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 2:15 AM EDT the air temperature was 71F, the sky was overcast, it had just started raining after being dry all night, the wind was blowing out of the south at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good enough in haze and precipitation. By 3:00 AM, it was still raining lightly, the air temperature had dropped a degree but the wind speed remained the same with some slightly higher gusts.

It rained at the dock just before we were to leave for the fishing grounds. It also rained on the ride out to the grounds. But the rain stopped when we got to our destination. And it was a lumpy ride getting out to start the fishing day. Seas were chops of three and four feet after the wind had blown all night. The wind had pretty much died out to about ten knots while traveling out but the seas were still there. On the grounds, the wind remained at ten knots or less through most of the day. The wind was out of the south. Near the end of the trip, the wind backed out of the southwest and blew up to ten and fifteen knots. Seas were no more than two feet or even less throughout the day. The air temperature reached a high value of 65F in the shade. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The sky was overcast for the first part of the morning, sunny for a bit and then overcast for the rest of the fishing. The sky cleared on the ride back to Perkins Cove. The visibility ranged to about fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58.9F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 63F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 69F).

The fishing was very good all day. We had no problem controlling the fishing lines. The weather was much better than predicted. There was no tide to speak of. And we had no problem hooking up with fish. I experimented on three occasions today. All my "new ideas" didn't pan out. At least they didn't pan out as I was hoping they might. Otherwise, I think landings would have been in the very good category. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock followed closely by pollock. There was a big range in size with the pollock. The haddock cull was fifty percent; for every two haddock caught, one was of legal length. We also had some larger than normal haddock caught. Legal landings also included one redfish, two cusk, five whiting and one butter mullet. We released twenty-eight cod from 5 to 14 pounds. Only four dogfish were caught. All were caught after Al Fournier (ME) pulled out a banana (bad luck) to eat! One wolffish was released. We drift fished, motor drifted and used the sea anchor. No anchoring today. Jigs and cod flies caught the most good fish.

There was no high hook today. Everyone caught an equal number of fish. There were no standouts at all. Al Fournier, before the banana, caught a 20.25 pound pollock and won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish. This is the largest pollock that Al has ever caught and it's the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the fishing season to date. I took a picture of Al holding his big pollock. This digital image appears on the left. Aside from dogfish, Al didn't catch another fish over 10 pounds. Noah Cookson (ME) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 14 pound cod. This is the biggest fish that Noah has ever caught. Noah also caught the third largest fish of the trip, a 13 pound wolffish. This is his largest wolffish and the Bunny Clark's fourth largest wolffish this season so far. I took a picture of him with his cat. This digital image appears on the right. I took two quick pictures and was able to let the fish go, hardly touching it at all. We never did get it quieted down enough to take a good picture - as you can see. Noah also caught the first two pollock I could weigh. One was 9 pounds. The other was 9.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Rich Gargan (NY) caught our biggest whiting of the year today. It weighed 2 pounds. I'm hoping we will see bigger ones in time. Rich's largest fish was an 11 pound pollock. He also caught the largest haddock of the trip. It weighed 4.25 pounds. Kevin Baker (ME) caught a cod that weighed 10.5 pounds, his biggest fish. Cameron Fournier (ME) caught the best double keeper catch today. His double included an 8 pound pollock and a 9 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. He landed the hard luck award for fighting a tug hawser (about twenty-five feet of 2.5 inch diameter line) for about a half an hour as we all made bets as to what he had on the line!

I received several donations from anglers helping me with my cancer fund raising bike ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those anglers and their donations included: Rich Gargan for $30.00, Al Fournier for $25.00 and Kevin Baker for $20.00. Thank you all so very much for your support and kindness. I truly appreciate it!

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, the wind was blowing out of the south at a solid ten knots or better and the visibility over the ocean was fair to poor in what looked like a fog back a mile off shore. Ashore, the sky remained overcast for most of the morning. There was a light intermittant rain from time to time that stopped by 8:00 AM. The wind blew out of the south all day but it was so light it never lifted a flag. The sun shone around noon but was covered with clouds again by 1:00 PM. At 2:00 PM it started to rain. It was pouring rain by 2:30 PM. The rain lasted an hour or better. There was no wind with it. The air temperature got up as high as 78F in Ogunquit. It was so humid that it felt like 89F. The visibility was fair to poor in fog all morning. The fog lifted by noon. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 63F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 87F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 66F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at ten knots or so until noon. After noon, the wind dropped somewhat. Mostly the wind blew out of the south at five knots in the later part of the trip. There was no swell all day. Seas were only chops of about a foot. The air temperature reached a high of 65F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to a mile in fog during the morning. After noon, the visibility improved to three and five miles in heavy haze. It was overcast all morning, sunny all afternoon. They didn't see any rain like we did. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

The fishing was excellent today. The factors that made it so included the weather, that you couldn't get to bottom without catching a fish of some size or species and that there were very few dogfish (six total). Landings fell into the good category. They saw the most haddock we have seen in weeks. In fact, most legal fish landed were haddock (twice as many as we caught on the marathon trip yesterday). The cull was off a bit, though. For every four haddock caught only one could be kept. There were a pile of short haddock released today. Legal landings also included twenty-eight pollock, two cusk and two herring. Released fish included thirty-four cod of 5 to 7 pounds, one wolffish and two sculpins. Drifting was the method. Jigs with cod flies caught the most fish.

Mark Hayes (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. He caught the bag limit of haddock plus his pollock. He never landed a fish of 10 pounds or better. Russ Watson (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 10 pound pollock caught by Kohl Lunardini (MA). There were no other fish caught of 10 pounds or more.

Other Angler Highlights: John Teehan (MA) landed the hard luck award for losing a jig. There wasn't very much hard luck today.

Dan Bailey (NY) donated $25.00, sponsoring me in my 192 cycling event to cure cancer called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Dan has supported me year after year in my quest for a cancer free world. And I certainly do appreciate his kindness and help. Thanks so much, Dan!

Thursday, June 30, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 2:45 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, there was just a little too much fog to tell if the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in black thick fog.

I had to navigate out of Perkins Cove using radar alone as the fog was black thick. However, it was a ground fog as you could see a sliver of a moon in the sky as we were cruising down the channel to the gate. The further we traveled to the fishing grounds, the thicker the fog became. This was unusual as the wind was blowing lightly out of the northwest, not a fog wind! But the dew point must have been just right with the humidity and the wind was very light anyway. The ocean was calm all the way to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, we had fog for an hour or so. Then the northwest wind picked up to about ten knots and the fog magically disappeared, leaving us with a nearly cloudless sky. The sky remained clear and sunny for the rest of the day. The wind remained out of the northwest the whole time we were on the grounds. It never blew more than ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot over a three to four foot long swell from the southeast. By noon, the wind had dropped enough to show direction but to leave the ocean very calm. The ocean was calm for the ride back to Perkins Cove but the wind hauled out of the west at the half way mark and then southwest later on. The air temperature reached a high of 69F in the shade. The tide (current) was light all day. After the fog was gone the visibility was excellent. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F, the highest value we have seen this season so far. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 56F).

The fishing, the weather, the catching and landings were excellent, the best trip of the year. We could have landed more fish had I focused on the pollock. But that would have been a waste. We caught plenty of pollock anyway. We might have landed more haddock and pollock had we not caught so many dogfish and cod. But we saw the most dogfish I have ever seen caught on an offshore trip. The cod average size was the best I have seen it this year. We had so many 10 pounders that I stopped weighing them. And forget about counting the dogfish we threw back. So it was a fish a cast from the time we arrived until we left the fishing grounds. We ended up leaving the fish to head back during one of the best bites of the day! Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far, followed by pollock. The haddock cull was three to one, legal fish to sub-legal fish. Legal fish caught also included two halibut (we had to release the bigger one), one cusk, one cunner and our first white hake of the season. We released about two hundred dogfish, quite a few cod, one halibut and three wolffish. We made four drifts for the day. The drift was perfect, maybe better than perfect! All terminal gear worked well.

It would be impossible to determine who was high hook with the most legal fish today. Not only was everyone catching legal fish but, near the end of the day, a few anglers were releasing fish they would have ordinarily kept. Eleven year old Luke Keniston, Jared's son, should have won the boat pool with a halibut that was at least 35 pounds. However, we had already landed a legal halibut a little earlier. And it's illegal to land two halibut in one day! So I played around with the fish and gaff (The fish was too big to "lip" aboard.) - trying to find some place near the mouth where I could hook it without killing it. In the midst of the task at hand, the line just broke. It must have been frayed as there was no pull on the line; the halibut was just lying there on the surface without moving. As soon as the line broke, the fish screwed. I could have gaffed it but, again, I didn't want to kill it just for a picture. So off it went. If I were to guess I would say the fish weighed 45 pounds. But it was at least 35 pounds. He caught the halibut as part of a double keeper catch that also included a 6.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Had we boated the halibut it would have been the biggest double keeper catch of the Bunny Clark fishing season and the third largest halibut of the Bunny Clark year to date. Luke also caught an 11 pound cod that he released. And he caught another cod that was larger but that also dropped off the hook before I could reach down and grab the gill plate. Luke caught a lot of haddock and pollock as well.

Gary Plourde (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 27.25 pound halibut. When I saw the fish I knew it was legal but I didn't realize how close is was to being illegal until I got it in the boat. That fish was exactly legal. And eighth of an inch less and Gary would have suffered the same fate that Vince DeBari (NJ) had a couple of years ago when he caught a 26 pounder that I had to release because it was a half inch short! Gary's halibut is the third largest halibut that has been landed this year off the Bunny Clark and it's his first halibut on his first deep sea fishing trip aboard the Bunny Clark. I took a picture of Gary and his halibut with my iPhone. The digital image appears on the left. Gary caught mostly keeper haddock today. He also released a 10.5 pound cod.

Larry Kabat (NH) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the third largest fish, a 22 pound white hake. This is the first white hake we have seen on the Bunny Clark this season so far. Larry might have also caught the most dogfish but I can't be sure of that. He certainly released a lot of cod!

Other Angler Highlights: Ed Robichaud (FL) caught the largest haddock of the trip at 5.5 pounds. He also caught the three largest cod. His three cod weighed 16 pounds, 13.5 pounds and 14 pounds. The 16 pounder is the fifth largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Neil Feldman (NJ) caught a few good fish I weighed including an 11 pound pollock, a pollock of 10.5 pounds, three cod of 10 pounds each, a 10.5 pound cod and a 4 pound haddock. Nate Roberge (ME) caught a 4.5 pound haddock and a 4.75 pound haddock. More importantly, he caught the 4.75 pound haddock at the same time his eight year old son, Gabe, caught a 4.5 pound haddock. I ended up taking a picture of the two of them holding their haddock together. The digital image appears on the right. Steve Selmer (NH) caught our first lobster of the year. It weighed 2 pounds, a nice hard shell female. Some of his other good fish included a 10 pound cod, a 12.5 pound wolffish (a tie for the Bunny Clark's fifth largest wolffish of the season so far), a 10 pound pollock and another wolffish that probably weighed 9 pounds. Fred Kunz (NH) caught the largest pollock of the day at 13 pounds. His largest haddock weighed 4.5 pounds, I think. He had two other big framed fish I didn't weigh. I also weighed a 10 pound cod and a 10 pound pollock that he caught. Brian Plasse (ME) landed an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. Charlie Rollins (MA) released a 12 pound cod that he caught, his biggest fish. Charlie caught a lot of haddock. Justin DeMott (ME) caught a 14.25 pound cod, his largest fish of the trip. And I forgot to mention that Nate landed the hard luck award for most tangled lines. No one was very tangled today at all. But I needed some excuse to give the shirt out!

I received a $40.00 donation from my brother, Court, sponsoring me in my ride to fight cancer call the Pan-Mass Challenge today. My brother sponsors me every year. Thank you, Court, I more than appreciate this!

Friday, July 1, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was clear with some clouds, there was no wind to speak of, the ocean was flat calm along the shore and the visibility over the ocean was good, at least, in some haze. Ashore, there was little wind all morning. The sky was clear and the visibility remained good, at least. The air temperature was in the high 70s but reached a high of 81F in Ogunquit. The wind direction was southerly. But there wasn't enough to lift a flag until around 2:30 PM. The southerly wind increased to fifteen knots by 3:30 PM. This was followed by increasing cloudiness from the west. The became overcast by 5:00 PM and remained so through the night. It started to rain at 9:15 PM (until then all the showers had been showing on radar a few miles inland for two hours previously). It rained periodically through the night. The wind blew up to twenty knots or more out of the south southwest in gusts after 7:00 PM. The visibility remained good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 86F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 54F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots or less all morning. The ocean was calm. After noon, the southerly wind increased to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot over rolling sea swells of about two feet from the southeast. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The air temperature was warm, 67F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63.3F.

The fishing was excellent. It was a fish a cast all day. There were a few cod in the mix to make it so. But no cod were bigger than 8 pounds. Landings were very good today, nearly excellent. Most legal fish landed were pollock, far and away. Legal landings also included quite a few haddock and two mackerel. The cull was three to one, one legal fish for every four caught. There were only two dogfish caught and released. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well but jigs and cod flies caught the most legal fish.

