www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

September 18, 2014, 3:10 AM EDT



Two Special Fish during Our First Ultra Marathon

The pictures above show special fish and the anglers who caught them taken during the July 8, 2014 ultra marathon. The shot on the left is a digital image of Jeff Philbrick with his 36 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the largest fish of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. It is also one of only ten white hake that have been landed on the Bunny Clark this season so far. Needless to say, Jeff won the boat pool handily with this fish. The shot on the right is a digital image of Bryan Lewer (FL) holding up his first Atlantic halibut. He snagged the fish in the side but knew right away what it was as he had never had a fish that fought quite like it. Well, actually, he did last year but lost the fish because his drag was too tight. But we won't talk about that episode! Bryan was very pleased with his catch as you can see in the shot. We caught three halibut on that trip, all of which were too small to keep and were released very much alive.




Saturday, July 26, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the wind was light out of the west southwest, the sky was clear and the visibility was good at best in thick haze. Although the air temperature seemed cool in the early part of the day it didn't take long for the air temperature to reach 80F. And the high hovered around that same value most of the day. It probably got up to 82 or 83F but I never noticed. It was certainly warm enough after noon. The sky was mostly clear and hazy with the sun available all day long. The wind was very light from the southwest. The visibility was good in haze.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest lightly to ten knots in the morning. After noon, it piped up a skosch to fifteen knots in gust. Seas ranged from calm to a two foot chop. The sky was sunny all day. The tide (current) was moderate. The air temperature was warm - the breeze kept the air temperature at comfortable levels. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.6F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 85F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 54F).

The fishing was good. The catching of legal fish was a little less than that. There were plenty of fish but the bite wasn't what it could have been. Legal landings included twenty-one cod, thirteen pollock, one haddock and sixteen cusk. Most fish were of a smaller size today. They released eleven dogfish and fifteen sub-legal haddock back to the ocean alive. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked about the same today.

Bill Murphy (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 10 pound pollock caught by Mike Tolman (MA). All the other groundfish caught today were less than 10 pounds. Thirteen year old Tyler Charest (MA) landed the hard luck award for losing the biggest fish of the trip.

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. It was very warm and a bit humid when the Bunny Clark let go the wooden anchors to head for the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The air temperature was perfect. The sky was clear/sunny. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate.

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was good overall. All legal fish caught were cusk and one cunner. Plus, they released a few sub-legal redfish, cod and pollock. Anchoring was the method. Everyone used bait.

Marcos Casares (MA) was the fisherman of the evening. He was high hook with two legal and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound Maine state trophy cusk. This is the largest cusk of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. And it's our first trophy cusk of the season as well. Captain Ian took a picture of Marcos and his special catch. This digital image appears on the left. Marcos also caught a 5.5 pound cusk. Elizebeth McGough (MI) caught the second largest fish, a 7 pound cusk. The third largest fish was a 5.75 pound cusk caught by Warren Barrett (MA).

Other Angler Highlights: Nico Ciolino (MA) caught a cusk of 4.5 pounds. Hazen Arthur (ME) caught a 5 pound cusk. Peter Messina (MA) landed the hard luck award for attaining high hurler status. Ouch!

I received three donations supporting my cancer cure fund raising bike ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Jim Clark (NH) gave $10.00 to me the first thing this morning, Normand Viens & Linda Govone (MA) donated a generous $100.00 and Bill Murphy gave a much needed $30.00. Thank you all so very much for your support. It means a great deal to me. But it means more to those with the disease and those who will have the disease in the future. Thanks again!

Sunday, July 27, 2014

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the wind was light out of the south southwest, the sky was mostly clear and the visibility was good at least. Clouds moved in at 7:00 AM. The sky was overcast by 8:30 AM. The sky remained overcast for the morning. It started to rain at 12:30 PM. The rain was hard at different periods. But mostly it just rained. The rain was over by 2:30 PM. It didn't rain again all day but the sky remained overcast for the rest of the day and into the night. The air temperature got as high as the mid 70s. There was about ten knots of wind from the southwest. The visibility was good in haze.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The sky was overcast for the trip. It started to rain just after they left the fishing grounds to head back to Perkins Cove. The rain was over by the time they got back to the dock. The air temperature was warm. The visibility ranged to six miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.9F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 80F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 57F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was good to very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twelve cod, one haddock, a cusk and three cunners. They released sixteen dogfish and one wolffish back to the ocean alive. Drifting and anchoring were the methods employed. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Mark Cote (ME) was high hook with fourteen legal. He had three fish worth weighing. They included a 10 pound cod, a 10 pound pollock and a pollock of 10.5 pounds. The 10.5 pound pollock shared the third largest fish designation with another 10.5 pound pollock caught by Ben Konarski (VT). Ben also caught a 10 pound pollock. Dave Archambault (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11 pound pollock caught by Andy Cote (ME). Andy also caught a 10 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Harold Pike (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Leslie Manney (VT) landed the hard luck award because she had to pay for her son's jig and fly loses today. No one was sea sick today.

There was no evening trip today.

Monday, July 28, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, there was no wind, the sky was obscured by fog and the visibility was poor in dense fog along the shore. The fog stayed dense along the shore until at least 9:30 AM, maybe longer. But at 8:50 AM, it started to rain. And it rained hard for most of the morning after that. By noon, the rain was starting to let up. By 1:00 PM, the rain was over. We had sun and some blue sky by 3:00 PM. It stayed sunny and warm until about 6:30 PM when a minor front came through with the threat of rain. The sky clouded up. At 7:00 PM, we had heavy rain along with thunder storms and lightning (there was no lightning this morning that I saw). This event was over by 8:00 PM. The air temperature reached the high 70s after a fashion. But you never would have thought it would do so with the temperature drop in the fog around 8:00 AM. After the fog left, the visibility was good in haze over the ocean for most of the day.

On the way to the fishing grounds, there was little wind but it was from the south. On the grounds, the wind picked up out of the south to ten and fifteen knots. Seas ranged from one to a solid two feet. After noon, the wind increased to twenty knots with seas in chops of three to four feet, a solid four near the end of the trip. The sky was overcast in the morning, sunny in the afternoon. The visibility ranged, in the morning, from a quarter of a mile to two miles in precipitation and fog. After noon, the visibility ranged to ten miles in haze. The air temperature was warm. The tide (current) was strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 64F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 84F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 64F).

The fishing was good, no better than that with the sea state, the strong tide and the few dogfish. The catching of legal fish was good to very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock and cod, in that order. Legal landings also included nine haddock (along with forty-two sub-legal haddock), two cusk and one winter flounder. There were twenty-one dogfish released back to the ocean alive. Drifting was the boating method. All terminal gear worked well today.

There was no mention of high hook today. It was probably too much of a chore to find out. Mike Guskey (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. He also caught the second largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. There was a tie for the third largest fish. Both Ed Merrill (ME) and Chris Ramage (NY) caught fish of 11.75 pounds. Ed caught an 11.75 pound pollock while Chris' was an 11.75 pound cod. Chris' largest pollock weighed 10 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Ray Clark (VT) caught a 10 pound pollock, his best fish. Bill Salisbury (NY) was there - finally! John Russell (ME) put a hook so deep in his hand that he had to go to the hospital after the trip to get it removed. He did it early in the trip. But this didn't keep him from fishing. And he could have been high hook. His two best fish included a 10.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock! He did however also land the hard luck award!

I received three donations supporting my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The donors and their donations included Chris Kirste (ME) for $25.00, Chuck MacDonald (ME) for a generous "egift" of $100.00 and Michele Peloquin (NH) for another generous donation of $100.00 via "egift" through the PMC site. Thank you so very much for your help on this project. It means a lot to me. And your support is wonderful.

Tim Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Alec Levine and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots or more, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at fifteen knots, more or less. Seas were chops of two feet or more over six or seven foot swells coming out of the southeast. This wind didn't last. By 10:00 AM, the wind was already half of what it was when we first arrived. By noon, the wind was light out of the northwest with a one foot chop over diminished sea swells. We had no wind for the ride home. The waters surface wasn't glassy. But there was no spray for the ride home. The air temperature was warm, perfect. The sky was nearly cloudless all day. The tide (current) was reasonable - light. The visibility ranged to over twenty-five miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66.8F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 79F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 60F).

The fishing was excellent. There was very little current, there were no dogfish (almost), the sea state was fine and the weather was perfect. The catching of legal fish was very good on one spot but a little less than good on most of the others. I would call it good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock. There were many more pollock (both legal and sub-legal) than any other fish. Legal landings also included nine cod, two haddock, four cunners and six cusk. We returned three dogfish and two big wolffish back to the ocean alive. We actually lost one of the wolffish on the surface, breaking the line trying to pull it aboard. The fish was caught by Angel Tracey (VT), the largest groundfish of her life. It would have been our largest wolffish of the year. I would guess that it was probably 18 pounds. But it could have been bigger or smaller. Of course, we would have gaffed the fish had it been legal to keep. We used the three boating disciplines for fishing; drifting, anchoring and drogue. Anchoring worked the best. Cod flies caught the most fish but jigs and bait also worked well.

Either Bob Mease (NY) or Brian Walsh (NJ) was high hook with about ten legal, maybe one more than that. Todd Aiken (NY) was third hook with eight or nine legal. Brian's largest fish was an 11 pound pollock. Bob caught more pollock than anyone on the boat. Some of his pollock weighed 11 pounds, 13 pounds and 10.5 pounds. The 13 pounder was the second largest fish on the boat today. Cecilia Gandolfo (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish boated, a 14.5 pound wolffish. I was able to pull the fish over the side by the line, unhook it and weigh it before releasing. By the way, the two wolffish were caught at exactly the same time. The third largest fish was a 12 pound pollock caught by Dub Tracey (VT).

Other Angler Highlights: Brian Aiken (NY) caught the first fish I could weigh, an 11 pound pollock. He caught this pollock as a double keeper catch with another pollock of 7 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. It was one of three double legals that were caught today. Brian's second largest fish was a 9.5 pound pollock. Doug Fortin (VT) caught a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Bob Best (NH) landed a 10.5 pound pollock. James Miller (CT) caught a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Eleven year old Daniel Best (NH) boated an 11 pound pollock. It was his biggest of the two legal fish that he caught. Ed "Glen" Parrow (NY) managed to bury a fly hook in his middle finger. I had to surgically remove it. He did it while trying to take an 8 pound pollock off his bottom hook. For this, and a sundry other malfunctions, he landed the hard luck award. Ouch and ouch!

I received another three important donations for the Pan-Mass Challenge, my 192 mile bicycle ride to raise money for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (Jimmy Fund) to help find a cure for cancer. These donors and their monetary contributions included Brian Aiken (NY) for $25.00, Ed Parrow/Todd Aiken/Brian Aiken for $50.00 and Cecilia Gandolfo for $20.00. Thank you all so very much for your support and sentiment. It gives me stronger faith for the project and process!

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the wind was light out of the north, the sky was mostly overcast and the visibility over the ocean was close to excellent. It stayed overcast all morning. It even looked like it was going to rain. But nary a drop fell to the ground in my realm. After noon, we had sunshine but not all the time. The air temperature was warm. I never looked at a thermometer but it had to be close to 80F at times. There was very little wind, if any. The visibility was very good at least.

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction. The ocean was calm over rolling sea swells of two to three feet. The sky was overcast for the trip. The air temperature was warm - perfect t-shirt weather. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility ranged from an eighth of a mile to a mile in patchy fog with a look at three miles occasionally. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 78F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 54F).

The fishing was excellent; there were no dogfish, the ocean was calm and the weather was beautiful. The catching of legal fish was just fair. All the legal fish were small today. Legal landings included twenty-three cod, two haddock, three pollock, two redfish and three cusk. They released one wolffish back to the ocean alive. Drifting was the only boating method available to them. All terminal gear worked about the same.

Ian weighed one of the first fish to come aboard today, an 8.5 pound pollock. He was waiting for a larger fish but that fish never materialized. So the pollock, caught by John Parson (MA), was the only fish weighed. John won the boat pool for the largest fish with this pollock. Dillan Bergethof (NY) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick and losing one jig.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather was perfect when they left the dock to head to the open sea. On the fishing grounds, the wind and sea state were the same as the morning trip; flat calm over two to three foot rolling sea swells with variable wind. The sky was clear and sunny. The air temperature was warm the visibility ranged to ten miles in haze. There was no tide (current).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was very good overall, probably our best afternoon trip of the season. Most legal fish landed were cusk, a pile of them. Legal landings also included three cod and four mackerel. Drifting was the method. Bait and cod flies caught all the fish but bait was best.

Clayton Koonz (CT) and Dean Caprini (IL) tied for high hook with three legal fish each (not including the mackerel). Dean won also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.25 pound cusk. His second largest fish was a 6 pound cusk. Clayton caught two cusk of exactly 5.5 pounds, his two largest fish. There was a tie for the second largest fish of 7 pounds. Bill Sullivan (VA) caught a 7 pound cusk and Brennan Ruments (IL) caught a 7 pound cusk.

Other Angler Highlights: Scott Nai (CT) caught a cusk of 4.5 pounds. Meigan Sullivan (VA) caught a cusk of 3.5 pounds. Rick Koonz (CT) landed a cusk of 4.25 pounds. Isabel McCarthy (VT) boated a 4.5 pound cusk, her largest fish. Ginger Ruments (IL) caught a 4.5 pound cod. John McGuinness (MD) caught a 4.5 pound cusk, his largest fish. Sean McCarthy (VT) landed a cusk of 5.5 pounds. Seven year old Samantha Sullivan (VA) boated the largest cod of the evening (day?) at 5.75 pounds. Logan McCarthy (VT) landed the hard luck award for being the high (sole) hurler of the trip.

Four donations supporting my ride in the Pan-Mass Challenge, an 192 mile two day cycling event starting this coming Saturday at 5:30 AM. This is a ride that raises close to $40 million for the Dana-Farber Cancer Instititute through the Jimmy Fund. The donors and donations included Dean Caprini for a generous $63.00, Creid Johnson (VA) for $25.00, Andrew Barowsky (ME/FL) for a very generous $250.00 and Bill & Marie Pimley (NH) for a generous $75.00. Thank you all so much for helping me in this most important project. I very much appreciate it.

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, there was no wind, the ocean was flat mirror calm, the sky was cloudless and the visibility over the ocean was suspect with haze/fog. We had fog most of the morning, sometimes moving over the edge of the coast a quarter of a mile, sometimes backing off to remain just off the coast. By noon, the fog was gone for good. And the wind had picked up to ten knots from the south as well. It was sunny all day until rain showers started to move in at 2:30 PM. Most of these missed Ogunquit. But we got the edge of a few of the showers at 3:15 PM to about 4:00 PM before clearing. The air temperature was in the mid to high 70s all day.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest. Light on the ride out, it was ten to fifteen knots on the grounds. Seas were chops of a foot over two to three foot rolling sea swells. They didn't have any of the fog we had along the shore. They stayed well outside it all day. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles, at least. The tide (current) was strong. The air temperature was warm. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67.9F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 81F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 52F).

The fishing was tough with the strong current and the sea state. There were no dogfish, however. Not a one. The catching of legal fish was slow, one of the slowest trips of the year. Legal landings included nine cod, 2 haddock, three pollock, one redfish and four cusk. There were over forty-five sub-legal haddock released and even more sub-legal pollock released. All three boating disciplines were used: drifting, anchoring and sea anchoring. No one method worked better than another. No conclusions were drawn on effective terminal gear.

Bill Murphy (NH) might have been high hook with approximately four legal. But this couldn't be confirmed. Bill, himself, denied being high hook. But he would. Troy Kingsbury (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.75 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 10 pound pollock caught by Sophia Perry (NY). Dave Harris (MA) caught the third largest fish of the trip, a 9.5 pound cod. Kyle Wilbur (ME) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single legal fish, losing a jig and being involved in the most tangled lines.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. It was raining at the dock just before they left to make the run to the fishing grounds. The air temperature was mild, about 70F. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the south at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two feet, more or less, with continuing sea swells of two to three feet. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds, although they had no rain. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility was very good at over fifteen miles.

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was good overall. Most legal fish landed were cod, for a change. But there were many more on the bottom they were fishing that they didn't catch. Legal landings also included one cusk. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait.

Kaitlyn Tursi (CT) was high hook with four legal cod. Her largest weighed 5.25 pounds, the second largest fish of the trip. Jim Tursi (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.5 pound cusk. The third largest fish was a 5 pound cod caught by Joe Norton. Mike Swart (ME) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single fish, legal or otherwise. I hosted a trip like that once!

I received donation help for my 192 mile bike ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge from two sources today. One source wished to remain anonymous for $25.00. The other was a $50.00 donation from Perkin's Cove's harbor master, Fred Mayo. Thank you very much for your support in this project. I appreciate it so much.

Friday, August 1, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the wind was blowing out of the south southwest at five knots, the sky was cloudless and the visibility over the ocean was good at least. The day ashore turned out warm, but not too warm, sunny with light southwest winds and good visibility around the ocean.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots with seas in chops of a foot or less over long rolling sea swells of two to three feet (average), from the southerly direction. The sky was sunny all day. The air temperature was warm, perfect. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.7F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 61F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 82F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 58F).

The fishing was very good. The conditions were great with few dogfish. The catching of legal fish was fair to good, depending on timing (some spots were better than that) and the expertise of the angler. Some anglers always do well anyway. And there were those aboard today. Most legal fish landed were cod, by far. Legal landings also included fourteen haddock, 9 pollock and sixteen cusk. Only five dogfish were caught. There were many sub-legal haddock released. Drifting was the only method employed. Jigs and cod flies worked slightly better than bait.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook or by how many. It was probably Matt or Zach Freitas (both MA) but that is purely a guess based on many previous performances. Paul Kostopoulos (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.5 pound pollock. This was the last fish brought on board the boat during the trip! Matt Freitas caught the second largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 10.5 pound cod caught by Zach Freitas. Blake Ofstein (FL) captured the hard luck award for being sea sick. Ouch!

We didn't have an afternoon half day trip today.

I received a parting donation helping me raise money to fight cancer with the Pan-Mass Challenge from John & Patricia Anderson (ME), who live right next door to me. John is a survivor of the disease and realizes full well how life changing this disease is. They contributed a generous $200.00 to the cause. Thanks so much for your support. I very much appreciate it!

Today was the start of my Pan-Mass Challenge. After 9:00 AM this morning, my great friend, Paul "Hez" Haseltine, picked me and my bicycle up and we drove to Boston. We had lunch under the towers of David MacDonald (World Trade Center). This is tradition or has been for the last eight years that I have been doing the ride. After lunch, we put our bikes in trailer trucks headed to Sturbridge, Massachusetts. We ourselves boarded a bus to Sturbridge shortly after. Once there we registered for the ride, got our room at the Sturbridge Host Hotel, got all our gear & bikes ready for the ride tomorrow and met friends at the dinner they provide for us at the same hotel under a huge tent on the property. I always go to bed early. This day I was asleep before 6:15 PM. Sound asleep.

Saturday, August 2, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

The weather ashore was cloudy all day, overcast. The air temperature was warm, winds continued light out of the southwest. The ocean was calm along the shore. The visibility was good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots with seas in chops of a foot or less over long rolling sea swells of two feet. The sky was overcast. There was no rain. The air temperature was warm, perfect. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged over fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66.2F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 72F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 56F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was good overall. However, on the catching side of things, you had to have a bit of expertise to do it. It wasn't jump on the hook day with the keeper fish population, certainly. Most legal fish landed were cod, by far. Legal landings also included twenty cusk, six haddock and eleven pollock. Nine dogfish and over forty haddock were released. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked about the same.

Dave Soucy (NY) was high hook with fifteen plus legal fish. His largest fish was a 9.5 pound cod, the third largest fish of the trip. Cory Madore (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 10 pound pollock caught by James Clifford (NH).

Other Angler Highlights: Luke Day (ME) caught a 9 pound cod, his best fish and the fourth largest fish of the trip. Dan Merrow (NH) had just a tough day today. On top of that he lost two jigs. He walked away with the hard luck award.

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather was perfect when they left the dock to head to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the ocean was calm, the wind was light, the sky was clear and the air temperature was perfect - warm but not too warm. The visibility ranged to fifteen or more miles in haze.

The fishing was very good. The catching was okay. There were a few sub-legal cod and pollock. Legal landings included four cusk and one mackerel. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait.

Mark LaJoy (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 5.5 pound cusk caught by Brian Latcham (ON). Tammy Bond (NY) landed the third largest fish, a 4.5 pound cusk.

