www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

May 6, 2016, 7:30 AM EDT



Nice Fish on an Early May Marathon Trip

The digital images above were taken during the marathon trip of May 3, 2016. The shot on the left shows Matt Steves (NY) holding his double (both fish caught on the same line at the same time). In Matt's right hand is a 6 pound cod (which he released shortly after this picture was taken). In Matt's left hand is a 6.25 pound pollock. I took the picture to show the mixed doubles we had that day, four different major groundfish species chasing a common bait source. The shot on the right is a picture of Adam Abel (CT) holding the Bunny Clark's largest cusk of the year, a Maine state trophy fish of 13 pounds. Catching a cusk of that size in early May was a great surprise to me.




Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon fishing trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 45F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind, the large seas that were so prevalent the day before could not be heard crashing on the shore and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

Smooth sailing was had by all Bunny Clark passengers on the ride to the fishing grounds. It rained all the way out but stopped at our destination. On the grounds, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots with seas in chops of about a foot. The sky was overcast, the visibility was very good and the air temperature was 42F. The wind increased to about fifteen knots a half hour after I got the anchor set on the first spot. Seas built to two and three feet in chops. I would say we had fifteen knots of wind for about two hours before it started to back off. By 1:00 PM, the wind was light out of the north with a one foot left over short sea. A light southeast wind chased us home with seas in chops of less than a foot. The sky cleared after noon but never fully. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds even on the ride home. The tide (current) was light. The air temperature got up to 50F at the highest. The visibility ranged to about thirty nautical miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 43.1F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 41F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 54F with a low of 44F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 43F).

The fishing was excellent overall. Most fish caught were legal redfish landed with very few under a pound in size but none reaching the Maine trophy size of 2 pounds. But we only caught six redfish that were too small to keep. Sub-legal pollock came in second. We released a few cod (only fifteen would have met the legal size limit of twenty-four inches) and thirty-nine haddock. Legal landings also included a lot of cusk, five mackerel, twenty-five cunners, one pollock and one herring. Three wolffish were released back to the ocean alive. We anchored for every productive stop. There was no success in drift fishing today. All terminal gear worked well but cod flies caught the most fish.

Lewis Hazelwood (MA) was high hook with the most legal and most sub-legal fish, bar none. There was no one even close. I don't believe there was even one time that he dropped his line to bottom and didn't catch a fish. I wish I knew how many double keeper catches he had because it could have been some kind of record. Lew caught the third and fourth largest fish of the trip, an 8 pound cusk and an 8 pound wolffish. I also weighed a 6.25 pound cusk he also caught. And I do believe he has the boat record for the most cunners caught by a single angler with a count of sixteen fish - today! Lew the Cunner King! Don Spencer (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17.5 pound wolffish. This is the largest wolffish that has been caught on the Bunny Clark since August of 2013. I weighed the fish, took a quick picture of Don holding it and then released it. Tim Rozan (ME) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, an 11 pound wolffish. Captain Ian took a picture of me holding the 11 pounder with Lew Hazelwood just before we released it. This digital image appears on the left in this entry.

Other Angler Highlights: Mike "The Cedar Key Bandit" Hayes (NY) caught quite a few fish but did log some time in the Hotel Bunny Clark. He told me that he went out on one of the Eastman's boats out of Seabrook, New Hampshire and was a bit worn out from catching "too many fish" the day before! Otherwise I'm sure I would be writing about some special fish he caught. Mike fished all afternoon and part of the morning. He did very well indeed. Jules Muscat (NY) caught a lot of fish. The only fish of his that I weighed was a 4 pound cusk. Our own Peter Day (ME) caught the first cusk of his life today. He also caught a lot of other fish. Bob Romeo (NY) landed the hard luck award for losing gear. I weighed three fish of his earlier in the day: a 6 pound cod, a 5.5 pound cusk and a 5.5 pound cod.

Tim Rozan and Lewis Hazelwood donated $50.00 and Don & Shirley Spencer (VT) donated $50.00 to help me in my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. This is my tenth season riding in this event. I need approximately $9,000.00 more to have generated and provided a quarter of a million dollars to the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts during my tenure. Lew & Tim and Don & Shirley are helping me on my way! Thanks so much!