Dylan Tucker (NY) was high hook with the most legal fish. Some of his better fish included an 11 pound pollock, a 13.5 pound pollock and a 14.5 pound pollock. His biggest pollock was the second largest fish of the trip. David Archambault (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's fourth largest pollock of the fishing season to date. David also caught the third largest fish, a 14 pound pollock and a pollock of 10.5 pounds. He also caught an old fishing line. Tangled at the end of the line was a female lobster with eggs. Seeing as he didn't actually catch the lobster, Ian didn't weigh it. The lobster was carrying eggs and was a little over 2 pounds, probably.

Other Angler Highlights: Don Chasse (NH) caught a 13 pound pollock, his largest fish. Karrie Breton (ME) caught the largest haddock of the trip at 5 pounds. Augie Archer (CA) caught two pollock exactly 10 pounds each. Steve Caron (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting a bit green.

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. The wind had picked up since they arrived from the day trip. It was also hot, muggy and sunny. On the fishing grounds, the sky had turned overcast. It was becoming so before the Bunny Clark left the dock. The wind blew out of the south at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were about two feet, a little larger on the ride back to Perkins Cove. The tide (current) was moderate. The air temperature reached a high of 65F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles. The surface water temperature had a high value of 59F.

The fishing was good. There were plenty of fish caught. Most of these were small cod, sub-legal pollock, sub-legal haddock and sub-legal redfish. Legal landings included a haddock, two cusk and a redfish. They anchored for every stop. Everyone used bait.

David Richardson (MA) was probably high hook. He didn't land the most legal fish but he did catch cod of 3 pounds, 4 pounds and 4.25 pounds. His largest cod was the third largest fish of the trip. Curtis Cozzens (MA) caught the largest fish of the trip, an 8 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 7 pound cusk caught by John McQuade (MA). None of these anglers entered the boat pool for the largest fish. T.J.Sheahan (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the fifth largest fish, a 3.5 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Aidan Sheahan (CT), Alex Richardson (MA), Tim McQuade (MA) and Will Thovin (NY) caught the first cod of the evening. These fish were all sub-legal and weighed a pound to 1.75 pounds (Will's). Robert Saraiva (MA) released a 2.75 pound cod. Colton Marshall (MA) caught the only legal haddock out of the three that were caught. Colton's haddock weighed 3 pounds. Dylan Pearson (MA) landed the hard luck award for not being able to tune his stomach in to the motion of the ocean as it related to his time on the Bunny Clark!

Saturday, July 2, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was clear with some clouds (we had a light rain only an hour previously), the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind steadily increased to about twenty knots with higher gusts ashore. The wind direction altered between west northwest and northwest depending on where you were. The day became brilliant with a bright sun, clear sky with minimal cloud cover and excellent visibility. These conditions stayed with us for the rest of the day. The high air temperature in Ogunquit was 78F. At least, that's the highest air temperature that I saw. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 80F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was much lighter. The wind blew from the west southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot over long rolling sea swells from the southeast that averaged about three feet more or less. The air temperature reached a high of 66F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high value of 62F.

The fishing, catching and keeping was very good to excellent today. It was just a great day. Many fewer market cod were caught today. Ian told me that there were twenty-four cod over twenty-two inches in length. Most legal fish landed (and most fish caught) were pollock, far and away. They also caught more haddock than they did yesterday and three cusk. The haddock cull was much better as well. For every two haddock caught, one was legal. No dogfish were seen. And no other species were caught. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Yoshito Umaoka (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a 13 pound pollock, the second largest fish of the trip. He also caught a 10 pound pollock and a pollock of 10.5 pounds. Tristan Winslow (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.5 pound pollock. Ian also weighed a 10 pound pollock that Tristan caught. The third largest fish was a 10.5 pound pollock. There were several anglers who caught pollock of 10.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Scalia (NH) caught the first fish to be weighed, a 10.5 pound pollock. Bobbi Falank (NY) also landed a pollock of 10.5 pounds. Adam Croteau (NH) caught a 10.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock, his two best fish. Beola Destromp (VT) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. The wind had backed off a bit from the velocity displayed during the morning and early afternoon. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or two. The sky was clear. The air temperature reached 66F. The visibility was excellent. There wasn't much current. The surface water temperature was 55F.

The fishing was very good. The catching was good. Landings were fair. Legal landings included two haddock, five whiting and one redfish. Twenty cod were released, including five over twenty-two inches. Quite a few sub-legal pollock were released as well as six herring. Anchoring was the method. Everyone used bait this evening.

Jake (last name withheld - VT) was high hook with two fish, a 2 pound haddock and a 4 pound cod, the third largest fish of the evening. Jarrod Lee (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 5 pound cod, released, of course. The second largest fish was a 4.5 pound cod caught by Noah Jakubowski (VT).

Other Angler Highlights: Matthew Terrell (MA) landed a haddock that weighed 1.75 pounds. Toby Jakubowski (VT) caught and released a 3.5 pound cod. Justin Abraham (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting a bit queazy.

Sunday, July 3, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Sean Devich ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing lightly out of the west southwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northwest starting at 8:00 AM. Wind gusts were over twenty knots. You could tell that the wind didn't reach offshore for any distance. The sky was cloudless, or nearly so, all day long. The air temperature reached a high of 83F in Ogunquit. There was not much humidity. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 54F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 47F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to twelve knots. Seas were chops of two feet or less. The air temperature got as high as 62F in the shade. The sky was very clear and sunny. The visibility was excellent. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60.5F.

The fishing was very good. The catching was very good. Landings overall were good. But, on one spot, the landings were exceptional. The catch of legal fish was fair to good on every other spot. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-five haddock. Released fish included seventeen cod from 5 to 7 pounds, a wolffish and a sculpin. Anchoring and drift fishing were the two methods employed. All terminal gear worked well but the cod fly caught the most fish overall.

I never did ask who was high hook. Jared didn't volunteer that information when I met the Bunny Clark at the dock. Bryan Robbins (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19.5 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's third largest pollock of the fishing season to date. The second largest fish was 13.5 pound pollock caught by Dick Grimm (ME). The third largest fish was a 13 pound wolffish caught by Leo Huang (NY). This is a tie for the Bunny Clark's fifth largest wolffish of the fishing season so far.

Other Angler Highlights: Victor Ross (ME) started off the day with the first fish to be weighed. It was a 7 pound cod. I believe this was the biggest cod of the fishing trip. Dave Osgood (FL) followed right behind with a 6.5 pound pollock just before they got into the really good fishing on the next spot. Cody Robbins (ME) landed a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Craig Turner (ME) caught a 12 pound pollock, his best. Craig Robbins (ME) boated an 11 pound pollock. April Turner (ME) landed the hard luck award for, you guessed it, getting sea sick. Seems like every day lately we have one or two who get the motion sickness bug. Ouch!

Captain Jared Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at five to eight knots. Seas were small chops of a foot at most. The sky was clear, the air temperature reached a high of 70F, the visibility was excellent, there wasn't much tide and the surface water temperature reached a high value of 57F.

The fishing was very good. The catching of fish was fair, at best. Landings were low. Most fish caught were cod, twelve in all, all released. Only two were over twenty-two inches long. Legal landings included two cusk and a redfish. They anchored and drift fished. Everyone used bait and cod flies.

There was no high hook this evening. Nicki Goumas (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.25 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 3.25 pound cod caught by Lexi Goumas (NH). Aiden Finneral (MA) boated a 3 pound cusk, the third largest fish of the evening.

Other Angler Highlights: Sofina Russell (MA) caught a cod that weighed 2 pounds. Bubba Carney (MA) caught a 2.25 pound cod. Mike Roesehlaub (NH) caught a cod of 2.5 pounds. Larry Sime (MA) landed the hard luck award for producing the worst backlash Sean has ever seen in monofilament line! Certainly better than winning it for getting sea sick!

I received a generous donation of $50.00 sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The donor was an old friend, Lynn B. Welsch (NM). The donation in memory of her friend, Karen Clark, who passed away from cancer too early in her life. Thank you Lynn. I appreciate your support very much! It was also very nice to see you today.

Independence Day, Monday, July 4, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The day warmed up nicely after the sun came up. By 11:00 AM, the air temperature was 83F. I did see the air temperature get up to 86F. It could have been higher. There was very little humidity today which was nice. The sky was cloudless or nearly so all day. The wind blew out of the west northwest at fifteen knots, more or less, in the morning and then died out before noon. After noon, the wind hauled out of the south. But it didn't blow much. The visibility was just shy of excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west to southwest at five to ten knots. It was actually pretty much the same for the whole fishing trip. Seas were chops of a foot or less over a two foot long rolling sea swell. The sky was nearly cloudless all day, same as it was ashore. The air temperature reached a high of 69F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was excellent, over thirty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.5F.

The fishing was nearly excellent as was everything else about the day. The catching, the keeping and the quality were all there. Plus there were quite a few good market cod released to 13 pounds. And there were very few dogfish. Three to be exact. Most legal fish landed were an equal number of haddock and pollock. There was also a cusk that was caught. The haddock cull wasn't bad with one legal fish for every three haddock caught. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian was hard pressed to come up with some who was high hook. There were too many excellent anglers on the boat who were doing very well today. Tina Martin (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 12 pound pollock caught by Eric Pysar (NY). He also shared in the third largest fish category with a pollock of 11.5 pounds. Tina was the other angler with a fish of 11.5 pounds. Her's also was a pollock. Eric also caught two pollock of 10.5 pounds each.

Other Angler Highlights: Carol Morse (ME) - of the Greg & Carol Morse team of Bunny Clark fame - landed a 10.5 pound pollock, her largest fish. Richard Baker (ME) also caught a pollock of 10.5 pounds. And Steve Brown (ME) also caught a pollock of 10.5 pounds, his largest fish. He also caught eight legal haddock as part of his catch. Joe Columbus (MA) caught a 10.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, his two best fish. He also landed the hardest luck award for losing a jig. Lucky for that because no one else had anything close to a reason for Ian to give the award out!

Joe Columbus and Dawn Beckwith (ME) sponsored me in my cancer quest with Pan-Mass Challenge. Joe's donation was $20.00 (plus another $20.00 he donated earlier in the year) while Dawn's (and Sally's) donation was a generous $60.00. All have supported me in this cycling event since I started riding it ten years ago! Thank you all, again, very much for helping me with this project. I appreciate it very much!

I ran the local fireworks cruise tonight. Every year my wife arranges to have me take our friends out off Ogunquit Beach, anchor up and watch all the fireworks. I also have friends I invite. But Deb has more friends! Like many years in a row, the weather was perfect, flat calm and warm. I ended up getting back a little after 10:00 PM. It was a good time.

Tim Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Sean Devich and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 67F, the sky was partly clear, there was no wind, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was very good in some haze. The wind was light out of the south, the sky was a light overcast, seas were chops of a foot or so with what looked like a left over two foot chop and the visibility was good to very good on the way to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the sky was mostly overcast with some looks at the sun every now and again. The air temperature reached a high of 70F in the shade at the very end of the fishing. Before that, the air temperature hovered around 63F to 65F. The tide (current) was moderate all day. The visibility was good for the first two hours of the day but came in foggy for about a half hour. We had kind of a misty rain during that time. The rest of the day the visibility was good in some haze. Maybe ten miles? We ran into fog again about a third of the way back to Perkins Cove. We carried the fog all the way to the gate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 76F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 58F).

The fishing was very good. The catching was very good - largely because of the cod. Landings fell into the good category. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-five haddock and three cusk. The haddock cull was three to one, sub-legal haddock to legal fish. A bunch of short haddock today. Quite a few cod to 14 or so pounds were released. I never did get an official weight on the biggest one because we couldn't get it out of the water without it falling off the hook - which it did! We caught and released only two dogfish. Drifting was the method. Cod flies caught the most fish, both pollock, haddock and cod.

David Martineau (NH) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish, mostly pollock. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15.25 pound pollock. Mark Martineau (NH) landed the second largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. He also caught a 10 pound pollock that I weighed. The third largest fish was an 11 pound pollock caught by Nate Eckman (PA).

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Martineau (NH) was second hook if you counted the cod that he also caught. I don't think he caught any cod as large as 10 pounds. But he had plenty that weighed 6 to 8 pounds. He caught the first fish on the boat that I could weigh, a 9 pound pollock. Plus, he caught the best double keeper catch of the trip. Steve's double included a 10 pound pollock and a 10.25 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Brendan McLaughlin (MN) caught one of the bigger pollock of the day at 10.5 pounds. Mylah Paquette (VT) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the trip. I have to say that when she did hurl, she hurled with soul!

Sean Devich and I ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. The ocean was calm all the way to the fishing grounds. The wind was from the south, mostly, but it was so light as only to be detected by the direction of the ripples on the water. We had fog half way to the grounds and at the half way mark to Perkins Cove on the way back. On the fishing grounds, the ocean was flat calm, almost devoid of wind ripples, warm and sunny. The air temperature was again 70Ffor a high. The sky remained clear for the trip. The visibility, even in the clear, was at most five miles. The most visibility we had in the fog was about a half a mile. The fog never did get black thick.