Other Angler Highlights: Rick Hogan (OH) caught the only other cusk, a 4 pounder. Sandra Latcham (ON) landed the hardest luck award for fighting the bottom but all the time believing it was a big fish. I guess if it were a fish she certainly would have landed it for all the effort that was put out!

Pan-Massachusetts Challenge: The morning went well. Hez and I did everything we normally do to get ready. All worked fine. As soon as we walked out of the hotel room door, Steve LaPlante (CT) was waiting for us to, greet us, get a group photo and see us off. This is tradition. And to see him towering over the rest of the cycling humanity in the morning is a welcome sight indeed! Our group picture appears on the left. Steve is the one sporting this years Bunny Clark/PMC theme t-shirt while I am the one in the red glasses - in case you didn't know. The "kits" that Hez and I are wearing are this year's PMC issue.

The ride itself started out fine except for the fact that I was first in line and didn't clip in at the gun (there is no real gun). So the top line rode around me. But it didn't take long to get to the road. It was raining/drizzling slightly at the start. And we had a mixture of dry and wet roads for the first twenty miles. As the rain became more significant the roads got wet. It wasn't so bad that you couldn't draft behind someone but you had to be careful. I stayed near the front until a faster group passed me and I jumped on. It was a perfect speed for sitting in. And very much like the group I ride in on Sundays with the Maine Coast Cycling Club. This ride ended at the Franklin Water Stop (a PMC hosted stop). Or so I thought. We all rolled in, everyone went their separate ways, got something to eat/drink and used the "porta potties". I lost track of them but rolled out again when I was ready. Within ten feet of leaving I noticed I was with the same group again! Perfect! "Can I hook up with you guys again?", this to one of the riders. "If you do a pull this time." was his reply. "I didn't think you noticed", I said. He laughed at that one. "Oh, I noticed", he said.

This ride went along great and was even a bit faster than before. I had worked my way to the second position behind the leader, a guy on a fast time trial bike. After a few minutes I looked behind me and found that we had dropped everyone. It was just he and I alone on the road. He thought he was carrying the whole train but all he was really hearing was the sound of my bike behind him! Realizing he didn't know he had dropped his friends, I rode up beside him, put my hand on his shoulder and told him. So he backed off and I went on alone and hooked up with three other riders. We too were going at a reasonable clip. And I was very comfortable. When it was my turn to lead it was on a wet down hill with a hard right turn. We might have been going 30 mph. Or we were going 30 mph, slowing a bit for the turn. I took it wide as I had every other turn but my wheels went right out from underneath me. With fast riders in a line, a gap develops at turns. And, as it worked out, that was a good thing. I was the only one of the four that hit the pavement. And they all cleared me easily.

Of course, I wasn't wearing gloves. So my hands got pretty chaffed up including a big rent in the thumb of my left hand between the nail and the knuckle. I landed on my right side, shoulder and head (breaking the 6th helmet in eighteen years). My hip and right knee were bruised and cut. Somehow, I got my left hand involved as well. The worst was a gash in my forearm that wouldn't stop bleeding. I needed stitches there. That was very evident. Cyclists stopped to help initially but I waved them on. But I was concerned that I would leak out if I didn't stop the bleeding on my arm. So I rode to the next group of people cheering riders on. I wish I could have written something down so I could have thanked them. They wanted to take me to a hospital. I certainly didn't want to do that. But they did put a compress on my arm which got the wound to stop bleeding so I could continue riding. The bike was okay.

Ten miles later, I pulled into the PMC's sanctioned lunch stop, 70 miles into the ride. There I had my thumb checked out at the medical tent. I just wanted to make sure I wasn't doing any damage to it by riding. At the 90 mile mark, it started to rain. It was a heavy rain that didn't stop until I finished the ride 22 miles later in Bourne, Massachusetts. Until that point I looked a mess. The blood from my forearm had dripped all over my white handle bar tape, my legs, my clothes and my bike. But after riding an hour in the pouring rain, I cleaned up pretty well. And no one would have suspected that I crashed except for the bandage on my arm and left thumb. And the bandage on my thumb was red from the blood and the compress on my right arm was tied in with a red self adhering medical tape, both matching my riding kit!

[As a side note, I did stop to see Jim Feeney and family who were cheering riders on, helping with hypothermic riders and making everyone feel welcome on the road. East Wareham? Jim, of course, is one of the best anglers I have ever met. And his family is super. Just stopping and talking to Jim & Angela made me feel confident that I was doing the right thing. And I think Jim got a good chuckle out of the whole thing. And, oh, I am very aware that the damage from the crash could have been worse.]

So I crossed the finish line with no notice. I had arrived at noon and it was starting to get busy with riders finishing. I found my assigned room at Mass Maritime Academy, found my bag brought by the PMC from Sturbridge, got my bed ready, took a shower, threw away all the bandages, scrubbed the wounds as best I could, dried off, put on some clean clothes and walked to the medical tent - dry and ready. There, they examined me and told me I needed to go to the hospital to get stitches. This I already knew. I was driven to Toby Hospital in Wareham, Massachusetts, a few miles from MMA (Jim Feeney had offered to drive me there earlier). There they had a record of my crash in the PMC a few years ago - including all my insurance information, etc.

They were super nice at the hospital. I had to have five stitches in my left thumb. I had cut through just to the top of the tendons ahead of the knuckle. And I had to have six stitches in my forearm. I had gone through three layers of tissue. That's why it had bled so much. And there was quite a bit of scrubbing and washing to get the small pieces of road out of both wounds. A couple pictures above and right show the results of Andrea and Susan's good work at patching me up. Andrea, the doc, did a wonderful job. It was obvious to me that she had found her station in life years ago. A true professional with bedside manner skills that can't be taught.

I was out of there and back to MMA by 5:00 PM. A volunteer, Mike (didn't get his last name - I'm an idiot), brought me to the hospital, picked me up, brought me to CVS to get the antibiotic prescription and brought me back. Plus, he kept checking up on me on the campus, in the food tent, on the lawn and at a vendor tent. The word must have gone out that I could be a danger to someone! But, in all seriousness, Mike was so very kind and helpful that he just epitomizes this whole weekend and the reasons for doing it. I can't emphasize enough how petty my injuries were to those we ride for. And that was my duty; to ride for those we work for, hundreds of cancer patients along the road to our destination. And I can't deny that it was also a ride for me.

Sunday, August 3, 2014

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

The weather ashore was mostly cloudy all day with peeks of the sun every now and again. The air temperature was warm. There was no wind. The ocean was calm along the shore. The visibility was good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots with seas in chops of a foot or less over long rolling sea swells of two feet. The sky was sunny all day. The air temperature was warm, perfect. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.8F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 70F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 54F).

The fishing was very good. The catching was good overall. Landings were good overall. Most legal fish landed were cusk, more than we have seen for a while. Landings also included nineteen cod, two haddock, ten pollock, one redfish and a cunner. There were quite a few sub-legal pollock released today. Drifting was the method. Jigs caught the most fish today.

Brian Murphy (NH) was high hook with nine legal. He did not boat a fish of 10 pounds or better. However, his most significant "other", Marian "Merv" Murphy (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound pollock. Her largest cod weighed 8.5 pounds, the third largest fish of the trip. As I have mentioned many times in the past, these most wonderful fishermen also are very talented singer/song writers in contemporary folk. At least that's what I call their music. And they and their family teach music and voice (http://www.brianandgardnermurphy.com/).

Other Angler Highlights: Justin King (MA) caught the second largest fish, a 9.5 pound pollock. His largest cod weighed 7 pounds. Rick Ciejka (MA) caught an 8 pound pollock. Billy Mahoney (MA) landed a 7.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Joe Ciejka (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick. The details of the event were not revealed to me.

About an hour after I had finished the last leg of the Pan-Mass Challenge, the finish at Provincetown, Massachusetts on the tip of Cape Cod, I got a text from my wife, Deb; "Call me!!!!!!!! Problem with BC". Of course, I conjured up all kinds of awful problems. I'm not going to go through the list of thoughts I had. So I found a spot away from the throngs of cycling humanity and called her back. She was a little upset. Apparently, Captain Jared had a hard time starting the engine, barely getting the engine turned over. In fear of stopping the engine and not being able to get it started again, Jared left the engine on for the rest of the day on the fishing grounds. But Deb didn't know how to proceed. This mainly because I always do all the boat stuff. Jared wasn't confident about taking the afternoon trip. I was standing in front of the Provincetown Inn when I told Deb to hang tight, I would call her back. The Bunny Clark still had an hour of fishing time yet. It was noon. Knowing that the starter was probably bad, I called Skip Dunning, the best road tech from Power Products (NEDDA) in Portland; "Skip, how would you like to make some extra money today?" He agreed to meet the boat when the Bunny Clark got back to Perkins Cove at 3:30 PM. Jared wasn't confident about changing the starter out as he had never done so with my engine. And I also had a faulty key switch that needed replacing anyway. Later that day, Skip found out that the starter was indeed broken (bendix, I believe) and now we also have a fully functional key switch. So disaster avoided - this time!

Pan-Massachusetts Challenge (Day 2): I woke up very sore in the morning. My right shoulder, which I didn't even notice yesterday, was sore, as were all my wounds and head. My thumb was throbbing. And I thought to myself; if it's pouring with rain, I am not riding again. But, in my heart, I knew I would ride regardless. But stitches have to stay dry for forty-eight hours. I peered at Hez's cell phone with the doppler radar image and rain cells trudging across the map of Cape Cod. It looked good.


On the second day of the event, the second ride, an 80 mile distance, almost everyone leaves early, when it's still dark. I don't have lights. And I don't have the confidence without the lights. And I had just crashed the day before. So I was the last of about fifteen riders who I have come to know and love over the last eight years whom I like to ride with on the last day. Actually, Hez and I headed out together. Or, rather, he started out and I caught up with him. And I took it easy for the first half of the ride, anyway. And I stopped at every sanctioned water stop. There are three before the finish. Forty miles in we caught up to most of our friends. They were just leaving Brewster, Massachusetts to move on when we were just arriving. We agreed to all meet at the Wellfleet, Massachusetts water stop. In the meantime, I met up with Dr. Ben Lowenstein (ME - he rides with his team "Lungstrong" at this event) who used to work with my cardiologist in York, Maine and is truly loved by my daughter, Halley. Halley used to babysit for his kids. It was her favorite family to babysit for. And he treated her like a special member of their family. So I had to have a picture taken with Ben, myself and Hez so I could text it to Halley who promptly put it up on her Facebook page before we had even started the next leg. The iPhone digital image appears above. Ben is the one in the middle. And I'm the one in red - blood red -, white & black.

I left Hez during the next leg as I ended up hooking on with a train of faster riders which brought me to Wellfleet much earlier than planned. This gave me time to talk to all my riding friends while we were waiting for Hez. When Hez got in, we got together in our own small groups and took off.

I had the unexpected pleasure to ride with Andy Carver and Mike Parent on their tandem. Andy used to be a professional rugby player in the UK. Mike started out as a physical trainer but is now more in administration and sales, I believe. Both are physical specimens. Both know how to ride. And both are very fit. I drafted off them for twenty miles, our average speed somewhere between 27 and 28 mph. It reminded me of motor pacing. For long periods we would be traveling the long flatter roads at about 35 mph. And we passed other cyclists at such a fast pace that no one could hook on the back. We did slow down near the end to allow two more Path to the Cure riders to hook on and draft behind me. But that was the only slower period.

The whole days ride was rain free with dry roads. The riding was perfect. There was zero wind but cool enough to make the ride better than normal. I managed to keep my wounds dry. However, to shower after the finish, I had to have Andy Carver tape plastic bags to both arms so I could hold the soap.

The rest of the day was uneventful and fun. We ate under the huge tent at the Provincetown Inn that the PMC provided for us. They fed us. We stayed until 1:00 PM and then walked to a bar at the base of the pier where the ferries depart. The ferry ride to Boston was over flat calm seas, overcast skies and perfect temperatures. I don't believe we had any rain. We were back in Ogunquit at 8:00 PM.

I want to thank those who support me, the cancer cure idea and the ride itself. For a guy like me who likes to ride his bike this event is a gift from you at a busy time of year where I can actually get a break for a bit. So I thank you for some time away and for the help your donation brings everyone with the disease or to those who fight to find a cure. Just wonderful.

I received many donations while I was gone this weekend supporting my cancer ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge. These individuals and their donations include: Roland Bastien (CT) for $20.00, Donald Johnsen (NY) for a generous $100.00 (egift), Richard Fox (CA) for a generous $100.00 (egift), another generous donation of $100.00 from Peter Bradley (CA) (egift), Robert S. Cary (MA) for a generous $200.00 (egift), Richard Jeffers (MA) for a generous $250.00, Thomas & Leslie Plante (FL) for a generous $100.00, Jon Freeman (ME) for $10.00 and, last & most, Dennis & Diane LaValley (MA) for a hugely generous $2,500.00 donation. Thank you all so very much for allowing me the opportunity to represent your cancer interests at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. You who are very special to me make me feel special in your support.

Monday, August 4, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, there was no wind, the sky was cloudless and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog along the shore. It was sunny most of the morning with dense fog along the shore. The fog was around all day but only along the immediate shore until noon. You could see a fog bank just off shore all afternoon. The air temperature was mid 70s. Clouds moved in from the west during the early afternoon and brought light sprinkles. No wind or thunder was associated with the rain. From 2:30 until late the sky was overcast. There was very little wind anywhere.

On the fishing grounds, the wind was very light out of the southwest. The ocean was calm. The sky appeared overcast all day because they were in the fog from Perkins Cove to Perkins Cove. So it was impossible to know what was above the fog. The visibility ranged to a half mile maximum. And I'm not sure what part of the ocean or what time of day that was. I would suspect the sky was clear in the morning and overcast in the afternoon. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The air temperature was warm, perfect. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67.1F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 80F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 58F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-three cod, two haddock, eleven redfish and six cusk. Nine dogfish and thirty-eight sub-legal haddock were released. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Greg Colley (ON) was high hook with thirteen legal. He two largest fish were both pollock and both 10.5 pounds each, the second and third largest fish. He was not in the boat pool anyway. The largest fish was a 12 pound pollock caught by nine year old Luke Keniston, Captain Jared & Michelle Keniston's son. He caught this fish as part of a triple keeper catch with a cod of 6 pounds and another pollock of 7 pounds. One fish was caught on the fly above the jig, one fish was caught on the treble hook and the other fish was caught on the tube in the split ring above the jig. Captain Uncle Ian took a picture of father, Jared, and Luke holding the three fish. This digital image appears on the right. Luke was not in the boat pool. He caught a total of eight legal fish. Rick Brunelle (ME) and Buck Steeler (CT) tied for the boat pool for the largest fish with the fourth largest fish of the trip at 10 pounds each, the fish. Buck's was a 10 pound cod while Rick's was a 10 pound pollock. Roger Brunelle (ME) landed the hard luck award for catching the least number of legal fish today, one! Well, at least he got one!

Tim Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Alec Levine and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, there was no wind, the sky was cloudless, the ocean was mirror calm and the visibility over the ocean was good in some haze. The ride to the fishing grounds was perfect. There was no wind for the whole ride there. On the grounds, the wind was very light from the north, dropped to zero by 11:00 AM and then hauled out of the southwest after noon. The ocean remained flat calm all day. The sky was clear and sunny. The air temperature was a little too warm for long pants and oilskins. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was very good or twenty miles at least. The surface water temperature reached a high of 71.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 61F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 82F with a low of 70F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 60F).

The fishing was excellent. There were no physical constraints to incur any difficulty to the most unseasoned of anglers. It was perfect weather to enjoy a day of fishing and the lines tended straight down for every drift, the only boating method employed today. The catching was very good. Landings fell into the category of "good". Most legal fish landed were cod, by far. In fact, even though there were plenty of good sized pollock around, we probably caught our last legal one at 10:00 AM. Legal landings also included twelve pollock, six haddock, two redfish, three cunners, five mackerel and sixteen cusk. Cod flies caught the most fish.

High hook could not be determined exactly. However, there were three anglers who caught ten or more legal fish each. Those anglers included Steve Hinkemeyer (MN), Chris Vossler (CT) and, Chris' son, Robb Vossler (CT). Steve won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. He also caught just about every species available including the only two legal redfish! The second largest fish was an 11 pound pollock caught by Steve Tessier (MA). John Ostrander (NY) caught the third largest fish, a 10 pound pollock. He also caught the largest lobster of the Bunny Clark fishing season. We have caught two so far this season. John's was a 2.5 pound egg bearing hard shell cull! I took a picture of his arthropod. The digital image appears on the left.

Other Angler Highlights: Chris Vossler, Robb Vossler and Dean Legg (MA) all fished with jig and jig stick up in the bow. Between them they released ten legal cod to 7.5 pounds back to the ocean alive. Robb's largest cod weighed 7.5 pounds. Chris caught a cod that weighed 9 pounds. Chris also caught a pollock of 8.5 pounds. Drew Hinkemeyer (MN) landed the largest cod of the trip at 9.5 pounds. Emily Ostrander (NY) landed the hard luck award t-shirt. I didn't give it to her for any hard luck. She actually had a good time and caught quite a few nice fish. The fact of the matter is that no one had any discernable hard luck on this trip. So I gave the shirt to Emily who was simply the youngest angler of the trip at 11 years old!

Alec Levine and I ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. Winds were light out of the southeast (less than five knots) on the ride to the fishing grounds. We had small waves of less than a foot over some kind of a long low ground swell. On the fishing grounds, the wind was all around the clock. This because we had localized low pressure cells with rain that passed to the south and the north of us. We never saw any rain. The sky was mostly sunny but we got the clouds from the edges of these cells periodically. The wind remained light and the ocean was calmer than the ride out. The visibility dropped to about fifteen miles in haze. The air temperature was just a little bit too warm.

The fishing/catching was good overall. We had a slight current into the wind and we had the most dogfish we have seen on a trip in two weeks or more. And it was our first afternoon trip with more than a couple dogfish. We had several species of fish including twelve sub-legal haddock, a species of fish we haven't seen this close to shore in a long time. Landings included one haddock, two cod, two cusk and one pollock. We tried drifting but anchoring seemed to work the best. All terminal gear worked about the same.

We didn't have any angler catch more than one legal fish. Craig MacEwan (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.5 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 6 pound pollock caught by Christine Hofferberth (ME). Laurie Oakes (ME) came in third with a cusk of 5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Bob Oakes (ME) lost a cod on the surface of about 5 or 6 pounds. It swam straight back to bottom! This while Alec was standing next to him with a gaff! I was on the other side of Bob involved in a tangle and was amazed how fast that fish took off! Jeff Valley (VT) caught a 4 pound haddock. Sean Dunton (VT) boated a 4 pound cod. Donna Kloss (NY) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the trip, the only person to get sea sick for the day. Hey, you never know!

Several anglers helped me with my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge (PMC) today. These anglers and their donations included Mark Coleman (NY) for $40.00 and, collectively, Chris Vossler, Robb Vossler, Dean Legg and Tom Daniels (CA) for $100.00. Of particular interest were the "Vossler Crew" who rode in the PMC over the weekend representing Team Lungstrong. I met them on the ferry back from Provincetown (on Sunday) saying that they had already booked a trip on the Bunny Clark for this day! Thank you all so very much for your kind support. I really do appreciate your help!

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 67F, the wind was light out of the northwest, the sky was overcast, it had just been raining and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze. The sky remained overcast for the early part of the morning and then cleared. The sky remained clear for the rest of the day until thunder showers rolled in at about 6:30 or 7:00 PM. The rain lasted for a half hour or so. There was just a little lightning. The air temperature was warm but not nearly as warm as it was yesterday (upper 70s). The visibility good in haze.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at very light speeds. The ocean was calm for the whole trip. The sky was overcast in the morning, clear after noon. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility was good in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.1F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 61F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 83F with a low of 70F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 57F).

The fishing,catching and landings were on the bottom end of the curve today. The tide (current) was very strong creating lots of tangles, the ocean was too calm to produce a bite and the direction of the current with the wind made it very hard to keep the attitude of the boat correctly positioned. The boat constantly wanted to spin and drift. Not good. Landings included twelve cod, three pollock and one cusk. Eighteen sub-legal haddock and 8 dogfish were released. Drifting and anchoring were the boating methods. All terminal gear worked about the same.