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

The Bunny Clark has engaged the wooden anchors for yet another day.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 40F, the sky was clear, the wind was out of the north northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. After sunrise, the wind dropped and remained light and variable for the rest of the morning. After noon, the wind hauled out of the northwest and blew up to fifteen knots. The wind hauled out of the southwest in the late afternoon after the northwest wind died out. The sky was sunny all day with few clouds. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature ranged up to 60F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 58F (with a low of 37F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 51F with a low of 45F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 61F (with a low of 39F).

I spent a little bit of extra time on my web page today. The rest of the day was spent at Barnacle Billy's restaurant. I spent some time preparing for the opening of Barnacle Billy's, Etc., pressing the flesh, working on orders, answering emails, employee hirings and printing order sheets for tomorrow. I also spent some time getting ready for tomorrow's marathon trip. I can't wait!

Thursday, April 21, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon fishing trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 38F, the sky was clear with a nearly full moon overhead, the wind was light out of the west and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

We had no wind and a calm ocean for the first five miles on the ride to the fishing grounds. For the rest of the ride to our destination we had westerly winds at ten knots or less. Seas were a foot or less in chops. On the grounds, the wind stayed out of the west until a little after noon. The wind was so light just before noon as to leave the surface of the ocean almost calm. It never quite got there. The wind hauled out of the southwest during the early afternoon and slowly increased to ten and fifteen knots with seas of about two feet. The tide (current) was light all day. The air temperature ranged from 42F to 51F at the highest. The visibility was excellent, clear enough to see the top of Mt. Washington seventy miles away! The surface water temperature reached a high of 43.8F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 32F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 77F with a low of 43F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 28F).

I introduced Josh Lester (ME) today as a potential deck hand to take the place of Alec Levine. Josh originally hails from Vermont but now lives up here with his family in Sanford, Maine. He filleted a pile of redfish today and did a much better job than I thought he would do. He was doing a good job by the end of the trip. We will have a few more trial runs before we find out if Josh will be the man.

The fishing/catching was good to very good all morning and excellent all afternoon. I spent the morning looking around for pollock but also catching redfish and some cod in the process. As one of my friends would say, it was stupid fishing from noon until the end of the trip. Our best trip of the year by far. Most legal fish caught and landed were redfish. Legal landings also included three pollock of about 4 pounds each, eight cusk, two cunners and a butter mullet. We released sixty-six haddock of all sizes and probably about forty cod. Of the forty cod released only eighteen cod measured twenty-two inches or better and only three cod were over twenty-four inches capliper fork length. We released one wolffish of about 5 pounds. We drift fished and anchored. Cod flies caught the most fish but all terminal gear worked well.

Taras Melmik (NJ) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a 6.5 pound cod. Jerry Titka (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9.5 pound cod. Some of his other good fish included a 6.25 pound cod, a 1.8 pound redfish (the largest of the day) and a 6 pound cusk, the largest cusk of the day. He also fought a porbeagle shark for about ten minutes. Eventually, the shark broke Jerry's swivel. Otherwise I think we might have landed that fish. Dana "Almost Porbeagle" Decormier (NH) also had a bout with a porbeagle and lost it right next to the boat. That fish was about 200 pounds. Dana won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 7.5 pound cod. He was the only one entered in that pool! Dana landed the second largest redfish of the day at 1.6 pounds. Dana also landed the hard luck award for losing a jig.

Other Angler Highlights: Alexander Ozhrleiev (PA) caught the only other decent cod. It weighed 6.25 pounds. I took a picture of Ramos on the last stop of the day. The digital image appears on the right in this entry. He is holding his double redfish catch, waiting for Captain Ian to take them off the hook for him.

Friday, April 22, 2016

The Bunny Clark looked lonely and sad this morning as looked at her from the deck of Barnacle Billy's restaurant. Alas, no trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was mostly cloudy, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The morning sky was overcast. We had light rain here and there but it was not consistent enough to cover the roads. Just when you thought the rain would start, it would stop for an hour or so before trying to start again. Essentially, everything remained dry all day. After noon, the clouds started to break up. By mid afternoon, there was a nice mix of sun and clouds. By sunset, the sky was starting to look overcast again. There was no wind all day. The ocean remained calm. The air temperature got up as high as 72F at the house here in Ogunquit. The visibility was very good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 44F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 49F).