The fishing was excellent. The catching was very good thanks to the forty-two cod that were caught. Only fifteen fish were over twenty-two inches with probably only five over twenty-four inches. Legal landings included seven haddock and one small legal pollock. We also released a handful of sub-legal pollock and another seven haddock. We released at least twenty-five dogfish. We tried to drift but the tide (current) was just a little too strong. So we ended the trip with two anchor stops after the drift. Only two cod flies were used. Almost every fish was caught with bait and rubber "smart baits" or Mojos.

Bryan Pratt (MA) was high hook with the most cod. His largest weighed 5.5 pounds, the second largest fish of the trip. Kevin Pratt (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9.5 pound cod. The third largest fish was a 5 pound cod caught by eight year old Cameron Neal (MA).

Other Angler Highlights: Richie Neal (MA) caught the largest haddock of the evening. It weighed 3 pounds, as large as the largest haddock caught on the previous trip today. Nine year old Adam Murray (NH) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single fish. Not even a dogfish! But no one was seasick, the first trip in a few. Adam's mother, Karen, took a picture of me with her phone presenting the hard luck award t-shirt to her son. This digital image appears on the right.

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was very good in some haze. Ashore, it was very warm, still, sunny (cloudless for most of the day) with zero wind and a calm ocean along the shore all day. The air temperature reached a high of 90F. It could have been higher. The visibility was very good, at least, in some haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 88F (with a low of 61F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 94F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 94F (with a low of 59F).

On the fishing grounds, the ocean was calm all day. Winds were light and variable in direction. The current, which was moderate, pushed them to the north. The sky was clear and sunny. The air temperature reached a high of 78F, the highest air temperature of the season so far. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing was excellent. The catching was good to very good. Landings were good. Fish were smaller today. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock were bigger today with a cull of 50/50, keepers to sub-legal fish. Legal landings also included eighteen pollock and one mackerel. They released quite a few cod to 8.5 pounds. Nine dogfish were caught. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear caught fish but bait did the best because of the haddock.

Dan Wescom (VT) may have been high hook. He landed twelve legal haddock and a few pollock. His largest fish was an 8.5 pound cod, the largest cod of the day and the second largest fish of the trip. Cam Bannister (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound pollock. Sam MacFarlend (ME) landed the hard luck award for his ill health directly related to the Bunny Clark and the way Sam's body corresponded to the slight roll.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. There was still very little wind, the sky was clear, the air temperature was very warm with little humidity and the visibility was very good when they headed to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots at most. The ocean was calm. The sky was clear. The air temperature reached 72F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature was 64F.

The fishing was excellent but the catching was slower than normal. Landings were low. In fact, only seven legal fish were caught, a redfish and six mackerel. Released fish included ten cod. Only one cod was over twenty-two inches. One other cod was close but the rest were small. Ian drift fished and anchored. Everyone used bait.

Maddie Neeb (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 3.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 3 pound cod caught by Mike Pouliot (MA). Eight year old Drew Myers (MI) caught the only legal groundfish, a redfish that weighed 1 pound. Ainsley Havrilak (NC) landed the hard luck award for almost getting sea sick!

Thursday, July 7, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at almost fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in some haze. Ashore, the wind picked up to almost twenty knots. Seas looked like gray beards, big chops, come to take the beach away after getting used to so many calm days in a row. It didn't rain but the fog rolled in around 7:00 AM. Along with the wind, the fog made it damp in and around the shore line. By noon, the fog was gone and the wind was starting to die. Overcast skies turned to mostly sunny skies with scattered clumps of clouds now and again. The visibility, except in the fog, was good all day. The air temperature in Ogunquit reached 77F, at least, as a high temperature today. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 64F).

The wind was twenty knots at times on the ride to the fishing grounds. Seas were three to four feet. On the grounds, the wind dropped somewhat. Ten to fifteen knots at first, the wind dropped to five knots before they were finished. [Seven miles from shore, headed in, the ocean was calm.] The sky was overcast. The air temperature reached a high of 63F. They had fog for the whole time fishing. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to a half mile. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

The fishing was poor; mobility was down and the boat was rocking too much to have a good haddock bite. And many were sea sick. One angler decided to sit out it the spray with only a t-shirt and shorts. He couldn't have been more wet if he had jumped overboard! He was cold for the trip. The catching was good. Landings were down, particularly with haddock. Whenever you can't hold your fishing pole still, it's hard to do well on the haddock at this time of year. All bets are off in April when they are spawning. Only six legal haddock were landed. The haddock cull was horrible too with five sub-legal haddock for every legal one. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Twenty-two dogfish were caught and released. The biggest cod was 7 or 8 pounds. They released about seventeen cod over 4 pounds. They anchored and drift fished. All terminal gear worked about equal.

I am not sure who was high hook. But I would bet it was Chris LeBlanc (MA). His two largest fish included a 9 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock. He was the first angler to boat a legal fish that was big enough to weigh for the boat pool. Derek Washburn (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. Second place was shared by two anglers who each caught a pollock of 11.5 pounds. Pete Gilbert (NY) caught one. Marvin Stopak (NE) caught the other. Marvin caught his 11.5 pound pollock as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 5.5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The high hurler of the day got the hard luck award t-shirt. It was a close contest but Ethan Gaugler (PA) ended up the winner.

I received two donations sponsoring me in my Pan-Mass Challenge cycling event to eradicate the scourge of cancer. One was a $50.00 "egift" through the PMC site from Malcolm & Kathie Jepson (CA). The other was a $20.00 contribution from Jim Sheeran (MA) - my third favorite Democrat! Thank you all so very much for your continued support (every year). I do so appreciate it!

Tim Williams/Dan Kelley Friday, July 8, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots or less and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in some haze. At sunrise we had very little wind out of the northeast, the was overcast and the visibility was very good. By late morning, the northeast wind started to air-on. At 10:00 AM, the northeast wind was blowing over fifteen knots. Before noon, there were gusts to twenty knots. After noon, the wind started to drop again. But it never got below ten knots. Seas didn't look as rough as they did yesterday. Nor did it blow that hard today. Nor was there any fog today like yesterday. The visibility remained very good. The wind off the water kept the air temperature lower than it would have been otherwise. I saw a reading of 69F in Ogunquit. That was probably the high for the day. The sky alternated between partly cloudy and overcast. It never did rain today. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 67F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 60F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind started out light. In fact, the wind and seas were light all the way to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind started at ten knots out of the northeast and blew up to over fifteen knots, about what we had ashore. Seas were chops of two to four feet. The air temperature reached a high of 63F. The tide (current) remained moderate as it has for the last few days. The sky was overcast for the whole fishing period. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles or excellent. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

The fishing was horrible for most today. The weather and seas were the culprits. Most anglers were sea sick again, like yesterday. And most anglers bait fished when it was really a jig fishing day. As I mentioned yesterday, haddock like the bait presentation. If the water moves the boat unnaturally and you can't control the stillness of the fishing rod, the haddock fishing suffers. It did today. Catching was very good today. But this was only for those who weren't sick. And better for those who were using a jig and jig stick. All anglers used bait today except for two. Landings were fair. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Most good sized fish caught were cod! Legal landings also included one cusk. Twelve dogfish were released (and all the cod, of course). They tried anchoring, drifting and using the sea anchor. Anchoring was most successful, by far. The sea anchor was very comfortable but non-productive today.

Dan Kelley (ME) was the fisherman of the day. He shared high hook status with Tim Williams (CT) - they caught half of all the fish landed during the trip - and Dan won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. Tim landed the third largest fish of the trip, a 10.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11 pound cod caught by Len Gentilini (MN).

Other Angler Highlights: Glen Adams (NH) released a 10 pound cod, his largest fish. Rick Harrington (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, his biggest. Bill Socha (NH) landed the hard luck award for getting sick. I can't believe he was sea sick as I have never seen him sea sick before, even in much worse conditions. But, regardless, I believe he got the shirt for the novelty of the situation and the fact that Ian has the power to give it to anyone he wants!

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at five to ten knots. Seas were two to three feet in chops, much like the mornings trip but with more space between the seas. The air temperature reached 62F. The current was moderate. The visibility ranged down from the day trip to ten and fifteen miles in haze. The sky was overcast. The surface water temperature reached 61F.

The fishing wasn't great, a few got sea sick with the conditions. The catching and landings were good, one of our best evening trips this season. Maybe the best. Most fish landed were cod; there were five over twenty-two inches. Legal landings included three haddock, four pollock, two whiting and one cunner. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Steve Martineau (MA) was the fisherman of the evening. He was high hook with the most fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8 pound pollock. Steve also caught the second largest fish, a 7 pound pollock. Some of his other fish included cod to 4 pounds, two whiting of 1.5 pounds each and a 3 pound pollock. The third largest fish weighed 4.5 pounds. There were two. One was caught by Joe Fitzgerald (MA), a haddock. And one was caught by Frank Farnsworth (MA), a cod. Frank also was high hurler and landed the hard luck award of the evening. It was hard enough luck not to be able to keep the third largest fish!

Other Angler Highlights: Joe Martineau (MA) caught a 2.5 pound haddock, a 3.5 pound pollock and a cod that weighed 3.5 pounds. Lydia Picariello (MA) caught a 4 pound cod. James Scione (MA) caught a cusk that weighed 4 pounds. Bobbie Pebbles (NH) landed a 3 pound haddock.

Saturday, July 9, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in some haze. Ashore, the wind hauled out of the east northeast and blew up to almost twenty knots before backing off around 9:00 AM. It started to rain shortly after 8:00 AM. It continued raining and drizzling as the wind dropped until noon. The rain stopped shortly after noon. The wind dropped to light and then hauled out of the southeast with wind speeds to ten knots. The sky remained overcast for the rest of the day. The air temperature didn't get much higher than 64F in Perkins Cove. The visibility was fair during the later morning and very good in the afternoon. After 6:30 PM, the rain came again in the form of thunder showers. After 7:30 PM, the thunder and lightning ended but the rain continued on into the night. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 59F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 65F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 63F (with a low of 57F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east northeast at ten knots. Seas were a mixture of a chop and a sea from the east northeast of two to four feet. The air temperature reached a high of 60F. The sky was overcast. The tide (current), again, was moderate. The visibility ranged from one to three miles in fog in the morning and fifteen to twenty miles in the afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61F.

The fishing was fair; the seas made it uncomfortable and hard to hold a line still for the haddock. The catching was very good for all species, including cod. Landings were fair. Legal landings included thirty-one haddock, twenty-four pollock and six cusk. Released fish included quite a few cod, the most prevalent species today and six dogfish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked about the same.

I was late getting to the boat today. I was sleuthing out a bread mixup at the restaurant which carried over into the time when the boat comes in. I was able to see a few of the anglers but didn't see them all as they were coming off the boat. So I also forgot to ask Ian who was high hook. And I didn't see who seemed to have the most fish either. Not that this really matters, I suppose.

Mitch Merrow (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.5 pound pollock. He caught this as part of a double keeper catch that also included a 7 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The second largest fish was a 10.5 pound pollock caught by Luke Smith (ME). Doug Dostie (ME) landed the third largest fish, an 8.5 pound pollock. Laurie Costigan (ME) landed the hard luck award for the same reason most of the hard luck awards have been handed out these last few days: sea sickness.

We canceled today's evening half day trip due to the bad weather expected during that time. Turns out it was a good call - for once.

Sunday, July 10, 2016, Happy Birthday Court Tower & Cathy Koppstein

Captain Jared Keniston and Sean Devich ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, the roads were wet, the wind was blowing out of the east at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair in precipitation, fog and haze. It rained for most of the morning. At times, the rain came down hard. But mostly it was a light rain. By 10:30 AM the rain was done. The sky was overcast for a while after that. After noon, we saw a little blue sky and a little bit of sun. The air temperature reached a high of 63F in Ogunquit. It could have been higher than that but I didn't see it. After sunrise, the wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen knots, more or less. Seas looked no bigger than they have been for this wind. The visibility ranged between fair to good depending on the depth of the haze and fog. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 64F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 64F (with a low of 57F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east northeast at ten knots, more or less. Seas were chops of two feet. The air temperature reached a high of 60.6F. The sky was overcast. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility ranged to five miles or less in fog. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.3F.

The fishing was good; the weather conditions were better for fishing than the last few days. The catch of fish, of all species and sizes, was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included twelve haddock and one cusk. Released fish included eighteen cod over four pounds, one dogfish and one sub-legal redfish. Anchoring and drifting were the methods. Cod flies caught the most fish today.

I didn't ask who was high hook. Andrew Garvin (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 10.5 pound cod caught by Matthew Garvin (MA). Jarrod Dube (NH) landed the third largest fish, a 9.5 pound cod. Zack Avery (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting a bit green.