Mike Murray (VT) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with almost half of the legal fish caught today. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19 pound pollock. And I believe this is also the Bunny Clark's largest pollock of the fishing season to date. We had two pollock earlier in the year that weighed 18+ but I don't believe we hit the 19 pound mark. And we certainly haven't caught a pollock of 20 pounds or better. Mike also caught the second largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. There wasn't another fish even close to 10 pounds to weigh today. Dan Zumpano (CT) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather was beautiful at the dock before the trip and beautiful on the fishing grounds. The wind blew out of the northeast at five to ten knots producing a light chop of a foot or less. The sky was sunny until the ride home when it started to rain. It poured rain the whole ride back, ending just as they reached the gate at Perkins Cove. The air temperature was warm. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze.

The fishing was very good but the catching was a little on the slow side this evening. Only one legal fish was landed, a cusk. Sub-legals only included twelve cod. They also caught four sculpins and a sea raven. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait.

Sean Hurley (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4.5 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 2 pound sub-legal cod caught by George Appleman (NY). Ryan Hurley (CT) and Todd LesPerance (ON) tied for third with fish of 1.5 pounds. Both were sub-legal cod. D. J. McCarthy (NH) landed the hard luck award for being constantly robbed of bait.

Thursday, August 7, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at ten knots, the sky was mostly clear and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. The sky was mostly sunny in the morning. After noon, thunder showers appeared and brought rain but very little rain. We had a dry slot between 1:30 PM and 3:00 PM and then more showers, lightning and thunder. Light showers were intermittent into the evening. The high air temperature was very comfortable at 76F today. Winds were very light, northwest in the morning and southwest in the afternoon. The ocean along the shore was calm. The visibility was good except in dense showers.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at very light speeds, calm and then southwest in the afternoon. The ocean was calm all day over short swells of two to three feet. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The tide was moderate. The air temperature was warm. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 70.2F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 79F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 75F (with a low of 51F).

The fishing was very good. The catching was good or very good overall. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were cod, by far. Legal landings also included two haddock, fourteen pollock, seven cusk and two mackerel. There were twenty-three sub-legal haddock and fourteen dogfish released. Drifting was the only boating method employed. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Ian couldn't determine who was high hook. Ken McLaughlin (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. He caught this very early in the trip and it remained the biggest fish until the end. Geno Kilchewski (VT) caught the second largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. Robert Abbott (ON) landed the third largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. Moe Melville (NJ) landed the hard luck award for getting not a single fish out of those who attended the trip as anglers.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. It was pouring rain when they left the dock to head to the fishing grounds. We had a full boat of anglers who had planned to go but the thunder, rain and lightning reduced the POB count to less than half. There was no wind. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less. They never got another drop of rain after they left the dock. Small storm cells went by but not near enough to give them any precipitation. The sky, therefore, was a mix of sun and clouds. The current was moderate. The air temperature was mild/warm (a fallish feel to it). The visibility ranged around fifteen miles in haze.

The fishing was good, catching good and landings were fair but many didn't want to take fish home. So landings were actually perfect. The caught mostly sub-legal cod, pollock and redfish. Landings included six cusk, three cunners, a squirrel hake and six sculpins. One haddock was caught and released. Drifting was the method. All bait was used.

Rich Molczyk (MA) was high hook with two cusk. One weighed 4.5 pounds. The other weighed 4.25 pounds. Seven year old Matthew Barron (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.75 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 6.5 pound cusk caught by Larry Barron (NY). Jack O'Sullivan (NY) caught the third largest fish, a 5 pound cusk.

Other Angler Highlights: Ten year old Molly O'Sullivan (NY) caught a 4.5 pound cusk, her best fish. Fay Kun (PA) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines.

There were several people who gave donations supporting my cancer involvement with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those wonderful people and their donations included Matthew & Justine Riegel (NJ) for $50.00, Lou & Barb Carangelo (MA) for $25.00, Weston Lord at Greenland Cove Cabins (someday I will take a vacation up there) for a generous $100.00 and Andy Rice (VT) for $50.00. Thank you for helping me make someone's life better against cancer. I appreciate this help very much.

Friday, August 8, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at ten knots, the sky was cloudless and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The sky remained cloudless until 11:00 AM. The deep blue sky was replaced with a few fair weather clouds after that. A rain shower hit Perkins Cove just before 4:00 PM. This was part of a string of showers that ran right over Ogunquit for the better part of an hour. Radar showed no rain to the northeast as far as Brunswick and no rain to the south as far as Gloucester, Massachusetts! It never rained again before 10:00 PM. I don't know what happened after that. The air temperature got up over 80F. There was very little wind of any direction. The visibility was very good over the ocean.

On the fishing grounds, the wind started out blowing out of the northwest at ten plus knots. Seas were chops of a foot or a bit more. The wind deceased all day leaving the ocean calm for the ride home. The air temperature was warm. The sky was clear and sunny for the trip. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility ranged to twenty or more miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 85F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 49F).

The fishing was not quite good; the current was a bit too strong and there were more dogfish than has been normal - just enough to be annoying. The catching/landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were cod, by far. Legal landings also included a few haddock, sixteen pollock, two cusk, a monkfish and a sculpin. Very few sub-legal haddock were caught today, which is a surprise. Eighteen dogfish were released. Drifting and anchoring were the boating methods. All terminal gear worked well as long as there was a cod fly involved.

Brian Miller (FL) or Evan Paghetti (MA) was high hook with over ten legal fish. Some of Brian's best fish included a 10 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock and a 10 pound cod. Some of Evan's fish included a 12.25 pound pollock, the third largest fish of the trip, an 11 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. Evan also tied for the boat pool for the largest fish with a 13 pound pollock. Garrett Settle (ME) also caught a 13 pound pollock to share in the winnings.

Other Angler Highlights: Dan Sanderson (MA) caught a 10.5 pound cod. Linn Elko (VT) landed a 10.5 pound cod. Bruce Beaupre (NH) caught a 10 pound pollock. Caleb Nix (MA) caught one of the largest haddock we have seen in a while weighing in at 6 pounds. David Elko (VT) did the same thing with another haddock exactly the same size at 6 pounds! Mike Snay (NH) landed the hard luck award for being the sole angler to not catch a legal fish!

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. It was raining again when they left the dock to head to the fishing grounds. But this time we didn't lose half our anglers. And it wasn't pouring rain. And it was evident that the rain was going to stop. On the grounds, it rained only briefly, once. The wind blew out of the south southwest at five knots or less. The ocean remained calm for the evening. The sky was sunny except for the short rain spell. The air temperature was warm (none of the cooling that was in place last evening). There was no tide (current). The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze except for the rain shower with about a half mile visibility.

The fishing/catching/landings were good to very good. And it was one of our best afternoon trips this season for legal fish. Most fish landed were cusk. Legal landings also included four cod and one mackerel. Many sub-legal pollock were released. Anchoring was the method. Everyone used bait.

Chet Krula (NY) was the fisherman of the evening. He was high hook with four legal. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound cusk. His second largest fish, a 6.5 pound cusk, was the second largest fish of the trip. The third largest fish was a 6 pound cod caught by Jim Makhoul (MO).

Other Angler Highlights: Oliver Page (QC) caught the first fish to be weighed, a 4 pound cusk. Alan Makhoul (MO) caught a 3.5 pound cod, his only legal fish. Tim Kasper (MA) caught a 4 pound cod. Paul Bentley (MA) landed a 3.5 pound cusk. Richard Page (QC) caught a 4 pound cod. Drew Tammelin (MA) boated a cusk of 3.25 pounds. Cody Gibbons (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting the most hang-ups on the bottom!

Saturday, August 9, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, there was no wind, the ocean was calm, the sky was cloudless and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. Ashore, there was very little wind. The ocean was like a pond, very flat with wind patches here and there among the calm patches. The sky was cloudless most of the morning, mostly sunny in the afternoon. The air temperature hit the high 70s. The visibility over the water was very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at light speeds creating wavelets in the morning. There was zero wind in the afternoon. The ocean went flat calm. The sky was sunny for the trip. The air temperature went from warm to hot; being on the boat was like sitting on a mirror in the sun! The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was better than twenty nautical miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 69.1F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 78F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 53F).

The fishing was good. But maybe it was too good. It was a perfect day for humans. But the bite was off and the fish were small. And the dogfish count was a little higher at nineteen. Most legal fish landed were small cod, not a one over 7.5 pounds. Landings also included six haddock, nine pollock, eleven cusk, two redfish and one squirrel hake. One wolffish was released. Drifting and anchoring were the boating methods. All terminal gear worked the same.

High hook was not discerned. Jon Whitney (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.5 pound wolffish. The second largest fish was an 8 pound pollock caught by Ralph Whitney (ME). Cody McPhee (ME) landed the hard luck award for having two reel failures in a row. 'Tis that time of year.

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. We had a light rain shower before the Bunny Clark left the dock. This was so brief as to have not even happened. It was perfect weather, other than the rain. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to eight knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less. The sky was sunny. The air temperature was warm. The tide was moderate. The visibility was about fifteen miles in haze.

The fishing and catching was excellent this evening. Landings were light, good if you included the mackerel. This night we broke a Bunny Clark record for the most haddock ever caught on an evening trip. The count was sixty-eight, give or take a fish. There were probably six or seven haddock that were almost long enough to keep. Most of them were sixteen to eighteen inches long. Legal fish included one cusk, one haddock, one whiting and fifty-three mackerel. Anchoring was the boating method. Bait and cod flies caught the most fish. One jig was tried and failed.

Ian didn't tell me who was high hook. This probably because of the mackerel. Matt Gibbons (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4.5 pound cusk. Ryan Lawn (NH) caught the second largest fish, a 3.25 pound haddock. Jamie Corbett (NY) landed the hard luck award for getting hit in the head with a sinker. Don't ask.

Former President George & Barbara Bush dined at Barnacle Billy's for lunch today. It was the first time I have seen them since last season. Some of their other guests included their daughter, Doro, and former Senator Alan Simpson (R-Wyoming). There were nine in the party. It was a little tough for the former President, I do believe - my perception only. But he would never admit it if it was. Certainly in his state of health it was a bit more problematic to be as comfortable there as he used to be in the past. They came by boat except for the former First Lady, who came by vehicle. They sat out on the deck near the flag pole. It was very enjoyable for me and our other lunch guests. My brother, Court, took a picture of the former Senator and I (This digital image - taken with my iPhone - appears on the left. The President was too busy with other photos at the time so I didn't bother him. I have to say that Senator Simpson had a wonderful personality. You can see why these people become so popular.

David & Barbara Winstanley (MA/ME) donated a generous $200.00 to sponsor me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, an 192 mile bicycle ride for the cancer fight. Thank you both so very much for your continued support. I do very much appreciate it!

Sunday, August 10, 2014

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the wind was blowing out of the north northwest at ten knots, the sky was cloudless (again) and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. The day turned out to be gorgeous. We had very light wind along the shore, calm seas, sunny skies and air temperatures into the high 70s. The visibility was good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north northwest at five knots in the early part of the trip, less than that for the rest of the day. The ocean was flat calm. The sky was clear/sunny. The air temperature was warm (not too warm). The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from five miles in heavy haze in the morning to unlimited visibility in the afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66.8F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 80F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 52F).

The fishing was very good. Catching was good. Landings were fair. Legal landings included three cod, twenty-one pollock, five haddock (out of twenty-three total) and three cusk. There were twelve dogfish caught and released. Drifting was the method. A jig & cod fly was the best combination for catching fish today.

High hook wasn't mentioned at the dock. Carly Callahan (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17 pound pollock. She caught this pollock as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 9 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The double is the Bunny Clark's six largest double keeper catch of the season. Actually, Carly ties with Liam Fahey (VT) who caught a double that included a 15 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock on a marathon trip in June. Captain Jared took a picture of Carly's prize. This digital image appears on the right. The guy in the background is Rich Callahan (CT), her father and veteran (excellent) Bunny Clark angler.

Lori Hogan (NH) caught the second largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. The third largest fish was 13 pound pollock caught by Brian Fernald (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Rich Callahan caught a 10 pound pollock, his biggest fish. His best fish was a 5 pound haddock, the largest haddock of the trip. Matt Lauvauskas (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock as well. Ryan Hogan (NH) landed the largest cod at 10.5 pounds. Cody Reeves (ME) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single legal fish, the only angler with that kind of success!

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather on the fishing grounds was so similar to the day trip it doesn't deserve a repeat here. The only difference was the wind direction which as out of the south southwest, very light, with a calm ocean.

The fishing and catching was very good. Landings were okay but a bit on the light side. There were a lot of sub-legal fish including quite a few pollock, cod and haddock. Legal landings included one cod, four cusk, a redfish, two cunners and three sculpins. The cunners and sculpins were not kept. Drift fishing and anchoring were the two boating methods. Everyone used bait - I believe.

Eleven year old Dylan Tetreault (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.5 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 7 pound cusk caught by Earl Klein (NY). Thirteen year old Ally Dejana (CT) caught the third largest fish, a 6.5 pound cusk.

Other Angler Highlights: Mike Jackson (CT) caught a 5 pound cusk. Hannah Jackson (CT) caught the only legal cod. It weighed 3.25 pounds. Mara Loschiavo (TX) landed the hard luck award for getting into the most tangles on an otherwise fairly tangle free evening.

After all the anglers had left, Jared did the customary engine check and found coolant in the bilge. Closer inspection found a head bolt with the cap snapped off. I had another one at the house but no torque wrench to turn it. We left this job for tomorrow at 5:00 AM.

Monday, August 11, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm, the sky was mostly clear and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. Ashore, it was a "111" day, as my father would call it. The air temperature was a perfect upper 70s beach day. The sky was clear, cloudless all morning. There was no wind to speak of. And the visibility was good in haze. It was a day I will be thinking of come February.

On the fishing grounds it was perfect as well. The air temperature was warm to hot. This was because the wind was so light from the southwest that it was like sitting on a mirror. The ocean was flat calm all day. The tide (current) was strong to moderate. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.5F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 84F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 86F (with a low of 59F).

The fishing was good; the current was really a bit too strong to call it any better than that. The catching (of all fish, legal or otherwise) was very good to excellent, the best day we have seen in a couple of weeks, at least. Most legal fish landed were cod and pollock, in that order. Landings also included thirteen haddock (out of a total of fifty-two caught) and ten cusk. Only two dogfish were caught. They drift fished and anchored. The jig and cod fly combination caught the most fish.

No one could say who was high hook. Steve LaPlante (CT) had over twenty legal, most of which he returned to the ocean alive and kicking. His largest fish was an 11.5 pound pollock. Ken McLaughlin (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. The second largest fish weighed 13 pounds. A tie. Dave Yerke (NY) caught a 13 pound cod, the largest cod of the trip, while Marco Morin (ME) caught a 13 pound pollock. Marco also caught two pollock of 10 pounds each.

Other Angler Highlights: Will McKay (ME) caught an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. Mike Mitchell (NH) also caught a pollock of 11 pounds as his best. Bob Ferguson (NY) did one better with a 12 pound pollock. Jack Judge (CT/ME) caught an 11.5 pound pollock. Don "Slim Zimm" Zimmerman (GA) boated a 10 pound pollock. He just couldn't catch Steve LaPlante in count or size. Ouch! Paul Huling (NH) landed an 11 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. He also landed the hard luck award after he got a hook in his arm. Captain Jared had to push the hook through and cut the barb off to get it out!

I received four donations supporting my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Those wonderful people and their donation amounts are as follows: Roberr Hunter (FL) for $25.00 in the form of an "egift" from the PMC web site, David C. Yerke (NY) for $30.00, Jack Judge (CT/ME) for $10.00 and Don "Slim Zimm" Zimmerman for $25.00. Yes, the event is over but cancer never sleeps and neither does the need to find new ways to cure it! Thank you all so much for your help.

Tim Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Alec Levine and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm, the sky was cloudless and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The fog rolled in around 6:00 AM. I was told that the fog hung around most of the morning before clearing out for good by early afternoon. The sky was a hazy overcast with some sun occasionally. The air temperature was warm but not as warm as it was on the Bunny Clark on the day trip.

The wind was light and variable on the ride to the fishing grounds. The ocean was calm. We went through a fog after leaving Perkins Cove. But we pushed out into the clear three miles later. The wind was light on the fishing grounds. After 10:00 AM, the wind left us altogether. The oceans surface was smooth as glass with what looked like a left over two foot chop from the southeast underneath. The tide (current) was very light, which surprised me with moon tides we have been having. The air temperature was very warm. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The sky was sunny until noon, mostly overcast after that. The surface water temperature reached a high of 69.8F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 82F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 57F).

The fishing was good. We had a few more tangles than is normal. We had several blue shark attacks where we lost gear and incurred more tangles. The catching good. Landings were good as well. Most legal fishing landed were pollock, by far. No other fish species came close. Landings also included eight cod, fifteen haddock, one redfish and three cusk. We released five dogfish and one wolffish back to the ocean alive. Anchoring worked the best despite what seemed like a perfect drift. Cod flies caught the most fish.

Dave Yerke (NY) was high hook with nine or more legal. His largest fish was an 11 pound pollock. Eddie Moore (MD) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15.5 pound pollock. He caught this as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 10 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! This is the Bunny Clark's eighth largest double of the season to date. Leo Vane (NY) caught the second and third largest fish. These fish included a 14 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock. Leo also caught the largest haddock at 5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Joe Pantrella (NJ) caught an 11 pound pollock, his best fish. Johan Halvorsen (ME) also boated an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. Julia Fairbanks (NY) caught the only wolffish. It weighed 7 pounds just before release. Remington Walls (MD) landed an 11 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Derek Bedard (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock. Arne Halvorsen (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock as well. It was the largest fish of the eight legal fish than Arne landed. Gill Bolduc (VA) landed the hard luck award for tangling lines. And he really wasn't that badly tangled. But he didn't have much for fish until the next to last spot where he caught a pollock over 10 pounds. I got the pollock in the boat for him but it flipped along the deck until its nose found a scupper hole, popped out the hole and floated away just out of gaff reach. That last situation cemented my resolve as to whom I was going to give the shirt!

Alec Levine and I ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. Winds were light out of the southeast (less than five knots) on the ride to the fishing grounds. Waves were small over a fairly flat ocean. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast to eight and ten knots leaving us with a one foot chop. The ride home saw southeast winds increase to almost fifteen knots sustained. Seas had increased to two feet by the time we reached the gate at Perkins Cove. The air temperature was warm, perfect. We had a very hazy sky with some sun but mostly a hazy overcast. The visibility might have been around ten miles or less.

The fishing was good at best with a moderate tide (current) running into the wind and more dogfish than we have seen on an evening trip in a while. These two factors promoted a higher degree of tangles than I had expected. The catching was good if you include dogfish and sub-legal haddock. We released thirty-two dogfish and twenty-three haddock. We also released four mackerel, fifteen small pollock, a sculpin, seven sub-legal cod and three sub-legal redfish. Landings included two haddock, a cod, one redfish and five mackerel. We anchored for two stops. Bait and cod flies caught all the fish.

Luke Dupuis (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4.25 pound cod. The second largest fish was a legal haddock caught by Darcy Clayton (NY) that was just shy of 3 pounds. There was a tie for third with two fish of 2.5 pounds each. One was a sub-legal cod caught by Shannon Toohey (RI). The other was a barely legal haddock caught by Jason Norman (ON). Incidentally, Bailey Norman (ON) had a legal cod that he brought to the surface and was in the process of "swinging it aboard" when it dropped off the hook, into the water and swam back to bottom unharmed. It looked to be around 4 pounds or so. Norm Dupuis (VT) landed the hard luck award for getting two backlashes of high quality. One was easy enough to remedy. The other I had to use the knife after ten minutes of minor frustration. All in good fun!

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

The trip today was canceled for lack of anglers. We had a few to start the week. But all bailed for this day when they heard the weather forecast. I certainly don't blame them.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the wind was out of the southeast at ten knots, we had a light rain falling, the sky was overcast and the visibility over the ocean was fair to poor in fog, haze and precipitation. It rained all day. This wasn't a steady rain. At times it stopped raining. But there were other times when it poured. Between 6:00 PM and 9:00 PM, we had torrential rains where streets became flooded and water rolled over side walks. By 10:30 PM, it was just about over for the day and following morning. The wind blew out of the southeast or east southeast at twenty to thirty knots, hardest after 6:00 PM. The air temperature may not have cracked the 70 mark. I didn't look at a thermometer. The visibility over the ocean was not very good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 61F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 69F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 66F (with a low of 60F).