I reversed things this morning. I got up early, did a few house chores and then got down to the Cove at 5:00 AM. I opened up both buildings just as the first delivery truck showed up. I checked off the delivery order and got that done before the next truck showed up. Between deliveries and the office, I was down there until 7:00 AM before heading home. In the meantime, our dog, Gill, followed me from building to building. I worked on this web site when I got home. The rest of the morning I stayed working at home.

About mid morning, my son, Micah, showed up to take the Petrel to get hauled out for an insurance inspection. He took the boat alone to Kittery, Maine (a little over an hour away). Deb went to pick him up after he got everything settled there. By the time he got back I was already working at Barnacle Billy's. I got out at 9:00 PM.

Saturday, April 23, 2016

Apparently, redfish are at the top of the hit list for Bunny Clark anglers, despite the fact that they are easy to find at this time of year. The Bunny Clark remains idle again today!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze. The air temperature remained in the high 50s to over 60F during the day. The wind was very light. A light north wind prevailed in the morning, light and variable in direction during the afternoon and light from the northeast late afternoon and into the night. The sky was overcast all morning with periodic light rain periods. The roads would almost dry and the rain would come again. After noon, the rain stopped for the rest of the day. The sky was partly sunny by 2:30 PM and remained so into the night. The visibility was near excellent except in precipitation. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 44F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 49F).

My day was centered around the restaurant, Barnacle Billy's. I spent most of my time there. Saturdays are always fun because of the regular patrons who come to visit. Very nice people, all. The only thing I did with the Bunny Clark was move her from the face of the float to the front of the float to tie stern to. I ran the engine for a few minutes to bring the temperature up and then shut her down for the day.

Sunday, April 24, 2016

A nice sunny day with the Bunny Clark tied at the dock. My worst fear is someone will come down to Perkins Cove and take pictures with the B.C. at the float, the picture ending up on a post card that will chase me for the rest of my life! Never has there been a post card with the Bunny Clark sedentary in the Cove.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 37F, the sky was clear, the wind was out of the north at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. At dawn, the sky was cloudless and remained so most of the day. The wind was light from the north in the morning, calm later and from the southwest, light, later in the afternoon and into the night. The air temperature didn't get out of the lower 50s today. It was cool in the shade but very warm in the sun out of what little wind we did have. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 33F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 50F with a low of 42F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 58F (with a low of 31F).

Nothing much to report today. I did my normal Sunday routine, worked at the restaurant all day and went home afterward. Nothing much new to report. And it was Sunday after all.

Monday, April 25, 2016

We had no call for a Bunny Clark trip today. So here we set yet again. It's not much of a surprise for me as if you can wait less than another week you can go fishing and keep haddock as well. So we wait!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 32F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. When I went down to the Cove at 6:00 AM, there was ice on the dock and an air temperature of 31F. The sky was almost cloudless all morning and into the afternoon. By mid afternoon, high clouds were creeping in. The sky was overcast by sunset. The ocean was flat calm for all but the last hour of the morning when a southerly wind flow started up. By late afternoon the southerly wind was blowing fifteen knots sustained. But this wind died out at sunset leaving no wind. The air temperature was cool all day at the Cove with the wind off the water. We never broached the 60F mark there. Inland, I'm sure the air temperature reached that mark. The visibility was excellent all day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 62F (with a low of 28F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 57F with a low of 44F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 63F (with a low of 26F).

I spent the first part of the morning working with moorings, storm lines and getting everything straightened out for the summer season. Later in the day the float, dock and ramp were stained. Ian Keniston worked on varnishing the companionway door on the Bunny Clark. And he also tied up some halibut hooks for the future offshore trips. Meanwhile, Micah Tower was over at the Kittery Point Yacht Yard getting our lobster boat, the Petrel, hauled, the bottom cleaned and the wheel pulled. I wanted to get the wheel reconditioned and a new key put in the shaft. The Petrel was hauled out late because the tide was late. They never did get the wheel pulled even with some heat. So that will be continued tomorrow.

I spent the day at both restaurants, Barnacle Billy's and Barnacle Billy's, Etc., after I was done with the moorings. I worked straight through. I was done by 6:30 PM. The business was slow probably in anticipation of a less than favorable weather day tomorrow.