Captain Jared Keniston and Sean Devich hosted the Jim Joseph (MA) afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip charter today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at five to eight knots. Seas were chops of a foot over a rolling three foot swell. The sky was overcast. The air temperature was 63F throughout. The visibility was over ten miles in some haze. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The surface water temperature was 63F.

The fishing was not great. The swell made it hard to maintain good fishing performance. The bite was off after so many days with the wind out of the east. Landings were poor. There were no landings. The fish caught were all sub-legal pollock and sub-legal cod. Anchoring was the method. Only sinkers and hooks (bait) were used.

Austin Haas (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 2.25 pound sub-legal cod. Anthony Emslie (MA) caught the second largest fish, a sub-legal cod that weighed 1.75 pounds. Ian Emslie (MA) landed the hard luck award for easily attaining high hurler status. I talked to him at the dock after he got back. You never would have known that he had that condition out there on the boat.

We had several donations from couples and individuals sponsoring me in my quest for a cancer free planet with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those donors and their contributions included Dick & Kathy Lyle (PA) for a generous $100.00, Charlie & Linda Nickerson (ME) for a generous $250.00, Herb & Pam Cook (NY) for a generous $250.00, Jon & Fran Leavitt (NH) for a generous $100 and Dan Killay (VT) for $25.00. Thank you all so very much for your support and help, all of whom donate to my charity every year. I certainly appreciate this!

Monday, July 11, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the sky was overcast, it had been raining an hour earlier, the roads were wet, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was good or better than that in some haze. Ashore, the weather just kept getting better. By 9:00 AM, the air temperature was in the high 60s and the wind was light. The wind stayed out of the northwest until about 10:00 AM. This wind was light. Before noon, the wind hauled out of the south southwest. By later afternoon, this wind was blowing about ten knots. It was much lighter than this earlier. The sky was clear all day with few clouds. The air temperature had reached a high of 77F by 2:00 PM. The visibility remained good, at least in some haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 72F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at ten knots to start. Seas were chops of a foot over a rolling sea swell of about two feet. The wind dropped as did the chop. By noon, there was no wind. But this was quickly replaced by a westerly wind of no more than five knots. The ocean stayed calm (except for the round swell) for the rest of the day. The air temperature reached a high of 69F. The sky was clear. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility was excellent, over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing was close to excellent today. The stronger tide made it just shy. The catching was nearly excellent as well. Landings were very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock by far. But the haddock count was up as well. The haddock cull was 50/50, legal to sub-legal haddock. Legal landings also included five cusk and a cunner. Released fish included one halibut, twenty-one dogfish and twenty-five cod of 4 pounds or better. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well. The bite was really good.

Mark Cote (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a 14.5 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Chris Helander (ME) caught the largest fish, a halibut of 23 to 25 pounds, just sub-legal. But Ian couldn't "lip" it in! The fish turned, the hook came out and the fish swam away before Ian could get a hold of it. It wasn't a legal fish so you can't kill it. Ian had no choice. Thirteen year old Zach Chaffee (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 17.5 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's fifth largest fish of the season to date. Ian took a picture of Zach with his fish. The digital image appears on the left. The third largest fish was a 15.5 pound pollock caught by Bob Pine (NY).

Other Angler Highlights: Dick Lyle (PA) had to be in there for second hook. He's just too good a fisherman. But I wasn't there so this is conjecture, pure and simple. Some of his good fish included an 11.5 pound pollock, a 13.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. Jake Pine (NY) caught the best double keeper catch of the trip. His double included a 9 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Chris Cote (ME) landed an 11 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Chris Helander landed the hard luck award for his loss of the halibut.

I received two donations today sponsoring me in my cycling event for a cancer cure called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One donation was a very generous $500.00 from Joe Amato (NH) in the form of an "egift" through the PMC site. The other was a donation of $25.00 from Jake Pine. Thank you both so very much for joining me in the cancer fight. I very much appreciate the help. But there are many others who certainly appreciate it more than I do!

Captain Ian Keniston, Captain Jared Keniston, Bryan Lewer and I ran the ultra marathon trip this evening.

At 6:30 PM EDT the air temperature was 72F, the sky was clear, the wind was less than ten knots out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good. I got down to the Cove a little before 9:00 PM to get the Bunny Clark ready to sail so we could leave the dock by 10:00 PM. There were already four of the fourteen anglers aboard ready to go. Everything came together by 9:45 PM. And we left the Cove right on time. I took the Bunny Clark out the gate while Jared collected the pool money and I filled out what I could of the Federal vessel trip report. A half hour into the trip, Captain Ian took the wheel while I went below to sleep. Ian told me that there was very little wind from the south southwest all the way to the fishing grounds. Seas were a foot or less, the visibility was very good and it was a very easy ride out.

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

I got up at 3:30 AM, got myself together and then took the wheel over from Ian. I sleep like a log when I have someone experienced who I trust at the wheel. But no matter how little I sleep, I can't help but wake up at 3:00 or 3:30 AM.

At dawn on the fishing grounds, the weather was perfect. The air temperature was 65F, the sky was clear, the wind was light from the southwest, seas were chops of a foot or less, the visibility was excellent and there was no swell. Part way through the morning, the wind hauled out of the west and blew up to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot for an hour or so but the wind dropped back to five knots or less after that. Later in the afternoon, the wind hauled out of the southwest. Winds remained light until the journey home when we saw southwest wind speeds increase to as much as fifteen knots with seas in chops of two feet. We never had more than a foot chop the whole time fishing. In fact, it was mostly calm all day. The air temperature got up to 70F for a high air temperature. But because of the slight breeze all day the air temperature was perfect. The sky was clear all day. The visibility was excellent. The tide (current) was light for most of the morning and moderate in the afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 54F).

The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good and landings were excellent. It was the Bunny Clark's biggest trophy fish day of the last two seasons. The only thing missing, which would have made it a perfect trip, was bringing a halibut to gaff. That didn't happen. But the places where we could have caught a halibut were so full of good sized pollock today, the halibut didn't stand a chance. But we did land our five largest hake of the season, our five largest cusk of the season our fifth largest trophy redfish, almost landed a thresher shark, caught our first barndoor skate of the season and we had some fabulous fish a cast drifts. There was only one person aboard who did not land a trophy or two or six.

Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far, followed by cusk (mostly over 10 pounds - only six under 10 pounds) and then, closely, by white hake. Legal landings also included sixteen haddock. Probably sixty dogfish and forty cod (between 5 and 14 pounds) were released back to the ocean alive. We anchored on only one spot. The rest of the day was spent drift fishing. All terminal gear worked well.

I couldn't begin to tell you who was high hook. Everyone did well. Before the day even got started, Steve LaPlante (CT) hooked into a thresher shark. As the sun was rising out of the eastern horizon, Steve's shark gave quite a show. It jumped clear of the water at least six times before breaking off and swimming away. Had Steve landed it the fish would have been the largest of the trip. Steve's largest fish was a 25 pound Maine state trophy white hake. He also caught a Maine state trophy cusk of 12 pounds.

Bryan Lewer (FL) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest landed fish, a 40.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the largest hake of the Bunny Clark season to date. He also caught the third largest cusk of the Bunny Clark fishing season with a fish that weighed 20.5 pounds, a Maine state trophy. Some of his other impressive fish included a 15 pound Maine state trophy cusk, a 27.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 26 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 33 pound Maine state trophy white hake and his first Maine state trophy redfish, ever, at 2 pounds. I took a picture of Bryan with his big redfish to add some color to this page. This digital image appears on the lower right.

Steve Selmer (NH) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 40 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest hake of the season so far. Steve also caught our first barndoor skate of the season with one that weighed 12 pounds. It was the second fish caught this morning. I took a quick picture and released it. This digital image appears on the left. Some of Steve's other good fish included a 14.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk, a 13.75 pound Maine state trophy cusk, a 10 pound cusk, an 18.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk, a 30 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 12 pound pollock and a 5 pound haddock.

Ray Westermann (MA) won the boat pool for the third largest fish with the third largest fish, a 38 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the Bunny Clark's third largest hake of the 2016 fishing season. He also caught a 14 pound Maine state trophy cusk. He also caught one of the largest pollock at 14 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Dave Gray (VT) and Lewis Hazelwood (MA) shared the fourth largest white hake title of the Bunny Clark season. They caught a 37 pound Maine state trophy white hake, each. Dave's was forty-six inches long while Lewis' fish was forty-four inches long. Dave has caught many hake over the years much bigger than the one he caught today. But this was Lewis' largest hake to date. It was his second Maine state trophy hake of the trip today. His other hake weighed 26 pounds. He also caught his first Maine state trophy cusk, 16 pounder. Lewis also caught a 13 pound cod and a 13.5 pound pollock. Dave Gray caught quite a few pollock. His better fish, in my opinion, were an 11 pound cusk, a 13 pound Maine state trophy and a 12.25 pound Maine state trophy cusk. I took a picture of Dave with his longer white hake. The digital image appears on the lower left of this entry. He is wearing a red shirt. Dave has been fishing with me longer than any other angler.

David MacDonald (MA) hooked our first blue shark of the season today. It probably weighed 70 pounds at most. It ended up breaking his jig off. David caught the Bunny Clark's largest cusk of the season today, so far. And it's doubtful that we will see one bigger. His Maine state trophy cusk weighed 27.25 pounds. It was a heck of a cusk to gaff and pull out of the water. This is also his largest cusk ever. The cusk took the treble hook of the jig full on. So I took a picture of David holding his fish with the jig in place. The digital image appears on the left. And, no, I didn't weigh the fish with the jig in it's mouth! Some of his other really good fish included a 19.25 pound Maine state trophy cusk, a 31 pound Maine state trophy white hake, an 11.5 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. His son, Tim MacDonald (MA), David's son, managed to avoid all the big hake. But he did catch a 13 pound Maine state trophy cusk and he tied for the biggest pollock of the trip with a 14 pounder.

Adam Towle (NH) boated a 16 pound Maine state trophy cusk. He also caught the most haddock of the trip and the biggest. His big haddock weighed 5.75 pounds. Dave Miller (MA) caught the second largest cusk of the day at the last stop of the day. It was a Maine state trophy of 22 pounds, the second largest cusk of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Some of Dave's other great fish included an 11.5 pound cusk, an 18 pound Maine state trophy cusk, a 25 pound Maine state trophy white hake and a 30 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Jon "Griff" Griffin (MA) landed the sixth and seventh largest white hake of the trip. Both Maine state trophies, one weighed 36 pounds and the other weighed 35.5 pounds. These fish are the sixth and seventh largest hake of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Some of Griff's other good fish included a 30.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake, an 18 pound Maine state trophy cusk, a 13 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. Dan Killay (VT) lost one of the biggest cusk of the day. It came off his line under the boat and floated up on the opposite side. It was huge, certainly over 15 pounds and probably well over 20 pounds. It was too far away to gaff and went down before I could move the boat. His largest fish was a 30 pound Maine state trophy white hake. He also caught a 23 pound white hake and released a 12 pound cod. Dick Lyle (PA) wasn't his usual self as he was suffering through a knee problem. Still, he took advantage of the fish-a-cast spots, doing better than anyone there. His two best fish were two bookend Maine state trophy white hake of 26 pounds each. Katie Baumann (MA) caught the most dogfish today. I mean she caught at least double the dogs of anyone else. That's just the way it was. Still, she caught a lot of fish but not as many in the trophy area. In fact, she won the hard luck award for being the only angler today not to land a trophy fish! I could have given it to her for most dogfish! I weighed only two fish for her, a 10.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. She caught some bigger cod I could have weighed but didn't.

I received two donations sponsoring me in my cancer fighting efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a $15.00 donation from Bryan Lewer but indirectly from Brian Dodge from Cutting Edge Tackle in Orange, Massachusetts. Brian gave me a bunch of jigs to use as well as a donation. The deal was if the jigs were lost, the cost of the jig was to be paid by the one who lost it and donated to the PMC. I have four more jigs left. Great idea! Thank you Bryan and Brian! [By the way, Bryan had all his success with Brian's jig!] The other was a $25.00 donation from Steve LaPlante who not only supports me and my cause but also meets me on the day of the ride in Sturbridge, Massachusetts at 5:00 AM! He has been meeting me adorned with a Bunny Clark/PMC shirt at the start of the race every year that I have been entered in it - nine years in a row! Thank you all so very much for your support! I really appreciate it!