I spent most of the day working at the restaurant. In the morning, I had to drive to Portland to drop off a starter at Kaza Autoelectric to have Mike rebuild it for me. This was the broken one that Skip Dunning removed from the Bunny Clark the Sunday that I was in Provincetown, Massachusetts with the Pan-Mass Challenge. I also picked up some head bolts that I had ordered from NEDDA (Power Products) while I was in Portland.

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the wind was blowing out of the west at fifteen knots, the sky was crystal clear and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. The wind remained a bit breezy from the west or northwest all day. Wind speeds were probably no more than fifteen knots. But it seemed like more as every day (except yesterday, of course) has been so calm. The air temperature got up into the mid 70s. The visibility was very good.

On the fishing grounds, the salient feature was the larger than normal ground swell. Ian had sea readings of six to ten feet, big long rolling swells. These swells diminished to four and six feet by the time they were ready to leave the grounds. The wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots with a one to two foot chop on top of the swells. It was not the most comfortable day but it wasn't bad for those who go often. The air temperature was warm. The sky was nearly cloudless all day. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged over twenty miles or excellent. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61.2F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 77F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 49F).

The fishing or the conditions for fishing were just fair. The strong tide, big seas and wind had to have a negative affect on the catch. And this could be seen by the low cod & haddock numbers. The catching was surprisingly good. Landings were good overall or better than that for certain anglers. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirteen cod, two haddock and five cusk. No dogfish were caught and only eight sub-legal haddock were caught. They anchored and drift fished, drifting worked the best. The jig and fly combination worked the best today.

Ray Vallaincourt (OH) or David Yerke (NY) were high hook. It was one or the other and Ian couldn't tell me who. And if you asked one of them, he would tell you the other! Dave Yerke won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19.5 pound pollock. This is the largest pollock that has been caught on the Bunny Clark this season to date. The second largest fish was a 12 pound pollock caught by Steve Segal (CA). Steve also caught a 10.25 pound pollock. Ken McLaughlin (ME) had the third largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock. He landed seven legal in all today.

Other Angler Highlights: Ray Vallaincourt caught a 10.25 pound pollock and a 9 pound cod, his two best fish. Bill Socha (NH) also caught a 9 pound cod, the largest cod of the trip (with Ray's). Bill's largest fish was a 10 pound pollock. Cal Erickson (NH) succumbed to higher than normal swells and spent the day in the Hotel Bunny Clark. For this he was awarded "the shirt".

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather was perfect when they left the dock. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to, later, five knots. Seas were chops of a foot over sea swells ranging from two to four feet. The air temperature was warm. The sky was clear. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was excellent.

The fishing was much better than the morning trip. The surface water conditions very good and the current wasn't nearly as bad. The catching was very good overall. Landings were fair. Legal fish landed included three cusk, five mackerel and two cunners. There were many sub-legal pollock, nine sub-legal cod and ten sub-legal redfish caught. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait.

Bailey Noel (NH) was the fisherman of the evening. He was high hook with two legal. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound cusk. He also caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 6.25 pound cusk. The third largest fish was a 3.75 pound cusk caught by Brandon Jones (NY). Mike Pote (VA) and Luke Barcroft (NY) tied for the hardest luck of the trip. Both were equally sea sick.

I received a generous $150.00 donation from Marc & Claire St. Onge (ME) sponsoring me in my ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thank you both so very much for your continued support. I very much appreciate the help!

Friday, August 15, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, there was no wind, the sky was overcast, the road was wet and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. The morning remained overcast with peeks at the sun occasionally. To the south you could see blue sky. This blue sky eventually arrived after lunch. The air temperature hung around the low 70s. In fact, at 3:30 PM it was exactly 70F. The wind blew out of the west at ten knots along the shore. The visibility was very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots or less. The ocean was calm for the whole trip under long sea swells of three to five feet. The intervals between swells ranged from eight to ten seconds. The sky was overcast in the morning and clear after noon. The tide (current) was very strong. The visibility was twenty-five miles or better. The air temperature was warm. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.5F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 75F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 50F).

The fishing was tough with the very strong current. However, not a single dogfish was seen. And, although the swells were a negative factor in the fishing, they were not nearly as big and bad as they were yesterday. The tide made up for it. The catching was good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included eighteen cod, three haddock and one cusk. They drift fished and anchored. Drifting was the best. Jigs and cod flies (combination) worked the best for boating legal fish.

Mark Hesselink (NJ) was high hook with twelve legal. His largest fish was a 13.25 pound pollock, a tie for the third largest fish of the trip. He also caught the best double keeper catch of trip with 10.5 pound pollock and a 9 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Peter Volkernick (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock caught by Mike Parent (ME). Will LaRose (ME) tied with Mark Hesselink for third in size. Will's fish was also a pollock of 13.25 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Giuffre (CT) caught a 12 pound pollock, his largest fish. Sean Piel (CT) landed an 11.5 pound pollock. Peter Grant (ME) caught a 12 pound pollock, his biggest fish of the trip. Martha Hesselink (NJ) caught an 11.5 pound pollock. This might be the biggest pollock she has ever caught. Matt Giuffre (CT) caught an 11 pound pollock. Larry Gill (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines.

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather at the dock was a bit breezy from the west, fifteen knots or so. On the fishing grounds, the wind also blew out of the west but not as strong. Wind speeds never broached any more than ten knots. The seas were chops of a foot over a three foot long rolling sea swell. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze.

The fishing/catching was good. The current made the fishing no better than that. Landings depended on fish preference. Most legal fish caught were mackerel. Only six anglers were using cod flies. But those six anglers caught almost fifty-five mackerel, fifty of which were released alive. I love to eat mackerel. And I love to freeze them for bait when the dogfish aren't around. But it's customer preference first. And their preference was to let them go. Landings also included one cusk, a redfish and two squirrel hake. A few sub-legal cod, redfish and pollock were also caught. Anchoring was the method. A jig caught the largest fish, flies caught most of the mackerel and bait caught the rest.

Ken Meade (NJ) caught the largest fish, a 5.75 pound cusk. He did not get in the boat pool. Blake Alois (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a .75 pound mackerel. Cecilia Meade (NJ) caught a third largest fish, a .5 pound redfish. Ryan Egan (MA) landed the hard luck award with a pretty good backlash in his reel.

Dawn Beckwith (ME) contributed $50.00 to help sponsor me in my cancer ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. She is a peach, just a wonderful person. Both Dawn & Sally have supported me every year in my quest for a cancer free world. And this I appreciate very much. The belief, support and the hope is what drives this bus. And they are a true example of what keeps it "between the poles". Thanks so much.

Saturday, August 16, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots, the sky was mostly overcast and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. The sky was mostly sunny today after a bit of overcast in the early morning. The wind blew out of the west at ten to fifteen knots in the morning, less in the afternoon. The air temperature was warm (mid 70s mostly). The visibility was very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots in the morning. Seas were chops of two feet. After noon, the wind dropped to five to ten knots out of the southwest with a one foot chop. They did have a ground swell today. But it was only two to three feet. The air temperature was warm. The sky was sunny in the morning, overcast in the afternoon. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility was very good at least, over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61.2F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 78F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 75F (with a low of 50F).

The fishing/catching was good. Landings were also good. Tangles kept the fishing from getting any better. And, of course, that also affected landings. This all caused by the stronger than normal current. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. legal landings also included eighteen cod, one haddock and one white hake. The white hake was our first "August hake" this season. They released one wolffish, seven dogfish and a few small cod, haddock and pollock. Drifting and anchoring were the methods. The jig and fly combo did the best.

Eddie Agoes (NH) was high hook with more fish than he could count. And I don't know what this means. His largest fish was a 14.5 pound pollock, the second largest fish of the trip. He also caught an 11.5 pound pollock before that. Andy White (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 22 pound white hake. This hake was 3 pounds shy of making the weight for a Maine state trophy. Andy also caught the largest cod of the trip at 12.5 pounds. Bob Foley (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 13 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Andrew Martin (NH) caught two pollock of 10 pounds each. Ryan McCrea (VT) landed a pollock just a bit larger at 10.5 pounds, his largest fish. Andrew Evans (VT) caught an 11 pound pollock, his best. Tim Forrett (VT) landed a 10.5 pound pollock. Steve Collins (VT) caught a 12 pound pollock. Matt Sund (VT) boated an 11 pound pollock. Mike St. Amand (MA) landed the hard luck award for being the lone hurler.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather at the dock was warm with the sun showing through a smurry sky. The wind was light, probably from the west. On the fishing grounds, the wind was very light out of the southwest at first. There was no wind after a while. The ocean was calm. The sky was a mix of sun and overcast. The air temperature was warm. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate.

The fishing was good as was the catching and landings. Most legal fish landed were cusk and mackerel, any amount of mackerel could have been caught this evening had they targeted them. Legal landings also included two cod. There were many sub-legal pollock returned to the ocean. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait and cod flies exclusively.

Wally Lennox (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.5 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 6.5 pound cusk caught by Jeff Valley (VT). Wes LaPoint (PA) boated the third largest fish, a 6.25 pound cusk. He also caught a cusk of 4.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Tory Hanna (MA) caught the first fish to be weighed, a 3 pound cusk. She also was the only angler to succumb to the dreaded mal de mer. For this she also landed the hard luck award t-shirt! Thirteen year old Adam Driscoll (NH) caught the largest cod of the evening at 5 pounds. Sam Dufour (QC) caught a 4 pound cusk. David Slater (MA) caught the only other cod. It weighed 4 pounds. Travis Hopkins (MA) caught a 4 pound cusk, his best fish.

Deborah McDonnell (MA) sponsored me with a donation of $50.00 for my ride for a cancer cure with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thank you so much, Deb. I very much appreciate it! She too is an annual donor.

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, there was no wind, the sky was partly cloudy and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, the sky was mostly cloudy today with sun about a third of the time. At 2:00 PM it rained for fifteen or twenty minutes. It didn't even look like it was going to rain. By 3:00 PM, most of the clouds had moved out to sea and the sky became sunny. It remained mostly sunny for the rest of the day. The air temperature hovered around the 70s but it felt much warmer in the sun. The wind was out of the west northwest most of the day. I don't believe it blew over ten knots. The visibility was good to very good all day except in the precipitation.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to eight knots. Seas were chops of a foot. The air temperature was mild, not as warm as it has been. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility was very good, over twenty miles. The sky was sunny and clear until they ran into the rain about half way back to Perkins Cove. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61.7F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 81F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 53F).

The fishing was good, no better because of the current. Tangles certainly put a damper on the landings. Catching/landings were fair to good. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Landings also included twelve cod, eight cusk, three redfish and fourteen haddock. There were twenty-two sub-legal haddock, one wolffish and five dogfish released. They anchored and drift fished. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Doug Frazier (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 9 pound cod caught by Sonny Witham (ME). John Russell (ME) caught the third largest fish, an 8 pound pollock. Mike Sorrentino (NY) landed the hard luck award for getting tangled a little too often.

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather at the dock was beautiful with a westerly breeze blowing. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew lightly out of the north. The ocean was calm. The air temperature was warm. The visibility was very good.

The fishing was good. The catching was also good for a variety of species. Legal fish caught included a cod, a whiting, seven squirrel hake, three cunners and seven mackerel. The only species that were kept included a cod, a mackerel and the whiting. There were also a few sub-legal cod and sub-legal pollock caught. They drift fished and anchored. Mostly bait was used, some cod flies (mackerel killers).

Allen Cooper (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4.5 pound cod. He caught this as part of a double with another cod on the same line. The other cod was sub-legal. Jared didn't weigh any other fish this evening. James Brausag (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines. It's a good thing when none of the passengers get sea sick!

Monday, August 18, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the wind was out of the west at ten knots, the sky was mostly cloudy and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, it turned out to be a beautiful sunny day. And for the first time in two weeks we didn't have a single rain shower at any point during the day. The clouds blew away early and left us a beautiful, warm (mid 70s), sunny and clear day. There was very little wind ashore today as well.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at ten to five knots in the morning and then hauled out of the northwest at ten to five knots. The ocean was left with a maximum chop of a foot or less. The sky was sunny all day. The air temperature was warm. The current had dropped to the moderate category. The visibility was very good or over twenty nautical miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.5F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 79F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 49F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was very good today. It would have been excellent but you needed just that little bit of extra expertise. The fish weren't committing suicide but there were plenty around if you knew what you were doing. Most legal fish landed were cod, by far. Landings also included forty-one pollock, nine haddock, fourteen cusk and one mackerel. Twenty-six sub-legal haddock were released along with four dogfish. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies as a combination worked the best by far.

Ray Westermann (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish any angler had caught on a Bunny Clark trip in a month or more. His largest fish was a 10 pound pollock. Ken Carter (ME) was second hook with four fish behind Ray. Matt Carter (ME) was one fish behind Ken for third hook. Matt caught the best double of the day, a 9 pound cod and a 9 pound pollock, both caught on the same line at the same time. His largest fish was a 10.25 pound pollock.

Caleb Carter (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock. Matt Austin (ME) and Jake Gardner (ME) tied for the second largest, both with 11 pound fish. Matt's was an 11 pound cod. Jakes was an 11 pound pollock. Tim Shorey (ME) landed the hard luck award for losing two jigs and for getting the most tangled lines.

I received two donations supporting my involvement in fund raising for cancer research with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was an early morning donation of $40.00 from an old friend, Joshua Tobey (PA), who has been fighting melanoma for years - and winning! The other was a generous $100.00 donation from Captain Ed Snell who owns a charter boat business that leaves out of Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine. And, yes, they go deep sea fishing as well. And Ed is a good voice for the angler on fishery management issues. Anyway, thank you both for believing as I do about the Jimmy Fund and the fight against cancer. And, of course, thank you very much for the support!

Tim Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Alec Levine and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, there was no significant wind, the ocean was calm, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. The wind was light from the northwest as we rode to the fishing grounds. The ocean was calm, the sky was clear, the air temperature was warm and the visibility was very good. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north northwest. But it was hardly significant, only creating a wind slick on the surface. This wind died well before noon and left the ocean glassy. After noon, we had very light southwest wind, again, just a ripple on the calm ocean surface. The sky was nearly cloudless for the trip. The air temperature remained warm, almost too warm. The tide (current) was moderate or slightly more than that. The visibility was thirty miles or better. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.8F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 49F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 74F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 44F).

The fishing was good. There were very few dogfish (eight total), the lines had only a slight angle and the weather was perfect. The catching of legal fish was fair; certainly not one of my better trips. Most legal fish landed were cusk, by far. Legal landings also included five pollock, five cod and eight haddock. between sixteen and twenty-three sub-legal haddock were returned. We drift fished and anchored. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Angelo Sousa (ME) was high hook with eight legal. His largest fish was an 8.5 pound cusk, the largest cusk of the trip and the third largest fish of the trip. He also caught another cusk of 6.5 pounds. Benoit Poirier (QC) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish of the trip, a 13 pound pollock. He caught this as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 11 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Not only that, his double included the first two fish landed on the boat this day and remained that way for at least ten minutes. The 11 pounder was the second largest fish of the trip. His double is the fourteenth largest double keeper catch of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date! He never caught another legal fish for the rest of the trip.

Other Angler Highlights: Kristine Anderson (IA) caught the fourth largest fish of the trip, a 7.5 pound cusk. Rachel Lavallee (VT) landed the hard luck award for attracting the most other lines around hers!

Alec Levine and I ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. Winds were light out of the south southwest when we left the gate to head to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the south. The wind speed was eight knots or less with seas less than a foot. We couldn't discern a ground swell. The air temperature was warm. The sky was very clear; almost no clouds. The current was light. The visibility was better than twenty-five miles.

The fishing/catching was good overall. Landings were good. The legal count included a cod, five haddock, five redfish, a cusk and seven mackerel. We released a few mackerel, twenty sub-legal haddock, three sub-legal cod, two wolffish, twenty dogfish, a couple of redfish and a blue shark. Anchoring was the method. Everyone used bait and cod flies.

Brian Fudge (NV) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.5 pound wolffish. This was his first ever wolffish because it was his first deep sea fishing trip! It was the last fish to come over the rail. The second largest fish was a 6.5 pound wolffish caught by Brandon Yeager (PA - no relation to Chuck). Just before he was to pull it over the rail, it was hit by a blue shark that gutted it, effectively ending its life! Brandon also caught a 3.9 pound cusk. The third largest fish was a 4 pound cod caught by Andrew Thorson (MA).

Other Angler Highlights: Joe Meagher (NH) landed two legal haddock and quite a few small haddock. His two legals weighed 2.8 pounds and 3.6 pounds. Steve Bucciero (NY) caught a 2.5 pound legal haddock. Andrew Sullivan (MA) caught a haddock that was gutted by dogfish. Even without the guts it weighed 3 pounds! Seven year old Thomas Schlegel (NH) landed the hard luck award for being the only angler to lose a rig. He lost it to an 150 pound blue shark that he was inches from seeing before parting it off. It was the same blue shark that hit Brandon's wolffish. And the shark was wearing the jewelry (fly, hook & sinker) that was donated by Thomas!

Benoit Poirier (QC) contributed $25.00 to help me in the cancer fight with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One hundred percent of his donation will go to the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute to fight cancer; none of it going to administrative costs. Thanks so much, Ben. It was nice having you all aboard!

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, there was no wind, the ocean was calm, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The ocean along the shore stayed flat calm all day. There wasn't a breath of wind. The air temperature was a pleasant 75F (more or less) all day. The sky was clear and sunny. The visibility was very good at least.

On the fishing grounds, there wasn't much wind. The ocean was flat as a pancake all day long. And this made the air temperature hot in the sun on this mirror of an ocean. The sky was clear all day and very sunny. The tide (current) was very light. The visibility ranged to over twenty-five miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.8F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 74F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 48F).

The fishing was good. There were still more tangles than they wanted. And there were a few more dogfish today than yesterday. The catching of legal fish was good, particularly for those who knew how to wield a jig stick and jig. Landings included mostly pollock, by far. Legal fish also included three cod, eight haddock and two white hake. Drifting was the only option today as there was no movement over the bottom. Cod flies caught the most fish.

Russell Mott (ME) was high hook with eight legal with Ken McLaughlin (ME) right behind him with nearly the same number of legal fish. Ken caught the largest haddock of the trip with a 6 pounder. Russell caught a 10 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound white hake. Elizabeth Fagan (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. The second and third largest fish were both pollock of 12 pounds and both caught by Steve Maxfield (VT).

Other Angler Highlights: Alyssa Garvin (MA) caught an 11.5 pound pollock, her largest fish, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Greg Porcello (CT) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, his best. Sam Porcello (CT) caught one just a bit larger at 11 pounds. Travis Gilbert (ME) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single legal fish. And he also had his share of tangles (plural).

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather was perfect at the dock. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at less than five knots. The ocean was calm. The sky was clear. The air temperature was warm to mild (the ride back). The tide was moderate to none. The visibility was about fifteen miles in haze.

The fishing was good as was the catching. Landings of groundfish were poor but there were plenty of mackerel that no one seemed to want. Legal groundfish landings included one cusk. Eleven sub-legal cod, six sub-legal redfish and fourteen sub-legal pollock were returned alive. Twelve mackerel were released. No dogfish were seen. Drifting was the method. Anglers used bait and cod flies.

Tom Villamaino (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 2.2 pound sub-legal cod caught by Pino Ragonese (NY). He also caught a 1.5 pound sub-legal cod. Scott Bishop (NY) and Brad Gould (NY) shared third place, each catching their own 2 pound sub-legal cod. Larinda Bishop (NY) captured the hard luck award for showing up on the Bunny Clark with all New York Yankees clothes. Ian thought that she needed a new shirt!

We entertained former President George H. W. Bush and his son, Marvin, Marvin's wife, Margaret, and friends (and Secret Service) at the restaurant today. It's always good to see the former President. And he was concerned about my mother. We talked about that for a while.

When the Bunny Clark showed up at the dock between trips, I changed out the starter solenoid. Turns out that that was another problem, the reason I had to change out the previous starter. By the time the season is done I should have the engine right where I want it!

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, there was no wind, the ocean was calm, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, the ocean was flat calm. There was very little wind, if any, all day. At dawn the sky started to cloud over. The sky was overcast by 7:00 AM. The sky remained overcast for the rest of the day. We had light spitting rain after 9:30 AM. But there wasn't even enough rain to notice it on the road. And it certainly wasn't enough for a rain jacket. At 2:00 PM, however, it did start to rain heavy enough to notice it on the road. The rain lasted ten minutes (more or less) and really wasn't much. The air temperature hovered above the 70F mark. The visibility was very good at least.