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

The Bunny Clark isn't sailing today. And I'm just as happy about that. The weather would not be great to enjoy a day of fishing. Northeast wind and cold temperatures do not a comfortable fishing trip make. So we remain happy in Perkins Cove.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 41F, the sky was overcast, a light rain was falling, the wind was out of the northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good enough to clearly see Boon Island at the nine mile mark. The rain was periodic to start the morning. By mid-morning, there was a steady rain. The air temperature dropped as the morning progressed. I saw 36F by 9:00 AM. By late morning it had started to snow. It snowed enough to cover the boats, the ramp, the dock, the trucks, a light covering only. As we got past 1:00 PM, the snow had changed back to rain. The rain slowly melted the snow away. By 4:00 PM, there was no more snow. The rain stopped after that. By sunset, there was evidence of clearing. We didn't have much for wind. Out of the northeast, it blew up to about fifteen knots and that was it. After noon, the northeast wind was light. No wind after 4:00 PM. The air temperature hovered below 40F. The visibility ranged around the "good" category, less than that in the snow. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 62F (with a low of 28F). It's hard for me to believe that we had a high of 62F in Portland. Obviously, someone isn't paying attention. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 51F with a low of 37F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 50F (with a low of 31F).

I spent the day running around getting things for the restaurant. The times that I wasn't running around I was in the restaurant working, mostly, on getting Barnacle Billy's, Etc. ready for opening on Thursday at 5:00 PM. That was my day.

Micah spent the morning at the Petrel cleaning her up for a survey on Friday. The wheel is still on the shaft. Tomorrow Micah and the KPYY crew will make a better attempt to take the wheel off.

Ian Keniston worked on tying up halibut hooks and varnishing doors for the Bunny Clark.

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

The Bunny Clark resides on a freshly painted float and dock this morning. And there she will stay - today. Sunday, May 1st, will be the first day that we can keep haddock. We are almost full for that day. I am looking forward to having the Bunny Clark running on a daily basis!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 32F, the sky was clear, the wind was out of the northwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind blew out of the northwest up to fifteen knots in the morning, hauled out of the west for the later part of the morning and then out of the south for the rest of the day. Wind speeds out of the south ranged to fifteen knots or more. The sky was sunny and mostly clear all day. The air temperature got up as high as 55F, that I saw. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 56F (with a low of 27F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 62F with a low of 37F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 60F (with a low of 25F).

I started the morning as I normally do: working on this web site and then migrating the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. After that I went back and forth with my son, Micah, as they were taking the wheel off the Petrel. From there, Micah took the wheel to H & H Propeller in Salem, Massachusetts to get it reconditioned. Then he went back to the Petrel to start scraping the bottom. While Micah was headed to Salem, I jumped on the bike and rode down to the KP Yacht Yard to look at the Petrel myself.

After I got home, I took a shower and worked at the restaurants for the rest of the day. Most of the time I spent in the office, answering a complaint in the form of a letter, pricing, making dessert menus, ordering, etc., etc. I was done by 8:00 PM.

I received a generous $250.00 donation for my involvement in my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The monetary gift was from Andy & Susan Tapparo (MA), a patron of Barnacle Billy's restaurant. Thank you so very much for your support! I appreciate your help very much!

Thursday, April 28, 2016

We have good news and bad news. The bad news first: the Bunny Clark sets a record for time at the dock since our fishing season started. The good news? Barnacle Billy's, Etc. opens at 5:00 PM to start the 2016 season!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 31F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind blew light out of the northeast to begin the day. It seemed more northerly ashore and not more that six or eight knots. By late morning, the wind had hauled out of the east. The afternoon saw southerly winds that blew up to fifteen knots. After sunset the wind dropped below ten knots. The sky was cloudless for the first part of the morning and mostly clear after that. The air temperature reached a high of 50F in Perkins Cove. The sun was the only thing that made it feel the slightest bit warm. It seemed cool all day. The visibility went from excellent to very good in some haze later in the day. The air temperature got up as high as 55F, that I saw. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 49F (with a low of 29F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 54F with a low of 41F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 61F (with a low of 26F).

I spent the morning running around communicating with my son, Micah, who was working on getting the bottom painted on the Petrel and the reconditioned wheel back on the shaft. My main thrust was working at Barnacle Billy's, getting ready for the opening at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. I took a break during the late morning to get suited up. I was back down at Barnacle Billy's at 12:15 PM. I worked until 8:45 PM.

The opening was good, albeit, a little mellow. But it was like old home week. I knew just about all the patrons. And it wasn't the craziness we experience with the opening at Barnacle Billy's (original). I was just as happy about that. It was a cool night (temperature wise) so I didn't expect a huge night anyway.