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at six knots max, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility over it was excellent. Ashore, the wind stayed light for most of the morning. The ocean was calm along the shore. What wind we did have blew from the west southwest or west. This lasted until about 2:00 PM when the wind hauled out of the south and picked up in velocity. By late afternoon, the wind was already blowing fifteen knots sustained with higher gusts. And right around sunset, the southerly wind was almost twenty knots or more in gusts. The air temperature warmed up quickly with readings over 80F before noon. It was more humid today than any other day this year that I can remember. The air temperature rose to a high of 88F in Ogunquit, maybe higher. So it was fairly muggy and hot if you got away from the water's edge for any length of time. The sky was mostly clear with surprisingly few clouds for a day that felt like there could be a thunder shower or two. The visibility ranged from very good to good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 92F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 93F (with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest lightly to about ten knots before it was time to head back to Perkins Cove. Sea conditions ranged from a light chop to a one to two foot chop in the afternoon. The air temperature reached a high of 68F. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze. The tide (current) ranged from light to moderate. The sky was sunny. The water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing was very good to excellent. The catching was the same. Landings were good to very good depending on your angling expertise. Most legal fish landed were pollock but only slightly ahead of the haddock count. There were more haddock caught today than any trip in the last two weeks. The haddock cull was a little off, though, with one legal fish for every three caught. Legal landings also included a cusk, two mackerel and two cunners. Released fish included a dogfish (only one!) and twenty-four cod of all sizes. There were only ten cod over twenty-two inches and no cod even close to 8 pounds. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well with bait catching the most haddock and flies and jigs catching the most pollock.

One of three anglers was high hook with the most legal fish today. The count was too close to call. Those anglers included Brian Hughes (SC), Brian Tufts (VT) and Norm Herrick (MA/ME). You could say that Brian Tufts was the fisherman of the day as he also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. He also caught a pollock of 10.5 pounds. It must have been his birthday today! The second largest fish was a 12 pound pollock caught by Dave Taylor (PA). Dan Sears (NY) caught the third largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Norm Herrick caught two pollock of 10 pounds each. Ralph Small (NY) caught two pollock of 11 pounds each. Brian Hughes also caught an 11 pound pollock. Armand Fortin (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting into the most tangles! Ouch!

Captain Jared Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southeast at ten to fifteen knots and increased from there. Seas were about two feet in chops to start and two to four feet by the end of the trip. It was a choppy ride home with seas of three to four feet. The air temperature got up as high as 74F, our highest air temperature this season so far. The tide was light. The sky was clear. The visibility had dropped to ten miles at most. The surface water temperature was 64.3F at most.

The fishing was a bit tough with the seas. The catching was good while landings were fair to good, good for a half day trip. Legal landings included two haddock, two pollock and two whiting. Released fish included quite a few sub-legal cod, sub-legal pollock, four sculpins, a wolffish, a cunner and six dogfish. Anchoring was the method. Everyone used bait, exclusively.

There were no high hooks today. Nine year old Charlie Krzeczunowicz (ON) caught the first fish to be weighed, a 2 pound sub-legal cod. Bob Albby (MA) caught the largest fish of the trip, an 8.75 pound pollock. Jake Drinkwater (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 5.25 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 2.25 pound haddock caught by David Wythe (MA).

Other Angler Highlights: Twelve year old Sam Krzeczunowicz (ON) caught a large whiting of 1.75 pounds. Carri Brennan (NY) caught a 2 pound haddock. Matt Bancroft succumbed to the motion of the ocean and landed the hard luck award for the adverse reaction it creates!

I received three donations sponsoring little old (getting older by the second) cycling me in a bike ride called the Pan-Mass Challenge. This event organized to find a cure for cancer and cancer care with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Most people know the Jimmy Fund which is the fund raising arm of this event and the DFCI. The wonderful donors and their donations are as follows: Norm Viens & Linda Govone (MA) for a generous $100.00, Dr. Ralph & Eleanor Small (NY) for a generous $100.00 and Brian Hughes for a generous $60.00. Thank you all so very much for thinking of me, supporting me (for so many years) and for bolstering my confidence in an Institute who's track record speaks for itself. I don't really need any bolstering but these donations do cement my resolve to keep going every year. And I do very much appreciate the funding and the human aspect of the whole thing.

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 71F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the south at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in haze. The wind kept up all day. Mostly it was blowing out of the southwest along the shore. But it did turn westerly after noon and southerly later. Wind speeds were up to twenty knots. The sky was mostly clear all day with sunny conditions. The air temperature rose to a value, that I saw, of 83F. The visibility was good in haze. The prediction today was for thunder showers in the afternoon. That didn't happen. We had a moment of rain at 11:30 AM that was nothing more than a quick mist. Then we had a substantial rain that started at 10:00 PM without thunder or lightning. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 67F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 87F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 68F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet, the seas showing the influence of stronger winds further off shore. The air temperature reached a high of 71F in the shade. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

The fishing was not great; the sea state took care of that. But it could have been worse if there had been a lot of dogfish around. They only caught ten. The catching was good to very good, despite. Fish were smaller today, all of them. Landings were good or better than that. There was only a single jig used. Everyone else used bait and cod flies. Cod flies caught the most pollock. Pollock was the most prevalent legal species landed today. Legal landings also included thirty-five haddock (more keepers today than sub-legal fish - 3.5 pounds was the biggest haddock), five cusk and a butter mullet. Released fish included a few cod but none over twenty-two inches. Anchoring was the method.

Hank Small (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 8 pound pollock caught by Jeramie Littlefield (ME). Katlyn Lemay (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 7 pound pollock. Al Machia (VT) could not handle the seas. His mind was okay but his body rebelled. He got the shirt. It's been a windy year and there has been more of this kind of behavior than I care to report.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at fifteen knots or more with seas in chops of three to five feet. Over half the anglers were sea sick, unfortunately. The air temperature reached a high of 71F. The visibility ranged from five to ten miles in a thick haze. The current was light to moderate. The surface water temperature was 63F.

The fishing was tough with the seas. And there was the added annoyance of dogfish creating tangles. So fishing was fair. Catching was good, regardless. There were many pollock, mostly sub-legal, and a few cod and haddock as well. Legal landings included nine pollock, one haddock and a butter mullet. Anchoring was the method. No jigs were used, just bait and cod flies.

Eric Girouard (MA) was high hook extraordinaire with four legal to his credit. He caught two pollock of 3 pounds each and a double keeper catch that included a 4 pound pollock and a 2.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Eric tied with Heather Lewis (VT) for the second largest fish of the trip, both with 4 pound fish. Heather's was also a pollock. Mark Tabaka (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9.5 pound pollock, a bigger fish that the day trips pool winner. Mark also almost beat the days big haddock with a 3 pounder.

Other Angler Highlights: Tara Aumand (ME) caught a 3 pound pollock. Josh Allbee (ME) also landed a 3 pound pollock. Nine year old Aidan Aumand (VT) landed a pollock of 2.5 pounds. David Eagan (MA) landed the hard luck award for something I think there has been too much of lately. It hasn't been a calm summer! Yet!

I received three donations sponsoring me in my Pan-Mass Challenge cycling event for a cancer cure (and care). Those donors and their contributions included: Dave Diminico (VT) for $25.00, Janice Burke (FL) for $20.00 and Judith Ferrante & Bill Myatt (FL) for $10.00. Thank you very much for these timely donations. It mean a lot to me but more to those hoping something better will happen. Here's to making dreams come true!

Friday, July 15, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 71F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was good in hazier conditions than yesterday. Ashore, it was hot, hazy and humid. The air temperature was over 90F before noon. The wind blew about fifteen knots out of the west, even a little north of west. The sky was hazy clear with few clouds. The air temperature made it up as high as 93F. The visibility was good in much haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 91F (with a low of 69F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 96F with a low of 72F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 93F (with a low of 67F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. There was a two foot chop/sea to go with the wind but not totally generated by the wind where they were fishing. The air temperature was a balmy 72F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The sky was sunny/clear with soft lighting from the haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing, catching and keeping were good today. There were a lot of cod and haddock caught. In fact, there were more cod over twenty-two inches released than there were haddock kept. And, still, haddock was by far the most prevalent legal species caught. The haddock cull was two to one, sub-legal to legal fish. Not great but not bad. Legal landings also included nineteen pollock and three cusk. They released five dogfish. Anchoring and drift fishing were both tried. All terminal gear worked well.

I wasn't told who was high hook. Maybe you couldn't tell. But I didn't ask. Mike Toth (NY) caught the most "counters" including the second and third largest fish of the trip. His largest, the second largest fish of the day, was a 10.5 pound pollock. His second largest fish was a 9 pound pollock, the third largest fish of the trip. The 9 pounder was caught as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 8 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Mike also caught a single 8 pound pollock. Demetri Anagnost (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Mike Sputo, Sr. (MA) caught the only other fish to be weighed, an 8 pound pollock. Noah Chaberek (NH) landed the hard luck award for losing a keeper pollock over the side! I didn't ask.

We didn't have enough anglers to run an afternoon trip today. I'm sure the thunder storm threat had something to do with it.

I was given a generous $100.00 donation from Blake & Pam Love (NH) supporting me in my Pan-Mass Challenge cycling event for a cancer cure (and care) today. They have always helped me out in this regard every season. Thanks so much! Enjoyed seeing you today. I very much appreciate the sponsorship!

Saturday, July 16, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 72F, the sky was hazy clear, there was no wind to speak of, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was good in haze. Ashore, it was hot, hazy and humid again. Not quite as hot as yesterday, I saw the mercury climb to 87F in Ogunquit. I didn't see any higher temperatures but that doesn't mean there weren't any. There wasn't any wind to speak of all day. What wind we did have was a land breeze from the west, probably ten knots or better. I don't believe this wind reached the one hundred yard mark offshore. From the bell buoy out it was flat calm. The sky was sunny with few clouds but the sky had a milky texture from the haze. The visibility was good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 69F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 94F with a low of 75F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 63F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were close swells of two to three feet with a light chop. The air temperature was 73F in the shade. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The sky was sunny. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66F, the highest value we have seen this season so far.

The fishing was very good today, the fishing conditions were great, no one was sea sick to my knowledge, only three dogfish were seen and a lot of fish were caught, albeit many were sub-legal. Catching was very good. Landings were in the good category. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included seventeen haddock, five cusk and two redfish. Released fish included seventy-eight cod of 4 to 10.5 pounds, sixty-three sub pollock and three dogfish. The haddock cull was three to one, sub-legal to legal. So for every four haddock caught three had to be released. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most legal fish.

I don't know who was high hook. Travis Mustone (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17 pound pollock. This ties the sixth largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. He caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 15 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. So far, this is the largest double keeper catch of the 2016 Bunny Clark season. Captain Ian took a picture of Travis with his double. This digital image appears on the right. The 15 pounder was the second largest fish of the trip. The third largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Anthony Palumbo (MA).

Other Angler Highlights: Joe Garland (VT) landed the fourth largest fish today, a 12.5 pound pollock. Tim Miller (NH) tied for the largest cod with Larry Shippee (NH). Both anglers caught a cod of 10.5 pounds each. Logan Dunn (MA) caught an 11.5 pound pollock. Clark Graff (VT) caught the hard luck award for being involved in the most tangles. And Nick Palumbo (MA) has been officially replaced by his father, Dennis, on Bunny Clark fishing trips! Ah, you can never replace the old days, can you Nick!

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots. The ocean was calm over rolling sea swells of about two feet. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The air temperature maintained a value of 72F in the shade. The tide was light. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached it's highest value yet at 68F.

The fishing was very good and the catching and keeping were good. It was the best evening trip for catching haddock that we have had since last year. Most legal fish caught were haddock. The cull was two to one, sub-legal fish to legal fish. Legal landings also included three redfish, a cusk and two whiting. Drifting was the method. Everyone used cod flies and bait.

Mario Correia (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.25 pound cusk. The second largest fish category was shared by two anglers, both at 5 pounds each. Josh Reed (MA) caught a 5 pound cusk while Drew Keller (CA) caught a 5 pound haddock. Josh also caught one of the largest whiting we have seen for a while at 2 pounds. Drew also caught a haddock that weighed 2 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Erik Danie (CA) landed a 1 pound whiting and a 3.5 pound haddock. Rich Roycroft (MA) caught two haddock of 2 pounds each. Chad Roycroft (MA) caught a 2 pound haddock. Dave Biel (NY) also landed a haddock that weighed 2 pounds. Alyson Flathers (MA) couldn't handle the ocean's swells this evening and landed the hard luck award for her ill health.

Sunday, July 17, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Sean Devich ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light out of the northeast, the ocean looked calm and the visibility over it was good in haze. The wind stayed light out of the northeast all day along the shore. The air temperature was perfect. It bottomed out at 67F at 7:00 AM but then rose to 75F. I didn't see it any higher than that. But I heard that it reached 79F. Whatever it was it was perfect. The sky was overcast almost all morning; rain showers popped up in isolated areas. The sky was clear for the rest of the day. The visibility was good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 64F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 67F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at ten to fifteen knots with seas in chops of two feet. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The air temperature reached a high of 70.5. The visibility ranged to nine miles in haze. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.4F.

The fishing was not great. The weather made it just choppy enough that a couple got sea sick. The tide was stronger than it has been. And the tangles were many. Maybe it was because of the moon tides coming on. Maybe there was an under current. But it was unlike any day this year so far. It wasn't because of dogfish; they only caught one! The catching was good, at least. Landings were good, despite. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was two to one, legal to sub-legal. In other words, there were two keeper haddock for every three haddock caught. Legal landings also included thirty-five pollock. Released fish included ten cod from 5 to 7 pounds, the dogfish and a wolffish. They tried drifting but the current was too much. Anchoring was the method. No jigs were used today, just bait and cod flies.