On the fishing grounds, the wind light and variable in direction. The ocean was flat calm. The sky showed them a mix of sun and clouds. And we could see the blue sky to the east from the shore but it never reached us. The air temperature was warm. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles or more in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 54F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 72F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 51F).

The fishing was good. The catching less so. It wasn't that there weren't fish. The bite just wasn't as good as it looked like it should have been for the numbers of fish showing on the sounding machine. But then calm weather in August has never really led me to believe the bite was going to be good. Just the opposite. And there are exceptions to every rule. Most legal fish landed were cusk. Legal landings also included three cod, nine pollock, eight mackerel and thirteen haddock. There were over a hundred haddock caught today, most sub-legal, of course. Eighteen dogfish and one wolffish were released alive. Drifting was the method; there wasn't enough current to do anything else. All terminal gear was equal in fish popularity today.

Ian didn't tell me who was high hook. This was probably because there was no one with eight legal today. But I don't know this for sure. Catie Lesniak (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. The second and third largest fish were both caught by Alex Gedmintas (NY) as a double keeper catch. He fish included a 13.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. This is the Bunny Clark's fourteenth largest double keeper catch of the season to date.

Other Angler Highlights: Steven Marra (CT) boated a 9 pound pollock, his largest fish. Bob Retzke (IL) landed the hard luck award for being involved in the most tangled lines.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather was as it had been with no wind, flat calm along the shore, overcast skies, no rain and an air temperature of 70F. On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction. The ocean was flat calm. The air temperature was warm. There was no current. The sky was partly overcast. The visibility was very good.

The fishing was very good because of the conditions and the lack of dogfish. The catching was good but it was mostly sub-legal fish including ten cod and eight pollock. Nearly one hundred mackerel were caught with over seventy-five released. Landings included fifteen mackerel and one cusk. Drifting was the method. Only bait and cod flies were used.

Scott Wescott (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.5 pound cusk. Rick Pickard (ON) and Jeff Macey (NY) tied for the second largest fish of the evening, both with sub-legal cod of 1.5 pounds each. Fred Brooks (MA) landed the hard luck of the evening award for losing a cusk a foot from the surface. That's half of all the legal groundfish gone at the turn of a hook!

Kevin Andros (CT) contributed $25.00 to help my fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thanks so much, Kevin. I appreciate the support!

Friday, August 22, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the wind was light out of the northeast, the sky was overcast and the visibility over the ocean seemed very good. Ashore, except for a couple brief peeks at the sun, it was overcast all day. It never did rain. The wind blew out of the northeast at ten to twelve knots. The wind off the water right directly on the shore made it cooler in the coastal areas than it was five or six miles inland. There was almost a ten degree difference between the two areas. The air temperature stayed right around 67F. The visibility was very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east northeast at ten or twelve knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet, three feet after noon. The air temperature was mild. The sky was overcast. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was about fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.9F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 72F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 69F (with a low of 56F).

The fishing/catching (landings) was good overall, maybe better than that. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included two haddock, thirteen cod and two mackerel. They didn't have nearly the number of sub-legal haddock that they had yesterday. Drifting and anchoring was the method. Anchoring worked the best. Cod flies caught the most fish.

Thirteen year old John Keniston (ME) was the fisherman of the day. He probably tied for high hook with Jim Higgins (ME); they both caught a lot of legal fish. And John caught the largest fish of the trip, a 16 pound pollock. Ian took a picture of John's fish. The digital image appears on the left. This is the largest pollock that John has ever caught. It may also be the largest fish that John has ever caught. He was not in the boat pool. John also caught a pollock of 12 pounds. Jim caught two pollock of 12 pounds each, his two largest fish. Christine Munsey (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. She caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! The third largest fish was a 14 pound pollock caught by Jared Keniston.

Other Angler Highlights: Terence Keating (VT) caught an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. Tracey Higgins (ME) landed the hard luck award for being the highest of a few hurlers.

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather was still overcast but the wind had dropped since the morning when they left the dock. There was still a bit of a larger than normal sea that they had to contend with on the way to the fishing grounds. That got some anglers started on the road to the dreaded mal de mer. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at 10 knots to five knots and then calm. The sea state started at two foot chops but ended up smoothing out somewhat before they got back through the gate into Perkins Cove. The air temperature was mild. The sky remained overcast. The current was moderate. The visibility was over fifteen miles in some haze.

The fishing/catching (landings) was good overall. Most legal fish landed were cusk. Legal landings also included nineteen mackerel and two cunners. They released a few mackerel besides and a lot of sub-legal pollock. Anchoring was the method. And the meaning of the method was clear. (Take that Nietzsche!) Everyone used bait. Some added a cod fly to the mix. The mackerel were savage on the cod flies.

Alain LaFerriere (QC) was high hook with three legal including two cusk of 5 pounds each. His two larger cusk tied for the third largest fish of the trip. Zack Havens (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.25 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 6 pound cusk caught by A. J. Havens (NY). Andy Havens (NY) tied Alain with a 5 pound cusk for the third largest fish.

Other Angler Highlights: Chris Parks (NY) caught a cusk of 4.5 pounds. Tim Habernig (NY) caught the largest cunner we have seen in a while weighing in at 1.5 pounds. Chad Havens (NY) earned high hurler status for the hard luck award. More than half of the anglers aboard this evening were sea sick.

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston hosted the Louis DiLeo (NJ) full day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the wind was light out of the north, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore it was cloudy most of the morning, clear and sunny in the afternoon. The wind blew out of the northeast at ten to twelve or more knots in the early part of the daylight hours. It hauled out of the east late morning. The wind died out after 2:00 PM. The air temperature was in the 60s most of the day. It could have been higher than that in the afternoon. The visibility was very good at least.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten knots minimum with seas in chops of two to three feet. The wind dropped all day to the point where there was no wind when they got back to Perkins Cove. The sky was overcast in the morning, clear in the afternoon. The air temperature was warm. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was excellent. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 72F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 73F (with a low of 54F).

The fishing was good as was the catching of legal fish. Most legal fish landed were cod, by far. Legal landings also included a haddock, eleven pollock, two redfish, two mackerel and three cusk. Only eleven sub-legal haddock were caught. Eight dogfish were released. Drifting and anchoring were the methods. All terminal gear worked well.

Park Smith (NJ) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with over ten legal. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. His second largest fish was a 10 pound cod. The second and third largest fish were both caught by Anthony Maiorana (NJ) as a double keeper catch. His catch included two pollock, both exactly 10.25 pounds each, caught on the same line at the same time!

Other Angler Highlights: Mike DiLeo (NJ) was the bachelor for whom this party was thrown. His largest fish was an 8.5 pound cod, the second largest cod of the trip (most of the cod were small markets today). Ian presented him with the hard luck award to help him into his new life as a married man!

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather was beautiful and calm when they left the dock to head for the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction. The ocean was calm. The sky was clear. The air temperature was warm turning to mild. The visibility was a little hazier than the morning giving them a max of fifteen miles. The current was moderate to none.

The fishing/catching of legal fish was good, probably our best afternoon trip of the season. Most legal fish landed were cusk, by far. Legal landings also included sixteen mackerel (a few were released), four whiting, one squirrel hake and three redfish. Nine sub-legal cod and eighteen sub-legal pollock were released. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait and cod flies. No jigs were used.

Louie Koulouris (NY) and Dan Mussen (NY) tied for high hook with three or more legal fish each. Dan was really the fisherman of the evening as he also won the boat pool for the largest fish with either of his two largest fish, a 7 pound cusk and a 6.5 pound cusk. Louie caught the third largest fish, a 6.25 pound cusk.

Other Angler Highlights: Avery Mussen (NY) caught a 6 pound cusk. Noelle Mussen (NY) landed a 5.5 pound cusk, her largest fish. Dan Nowell (ME) caught a 4.5 pound cusk. Ken Wachowicz (NY) also caught a 4.5 pound cusk. Bill LaVoie (ME) caught a 4 pound cusk. All the other cusk that were caught weighed in at 4 pounds or less. Mike Geller (ME) landed the hard luck award getting hung on bottom, getting a hell of a backlash by releasing the eccentric lever, losing his gear and getting sea sick. Ouch! Not Mike's best fishing trip!

Part of my training for the Pan-Mass Challenge involves riding all year round. One of the best rides I do is the "Annual K-Port to Massachusetts Labor Day Century". This I do with friends who I have known over the years. Today was the day. I rode to Kennebunkport, met the rest of the riders and we all headed south. The ride stops twice at Barnacle Billy's, once on the way down and at the end. I end up doing a bit more than 100 miles. This day my total was 119 miles. It is the most enjoyable ride of the year as we enjoy a comfortable pace, make various stops (breakfast and lunch included) and talk. Believe it or not, this tends to be one of my best workouts of the year as well. And it's not so much the miles we log as it is the spinning characteristics of the ride. At right is a shot of the five of us (from left to right: Ben, Brian, Howard, Andy and I). The shot was taken at 7:30 AM at Barnacle Billy's restaurant. I had put 31 miles on the bike at that point.

Sunday, August 24, 2014

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, there was just a skosch of wind out of the northwest, the ocean was flat, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was very good to excellent. Ashore, the air temperature was cool during the early daylight hours. The air temperature started to really warm up after noon. And by 2:00 PM it was over 80F. The sky was clear and sunny. The wind was very light. The ocean was calm. The visibility was very good to excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew lightly out of the northwest. The ocean was calm. The visibility was "unlimited". The sky was clear. The air temperature was warm. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 53F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 75F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 53F).

The fishing/catching of legal fish was good to very good. Landings were very good for one third of the anglers. It was good for most. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included sixteen cod, two haddock and two cusk. There were only seventeen sub-legal haddock returned. And eighteen dogfish were released as well. Drifting was the method. The jig and fly combination worked the best for catching fish.

Matt Freitas (MA) or one Bill Murphy's (NH) crew (Bill Murphy?) was probably high hook today. There was no way to know for sure except by the bags of fillets they brought off the boat. And that would only give you an idea. There was also another angler in the stern who could have been high hook but he was keeping his fish with a group. Regardless, it was very good for these anglers who caught the lion's share of the fish. Charlie McGee (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock caught by Jason McGee (ME). Patrick Kelley (CA) caught the third largest fish, a 13 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Jeremy Huston (ME) caught the largest cod of the day at 10 pounds. Marian "Merv" Murphy (NH) caught a 12 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock, her two biggest fish. And she caught quite a few legal fish. I did not get the count from her. And she would have known right down to the fish! Brian Murphy (NH), Merv's dory mate, didn't do as well with only three legal to his credit. It was the first time in two years, on all the trips he has attended on the Bunny Clark, that he hasn't been high hook. He just didn't have the mojo (He could have bought two for a buck but I guess he didn't think of that!). God does help those who help themselves! Brian's biggest fish was a respectable 10.5 pound pollock. Matt Freitas caught a 12 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Bill Murphy landed a 12 pound pollock, his best. Don Russell (NH) caught a 12 pound pollock. And Zach Freitas (MA) boated a 12 pound pollock as well. Tom "That Guy" Barden (ME) landed the hard luck award for being the most tangled. It got to the point when someone was asked who they were tangled with the reply was "That Guy"!

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather at the dock was beautiful with a very light westerly breeze blowing. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew lightly out of the southwest. The ocean was calm. The air temperature was warm. The visibility was better than ten miles in haze. The tide was light. The sky was clear and sunny.

The fishing was very good. Landings were poor. The catching of fish was fair overall. Most fish caught were sub-legal and no traditional groundfish were landed. Legal landings included three cunners and one mackerel (even the mackerel didn't bite). They did catch a few sub-legal pollock and four sub-legal cod. Drifting was the method. Bait only was used.

Cameron Clegg (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 1.5 pound cunner. Devin Cronin (CT) and Viny Bushee (VT) tied for the second largest fish with a 1 pound fish each. Devin's fish was a 1 pound pollock. Viny's was a 1 pound cunner. Viny also caught a cunner that weighed .75 pounds. Fourteen year old Dmitri Dutkewych (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled.

I received some very thoughtful donations from three sources today supporting my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Those people & their donations included Bill Murphy for $25.00, Brian & Marian Murphy for a generous $100.00 and Bill & Barbara Finkle (ME) for $25.00. Thank you all so very much for your contributions to the cause. I very much appreciate your kindness and generosity!

Monday, August 25, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, there was just a skosch of wind out of the northwest, the ocean was flat, the sky was cloudless and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze. Ashore, the weather was perfect, a perfect summer day. There was no wind all day. There was surf along the shore but just outside the surf was a very calm peaceful sea. The air temperature got up to 85F and yet didn't feel that warm in the shade along the coast. The sky was almost cloudless all day. The visibility was good to very good over the ocean.

On the fishing grounds, the wind was very light and variable in direction. The ocean was flat calm all day. Ken McLaughlin (ME) said it was almost too hot to fish in the afternoon. And I can believe it with the ocean like a mirror and air temperatures in the 80s. Ian said the air temperature was warm in the morning and hot after noon. The visibility ranged to twenty miles in some haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was nearly cloudless as it was ashore. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 85F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 81F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 53F).

The fishing was good. It was no better than that even though the weather conditions were excellent. This was mainly because they caught quite a few dogfish. The "dogs" created more tangles than normal and, of course, take the place of a nice eating groundfish. Landings were lighter than normal as a result. I would put the catching of legal fish in the fair to good category. Some anglers did well today while others did not. One angler only caught one legal fish. Most legal fish landed were pollock by far. Legal landings also included twenty-five cod, one haddock, six redfish, eleven cusk and a monkfish. Fifty-five sub-legal haddock were released and fifty-five dogfish were released as well. Drifting was the only method employed. All terminal gear worked equally well.

Rich Warner (ME) was high hook with eleven legal. His largest fish was a 10.25 pound pollock, the third largest fish of the trip. Tim Collins (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. He also caught the second largest fish, a 10.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Kevin Weisher (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, his best fish. Dean Wolf (NJ) also caught a 10 pound pollock as his largest fish. Gail Bergeron (MA) - I like anyone with the last name of Bergeron (It's a Bruins thing.) - landed the hard luck award for getting quite a few tangles. She was tangled but always "Just minding my own business". Actually, the shirt looked good on her!

Jim LeMay (ME) was on the boat today but Sparkling Jig Feather, from the northern tribe, was not.

Tim Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Alec Levine and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, there was no wind, the ocean was flat, the sky was cloudless and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good. We carried about eight knots of southerly wind on the ride to the fishing grounds. The wind was just rolling over a one foot chop. On the grounds, the wind hauled more out of the south southwest. The wind speed might have gotten up to fifteen knots. Seas were chops averaging two feet, this mainly because we had a tide (current) running up into the wind. The tide was moderate. The sky was cloudless (except over land) for the trip. The air temperature was warm (perfect with the wind). The visibility ran to almost exactly ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.1F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 85F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 56F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was good overall Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included two squirrel hake, six cod, a dogfish, eight haddock, three mackerel, five redfish and nine cusk. Forty-six sub-legal haddock were released along with twenty-five dogfish. We anchored on every spot. Cod flies caught the most fish.

I could not tell you who was high hook. But I don't believe anyone caught more than eight legal. Everybody seemed to catch two or three which got us into the "good" category, success on a collective basis. I do know that Mike Hayes (NY) caught the most dogfish. His count might have been as high as fifteen fish. No one else seemed to be bothered much by them, not like Mike!

Don Cheney (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. He also caught a pollock that weighed 10.5 pounds. Scott Wheeler (CT) caught the second and third largest fish of the trip. His largest was a 14 pound pollock, with which he had the boat pool lead for most of the day. His second largest fish was a pollock of 13.5 pounds. He also caught a pollock that weighed 10 pounds and another that weighed 10.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Ray Gilcris (VT) caught three nice fish including a 10 pound pollock, an 8.5 pound cusk and a 10.5 pound cusk. Mike Barton (NY) landed the best double keeper catch of the trip. His double included a 9.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Patrick Kelley (CA) landed a 12 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Russ O'Connell (NJ) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. He caught his pollock as part of a double with another pollock of 8.5 pounds. Dan Calcaterra (ME) landed a 12.5 pound pollock, the largest groundfish he has ever caught. Kris Guastamachio (NY) caught a 10.5 pound pollock. Jimmy Bradley (VT) landed a 10.5 pound cusk, a tie with Ray and one of our biggest eight cusk of the Bunny Clark season to date. Scott Adams (CT) caught our largest cod of the day at 10 pounds. Zack Van Derminden (NY) landed the hard luck award for being the first of two anglers to hurl today. He fished like a mad man all day, to his credit!

Alec Levine and I ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. Winds were light out of the south southwest and the air temperature was hot when we left the gate to head to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest to almost fifteen knots, maybe less. It was hard to say. Seas were chops of two feet with the occasional larger swell added to the mix. Whatever it was, mal de mer was prevalent throughout the Bunny Clark this evening because of the uneven seas. The air temperature was perfect with the breeze blowing, just warm. The sky was mostly clear and sunny. The visibility ranged to about ten miles in haze. The current was moderate.

The fishing was very good; line tended perfectly, the current was perfect on anchor and there were no dogfish. Landings were poor, the second worst afternoon trip I have probably ever taken. But, to my credit, the bluefish arrived yesterday and scared the mackerel away from the inshore area. When they do this, my experience has been that the groundfish bite shuts down as well. It couldn't be me, could it? For whatever reason, we could not tease a legal desirable groundfish off the bottom this evening. Legal landings included two squirrel hake. Sub-legal fish included two redfish, one cod and one pollock. Ouch! We anchored for three spots. No terminal gear held the answer I was looking for.

Holly Leonard (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a .5 pound squirrel hake. The largest fish was caught by Leonardo and, his son, 8.25 year old Julian Jafet (NY). Unfortunately, Julian hooked it but his father, who wasn't in the boat pool, reeled it in, disqualifying the two for the winnings. Their fish was a sub-legal cod of 1.5 pounds. The third largest fish was a .49 pound squirrel hake caught by Eric Jeffries (CT). Mark Hager (MA) caught the only other two fish (except for a tiny redfish) this evening. One was a bigger redfish than the tiny one and the other was a .25 pound pollock. The hook was bigger than the pollock! Ouch! Jessie Jafet (NY) landed the hard luck award for being the first one to hurl. And she was also the high hurler of the evening as well. I hope she got over her malady shortly after landing!

I received two donations supporting my addiction to fighting cancer with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a generous $70.00 contribution from Mike "Dogman" Hayes (NY) and the other was a donation of $25.00 from George & Janice Thaler (NJ). Thank you all so very much for feeding my habit. I hope to keep helping the Jimmy Fund for as long as I am able. I appreciate the sponsorship.

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was good at least. Ashore, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots. The sky was clear and sunny, the air temperature reached a high of 89F in Ogunquit and the visibility was good in haze. It was one of the warmest days of the summer.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots in the morning but increased to over fifteen knots in the afternoon. Seas were chops of two to three feet (more at times). The sky was hazy clear and sunny all day. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to over fifteen miles in haze. The air temperature was warm, perfect with the wind. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.9F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 88F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 91F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 63F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was good to very good overall. They had a slow start but a great finish. Most legal fish landed were cod, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-three pollock, one haddock, one redfish and eight cusk. All the largest fish were pollock. Thirty dogfish were released but only fourteen sub-legal haddock were released as well. They drift fished for the trip. The jig and fly combo worked the best.

Steve Levine (ME) was high hook with seventeen legal, most of which he released back to the ocean alive (the cod) or gave away. He didn't catch a fish of 10 pounds or better. Ken McLaughlin (ME) caught thirteen legal, mostly cod. There were other anglers who caught numbers between Steve and Ken. Max Macias, Jr. (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. He also tied for second/third place with a 12 pound pollock. Frank Wolfgang (ME) also caught a 12 pound pollock to tie with Max for second/third.

Other Angler Highlights: Marie Harding (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, her largest fish. John LaBrecque (ME) landed a 10.5 pound pollock. Justin Vaillancourt (NY) boated a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Ed Gschrey (NY) landed the hard luck award for attaining high/sole hurler status.

We didn't run an evening trip today.

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran our first fall marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 72F, there was no wind at the house but the buoys were giving light northerly winds, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was good at least. The wind was light from the north, the ocean was calm and the visibility was very good on the ride to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind blew from the north at about eight knots, at most, died out around noon and came on from the northwest at very light speeds (one or two knots?). The ocean was calm all day. The air temperature started out mild/warm, moved to warm and then to too warm. The tide (current) was a little bit stronger than moderate. The sky was mostly sunny. The visibility ranged to twenty-five miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67.6F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 82F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 56F).

The fishing was good only. We had a stronger than normal tide and we caught over one hundred dogfish. We even had some places where all we caught were dogfish. Catching was excellent. Landings were very good overall. Size of fish was excellent except for the haddock. We caught so many sub-legal haddock that I lost count after one-hundred and fifty. I suspect we caught over two hundred sub haddock. Most legal fish landed were hake, cod, pollock and haddock, in that order. In fact, we caught hake everywhere we went. Legal landings also included seven redfish, twenty-three cusk and six whiting. We had minor problems with blue sharks, losing three or four rigs to them. We drift fished all day and tried anchoring once. All terminal gear worked well.

I could not tell you who was high hook by an exact fish count. But it had to be Yoshito Umaoka (MA). His legal haddock count was ten, he caught the most hake and he tied with Fred Kunz (NH) for the largest cod at 12 pounds. He caught one of the largest cusk at 9.5 pounds. Yoshito's three largest fish included a 23.5 pound white hake, a 25.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake and a 28 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Eric Grove (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 32 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest fish and hake of the season to date. Erik also landed the third largest fish of the trip, a 30 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Fred Kunz won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 31 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the largest groundfish Fred has caught in three seasons. Fred had nineteen legal including the largest haddock at 5.5 pounds, a tie for the largest cod at 12 pounds, five other white hake between 16 and 21 pounds and several pollock. I took a picture of Fred's biggest hake (this shot appears on the left) and his biggest cod (the shot on the right).

Other Angler Highlights: Chuck Lennon (MA) caught the first fish of the trip, a 15 pound white hake. His largest fish was a 27 pound Maine state trophy white hake. His largest pollock weighed 10 pounds. Guy Hesketh (CT) caught a pile of fish. His largest was a 22 pound white hake. His two best pollock weighed 10.5 pounds each. Wobby Barnes (MA) landed a 21 pound white hake, his biggest fish. Jon Griffin (MA) boated a 22 pound white hake, his best fish. I suspect he will get bigger fish later if it's any kind of fall season at all. Mike "dogman" Hayes (NY) did better than his reputation. He just about every species including dogfish (again) and one 25 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Kleanthe "Bubby" Caryofilles (MA) landed our largest pollock of the season today at 23.5 pounds. It was the last fish in the boat. His largest fish of the trip was a 24 pound white hake.

Ray Westermann (MA) caught the second largest haddock of the trip at 5.25 pounds. His two best fish were both Maine state trophy white hake of 26 pounds each. Cameron Fournier (ME) landed the largest groundfish of this life today, a 29 pound Maine state trophy white hake. He also caught a nice double today that included an 11 pound pollock and a 6 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Travis Cropley (ME) caught a 23 pound white hake and a 21 pound white hake, his two largest fish. Spencer Patton (OR) caught the largest cusk at 11 pounds, the Bunny Clark's third largest cusk of the fishing season to date. Spencer's largest fish was a 25 pound Maine state trophy white hake. He also caught five legal haddock. Al Fournier (ME) landed the second biggest pollock of the trip at 15.5 pounds. Howard Lorenz (MA) boated an 18 pound white hake and a 21 pound white hake, his two best. Chris Porter (MA) landed a 21 pound white hake and a 20 pound white hake. His largest cod was the third largest cod of the trip at 8.5 pounds. Rich Knauer (NJ) landed the hard luck award for catching the least number of legal fish with a count of two! Ouch!

I received a anonymous $20.00 donation helping me raise money to fight cancer with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. I appreciate anything I can get to help the Jimmy Fund. Thank you so very much!

Friday, August 29, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the wind was light out of the northwest, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The wind blew out of the northwest to ten knots until sometime after 10:00 AM when the wind hauled out of the east or southeast. The air temperature hovered around 70F until the wind shift. Then the air temperature dropped a couple of degrees. The sky was sunny with some clouds. The visibility was very good at least.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen to ten knots in the morning. After noon the northeast wind blew from ten to five knots. Seas were chops of two feet or more with a three foot sea in the morning. Seas were much less than that for the ride home. The air temperature was warm. The sky was sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was very good, over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.7F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 71F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 47F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was good overall, better than that for one angler, at least. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-two cod and four cusk. No dogfish were caught. No legal haddock were caught either but they did release thirty-five sub-legal haddock. Anchoring and drift fishing were both used. The jig and fly combo worked the best.

Mark Cote (ME) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with about fifteen legal (more or less). And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.5 pound pollock. Krista Cote (ME) landed the second and third largest fish. They were an 11.5 pound pollock and the largest cod at 10.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Moe Carrier (NY) caught a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Tom Currie (NY) landed the hard luck award for being sea sick.

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather was beautiful, clear, mild and quiet when they left the dock to head for the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot over a two foot sea. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was light. The visibility was excellent. The sky was clear and sunny.

The fishing/catching was good. Landings were fair to good. Most fish caught were sub-legal pollock (over 100). They also caught eleven sub-legal cod and a sub-legal redfish. Legal landings included seven cusk and two cunners. Anchoring was the method. Everyone used bait and cod flies.

Rob Faulkner (CT) caught the largest fish, a 6.75 pound cusk. He was not in the boat pool. Kellie Tabernia (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 6.5 pound cusk. The third largest fish was a 6 pound cusk caught by Sara Faulkner (CT).

Other Angler Highlights: Brady Evans (ME) caught a 3 pound cusk, his best fish and the first fish to be weighed. Mike Santoro (NH) boated a 4.5 pound cusk. Chris Anna Rogers (MA) also caught a 4.5 pound cusk. Glenn Tabernia (NY) caught a 3.75 pound cusk. Megan Tabernia (NY) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the trip.

The Conservation Law Foundation came out with a short video about keeping the Cashes Ledge closed area closed instead of opening it up to commercial dragging as is the plan right now. I had a short part in the video. I am very supportive of keeping the Cashes Ledge area closed and keeping the status quo on the Georges Bank closed areas number 1 & 2. Some on the New England Fishery Management Council want to see Georges Bank, particularly, opened to dragging. This is where our haddock are coming from, the biggest groundfish success story of the modern era. And they want to open it up? It's selfish and crazy. There is a petition to sign at the video link I just gave you. I would appreciate it if you signed your name in support of keeping the Cashes Ledge area closed. The closed areas have been a very important part of the rebuilding of the groundfish stocks in New England. Without the closed areas I am certain you will be kissing your fish goodbye. This isn't the only thing that needs to be done, of course, but it's a good start. Thank you.

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. Ashore, the wind blew out of the southwest at fifteen knots or better for most of the day. The air temperature was perfect (70F or a little warmer than that). The sky was sunny with few clouds. The visibility was very good at least.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at twelve to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The air temperature was mild. The visibility ranged to twenty miles or more. The sky was sunny and mostly clear. The tide (current) was strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 79F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 52F).

The fishing was good but the under-current made the fishing lines tangle more than is normal. Dogfish didn't play too much of a factor as there were only seven caught. Landings were good overall, better than that for guys like Jason Peters (MA) who weilded a jig stick for the trip. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included fourteen cod, five cusk, two redfish, two haddock and three mackerel. Anchoring was the only method employed. Cod flies caught most of the fish today.

As you might have guessed from the allusion, Jason Peters was high hook with the most legal fish. He held court in the pulpit all day. Others did well around him but he was the man. His largest fish was a 14 pound pollock, the second largest fish of the trip. He also caught pollock of 10 pounds and 11 pounds. Scott Matteson (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. His second largest fish was a pollock of 10.25 pounds. And, for the first time, he caught more fish and bigger fish than his father, Fran! Rick Lemieux (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 13 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Sean Kelly (ME) caught a 12.5 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Nicki Frazier (ME) was high hurler and landed the shirt for her efforts! She was in good spirits when I saw her at the dock.

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather was mild, sunny and breezy from the south before they left the dock to head to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at fifteen knots or more. Seas were chops of three feet, more or less. The sky was clear and sunny. The air temperature was mild. The visibility ranged to twleve miles in haze along the shore.

The fishing was fair as was the catching of legal fish. They did catch a few small fish including quite a few pollock and redfish and three cod. Legal landings included two cusk, six squirrel hake and four cunners. They anchored for the evening. Bait and cod flies were used. No jigs.

Dave Holmes (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 5.25 pound cusk. Josh Reed (MA) caught the second largest fish, a 5 pound cusk. The Lowenstein family (ME) were out with us this evening, all of whom were sea sick. This including Dr. Ben who I ride with in the Pan-Mass Challenge every year. So four out of five were eflicted with the dreaded mal de mer. The only one who wasn't was Ellie Lowenstein. As you might imagine, Beth Lowenstein landed the hard luck award for being the annointed high hurler of the evening. But the shirt ended up fitting Ben. This isn't what I would call a good introduction to the Bunny Clark!

I received three donations toward my involvement in cancer research with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts through the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those donors and their contributions included Jeff McGuire (ME) for $25.00, Greg Holt (ME) for $25.00 and Jack Henke (NY) for $45.00. Thank you all so very much for your support. I appreciate it so very much.

Sunday, August 31, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the wind was blowing out of the south southwest at fifteen knots, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. Ashore, the wind was breezy from the southwest to west. It was enough that we couldn't use the awnings over the deck at Barnacle Billy's restaurant for fear of breaking something. The wind dropped off as the day progressed. The sky was clear and sunny most of the morning with encroaching high clouds. By 2:00 PM those clouds had thickened creating overcast conditions. By 6:00 PM, there was a sprinkle or two of rain. These conditions remained until 8:30 PM when we started to get a steady light rain. It rained lightly on and off through the night. It was hazy, with a high air temperature around 80F+ and humid all day.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at fifteen to ten knots or, later, less. Seas were a chop/short swell combination of two to three feet and less as the day progressed. The sky was clear to begin and progressively overcast later. The air temperature was warm. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 85F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 85F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 62F).

The fishing was good. The weather conditions weren't perfect for catching fish and the blue sharks took many jigs today making anglers lose fish and jigs too! The catching (of legal fish) was very good to excellent (for some), despite the conditions. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-eight cod, one haddock, seven cusk and one white hake. Drifting was the method. The jig & fly combo caught the most fish.

High hook could not be determined today. Randy Clark (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 23 pound barn door skate. This is the first barn door skate of the Bunny Clark season and one of only seven ever caught aboard the Bunny Clark in over thirty years. This is primarily due to the fact that these fish have been able to make a come-back with the advent of the closed commercial fishing areas. And this is also a testament to why we have areas that are closed to commercial bottom trawling. Captain Ian took a picture of Randy with his catch. This digital image appears on the right. The skate was promptly released alive after the picture was taken.

The second largest fish was a 19 pound pollock caught by Roger Hopkins (RI). This is one of the largest pollock of the fishing Bunny Clark fishing season. We have caught a couple of pollock weighing 19 pounds and two pollock of 19.5 pounds (plus the 23.5 pounder we caught on Tuesday). Roger also caught a 10 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Justin Grenier (RI) caught the third largest fish, a 15.5 pound pollock. Justin also caught an 11 pound pollock and a pollock of 11.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Bill Grenier (RI) landed a 14 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock and a pollock of 11.5 pounds, his three largest fish. Krystal Burns (NY) boated a 10.5 pound pollock. Pap Papliosas (RI) caught the largest cod of the trip weighing 11.5 pounds. Jeff Ross (NY) caught a 13 pound pollock, his best fish. Gene Schwab (RI) landed a 12 pound pollock, his best. Steven Scardace (RI) boated a 15 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip. He also caught another pollock of 12 pounds. Bill Durning (RI) landed a pollock of 11.5 pounds, his biggest fish of the day. Kevin Reph (RI) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer. A touch, I said.

I received some well needed donations today helping me in my quest with the Pan-Mass Challenge to eradicate cancer. Katie Graichen (LA), one of our best reservationists at Bunny Clark Deep Sea Fishing a couple of years ago and before, gave $25.00 in the form of an "egift" on line through the PMC site. The Roger Hopkins Party (all Rhode Island) gave $40.00. Thank you all so very much for your support. Many really appreciate it!

Monday, September 1, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 71F, the wind was blowing out of the west at five knots, the sky was clear except for the clouds in the eastern horizon and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze. Ashore, it was muggy and very warm. The mercury reached the 80F mark, at least, today. There was very little wind. The ocean was calm all day. The sky was cloudless for most of the daylight hours. The visibility was good, at least, in haze over the ocean.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew from the southwest. But you would hardly know this as it was so light as to just leave a ripple on the surface. The surface of the ocean was calm all day. A dead sea, you might say. The air temperature was warm to hot. The sky was clear and sunny. There was no tide (current). The visibility ranged to ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 65F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 85F with a low of 72F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 63F).

The fishing was excellent all day. Only two dogfish were caught, the ocean was flat, there was no current and I didn't hear of a single blue shark. The catching of legal fish was poor in the morning, fair to good in the afternoon. Most legal fish landed were pollock. In fact, almost everything they landed were pollock. They could have kept twenty-five cod if it were legal to do so. Legal landings also included one redfish and two cusk. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked about the same.

Ryan Keniston could have been high hook with four pollock and five cod over twenty-one inches. But there were others who also could have had nine legal including more pollock than Ryan caught. Ian was just not sure. Personally, I would doubt anyone caught more than Ryan. But that's me. John Baker (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11 pound pollock caught by Brian McCormick (VT). He also caught a 10 pound cusk and a pollock of 10 pounds as well. Louise White (NY) caught a 10.25 pound pollock. Dee Guimond (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick. I'm not sure that this is the boat for her on such a calm day!

I received a $25.00 donation from Frank Wertheim (ME) and the Maine Coast Cycling Club sponsoring me in my cycling event with the Pan-Mass Challenge, a fund raiser to fight cancer with the Jimmy Fund/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. These people from the Maine Coast Cycling Club are just wonderful individuals. I feel so grateful that Breeze Keller brought me up there one fine day for a ride with the Club. I was hooked after that. I spend every Sunday morning that I can with them. They are generous to a person and socially conscious as well. Thanks so much for the kind support!

Tim Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I hosted the Lighthouse Fishing Club (MA) marathon trip charter today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 68F, there was no wind at all, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was fair in what appeared to be ground level fog in the Cove. I had to navigate out through black thick fog to make it out of the gate into the ocean from Perkins Cove. We carried the fog for a few miles before we broke out of it. We never saw the fog again. We had flat calm seas all the way to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, we had some very light wind out of the south. Our first stop showed wind and calm patches, both, on the surface of the water. As the morning progressed, the wind got stronger out of the south. It might have blown as much as ten knots in the early afternoon with seas in chops of a foot or so. The tide (current) was strong in the morning, less so in the afternoon. The air temperature was warm with the wind. It could have been hot without it. The sky was clear for the trip. On the ride home we had thunder showers that lasted about a half an hour or less before breaking into clear skies eight miles from shore. We had very light winds, clear skies and a very calm ocean for the rest of the ride back to the dock. The visibility was six or seven miles in thick haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.8F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 93F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 63F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was very good overall. We never did have a slam but the catching was steady from the moment we started until we stopped at the end of the day. There were only two dogfish caught. The blue sharks were there but didn't really bother us. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included eleven white hake, twenty-eight cusk, eight redfish, two mackerel, five squirrel hake and a whiting. Ten cod and two haddock were returned that would have been legal before September. One was a double keeper catch by Phil Wicker (MA) who had a cod of about 9 pounds and another of 5 or 6 pounds, both cod caught on the same line at the same time. Drifting and anchoring were methods we used back and forth all day. We spent an equal amount of time at both. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Keith Hayden (MA) was high hook with thirty legal. His largest fish was a 13.5 pound white hake. Gloria Gennari (MA) won the Club pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 25 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is her largest groundfish of the season to date. I took a picture of Gloria and her special fish. This digital image appears on the left. Gloria also caught the largest pollock of the trip at 15.5 pounds. And she had another pollock that weighed in at 10.75 pounds. Al Hanson (MA) won the Club pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 24.75 pound white hake. His largest pollock weighed 14.25 pounds, the second largest pollock of the trip. He also caught another hake that weighed 21.75 pounds and led the Club pool for a long time with that fish. Steve Marko (MA) won the Club pool for the third largest fish with the third largest fish, a 24 pound white hake. I had forgotten about Steve (What was I thinking?) and gave the pool to Bill Bolotin who caught a fish slightly smaller at 22 pounds! This after Steve caught the most white hake of the trip with a count of five. He caught them on three different spots, even when others were catching different species! So how did I forget about him? Steve caught two other hake worth a mention. One weighed 18 pounds and the other weighed 16 pounds. One of his hake he caught in 25 fathoms of water!

Other Angler Highlights: Rick Gurney (MA) landed a 10.5 pound pollock and two pollock of 10 pounds each, his three largest fish. He landed the hard luck award for losing a jig and getting his feet wet! Phil Wicker (MA) caught a 10 pound pollock, his best. Mike Kruszyna (MA) landed an 18 pound white hake, his largest fish. His largest pollock weighed 11 pounds. Barry Juhasz (CT) landed a 12.5 pound pollock, his largest fish of the trip.

I received contributions from three anglers supporting my cause with the cancer charity bike riding event called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. These anglers and their contributions are as follows: Steve McGrath (NH) for $25.00, Al & Dawn Hanson for a generous $63.00 (They donate to the PMC every year giving an amount equal to my age in years - a reminder of sorts that I need to remember what I have experienced in all that time!) and Gloria Gennari for $25.00. Thank you all so very much for your kindness and generosity. I appreciate it very much but not nearly as much as those with the disease or the researchers we fund who need the tools (money) to do the great things that they do!

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean appeared good in haze. It was a beautiful sunny day today with much less humidity, clear skies, air temperatures in the lower 80s and good visibility. The wind continued to blow out of the west at speeds up to fifteen knots. It was hard to keep an awning out on the deck at Barnacle Billy's.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at ten to five knots. Seas/chops were about two feet (more or less) including tide chop and wind chop. The tide was bulling into the wind so it appeared rougher than it really was. And it was not rough. The strong tide in the morning slacked off to moderate in the afternoon, same as it did yesterday. The sky was clear all day. The visibility was excellent; over twenty miles. The air temperature was warm, perfect. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.8F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 85F with a low of 72F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 65F).

The fishing was good or better than that. Landings were very good overall, excellent for two. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included five redfish, three cusk and two mackerel. Had cod been legal to keep they would have landed thirty-five. Only three haddock could have been taken if legal to keep them. There were eighteen dogfish released. Drifting and anchoring were the methods. There wasn't much of a problem with blue sharks. Jigs and flies, that combination, did the best.

Dan Killay (VT) and Joel Gaines (VT) were high hook with the same number of legal fish that Keith Hayden (MA) caught on the marathon trip yesterday. Impressive. Dan never landed a fish of 10 pounds or greater. Joel caught an 11 pound pollock that tied with Thayne Henry (MA) for the third largest fish of the trip. Thayne also caught an 11 pound pollock. Alan Tuthill (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.5 pound pollock. He caught this pollock as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 8 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The second largest fish was an 11.5 pound pollock caught by Thayne Henry.

Other Angler Highlights: Ken McLaughlin (ME) landed seventeen legal. He didn't have a single legal fish before 11:00 AM! His largest was a 10 pound pollock. Scott Nolan (NH) also caught a pollock of 10 pounds. Joe Goodness (MA) landed the hard luck award for catching nary a single legal fish and for losing a jig. Well, at least he was fishing near the bottom!

Ian caught a lobster buoy in the wheel only a mile from the entrance to Perkins Cove. Of course, this meant I couldn't get right to preparing for the fishing trip tomorrow before I went diving! So off to the house on my scooter where I yanked on my tri-suit, grabbed a mask and back to the boat. The water temperature was 60F so I had to sit on the float with my feet in the water until my ankles got used to the cold. I am truly a wimp when it comes to my feet. Once I got under the boat I noticed that the trap line that was hit got wrapped in the propeller because the lobsterman left a coil of line (Easyhaul) just under the buoy. But it didn't take long to cut it out. It just took a half an hour of my ever increasing valuable time to complete the task.

I received several donations supporting my bike ride for a cancer cure (the ultimate goal) with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. These anglers and their donations are as follows: Linn Burgess (MA) for $20.00, Bob Munroe (MA) for $40.00, my dory mate from the tuna days, Suzanne Graves (ME), contributed $25.00 and Rick & Kathleen Henderson (MD) for a generous $100.00. I want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for your help. We make a great team and I appreciate it so much!