Ryan Lally (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound wolffish. The second largest fish was a 9.5 pound pollock caught by Guillaume Boisvert (QC). Kurt Thorpe (VT) caught the third largest fish, a 9 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Craig Coolidge (ME) caught a pollock that weighted 8.5 pounds, the fourth largest fish today. Gabby Dubois (MA) landed the hard luck award for.....? Yes, a touch of the mal de mer. Again.

Captain Jared Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at five knots. The ocean was calm. The sky was clear, mostly. The air temperature maintained a value of 72F in the shade. The tide was light to moderate. The visibility ranged to ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66.9F.

The fishing and catching were very good this evening, one of the best half day trips of the season. However, the fish caught were mostly sub-legal. Cod was the most prevalent species. Of the thirty-five caught and released, only five would have been big enough to keep had we been able to keep cod. Legal landings included a pollock, a cunner, a whiting, a redfish and five mackerel. Fourteen haddock were caught. All were too small. One dogfish was caught and released. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait or a combination of bait and a cod fly.

Ken Shearer (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 5.25 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 4.5 pound cod caught by Ken Dwyer (MA). Ken and Fred Girard (MA) shared third place status each with a 4 pound cod. Ken caught his singly while Fred caught his as a double keeper catch with another cod of 2.75 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time.

Other Angler Highlights: Rose Reale (MA) caught the largest legal fish, a pollock of 2.75 pounds. Aidan Molloy (MA) had the same malady as Gabby on the earlier trip and landed the hard luck award for it.

Monday, July 18, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was clear with high thin clouds, the wind was light out of the southwest, very light, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was good in haze. The morning was sunny and the sky was hazy clear with some high thin cloudiness that just made the blue sky a bit dull. But just a bit. The air temperature rose to 89F. But it felt like 95F as it was so humid. Around noon, the sky started to cloud up. By 2:00 PM the sky was overcast. By 3:15 PM, it started to rain with thunder and lightning. We lost power at the restaurants for less than a minute. The rain continued to fall, sometimes hard, until about 4:30 PM. We had no rain for the rest of the evening. The wind was light from the southwest and then south until the rain storms came through. We had westerly wind gusts to thirty knots or more with the low pressure cells. The wind increased from the south after 5:00 PM. I saw one fifteen knot reading before dinner. The visibility was good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 85F (with a low of 64F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 95F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 90F (with a low of 63F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five to ten knots in the morning. Seas were a foot or two. After noon, the wind hauled out of the southwest and blew up to fifteen knots or more with seas in chops of two to three feet. The air temperature reached a high of 74F. The sky was a mix of clear skies and overcast skies, clear early. The tide (current) was moderate to a little more than that. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

The fishing was good; the chops made it more difficult than it should have been. The catching was excellent. Landings were nearly so. Landings would have been excellent had they been able to keep cod. It was a fish a cast for most of the day. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. There were also quite a few haddock caught. The cull was two to one, sub-legal haddock to legal fish. Legal landings also included a cunner and a mackerel. Released fish included a lobster of 1.25 pounds, a yellowtail flounder, five dogfish and too many cod to mention. They anchored and drift fished. The drift was fast but the fishermen were good. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Either Adam Tozian (MA), Steve Brown (ME) or Jack Judge was high hook today. It was too close to tell. But Adam had enough fish and the largest fish to make him the fisherman of the trip. Adam won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17.5 pound pollock. This is a tie for the Bunny Clark's fifth largest pollock. Adam also landed an 11 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. Leo Tozian (MA) caught the second largest fish, a 17 pound pollock. Leo also caught a 12 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 14.5 pound pollock caught by Jim Wescom (VT).

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Brown caught the most legal haddock with a count of ten. John Baker (ME) caught a variety of fish including a sub-legal yellowtail flounder and a 1.25 pound lobster. I know the lobster isn't a fish. This is the third lobster caught on the Bunny Clark this season. His largest "fish" was a 12.5 pound pollock. Jack Judge caught eight legal haddock plus a pile of fish. He also landed the hard luck award for losing a jig.

Captain Jared Keniston, Captain Bryan Lewer, Captain Bryan Tufts and I ran the SOFT (special offshore fishing trip) today.

At 9:00 PM, the air temperature was 74F, the wind was blowing out of the south at twelve knots, the sky was clear and the visibility was good in some haze. I got down to the Cove a little before 10:00 PM to get the Bunny Clark ready so we could leave the dock by 11:00 PM. But everyone was there waiting for me, almost, when I got there. So, by the time I had everyone fill out the POB manifest, collect the fares and give the speech, it was still before 10:30 PM. So we cruised under the bridge at Perkins Cove headed to the fishing grounds just a couple minutes after 10:30 PM. I figured that this would be good as we might experience three foot seas/chops. We could travel at a slower speed and still get there at the time I wanted. But there weren't any seas to speak of. There was a bit of a swell from the south southwest but the wind was light out of the south and the chops were less than a foot.

After eight miles at the wheel getting things organized, I turned the helm over to Bryan Tufts while I retired in the bunk down below. Bryan steered to within four miles of our destination. The ocean just got smoother the further we went.

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light from the southwest, the sky was a mix of clear skies, stars and clouds, the air temperature was 69F and the visibility was very good. After sunrise, the wind hauled out of the west and then died. By 9:00 AM, the wind hauled out of the north northeast and blew up to ten knots with a one foot chop, maybe slightly more than a foot. But there wasn't much for seas. The wind blew just like that with duplicate seas into the early afternoon and then died out. By 2:00 PM, there was no wind, the ocean calmed down even more and the sky became clear. The ocean was calm with light variable winds for the rest of the day. The air temperature got up to 73F in the shade. But there was no humidity. It was very comfortable. The visibility was nearly excellent. The tide (current) was light for most of the morning and moderate in the afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 69F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 55F).

We arrived at the first spot on the fishing grounds at 4:00 AM. As soon as we could get the boat and the anglers ready, I threw the boat into a drift and we started fishing. We caught fish steady, mostly pollock, until sunrise. I was surprised with the pollock bite so early. It was actually a little bit darker longer with the cloud cover we had at that time.

The fishing, catching and landings were excellent all day long, the best day of the season for catching fish and bringing home fillets. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. It was a pollock biting wind today. But, regardless, the pollock were everywhere we went, even when I didn't see them on the sounding machine. Legal landings also included the most haddock we have caught and landed for a few weeks and thirteen cusk. The haddock cull was six legal for every ten haddock caught. So most haddock that were caught were kept. Released fish included a large number of cod including about thirty between 9 and 13.75 pounds. We also caught the two largest cod we have seen this season to date. Released fish also included two wolffish, eleven dogfish, our second blue shark of the season and one sub-legal halibut. We drift fished, anchored and used the sea anchor. All disciplines worked as well as any party boat captain would want, perfect! All terminal gear worked well.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook; it was a fish a cast for everyone from beginning until the end. In fact, almost everyone had as many pollock as we needed by noon. Many pollock, legal or not, were released back alive. Bryan Lewer (FL) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 45.5 pound cod. We managed to get the fish into the boat without hurting it, weighed it and took a couple of pictures before releasing it. One of the digital images I took appears at the upper left of this entry. This is the largest cod we have seen since Liam Kennedy (NJ) caught his 47.5 pound cod off the Bunny Clark during a marathon trip on May 19, 2011. And it's Bryan's largest cod ever by more than 10 pounds! Some of Bryan's other fish that I weighed included an 11.5 pound pollock and a 13 pound cod. He could have easily been high hook - but so could have many others.

Lewis Hazelwood (MA) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 21.5 pound cod. We did the same as we did with Bryan's big cod and released it after a couple of quick pictures and securing an accurate weight. One of the pictures appears on the right. Mark Laroche (VT) won the boat pool for the third largest fish with the third largest fish, an 18 pound sub-legal halibut. Again, I lifted it out of the water by the cod fly that was hooked in the lower jaw, let Mark hold it for a quick picture and then weighed it before releasing it. His digital image appears on the lower left. One of the pollock he caught was boated well before first light and weighed 15 pounds, the second largest pollock of the trip.

This is the first time in the short history of the Bunny Clark that the three largest fish, all counters, had to be released because of new laws preventing the angler from landing them. For years we had a boat rule that said that if a halibut was under 10 pounds it was released, over 10 it was kept. [I can remember telling Dave Wilmarth (PA) on a trip in the mid 1980s that he had to return a 7 pound halibut he caught in the morning while fishing on Platts Bank. Later that day he caught a 26 pound halibut he could keep caught on the same cod fly that the smaller fish was caught on. Today that fish might not have been long enough!] And until the beginning of the 2015 season, we would have been able to keep the two big cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Dan Wescom (VT) caught the largest pollock of the trip, a 16 pounder. Like Mark, he boated the pollock well before sunrise. Bryan Tufts would have boated a larger one had it not dropped off the hook just too far away from the boat to gaff. That fish looked to be over 20 pounds and was, again, lost around 4:30 AM. Dan's largest cod weighed 13.5 pounds. Bryan Tufts also caught a 13.5 pound cod.

Merton Thompson (MA) caught a 10 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock before I stopped weighing cod and pollock unless they were over 10 pounds. I think everyone caught a cod and a pollock of 10 pounds. Paul Dadalt (CT) caught a 14 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Bob Mayer (ME) landed an 11 pound pollock, his best. Dave Miller (MA) released a 13.75 pound cod his biggest fish. He actually caught quite a few cod over 10 pounds. Maybe the most of any angler. Mark Carter (CT) caught our third largest wolffish of the Bunny Clark season, a 14 pounder. This is the first wolffish he has ever seen or caught. I took a picture of Mark and his wolffish. This digital image will appear on this site at a later date, probably on the index page. Fred Kunz (NH) caught a lot of cod over 10 pounds that I didn't weigh and one that weighed 11 pounds. He caught one of the biggest haddock of the trip at 5 pounds. And he caught a 10 pound pollock that I weighed earlier in the trip. There was one person between Fred and Mark, the angler who caught the halibut (I thought Bob Nixon and Jim Feeney would appreciate this knowledge). Donna Moran (NY) didn't get sea sick today! She caught many haddock and two cod of 10 pounds each. Her largest fish was a 12 pound pollock. Bob MacNeil (NH) also caught quite a few haddock. Bob's largest fish was a 12.5 pound pollock. Paul Seavey (NH) caught two pollock that I weighed early in the day. One weighed 10 pounds while the other weighed 10.5 pounds. He also landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler!

The last drift of the day was on the sea anchor, a perfect drift with lines straight down, moving the boat slowly over the bottom and down an edge. The whole drift was a fish a cast, like the whole day. Somehow, retrieving the shute, I inverted it. This took Dave Miller and I about ten minutes to rectify so I could re-pack it and could easily use it at a future date. Other than that, it was a perfectly smooth ride home. We ran into a northwest wind of about fifteen knots at the fifteen mile mark (from shore) that gave us some spray and a one to two foot chop. But the closer we got to shore the smaller the seas became. We pulled into the dock in Perkins Cove at 6:20 PM.

So ends the two biggest offshore trips of the season. I don't care to do them later in the summer because the blue sharks become such a problem; we end up killing more fish and losing more jigs in the process. And the end of the two big trips marks the middle of our season and the run to the finish. We were lucky that this years two trips were both beautiful days. And, as an added bonus, they both went according to plan with almost everything I wanted to achieve for my fishing guests. Oh, sure, we could have used a 250 pound halibut yesterday. But that will give us something extra to shoot for on some future trip. I'll be planning and looking forward to the next one!

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at ten knots or more and the visibility was nearly excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northwest at fifteen knots or more to west or west northwest at fifteen knots or more. Some gusts were as high as twenty plus knots. This wind didn't reach off. The sky was clear all day, cloudless most of the morning. The air temperature reached a high of 81F in Ogunquit, from what I saw. The visibility was very good or maybe even better than that. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 49F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at ten to five knots or even less at the very end of the fishing. As soon as they started to head back in, the wind hauled out of the southwest. They had southwest wind all the way back to within two miles of Perkins Cove when they struck the on shore west northwest wind of fifteen knots or more. Seas on the fishing grounds were one to two feet in chops. The air temperature reached a high of 70F in the shade. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility was very good or at least twenty miles. The sky was sunny all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing was good (the strong tide), the catching was very good and landings were fair or better than that. There were quite a few cod that have to be (and were) released, mostly sub-legal, and quite a few sub-legal pollock. Thirteen dogfish were released. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included fourteen haddock, two cusk and three cunners. They anchored and drift fished. All terminal gear worked about the same. Probably cod flies were the single best rig to use if you wanted to catch fish you could legally take home.

Frank Noble (ME) was most probably high hook today. I can't know that for sure but all indications pointed in his direction when the boat got back to the dock at 3:00 PM. LuAnne Herrick (MA/ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. Her fish was the last fish in the boat before heading back to Perkins Cove! Beth Horner (VT) caught the second largest fish, a 10 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 9.5 pound pollock caught by John Jabre (ME). Quinn Heckman (PA) landed the hard luck award for being part of the worst tangles of the day.