Thursday, September 4, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was very good. It was a beautiful flat calm morning on the ride to the fishing grounds. The sky was clear and full of stars, the visibility was near excellent, the wind was light out of the northwest and the air temperature was 68F. On the grounds, there was no wind. The ocean was flat calm. By mid morning, the wind had hauled out of the south. It blew lightly out of the south for the rest of the trip. The most it blew was probably five knots giving us small waves of a half foot. The sky was clear all day. The air temperature was warm, perfect. The visibility maxed out at 30 miles in some haze. The tide (current) was fairly strong all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 83F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 51F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was good at best. Some spots were very slow. Many others were good. But it was not easy to catch fish today. There were many more fish on the machine than we caught. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included two redfish, five cusk, four squirrel hake, eighteen mackerel and seven white hake. We also caught ten haddock and twenty-three cod that would have been keepers before September 1. Three dogfish, one blue shark and forty-one small haddock were released back to the ocean alive. We alternated between drifting and anchoring. Drifting seemed to work the best. Cod flies caught the most fish.

I believe Bob Jones (ME) was high hook with eleven legal. It might have been Robert Ploss (NY) if we could have kept cod and haddock. Bob's largest fish was a 10.5 pound pollock. And Johnny Castonguay (ME) was close enough in fish count to have tied Bob too. Johnny didn't count his fish. Bryan Lucas (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 26 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Bryan's largest pollock weighted 12 pounds. Jim Iams (ME) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 23 pound white hake. Jim also caught a 21.25 pound white hake, a pollock of 11 pounds and the second largest cod of the trip at 8.5 pounds. Johnny Castonguay landed the third largest fish, a 22.5 pound white hake. Johnny also caught a 12 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Jim Bonney (ME) caught the largest haddock at 5 pounds. Rodney Leach (ME) caught the largest cod at 10 pounds. John Charette (ME) boated a 12.5 pound white hake, his largest fish. Rand Richards (ME) caught a slightly bigger hake at 22 pounds, his largest fish of the trip. Karilyn Bonney (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, her largest fish. Jim Morrell (ME) caught a 14 pound pollock, his biggest fish by far. John McGrath (NY) landed the hard luck award for tangling just a little too much today. His line was much thicker than any of the lines everyone else was using. This gave him more angle on his line compared to the others. And it made him a big target. Had he had thinner line with his position on the boat his line would have been very infrequently tangled. And this is something you really have to consider if you are going on a party that likes to fish in more technically difficult conditions.

The most interesting thing that happened, happened to Robert Ploss. On one of our drifts, he dropped to bottom, hooked into a fish immediately and then got caught on bottom. He sat their with his rod, holding it, swearing to me that he had a fish. I believed him. He's too good a fisherman to be taken lightly. I was busy doing other things when Ian tried to help Robert. They ended up cleating his line off (his line had a rating of 110 pound test!) which, I thought, would hold us there, like an anchor. Later, I looked at our position and realized that we had drifted twelve boat lengths with Robert's line cleated off! Obviously, whatever he hooked was being dragged along the bottom as we drifted along. I pulled on the line and gained some. So I uncleated the line and told Robert to reel. I ended up pulling on the line (with a little help from my friends) as Robert reeled. After quite a long time we brought it to the surface. There, just under the water, was a coil of heavy duty orange electrical extension cable tied to what looked like a broken stantion!. Underneath all this was a 22 pound white hake! The hake, obviously, had wrapped around this mess after having been hooked but Robert managed to get the fish anyway! This is the largest fish that Robert has caught so far this year (he fishes quite frequently) and the second largest hake he has ever caught!

I received a couple of donations helping with my fund raising for the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was give to me by Jim Morrell from the "Larry Reed Crew". Larry had actually chartered the whole boat this day but couldn't make it because of a back problem. We ended up putting two other anglers on the boat to take Larry's and another's place. We had fun but I missed abusing Larry! There were two other donations in the form of "egifts", one from Jack Judge (CT/ME) for $50.00 and the other from Lawrence "Jay" Kennedy (VT) for $114.14 (Nothing is simple with Jay!). Thank you all so very much for your generous support.

Friday, September 5, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean appeared good in haze. It was a very warm day today (hot in the sun) but with less humidity than one would expect. The air temperature never reached 90F but it was close. The wind was light from the southwest all day. The sky was clear. There was never a hint of rain. The visibility was good along the shore.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at light speeds in the morning and as much as ten knots in the afternoon. Seas were calm in the morning with a one foot chop after noon. The air temperature stayed comfortably warm with the wind. The tide was moderate to strong at times. The sky was clear all day with much sun. The visibility ranged up to ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67.5F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 91F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 57F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was good to very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, of course (we are now targeting them). Legal landings also included six redfish, a skate and two mackerel. No potentially legal haddock or cusk were caught today. Only sixteen haddock were caught, all under twenty-one inches. Had they been able to keep cod, ten would have been landed. Only three dogfish were caught and released. Anchoring and drifting were the methods. Flies caught the most fish. The jig and fly combination worked the best.

Ian could not tell me who was high hook. However, whomever it was had no more than eight or ten legal. The difference was that almost everyone had at least seven or eight legal! And all the fish were much bigger on average than we have been seeing. Paul Guenthner (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the fishing season to date. The second largest fish was an 18.5 pound pollock caught by John Bye (ME). Todd "Cat Killer" MacDonald (NH) caught the third largest fish, a 17.5 pound pollock. He caught his pollock as part of a double keeper catch that also included a 13 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! This is the largest double keeper catch of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far.

Other Angler Highlights: Ron Covey (VT) caught an 11.5 pound pollock, a 10 pound pollock and a 16 pound pollock, his three largest fish. He also lost two jigs and landed the hard luck award t-shirt! Mitch Prophet (NY) landed a 10 pound pollock, one of the first good sized fish to come aboard today. George Thaler (NJ) caught a 15 pound pollock, one of the bigger fish of the trip. Jay Cobb (NH) tied George also with a 15 pound pollock. Derek Precourt (NY) boated a 12.5 pound pollock and a 14.5 pound pollock, his two best. John Baker (ME) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Bill Precourt (NY) caught a 14 pound pollock. Ken McLaughlin (ME) had seven legal today. His largest fish was a 13 pound pollock. Cliff Foster (ME) rounded off the trip with a 16.5 pound pollock.

Saturday, September 6, 2014

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 73F, the wind was blowing out of the south southwest at ten knots, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean appeared good but it seemed very hazy. The air temperature had climbed into the 80s by 10:00 AM. By noon, the air temperature was 89F. It was hot, hazy and very humid (uncomfortable). The visibility was down to fair because of the excess haze looking out over the ocean. The sky was mostly sunny all day. After noon, thunder showers went by on either side of Perkins Cove. But we never got any rain or lightning until 7:00 PM or slightly after. And we never got the full on thunder storms. The rain went on until 8:00 PM and then stopped. There was never much wind associated with it because we never got the brunt of any storm. Lucky.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at fifteen knots (more or less) with seas in chops of three to four feet. The air temperature was mild with the stronger than normal wind off the water. The sky was clear all day. They did, however, run into the edge of a thunder shower on the way back in. This only lasted a couple of minutes with rain. The tide (current) was strong and right up into the wind. The visibility was about six miles tops in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.4F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 65F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 92F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 62F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was fair today. The tide was such that it was running into the wind (you couldn't anchor) and the chops were such that it was uncomfortable to fish. Landings were down today. There was no bite except on cod. They would have been able to bring home twenty-seven cod had they been legal to keep over twenty-one inches. And there were six haddock over twenty-one inches as well (along with thirty haddock under twenty-one inches). However, the pollock, the targeted species, would not bite. And of course the haddock and cod were incidental while going after the pollock. Legal landings included twelve pollock, one redfish and one cusk. Drifting was the method for most of the day. They tried anchoring to no avail. Cod flies caught the most fish. The jig/fly combo worked the best.

Jared didn't tell me who was high hook. Derek Precourt (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11.5 pound pollock caught by Bill Precourt (NY). Mitch Prophet (NY) caught the third largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. Tom Oliver (NH) landed the hard luck award for getting that bad result from a lack of symmetry between his body and the motion of the ocean.

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip. The weather for thunder showers had been building all day. You could feel it. When the boat left the dock all I could think of was that I hoped it didn't rain so much that it spoiled the trip for them. On the grounds, that really wasn't the case. Although they saw quite a bit of lightning, they didn't see much rain. They did see lightning around them but nothing so severe to keep them from fishing. The wind blew out of the southwest but it was less than the day trip with the strength about ten to fifteen knots max. Seas were chops of one to two feet. The sky was mostly overcast for the trip. The air temperature was mild. The visibility ranged from one to eight miles in fog and haze.

The fishing/catching was actually pretty good. Landings were down as almost all the fish caught were sub-legal, mostly pollock. Legal fish caught included a cunner, a cusk and three mackerel. There were quite a few sub-legal cod, one sea raven and three sculpins that were also caught and released. They anchored for every stop. Everyone used bait only.

Derek Decesere (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 1.75 pound sub-legal cod caught by Nick Pac (ME). Nick was also the bachelor (all but two anglers were in this "party") being celebrated this evening so Jared gave him the hard luck award as well. Clyde Hill (NY) caught the third largest fish, a 1 pound cunner.

I received a $25.00 donation from Tim Bowden (MA) sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thanks very much, Tim. I very much appreciate the support. And so do many others!

Sunday, September 7, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston were supposed to be hosting the Jim Lennon (all New York) extreme day trip charter (sans Jim) today. Or they tried to. Half way to the grounds, they discovered a coolant leak near one of the heads. At the same time I was on my bicycle headed to the Senior Games to compete in a 40K & 20K road bike race for a chance at going to the Nationals. The event was taking place in Kennebunkport, just fifteen miles down the road from my house. I was almost there when I got the call from Ian. After he described the situation, I suggested that he terminate the trip and head home. This he did. At the same time, I continued to the start of the race to tell them at the registration desk that I wouldn't be in the race and to thank them for allowing me to participate (They had allowed me to sign up late.). I ended up meeting the boat shortly after they got back to the dock.

We worked on the engine all day and seemed to get the problem under control. This with much consulting with Skip Dunning, my preferred road tech from NEDDA (Power Products) in Portland, Maine. We will plan to run the trip tomorrow and start all over again.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the wind barely blowing out of the west, the sky was overcast and the visibility over the ocean appeared good in haze. The overcast skies did not last. By 7:00 AM, the sky had cleared and the sun was shinning brightly. It was a beautiful day overall. The air temperature reached 75F. The humidity of yesterday was gone. The wind blew out of the northeast in the morning, quickly died out later in the morning, became light and variable in direction and then established a southwest direction in the afternoon. The ocean was calm all day. The visibility went from good to excellent. The air temperature cooled to the 60s in the evening. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 76F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 50F).

Monday, September 8, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the wind was blowing lightly out of the northeast, the sky was crystal clear and the visibility over the ocean seemed excellent. The sun rose after 6:00 AM, over a flat calm ocean. When the wind did blow it was very light from the northeast. The wind never got up to ten knots along the shore. Or, if it did get that high it was just ten knots. The ocean remained calm along the shore all day. And Captain Jack Gordon on the charter sailing yacht, Silverlining, was complaining that there just wasn't enough wind to allow his boat to sail properly. Another five knots was all he was asking. He never got it! The air temperature was perfect today with a high reading of 70F at the house. The sky was cloudless most of the day. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or two. The visibility was excellent as it was ashore. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The air temperature was warm. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 50F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 71F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 75F (with a low of 45F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was good overall. It was also very good for catching sub-legal fish (including eight cod over twenty-one inches and three haddock over twenty-one inches). Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included two redfish. Drifting and anchoring were the methods employed. Cod flies caught the most fish. The jig and fly combo worked the best.

I wasn't told exactly whom was high hook. But I do know that it was over ten legal. Sam Maresh (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.5 pound pollock. He caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 13.5 pounds. This is the Bunny Clark's largest double of the season to date. The 13.5 pound pollock tied with another 13.5 pound pollock caught by Dave Latast (NY) for the third largest fish of the trip. Dave also caught a 12 pound pollock. Leon Schrecengost (NY) landed the second largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. And he could have been high hook as well. I just don't know that for sure. Leon also caught a pollock of 11 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Fran Lizor (NY) caught an 11 pound pollock. George Ranney (NY) landed a pollock of 10.5 pounds, his largest fish. Art Green (NY) caught a 13 pound pollock. Our own Ken McLaughlin (ME) landed an 11 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, his two best. Bill Wallace (ME) would have been high hook if you counted his sub-legal fish. In fact, he caught so many sub-legal fish that Ian took pity on him and presented him with the hard luck award!

The engine was fine today. Ian checked it out half way to the grounds. No coolant leaks. On the grounds. No coolant leaks. And back at the barn (Cove). No coolant leaks. I found the problem. And it looks like something we could fix at sea anyway. Now!

Tim Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I hosted the Annual Sweenor (NY) Marathon Trip Charter today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the wind was blowing lightly out of the east, the sky was clear with a few small clouds here and there, the full moon was shinning brightly overhead and the visibility over the ocean seemed excellent for the second day in a row.

We had a decent ride to the fishing grounds. The wind was out of the northeast at less than ten knots headed out the gate. Seas were chops of a foot. The further we got out the windier it got. On the grounds, we had east northeast winds of ten knots and seas in chops of a foot or two. Later in the afternoon, the wind hauled out of the east southeast and blew up to fifteen knots with seas of about three feet, more or less. This wind backed off to five knots or less on the ride back to Perkins Cove. The sky was mostly sunny in the morning, mostly cloudy in the afternoon. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged to twenty miles or more in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.1F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 49F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 69F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 42F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was very good overall. The tide was strong but it was up into the wind most of the day so anglers had an advantage, instead of an expected disadvantage with the full moon tide. We had very few cod & haddock as I pretty much stayed away from them for all but the last hour of the trip. We did release nine cod that would have been legal last month. Haddock was the same. We were able to avoid them until the last drift. Out of the fifteen haddock caught, only two would have been legal with a twenty-one inch minimum size. Most legal fish landed, by far, were pollock. Legal landings also included seven redfish, five cusk, two white hake, one whiting and two butter mullet. We lost three jigs to blue sharks. Not a single dogfish was seen. We anchored on every spot except the last two drops. All terminal gear worked well but the cod flies caught the most fish.

Fran Sweenor, Jr. (NY) was high hook with the most legal fish. I don't know exactly how many he caught but it was well over twenty. His best catch was a double keeper catch that included a 15.5 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! This is the Bunny Clark's third largest double keeper catch of the season to date. Tim Sweenor (NY) caught the largest fish of the trip, a 22 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the season so far. This is the largest fish that Tim has caught in many years. He was not in the boat pool! I took a picture of Tim with his nice fish. This digital image appears on the left. Tim also caught a 12 pound pollock as part of his catch. Dan Seymour (NY) and Stuffy House (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with a tie for the second largest fish of the trip weighing 18 pounds. Dan's was an 18 pound pollock. This fish was caught as a double keeper catch along with another pollock of 7.5 pounds. Some of Dan's other notable fish included a 15 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Stuffy's 18 pounder was a white hake, the largest white hake of the trip. Stuffy also caught two pollock of 12.5 pounds each.

Other Angler Highlights: Keith House (NY) was the first angler to catch a fish I could weigh. That fish was a 10.25 pound pollock. Keith's biggest fish was a pollock of 12 pounds. Dave Sweenor (NY) landed the second largest double keeper catch of the trip. His catch included a 14 pound pollock and a 13.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. This is the Bunny Clark's seventh largest double keeper catch of the season so far. Some of Dave's other great fish included a 10.5 pound pollock, a 12.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. Fran Sweenor, III (NY) landed an 11 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock, his best two fish. Cliff Steinauer (NY) boated a 12 pound pollock, a 10 pound pollock, an 11.5 pound pollock and a15.5 pound pollock, his best fish. Dale Dattler (NY) boated a 10.5 pound pollock very early in the trip. Near the very end of the trip he caught his largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. Ron Witkowski (NY) caught the two largest cod. One weighed 9.5 pounds. The other weighed 8 pounds. He released both right back to the ocean alive. Some of his other good fish included an 11 pound pollock, an 11.5 pound pollock and a double that included a 16.5 pound pollock and a 9 pound pollock. Kevin Dattler (NY) landed a 10 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock, his two best fish. Pat Sweenor (NY) had a hard time getting out of the bunk. The head seemed to garner more of his attention than the fishing. He finally launched himself out of the Hotel Bunny Clark to spend the day on the rail - fishing. For the extra curricular stuff he landed the hard luck award. His reward for fishing was a 17 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip.

I received two generous donations sponsoring me in my Pan-Mass Challenge cycling event for cancer research and care with the Jimmy Fund. The first donation was from Dave & Rita Sweenor (NY) for $50.00. The other donation was $70.00 from Cliff Steinauer (NY). Thank you all so very much for your kindness and support. I very much appreciate that you care as I do.

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston hosted the Annual Tom Bruyere & The St. Lawrence River Rats Extreme Day Trip Charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots, the sky was overcast and the visibility over the ocean was very good, it seemed. Later, I questioned my visibility claim as it looked like some fog or rain showers over the ocean at 7:00 AM. The Bunny Clark headed out of the Cove with everyone forward to lighten up the stern, or deepest drafting part of the boat, to clear the bottom in this full moon dead low (1.5 feet below normal) tide.

The weather ashore was perfect starting at 11:00 AM. The clouds had cleared away by that time leaving the sky sunny and clear. The sky remained mostly clear for the rest of the day. The air temperature was mild with a high air temperature of 68F. The wind blew out of the northeast for most of the day. There was no wind by 5:00 PM. The ocean was calm along the shore. The visibility was very good with some haze during the day.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten knots in the morning, less than that in the afternoon. The ocean was calm for the ride back to Perkins Cove. The largest chop they saw was about a foot over chop/swells of two to four feet, this, obviously, from a wind blowing harder off shore. The sky was overcast for most of the morning, clear and sunny around noon. The air temperature went from mild to warm as the wind dropped. The current was moderate to strong. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.9F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 70F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 53F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far, our newest targeted species. They managed to stay away from concentrations of cod and haddock. Had the same rules applied today as they were in August they would have kept four cod and three haddock. They released four dogfish and were not bothered by blue sharks as much as we were yesterday. Legal landings also included eighteen white hake, one mackerel, one cusk, three redfish and two butter mullet. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Rich Mallott (NY) was high hook with fourteen legal. His largest fish was an 18.5 pound white hake. His two largest pollock weighed 11.5 pounds and 11 pounds. Lance Rudiger (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 24 pound white hake. He also caught a hake of 18 pounds. The second largest fish was a 22.5 pound white hake caught by Gregg Mallette (NY). Gerry Hydrusko (NJ) landed the third largest fish, a 19 pound white hake.

Other Angler Highlights: Mike Kotash (NY) caught the largest pollock of the trip at 17.5 pounds. He also caught a 10 pound pollock very early in the trip. Andrew Bruyere (NY) boated a 17.5 pound white hake, his largest fish. His two best pollock weighed 10.5 pounds and 11 pounds. John Gardner (NY) boated the largest haddock at 5 pounds. His biggest fish was a 10 pound pollock. Matt Liscum (NY) landed a 15 pound white hake, his biggest fish. Bob Williams (NY) caught a 17.5 pound white hake, his best. Kim Demers (NY) landed a 13.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, his two best fish. Doug Duprey (NY) caught a 12.5 pound pollock as his largest fish. Tom "Ollie" Bruyere (NY) landed the largest cod at 12 pounds. He hated to see it go! Kimberly Duprey (NY) landed the hard luck award for catching the dreaded mal de mer. Her condition was such that she never wetted a line! Ouch, that's not good!

Every year, early in the year, Tom Bruyere and the "River Rats" give generously, helping me in my cancer bike ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge. This year was no exception. Thanks again, men. We all enjoy having you guys aboard!

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I hosted the Jim Strife Boys & Friends Marathon Fishing Trip Excursion today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, there was no wind in the Cove but the closest weather buoy was giving south southeast wind at ten knots, the sky was mostly clear with an almost full moon overhead and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in some haze.

The wind was blowing out of the south at ten knots under a starry sky with very good visibility and one foot chops as we left the gate at Perkins Cove behind. The wind got a bit stronger before we got to the fishing grounds and the seas made up a foot more. On the grounds, the southerly wind was probably fifteen knots, more or less. Seas were chops of about two feet. Later in the morning the wind hauled out of the south southwest and blew up to twenty knots or so. Seas built to three and five feet. Clouds rolled in after noon. By early afternoon, the sky was overcast. Mid afternoon saw a few sprinkles of rain but not enough to warrant putting oil gear on. The rain stopped almost as soon as it started. The visibility ranged to eight miles in haze. The tide went from strong to moderate. The air temperature was warm/mild. It was just too cool for me to wear just a t-shirt. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.3F on the fishing grounds early in the morning and then never went above 63F after that. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 80F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 58F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was very good overall. We were inundated with blue sharks on the first drift. We lost at least four jigs to them right off the bat. And we hooked others besides. We never hooked another blue shark at any time for the rest of the trip! We used the current to our advantage all day. There were no dogfish seen. And there was no end to the pollock. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by (very) far. In fact, on one spot, we caught more pollock over 10 pounds than on any other spot this season to date. Three of these pollock were over 20 pounds. Legal landings also included thirteen redfish, one cusk, one whiting and two butter mullet. There were six cod over twenty-one inches to 6.5 pounds released as well as two haddock over twenty-one inches out of a total haddock count of six. We drift fished and anchored. Cod flies and jigs caught the most fish by far.

I don't know who was high hook but I suspect it was Trevor Ryan (NY) with over twenty legal. There were others who might have had over twenty as well. I don't know who they were. This primarily because everyone pooled their fish under one number. Some of Trevor's better fish included an 11.5 pound pollock, a 17 pound pollock, a 14.5 pound pollock, a 13.5 pound pollock and a double keeper catch that included a 14 pound pollock and a 16 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! This is the Bunny Clark's fourth largest double keeper catch to date.

Mark Strife (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 24 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's largest pollock of the season so far. I took a picture of he and his nice fish. The digital image appears on the left. Mark also caught a 13.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. [I did not have time today to weigh every pollock over 10 pounds. I was way too busy!] Mark Cerroni (NY) had a very hard day catching fish. In fact, I don't think he caught a legal fish until after 1:00 PM. Then he boated a 22.5 pound pollock. After that, all hell broke loose and he caught one fish after another. With the 22.5 pounder, he won the boat pool for the second largest fish. It was the second largest fish as well. It's also the Bunny Clark's third largest pollock of the season to date. I took a digital image of Mark with his long pollock. This picture appears on the right. A couple other fish of his that I weighed included a pollock of 16 pounds and another pollock of 13 pounds. The third largest fish was a pollock of 21.5 pounds caught by Russell Strife (NY). He caught this as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 10.5 pounds. This is tie for the Bunny Clark's largest double keeper catch of the season so far. The pollock is the fifth largest pollock of the Bunny Clark season to date. Before the double his two largest pollock weighed 10.25 pounds and 12 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Jim Strife landed a 10 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock, his two largest pollock. James Strife, Jr. (NY) landed the only cusk. It weighed 11 pounds, a tie for the third largest cusk of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. His largest pollock weighed 13 pounds. But, to his credit, he spent most of the later part of the day helping the captain/mate gaff pollock! Paul Strife (NY) landed a 17.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Ron Swartout (NY) caught an 11 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, his two best. Mike Strife (NY) landed an 18 pound pollock, his biggest fish. He caught an 11 pound pollock early in the day. Scott Strife (NY) caught so many fish over 10 pounds that I stopped weighing them. The pollock I did weigh had values of 16.5 pounds, 15 pounds, 12 pounds, 13 pounds and 11.5 pounds. Joe Strife (NY) landed a 10.25 pound pollock. He might have caught bigger fish that I didn't weigh. John Strife (NY) landed a 10.5 pound pollock early and then proceeded to get larger fish. Some of the fish that I weighed were a 15 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. He also caught a double that included a 17 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. This comes in as a tie for the ninth largest double of the Bunny Clark season to date. Chris Schilling (KY) had a bit of a slow start in the morning with equipment issues but came on strong after noon. His three best fish included a 14 pound pollock and two pollock of 13 pounds each. Bill Gardner (NY) caught an 11 pound pollock. Bruce Bezanilla (NY) landed a 14.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Pat Bennett (NY) caught a 19 pound pollock, his best fish and the fourth largest fish of the trip. Two other fish of his that I weighed were a 12 pound pollock and a pollock of 15.25 pounds. Mark Connelly, Sr. (NY) boated a 17.5 pound pollock very near the end of the trip, his best fish. Dave Fahsel (NY) landed the hard luck award for spending the whole day in the Hotel Bunny Clark. He asked for a bucket fifteen minutes into the trip and never broke stride until all but the last half hour of the ride in! He never wetted a line! Yes, ouch!

I received two generous sponsorship donations for my ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The first came from this charter as a whole, thanks to help from Jim Strife, a cancer survivor. The donation amount was $110.00 total. Thank you all so very much! The second came to me in the mail from Richard Payeur (FL) and, his daughter, Elinor Kostanski (FL) for a very generous $200.00. They support me very generously every year. Thanks very much, Dick & Elinor. I do so appreciate your joining me in the fight against cancer!

Friday, September 12, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at ten knots, the sky was mostly clear with a partial moon overhead lighting the landscape and the visibility over the ocean seemed very good at least. The sunrise was a bit colder than it has been. Fifty-six degrees was the temperature at 6:00 AM. The high air temperature was 68F. It was sunny all day with a light northwest wind in the morning, dying out around noon. The ocean was calm for the rest of the day with light and variable winds. The visibility was very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were two to three feet in chops. After noon, the wind died to about five knots, still out of the north. Seas were chops of a foot. It was calm for most of the ride back to Perkins Cove. The sky was sunny all day. The air temperature was warm, a shorts and flip flops kind of day. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was very good or over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63.0F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 47F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 68F with a low of 56F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 47F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was very good today, overall. Some anglers had a fair day, most did good or better and one angler had an excellent day. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included one redfish and three cusk. There were ten cod and twelve haddock that would have been of legal size had the regulations been the same as they were in August. The total haddock catch was about one hundred and fifty or more than we have seen in this same area probably ever. There were twenty-three dogfish caught and released. No blue sharks were seen. Drifting and anchoring were the methods. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Mark Cote (ME) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish an angler has caught during any trip in a month. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.75 pound pollock. His second largest fish was a pollock of 10.5 pounds. Leo Lamoureux (VT) landed the second largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. Leo caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch that also included a 12 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! He also caught a pollock of 10 pounds. The third largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Ken McLaughlin (ME). Ken caught seven legal fish today. This is not a good count for him. But it's not bad either.

Other Angler Highlights: Kamron Kimball (ME) landed the first fish that could be weighed, an 11 pound pollock. Aaron Cote (ME) caught the largest cod of the trip. It weighed 11 pounds. His largest fish was a 12.5 pound pollock. Rick Graves (ME) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, his best fish. Lee Goudy (IN) caught the second largest cod, a 10 pounder. Cindy Harris (ME) landed the hard luck award for attaining high hurler status.

Saturday, September 13, 2014

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 4:30 AM EDT the air temperature was 50F, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots, the sky was clear with a two thirds moon directly overhead and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind was the salient feature of the day. It blew out of the northeast at fifteen to twenty knots most of the day. Before the morning had run out the sky had become overcast. The threat of rain was in the air but it didn't start raining until 5:00 PM. Light to moderate rain fell until after 8:00 PM. There was not much rain after that. The air temperature dropped to 44F at 7:00 AM before rising back up to a high of 62F after noon. The visibility on the ocean was good in haze.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north northeast at fifteen to twenty knots, the same as it did along the shore. Seas were chops of three to five feet for the trip. It wasn't so rough that you couldn't go but it wasn't fun for a number of anglers aboard. Quite a few were sea sick. The sky was sunny for the trip, overcast by the time they made Perkins Cove. The air temperature was mild. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged to ten miles in some haze/spray. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 61F (with a low of 43F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 67F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 58F (with a low of 39F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was poor overall. The sea conditions were hard, the blue sharks bothered them on anchor, there were a few dogfish and there was no bite. Legal landings included seven pollock and two redfish. They would have been able to keep five cod and two haddock had the regulations been the same as they were in the summer. fourteen dogfish were released. They tried drifting but anchoring was the preferred method. All terminal gear worked the same.

Colby Lavin (MA) should have won the boat pool with a pollock that was estimated to have been 12 or 13 pounds when it was whole. Unfortunately, a blue shark took half the fish before they could get it in the boat. The remains (head) weighed 7.5 pounds which made it the second largest fish of the trip. Casey Stearns (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 7 pound pollock caught by Peter Stearns (MA). Peter was the manager at Power Products in Portland, Maine and was instrumental in helping me re-power the Bunny Clark with the engine I still have in her today. I never did see Peter when he arrived to the boat in the morning as I was off on a "century ride" with the Maine Coast Cycling Club before 6:00 AM. And I missed him getting off the boat because I jumped on the bow before the passengers departed and came in by the starboard side curtain. Had I waited until everyone got off the boat I would have been able to shake his hand, something I didn't do before he left the company a few years ago. He helped me quite a bit in those days.

Zack Little (MA) landed the hard luck award for being one of the high hurlers on the Bunny Clark today. He is also getting married here in the near future.

I received a $25.00 from Daniel Lambert (NY) supporting me in my cancer fund raising with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thanks, Dan. I appreciate your generosity!

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots, the sky was clear and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The air temperature dropped down to about 48F before it started the climb up to about 62F. The air temperature felt cool. In fact, it felt cooler than 62F except in the sun. There was a little wind from the northwest in the morning. After noon, the wind was light and variable in direction. The ocean along the shore was calm. The visibility was excellent. The sky was nearly cloudless and very sunny all day.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at ten knots or more in the morning. Seas were chops of two feet. The air temperature was cool in the morning. After noon, the northerly wind had dropped to five knots. The air temperature turned warm. Near the end of the trip the wind was light and variable with an almost calm ocean. The sky was a mix of sunny conditions and overcast skies. The tide (current) was strong all day. The visibility was excellent. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 45F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 66F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 63F (with a low of 37F).

The fishing was good or maybe better than that. The current was the only thing they really had to contend with. The weather was good and there were few blue sharks and no dogfish. The catching was fair to good. Landings were poor. Legal fish landed included nine pollock, six redfish, one whiting and three cusk. There were twenty-five cod over twenty-one inches that were released. None of these cod approached the 10 pound mark. There was one haddock of twenty-one inches caught out of forty-six total that were caught. Drifting and anchoring were both utilized with very little difference. There was really no bite today. All terminal worked about the same.

Jeff Vieser (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 9.25 pound cod caught by Ian Kiraly (NH). This fish, of course, was released after weighing. Joe Zydlewski (ME) landed the third largest fish, a 9 pound pollock. Carl Graves (VT) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.

Monday, September 15, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at eight knots, the sky was mostly clear in a cero mackerel sky and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The air temperature warmed up to the mid 50s by 9:00 AM. After noon, the air temperature got up to 63F. It never got any warmer than that because a southwest breeze started to blow in over the ocean keeping the air temperature a bit cooler than it was inland. The wind blew out of the northwest until about 11:30 AM, when it died out. The wind was never stronger than ten knots ashore. The sky was clear, cloudless at times. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at ten to five knots. Seas were chops of a foot or more over a two to three foot long swell. After noon, the wind dropped, the chop was gone and they were left with long rolling sea swells of about two feet. The sky was clear. The air temperature was mild overall. The visibility was excellent. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.3F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 41F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 67F with a low of 48F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 66F (with a low of 35F).

The fishing was very good. The catching was very good or better. Landings feel into the "good" category. Most legal fish landed were pollock in the 7 to 8 pound class, a little smaller on average than they have been. Legal landings also included one redfish, two cusk and one butter mullet. There were forty-four cod over twenty-one inches they could have kept had it been August. Six haddock fell into the same category out of a total haddock count of eighty-one. Drifting and anchoring were the methods. Cod flies caught the most fish by far.

Eric Baker (NY) or Tom Zido (NY) were high hook with enough legal fish that they couldn't get an accurate count. Tom caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 10.25 pound pollock. Both Eric and Tom tied for the third largest fish, both with pollock of 10 pounds. Tom had two 10 pounders while Eric had one. Our own Ken McLaughlin (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.75 pound pollock. Mack Williamson (ME) landed the hard luck award for being the only angler aboard to not catch a single legal fish! Oh, man!

Ian Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the marathon trip today.

At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the wind was blowing out of the south southwest at five knots, the sky was overcast and the visibility over the ocean was good (at least eight miles). At 4:30 AM, it was just starting to sprinkle with rain. The rain was short lived. Except for a couple of sprinkles now and then there wasn't enough rain after the 4:30 AM shower to even wet the grounds. The sky stayed overcast all day until just before 5:00 PM when it cleared for good. The air temperature remained in the lower 60s. The visibility was very good. The wind blew very lightly out of the southwest. The ocean remained calm along the shore.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to five knots. Seas were chops of a foot at most to calm. Mostly it was really too calm for a good bite. The sky was overcast for the trip. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility was very good to excellent. The air temperature was mild. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.8F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 61F (with a low of 46F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 65F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 65F (with a low of 48F).

The fishing/catching (of legal fish) was fair overall. Although it was calm, the tide made it difficult to get exactly where you wanted to be. The bite was off because of the calm weather even though I thought the overcast conditions would help. And there were only four dogfish seen today. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-three redfish, two cusk, eleven white hake, four butter mullets and one mackerel. Had the same rules in August applied today they would have also brought home twelve cod and three haddock (out of thirty-seven total). Drifting and anchoring were both used intermittently. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Tom Murphy (VT) was high hook with about fifteen legal, more or less. His largest fish was a 10 pound white hake. Dave Gray (VT) probably had the largest fish of the trip. They never saw the fish as it was lost part way up from bottom. Roger DuHamel (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 26 pound Maine state trophy white hake. He also caught another white hake of 11.5 pounds. The second largest fish was a 21.5 pound white hake caught by Dennis Koch (CT). Ernie Centerbar (NY) landed the third largest fish, also a white hake, of 19.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Joe Sinkler (NY) caught the first good fish to weigh today, a 12.5 pound pollock. Bruce Gray (ME) caught the best double keeper catch of the trip. His double included a 12 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. He also landed a 10.5 pound pollock. Dan Daleb (CT) caught the largest pollock of the trip at 15.5 pounds. He also caught the largest haddock we have seen on the Bunny Clark in weeks. His haddock weighed 6.5 pounds, only a half pound shy of a Maine state trophy. Chad Whittemore (VT) landed an 11.5 pound cusk. This ties the second largest cusk caught on the Bunny Clark this season to date. Fritz Cybulski (CT) caught one of the larger pollock of the trip at 12.5 pounds. Arthur Centerbar (NY) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single legal fish! He was the only angler in that category.

I spent the morning and early afternoon in Portland, Maine at the New England Fishery Management Council's Recreational Advisory Panel meeting. Of most interest to our anglers, we talked about relaxing the prohibition on cod and haddock before November. Although the assessment showed that there are ten times more haddock of value available to the recreational angler, the cod are in such desperate shape that, in it's wisdom (or lack there of), the National Marine Fisheries Service thought it best to keep recreational anglers away from the cod by not allowing anyone to keep haddock. In other words, cod became the choke species for the possession of haddock. It also looks like the recreational angler may not be able to keep haddock in April at this point. There is a chance that that could change over the winter. But this chance is a slim one. However, haddock rules have changed in the past so I believe anything is possible. We will have to see.

Other things of interest were new inshore areas to be proposed as cod spawning closures. Some of the meaningful closures we all agree with. But others are no longer cod spawning areas where you find other species including haddock in May. We didn't agree that these other areas should be closed to the recreational angler. There was another proposal for an inshore and offshore designation. Here the thought was that a vessel would have to declare the area to be fished. I was unsure of the timeline for a declaration. Regardless, we thought it unnecessary, a lack of benefit for any of the species (particularly cod), trouble with enforcement and we had safety concerns. And, finally, we sent this motion forward: "The RAP would support for analysis purposes a small or no possession of GOM cod if it means continued prosecution of other recreational fisheries (e.g., haddock, pollock, etc.). The RAP reserves its judgment on haddock bag limits, size limits, seasons, etc for FY 2015 until such data is provided. The RAP requests this information be provided in a timely manner." Read into this what you will. The concern is that keeping any amount of cod for the 2015 season is problematic at best with the new numbers that have just come out. Plus the spawning stock biomass is so low as to make any directed fishery on cod an unlikelihood. I know it doesn't sound good. I will keep working on this problem with others and keep informing you of the details in the future.

I received two donations from anglers I wish I could have taken fishing (myself) today supporting my involvement with the Pan-Mass Challenge cancer cure project. Tom Murphy gave $25.00 while Chad Whittemore gave $20.00. Thank you both so very much for your help. I certainly do appreciate it!

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 51F, there was no wind to speak of, the sky was clear with a crescent moon hanging well above the eastern horizon and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The day ashore was wonderful in the weather department. The wind was light with no discernable direction the whole day. The ocean along the shore was calm. The sky was clear. The air temperature got up to 65F. The visibility was very good. And it was very peaceful in Ogunquit. It was a great day to be here. Unfortunately for me, I spent the whole day in the office, longing to be anywhere outside.

On the fishing grounds, there was no wind and no direction of wind. The ocean was flat calm all day. You could have floated a scallop shell on the ocean today. The air temperature was warm. The sky was clear and sunny. There was no tide or very little current. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.8F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 66F (with a low of 43F). In Boston, Massachusetts the high was 69F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 69F (with a low of 47F).

The fishing was excellent. The catching was good, at least. Landings were down in the fair category. Legal landings included twenty-two pollock, four redfish, a whiting and four cusk. Eighty-one haddock were released. Six could have been kept if this time were August. And fifteen out of thirty-two cod would have been kept if this were August as well. Ten dogfish were released. Ian didn't mention anything about blue sharks. They drift fished and anchored. It didn't seem to matter. The jig & fly combo worked the best.

Ian didn't mention to me who the high hook was today. He doesn't like catching so few fish. So I believe this makes him ambivalent about the angler who caught the most legal fish. Rick Krajewski (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. He also caught a 10 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11.5 pound pollock caught by Steve Millikan (MA). Steve also caught a 10 pound pollock. John Baker (ME) caught the third largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. John caught this as part of a double keeper catch that also included another pollock of 10.5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time.

Other Angler Highlights: Ken McLaughlin (ME) had an enjoyable day but only caught three legal fish. That's a slow day for him. Nor did he catch a fish close to 10 pounds. Steve Ladd (ME) caught a pollock of 10.75 pounds, his best fish. Chandler Van Orman (ME) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single legal fish. This is new territory for Chandler. He's my neighbor. I won't rub it in too much!

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Captain Ian Keniston and I are running the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 48F, there was eight knots of wind out of the west, the sky was clear with a crescent moon hanging over the eastern horizon and the visibility over the ocean seemed excellent. More later.

As of September 1, 2014, possession of cod and haddock is prohibited while fishing in federal waters with rod & reel recreationally. That means that we can't bring cod or haddock fillets back to Perkins Cove. This moratorium on cod & haddock possession is supposed to last for September & October. Things change. If they do with this regulation, I will let you know.

The Conservation Law Foundation came out with a short video about keeping the Cashes Ledge closed area closed instead of opening it up to commercial dragging as is the plan right now. I had a short part in the video. I am very supportive of keeping the Cashes Ledge area closed and keeping the status quo on the Georges Bank closed areas numbers 1 & 2. Some on the New England Fishery Management Council want to see Georges Bank, particularly, opened to dragging. This is where our haddock are coming from, the biggest groundfish success story of the modern era. And they want to open it up? It's selfish and crazy. The video on my browser starts as soon as you bring up the page but you have to scroll down to see it. Otherwise, all you hear is the narration. There is a petition to sign at the video link I just gave you after the video is completed. I would appreciate it if you signed your name in support of keeping the Cashes Ledge area closed. The closed areas have been a very important part of the rebuilding process of the groundfish stocks in New England. Without the closed areas I am certain you will be kissing your fish goodbye. This isn't the only thing that needs to be done, of course, but it's a good start. Thank you.

We have future fishing trips with openings this week. The extreme day trip of Friday, September 19 has four spots available, the Monday, September 22 extreme day trip is wide open with fifteen fishing spots available, the Tim Tuesday, September 23 marathon trip is also wide open with fifteen fishing spots available (Please don't make me stay shore that day!) and the Wednesday, September 24 extreme day trip has twelve fishing spots available. The fall weather is coming upon and the fishing/catching should be getting better. To make a reservation you can call 207-646-2214. Be there or, well, you know.









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