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at five to eight knots. Seas were chops of a foot. The air temperature reached a high of 73F in the shade. The sky was clear. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high value of 66F.

The fishing was very good (the conditions were great), the catch was good but landings were poor. Legal fish included nine mackerel and one monkfish. Released fish included quite a few sub-legal cod and sub-legal pollock, a redfish and three sculpins. Drifting and anchoring were both used. Mostly bait was used.

Bob Mimitz (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 4.25 pound cod caught by Seamus Shanlay (MA). John Howard (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 4 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Giovanni Camejo (MA) caught a 3.75 pound cod which he released, of course. Natalie Serrano (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting into the worst tangle of the evening.

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was nearly cloudless, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was very good at least. We had light wind all morning, the ocean along the shore remained calm. After noon, the wind started to blow out of the southwest at ten knots or better. This wind kept up into the night. The sky was clear all day. The air temperature reached a high of 86F in Ogunquit, that I saw. It was not nearly as humid as it has been. The visibility was good, at least, in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 91F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 53F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops up to one foot. The air temperature was 73F in the shade. The sky was clear and sunny. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high value of 67F.

The fishing was very good, the catching was excellent and landings were very good. Most fish caught and most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twelve haddock and five whiting. Released fish included quite a few cod (only fifteen over 5 pounds) and four dogfish. Drifting was the method. Only jigs and cod flies were used.

Tim Williams (CT) was high hook with the most legal fish. And, yes, he's still got it! His largest fish was a 14 pound pollock, the second largest fish of the trip. And he was leading the boat pool for most of the day. He caught this pollock as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Dan Rodrigue (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18 pound pollock. This fish is the fifth largest pollock caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. It's also the largest pollock that Dan has ever caught. This fish too was caught as a double keeper catch with another pollock of 4 pounds. The third largest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock caught by Jeff Philbrick (ME). This fish was also caught as a double with another pollock of 10 pounds! Jeff also landed a 12.5 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Pete Doyon (ME) caught a 3.5 pound monkfish. His largest fish was a 12.5 pound pollock. Brian Beaulier (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock and a pollock that weighed 10.5 pounds. Chris Morin (ME) boated an 11 pound pollock. Jayde Meader (ME) landed a 10.5 pound pollock. Jeff St. Pierre (ME) caught the largest cod at 10 pounds. Brian Cram (ME) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single fish. Not a legal or a sub-legal fish of any species! I would say that if someone put their terminal gear in front of the faces of so many fish without hooking one, this angler has to be incredibly skillful at it or has to be fishing without hooks! I think he just wanted the shirt!

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at the same velocity and wave height as the morning trip, no difference. The air temperature was also the same as was the sky, the current and the visibility. The surface sea water temperature reached a high of 66F.

The fishing was very good, the catching was good (mostly sub-legal pollock) and landings were fair. Legal landings included three haddock, five whiting, a butter mullet and two mackerel. Released fish included the many sub-legal pollock that were released, two dogfish, nine cod, six sub-haddock and a herring. Anchoring was the method. Every angler but one used bait, some in the combination with a fly.

Sean McIntyre (NH) was high hook with two legal fish, a 2 pound haddock and a 2 pound whiting. Two pounds was the weight of the second largest legal fish. Ryan Johnson (NY) also caught a 2 pounder, a cod that was released. Matt Claussen (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 2.25 pound haddock. Haley LaFreniere (ME) landed the hard luck award for a health issue associated with the Bunny Clark's motion on the ocean.

I received three donations sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising cycling event, taking place on August 6, called the Pan-Mass Challenge. Those donors and their donations included Mark Robinson (MA) for $25.00 via "egift" through the PMC site, John Stebbins (ME) for $25.00 via "egift" through the PMC site and Marty Nephew (NY) for $60.00. Thank you all so very much for the support and the kindness. I so appreciate that you appreciate the gravity of individuals with cancer as I do.

Friday, July 22, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was hazy clear, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at fifteen knots and the visibility was good in haze. Ashore, the wind kept up all morning and part of the afternoon. By sunset there was very little wind. Wind speeds during the day were up to twenty knots out of the southwest. And with the wind came the heat. The air temperature was already in the 80s by 9:00 AM. By noon, the air temperature was over 90F. I saw 96F for a high temperature in Ogunquit. It might have been higher but not in Perkins Cove. The sky was hazy clear all day. We had no thunder showers, although showers were predicted (all signs fail in a drought?). The visibility was good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 95F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 98F with a low of 73F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 97F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots in the morning and more than fifteen knots after noon. Seas ranged from two to three feet in chops to start and three to four feet before it was time to head back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature reached a comfortable 73F for a high, in the shade. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze. The tide was moderate. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface sea water temperature reached a high of 67F.

The fishing was fair to good in the chops with quite a few more anglers sea sick than I would have anticipated. The catching was good to very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included sixteen haddock and two redfish. The haddock cull was one to one or one legal fish for every two haddock caught. There just weren't many haddock caught today. And some of this was due to the rocking platform anglers were fishing from. Released fish included fifteen cod from 4 pounds to 8 pounds, two wolffish, five dogfish, a sculpin and twenty-seven sub-legal pollock. Anchoring was the method today. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Ron Schofield (NY) was the fisherman of the day. Not only was he high hook with the most legal fish but he also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.5 pound pollock. He caught this pollock as part of a double keeper catch with a cod of 6 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. But more than this, Ron caught an "ace". An ace is scored when an angler catches the three largest fish during a trip. The last time an ace was scored was on April 17, 2014 when Ray Westermann (MA) caught the three largest fish during a marathon trip. Ron's two other fish, to complete the ace, were a 13 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock! No aces were scored during the 2015 Bunny Clark fishing season. Nice going, Ron!

Other Angler Highlights: Marty Nephew (NY) was second hook. His largest fish was an 11 pound pollock caught as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 5 pounds. Keith Ross (NY) also caught an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. Betty Fitzgerald (CT) landed the hard luck award for, you guessed it, attaining the dreaded malady that prevents party boat fishing from being the number one sport in the world!

Tonights half day trip was canceled due to the windy weather prediction.

Chris Galletta (NY) donated $25.00 today to sponsor me in my cancer fund raising cycling event called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Chris and his father are some of my favorite anglers on the Bunny Clark. He made his donation in the form of an "egift" via the PMC site. Thank you so much Chris! I appreciate your support very much!

Saturday, July 23, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 71F, the sky was hazy clear, there was no wind, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility was good to very good in some haze. The wind was light and variable for most of the day. At 4:00 PM, it started to rain. Along with the rain came strong winds, variable in direction, with thunder and lightning. These storms lasted until about 7:00 PM. There was no more rain after that. The sky was most clear all day until the showers. The air temperature reached a high of 87F in Ogunquit. It was probably higher than that but that's what I saw. We had the influence of wind off a colder than normal ocean to keep temperatures down. The visibility was good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 89F (with a low of 67F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 94F with a low of 72F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 95F (with a low of 64F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction all day. The ocean was calm. The air temperature reached the highest value we have seen this year so far, 79F. The tide (current) was light. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-five haddock, one redfish and four cusk. Released fish included eighteen cod between 5 and 8 pounds and five dogfish. Drifting was the boating method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most legal fish.

Justin King (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish. He made it his job to catch fish. At the end of the day there was no question at to who had the most! Justin didn't land a fish of 10 pounds or better. Greg Beaulieu (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. Ken Stone (NH) caught the second largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 10 pound pollock caught by Colton Lebel (NH). Alissa Stanley (ME) landed the hard luck award for not feeling the best in a fairly new environment.

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. It was raining when the boat left the dock to head for the fishing grounds. Thunder and lightning followed. On the fishing grounds, the wind was variable in direction with various low pressure cells passing out to sea off the land all around them. Wind speeds ranged from five to ten knots. They had hard rain, fog at one point with a visibility of a mile or more, sun, clouds, etc. It was almost as if the weather was trying to test the anglers to see what would make them quite. Some were scared at times with the lightning. But most were okay.

The fishing was tough with the weather. The catching was a little off. But, more than that, the fish were small. And I'm sure the weather affected the bite in an adverse way. Landings were light with only two legal fish brought aboard (both whiting). Released fish included seven sub-legal haddock, five small cod, five sub pollock and two sub-legal redfish. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait with some cod flies.

Danielle Fowler (VT) was high hook with two of the largest fish of the evening. She also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 2.75 pound whiting. This is the Bunny Clark's largest whiting of the season so far. Captain Ian took a picture of her fish. This digital image appears on the left. Her second largest fish was a 2 pound cod, released of course, a tie for the second largest fish of the evening. Ronnie Holmes (MA) also caught a 2 pound cod. Desiree Bowen (VT) landed the hard luck award for no particular reason. Everyone was on a level playing field with the hard luck this evening. Or maybe I should say they all had the same luck.

Sunday, July 24, 2016

Captain Jared Keniston and Sean Devich ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was partly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean seemed very good this morning. Ashore, the wind died at sunrise. Winds were very light for the rest of the day. They were so light, I couldn't tell from what direction the wind was blowing. And every flag was limp! The sky was clear with a few high thin clouds. The sky was cloudless for a couple of hours in the morning. The air temperature got up as high as 82F in Ogunquit. If it was any higher, I didn't see it. The visibility was very good at least. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 64F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 91F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the ocean was flat calm all day. The wind, when it did blow, was out of the northwest at as much as five knots. Seas, at most, were half a foot. The wind would blow for a bit giving them a little chop. Then it would die out and leave the ocean glass calm. Then the process would repeat itself with the northwest wind showing again. The air temperature only got up to 73F in the shade despite the calm sunny conditions. The tide was moderate. The visibility was unlimited. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good and landings were fair to good. You couldn't have had a better fishing platform with the calm ocean and lack of wind. The drift was perfect. Most legal fish landed were haddock. In fact most fish caught were haddock. The haddock cull was fifty/fifty, legal to sub-legal fish. Legal landings also included fourteen pollock, three cusk, two whiting and two butter mullet. Released fish included seven cod between 5 and 7 pounds and a bigger dogfish day than most with forty released. Drifting was the boating method. All terminal gear worked well but flies caught the most fish.

I didn't ask who was high hook but it had to be an Atkins. Erik Atkins (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock, the first fish in the boat. No one got a bigger fish for the rest of the trip. Not even close! Two fish tied for second place in the size category. Both fish were pollock and both weighed 8 pounds. One was caught by nine year old Ryan Swanson (NV). The other was caught by Mike Atkins (NH).

Other Angler Highlights: Craig Meunier (ME) caught the largest haddock of the trip. It weighed 4 pounds. The haddock were bigger today with many haddock over 3 pounds. Ray Meunier (ME) landed the hard luck award by losing a jig. At least it wasn't sea sickness!

Captain Jared Keniston and Sean Devich ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. At the dock at 4:00 PM, the air temperature was 82F, there was no wind, the sun was shinning and there was no hint of bad weather on the horizon. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at very light speeds or it was calm. The air temperature had dropped to 68F. The sky was clear, sunny. The tide was moderate. The visibility was very good. The surface water temperature was 64F.

The fishing was very good or better than that. Catching was good. Landings, fair. Legal fish landed included two cusk, a redfish, a whiting and a butter mullet. Released fish included twenty-one cod 3 pounds or less and twenty-eight sub-legal pollock. Drifting was the method. All anglers used bait with our without a cod fly.

Jim Doherty, Jr. (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 4 pound cusk caught by Benjamin Mukda (MA). Tina Mukda (MA) released the third largest fish, a 3 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Tim Mukda (MA) released a cod that weighed 2.75 pounds, the third largest fish of the trip. Jim Doherty, Sr. (MA) landed the hard luck award. He was rewarded for being the sole hurler on the trip. Yes, even in calm water.

Erik Atkins did me a solid today by donating $20.00 to help me raise money to fight cancer with the Jimmy Fund, the fund raising arm of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. In other words he sponsored by bike ride in the Pan-Mass Challenge, an event that will take place in thirteen days. Thanks, Erik. I very much appreciate the support!

Monday, July 25, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, more than half the sky was cloudy, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility over it was very good in some haze. The sky stayed mostly cloudy, overcast at times, until about 10:00 AM, when it cleared and remained mostly blue and sunny. Clouds moved in again around 5:00 PM. The sky was overcast until sunset. I was in bed before the rest of the evening. The air temperature got up as high as 83F. There was a slight on-shore breeze that kept the air temperature down to values lower than I expected after hearing the weather report yesterday. The wind along the shore was light with winds less than four knots and mostly out of some variation of the east, the reason for the reasonable air temperatures. The visibility was good to very good in some haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 61F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 92F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 92F (with a low of 56F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable all day. Wind speeds were less than five knots. The ocean remained calm. The air temperature reached a high of 75F. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds for the duration of the fishing. The water temperature reached the highest value we have seen this year to date; 70F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good and landings were good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty haddock, four redfish, seven cusk and one mackerel. The haddock cull was two to one, sub-legal to legal fish. In other words, for every three haddock, one as a keeper. There were no bigger haddock like they had yesterday. Released fish included seventeen cod from 5 to 11 pounds, six dogfish, one wolffish, three sculpins and quite a few sub-legal pollock and small cod. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well but flies worked very well indeed.

I didn't ask as to whom was high hook. Was it John Cadorette (MA)? I don't know. Nick Rello (NJ) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.5 pound pollock. Tyler Sands (NH) caught the second largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. The third largest fish weighed 11 pounds, a tie with two fish by two different anglers. Tyler Sands caught an 11 pound cod while Joe Cadorette (MA) caught an 11 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Greg Colley (ON) landed a 10 pound pollock, the only other fish of 10 pounds or larger. Ricardo Aristsiaga (VA) landed the hard luck award for being most involved with tangles.

I received two donations sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a $25.00 contribution from Bob MacDonald (ME) and the other was a very generous $500.00 donation from Joe & Lynne Goodman (MA). Thank you both so very much for your help and generosity. I am always so humbled to receive the support I do in this project. I do so appreciate it!

Tim Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Sean Devich and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots or better and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind stayed light out of the west, for the whole of the full day fishing trip.Wind speeds were less than five knots. The ocean was not flat calm, though. It was as if it were blowing much harder inside and we were seeing "chop rollers" of about two feet - with frequency. The air temperature reached a high of 77F. The sky was clear and sunny. The visibility ranged to twenty-five miles at least. The tide (current) was moderate to light. The surface water temperature reached a high of 69F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 90F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 94F with a low of 76F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 92F (with a low of 65F).

The fishing (the act of) was excellent. Lines were pretty much straight down, there were very few tangles, there were few dogfish and the Bunny Clark was a stable fishing platform. Catching was good as were the landings. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included eighteen haddock, two dogfish and one cusk. Released fish included nine cod of 5 to 7 pounds, twenty-three sub-legal haddock, a few sub-legal pollock and one dogfish. Drifting was the main boating method for fishing. We did anchor once with variable success. Cod flies caught the most legal fish.

The locally famous Wayne Johnson (NH) was high hook with eleven legal fish, almost all pollock. Some of his better fish included a 9 pound pollock, a 12.75 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. The 12 pounder was caught as a double keeper catch with another pollock of 5.5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Wayne's biggest pollock was the third largest fish of the trip. Bernie Rotman (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. Ren Poirier (ME) boated the second largest fish of the trip, a 13 pound pollock. Ren also landed a double that included a 10 pound pollock and a 7 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: John Bullard (MA) caught the first fish worth weighing, an 8 pound pollock. James Parry (QC) caught two pollock of 10 pounds each. Willie Goodson (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock as well. Twelve year old Peter Micciche (MD) caught a double keeper catch that included a haddock that weighed 1.5 pounds and a 6 pound pollock. I took a picture of Peter with his catch. This digital image appears on the left in this entry. Luigi Cipriani (QC) landed a 9.5 pound pollock. Bryson Moore (NH) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the trip!

As mentioned above, John Bullard was aboard today. John is the Northeast Regional Administrator of the Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office in Gloucester, Massachusetts which works with coastal states from North Carolina to Maine, two fishery management councils, the fishing industry and other stakeholders to manage federal commercial and recreational fisheries, marine mammals, habitat, etc, etc. He was here on a fact finding mission to see how the party/charter business operates first hand. I was extremely honored to have him aboard my vessel critiquing my operation. And there was no question that he was at work today. We were engaged in fishery discussions all day long. He might have been bored by my views but he never showed it. I was very interested in his. And my opinion of the man was elevated to new levels by the time he left the boat. It is always great to have someone is charge who you respect and who you feel is working for the better interest of all in the fishery. And I believe that John is that man.

Sean Devich and I ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind was very light out of the west. The ocean was flat calm. Just before we were ready to head in, the wind hauled out of the northwest and blew up to twelve or more knots. Seas were chops of one to two feet. We carried this wind, with diminishing seas, all the way back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature reached a high of 83F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty-five miles or more. The sky was clear. The surface water temperature reached a high of 71F, the highest value we have seen this season to date.

The fishing, the catching and the keeping were all good by afternoon trip standards. There were an equal number of cod and pollock, including the sub-legal fish, caught this evening. Legal landings included seven pollock, one haddock, one redfish and two butter mullet. We released four dogfish and cod from very small to 6 pounds. Anchoring was the principle boating method. Cod flies caught almost all the fish.

Chris Haley (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.25 pound pollock. The second and third largest fish were both caught by Wally Sloper (MA). Those fish were a 6.25 pound pollock and a 6 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Mike Haley (MA) caught a 3.75 pound pollock and a 2.25 pound cod. Jack MacDonald (MA) caught a pollock that weighed 3.25 pounds. Ten year old Max Waller (MO) landed a 2.5 pound pollock and a 5.5 pound pollock. Seven year old Noah Bennett (NY) and his grandfather, James Bennett (NY), caught a 2.5 pound pollock and released a 4 pound cod. Alex Waller (MO) caught a 3 pound cod and the only keeper haddock. The haddock weighed 2 pounds. Rebecca Higgins (PA) landed the hard luck award for the most tangled lines!

I received a $20.00 donation in sponsorship of my Pan-Mass Challenge cancer fund raising cycling event from Charlie Feeney (MA) today. Thanks, Charlie. I appreciate your help very much!

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 68F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind, the ocean was calm along the shore and the visibility seemed excellent. The sky was nearly cloudless all morning, mostly clear in the afternoon. The air temperature rose to 85F in Ogunquit. There was very little wind. What wind there was seemed variable in direction. The ocean along the shore was calm. The visibility was very good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 85F (with a low of 64F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 87F with a low of 73F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 94F (with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable. The ocean was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 78F. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was clear and sunny. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 72F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was good and landings were fair to good. Actually, we only landed one more fish yesterday than they did on the same trip today. Yesterday's pollock were larger on average. And there were less haddock caught yesterday. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included sixteen haddock, four redfish, five cusk and one whiting. The haddock cull was over two to one, sub-legal to legal haddock. Released fish included thirteen dogfish and eight cod over 4 pounds. The largest cod might have been 6 or more pounds, much like yesterday. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most legal fish.

Eva Schlauch (NJ) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 9 pound pollock caught by Ed Roche (NJ). John Andreychak (NJ) landed the third largest fish, an 8.5 pound pollock. Joe Gurney (ME) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single legal fish and tangling lines in the process! Ouch.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at about five knots. The ocean was calm. The sky was clear. The air temperature got up as high as 79F. There was a moderate tide. The surface water temperature hung up around 70F.

The conditions for fishing were excellent, the catching was fair but landings were on the poor side. Legal landings included a haddock, a redfish, two whiting and two squirrel hake. Released fish included eight cod from small to 4 pounds,a sub red, a small whiting and a small butter mullet. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear was tested and all worked about the same.

Alexander Piorier (QC) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4 pound cod. There was a tie for the second largest fish at 3 pounds, both were cod. Benoit Poirier (QC) caught one while Dan Genie (MA) caught the other.

Other Angler Highlights: Geoff Hill (GA) caught the only haddock. It weighed 2 pounds. Dan Genie landed the hard luck award for fighting a good sized rock to the surface, thinking the whole time that he had some really big special fish. Hey, he could have had a big fish.

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was calm along the shore and the visibility was very good or better than that. Ashore, the ocean stayed calm with very little wind until about 9:00 AM when a gentle southwest breeze started to blow. It never got much more than five knots. The air temperature rose as did the humidity. The highest air temperature reading I saw was 90F. But, with the humidity, it felt warmer than that. The sky was clear until after noon. The sky became overcast for the rest of the day. We had rain that started at 6:20 PM and lasted until 7:30 PM. It was light at first but the poured for fifteen minutes. To my knowledge, when the rain stopped it stopped for the evening. The visibility was good to very good in haze, less visibility as the day progressed. The southwest wind picked up a little more, to ten knots, in the afternoon. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 64F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 92F with a low of 75F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 95F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest no more than five knots. The surface of the ocean was calm. The air temperature ranged from 73 to 78F in the shade. The tide (current) was absent for the first couple of stops and fairly light after that. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze. The sky was clear in the morning but overcast in the afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 71.

The conditions for fishing were perfect for humans on the high seas. There couldn't have been a better fishing platform even if they were fishing off a pier. The catching was very good, better than yesterday. Landings were fair to good. Per person, the landings were the same or slightly better today. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included thirteen haddock, three butter mullet, one redfish and two cusk. The haddock cull was two to one, sub-legal fish to legal fish. Released fish included two cod of about 5 pounds each and seventy-five dogfish, the most dogfish we have seen in weeks during a trip. Drifting was the method. There were no other choices. All terminal gear worked about the same.

Jim Chase (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 8.5 pound pollock caught by Mark Konish (NC). There were no other fish even close to the 8.5 pound pollock that Mark caught. Wayne Vanzandt (NY) landed the hard luck award for catching the most dogfish.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at about five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or two. The sky was overcast with thunder showers skirting inside of them. They never saw rain. The air temperature got up as high as 78F. There was a moderate tide. The surface water temperature only made it up to 68F.

The fishing was good; the storms inside the grounds gave them variable wind shifts that made it impossible to know how the boat was going to lie. And the storms kept the fish from biting as they should. The catching was okay. Landings were poor. Legal landings included two redfish, on whiting and one squirrel hake. Released fish included three sub-legal haddock, five small cod and one pollock. They anchored and drift fished. Only bait rigs and cod flies were used.

Zane Yoder (PA) was the fisherman of the evening. He won the boat pool for the largest fish with the two largest fish, both cod of 1.5 pounds! In fact, he caught them as a double, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Even if the cod were big enough to keep, which they weren't, we won't be able to keep cod until August 1st. At that time the minimum size will be twenty-four inches. Richard Polirer (FL) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer, a good touch of the dreaded disease.

Friday, July 29, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing lightly out of the northeast and the visibility was very good at least. Sunrise showed us spitting rain but not enough to get the ground wet. The sky stayed overcast all morning and into the afternoon. By 10:00 AM, it was raining hard enough to get the roads wet and make sure you had oil gear on before heading out the door. The rain started to taper off by 1:00 PM. The rain was done by 2:00 PM. By 3:00 PM, the sky was mostly clear the wind was so light that the ocean became glassy calm along the shore. There had been a little northeast wind in the morning but not enough wind to even hold a flag out straight. The air temperature reached a high of 82F. It remained humid enough to make it feel much warmer than that. The visibility was very good when it wasn't raining. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 72F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 69F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten knots to start. The wind tapered down after that to a reasonable five knots. Seas were one to two feet at the start, calm on the ride home. The sky was overcast all during the fishing with a light rain in the morning. The air temperature got up to 69F, max. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from one to five miles in fog. The surface water temperature reached a high of 70F.

The fishing was very good. The catching was very good. There were plenty of fish to catch and plenty of dogfish as well. In most cases it was a fish a cast. Landings were on the low side of good. Legal fish landed included mostly pollock, twenty-eight haddock and one cusk. The haddock cull was two to one, sub-legal fish to legal fish. Released fish included eighty-five dogfish, fifteen cod of 4 to 6 pounds and quite a few sub-legal pollock. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Mark Konish (NC) was voted high hook for most legal fish. Certainly no one left the boat with as many fillets as he did. Steve Grasse (NY), a regular Bunny Clark angler whom we haven't seen for a couple of years, won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. He caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 7 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Mel Steenwyk (TN) landed the second largest fish, a 10.5 pound pollock. Mel also caught his fish as a double with a 7 pound pollock, same as Steve did.

Other Angler Highlights: There were no other legal fish landed approaching 10 pounds. Matt Marshall (VT) landed the hard luck award for leaving all his day's food and supplies in his vehicle ashore!

We had not enough anglers to run the second trip today. The weather forecast scared everyone away. It was just as well. We had to take our principle sounding machine off the boat last night because the hard drive failed. So I had to install a loaner when the boat came in. Actually, Ian did all the work including the setup features we use on a daily basis. I ended up changing the engine lubricating oil, the engine oil filters (three), the reverse gear oil and the reverse gear oil filter (about a three hour job).

I received several donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a long distance cycling event across the state of Masschusetts that raises money to fight cancer. Those donors and donations are as follows: Richard Polirer (FL) for $25.00, Tim & Nancy Hesselink (NJ) for $50.00 and Bill & Marie Pimley (NH) for a generous $75.00 as an "egift" through the PMC site. Thank you all for your generosity and support. I really do appreciate it!

Today started off horribly with the news that Wayne Perkins died last night of a massive heart attack. Wayne was the mayor of Perkins Cove. He and his father taught me how to lobster at eight and nine years old, taught me how to torch herring along the beach, helped me with problems whenever asked, we served on the Cove Committe for many years and just an all around wonderful individual. He was a good friend and a real local who was born here and grew up in Perkins Cove, the same as I did. I felt bad all day with his passing. He will really be missed around here, a guy who was Mr. Perkins Cove himself.

Saturday, July 30, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing lightly out of the northwest and the visibility was very good. More later.









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