Friday, April 29, 2016

The Bunny Clark resides on the float at the end of the Barnacle Billy's Dock in Perkins Cove. And there she will set the next two days. On Sunday, Captain Ian Keniston will take the boat on her first extreme day trip. The boat is almost full. Monday's extreme day trip is wide open for fishing spots. There are lots of haddock around right now. And, of course, Sunday will be the first day we can keep them. I wish I were going myself!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 37F, the sky was a mix of clear sky and clouds, the wind was light out of the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind never really got moving today. The morning showed us dying northeast winds that were replaced by southerly winds up to twelve knots in the afternoon. There was a period of very light east winds around noon. It rained lightly from 8:00 AM until just before noon in the Ogunquit area. Not a drop of rain fell from North Berwick to South Berwick, just ten miles inland. The rain was only a coastal event in Portsmouth, Boston, Ogunquit and to the east. By 2:00 PM the sky were sunny with few clouds. The air temperature reach a high of 48F with the cool onshore winds of the day. The visibility was very good from noon on. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 49F (with a low of 33F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 51F with a low of 43F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 60F (with a low of 38F).

I spent the day working at Barnacle Billy's. I got there at 5:00 AM worked until 8:00 AM, worked on Bunny Clark stuff until noon and then went back to the restaurants and worked until after 9:00 PM.

We had a marine survey done on the Petrel. This was primarily done in order to carry insurance on the boat. Gene Barnes was the surveyor. Micah Tower helped Gene by being there to answer questions. Later, Micah and KPYY got the wheel back on the shaft. Then Micah finished painting the bottom. The Petrel will be launched on Monday.

Saturday, April 30, 2016

The Bunny Clark rests at the float today waiting for the extreme day trip on Sunday.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 34F, the sky was clear with a half moon hanging above the southeastern horizon, the wind was light out of the south (less than ten knots) and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The air temperature warmed quickly. By 7:30 AM, the air temperature was already 46F. The air temperature was 50F by noon. After that the southerly wind kicked in. The extra wind (there was no wind all morning) kept the air temperature to a high of 52F in Perkins Cove. About ten miles inland the air temperature was ten or even fifteen degrees higher. The sky was cloudless all morning and mostly clear in the afternoon. The southerly wind was no more than ten knots in the afternoon, enough to lift a flag and show the occasional white cap when looking from the Marginal Way. The visibility was very good to excellent over the ocean. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 55F (with a low of 30F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 55F with a low of 41F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 69F (with a low of 32F).

I worked at Barnacle Billy's restaurants all day. There is nothing special to report. One side of the deck, the side that was protected from the cooler wind, was full. The other side was ten degrees cooler and just about empty. It was a moderately busy day overall.

My son, Micah, finished up with the Petrel today and came home early. She is ready to be launched. The launching is slated for Monday morning.

Sunday, Uno de Mayo, 2016

Haddock season opens!

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 43F, the sky had a thin layer of overcast, thick enough to cover the stars but not thick enough to hide a crescent moon hanging over the eastern horizon, the wind was blowing out of the south at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. The sky remained mostly overcast all morning. There was not much wind during that time. What wind there was (five or six knots) was blowing from the south. Around 11:00 AM, the wind hauled more southeast than south and blew up to ten knots or better. By 12:30 PM, it started to rain - lightly. It rained lightly for the rest of the day. There was hardly enough rain to cause puddles in the road. The air temperature got up to about 52F in Ogunquit. Most of the morning it was below 48F. The viability remained good in some haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 52F (with a low of 38F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 53F with a low of 44F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 51F (with a low of 39F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at five to ten knots. Wind generated seas were chops of about a foot. They also had a long rolling sea swell of two to three feet. The sky was overcast all day. The visibility was very good, about twenty miles. There was a little rain near the end of the trip. The tide (current) was moderate. The air temperature ranged up to 46F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 45.2F.

The fishing was very good overall. The only way the fishing could have been better was if the fish were larger. There were a lot of haddock, mostly sub-legal. But there were plenty of legal haddock as well. Most legal fish were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included a mackerel, eleven pollock and a redfish. They also released seven or eight cod that were twenty-four inches or better. They drift fished for every stop. All terminal gear worked well but bait caught the most haddock.

Probably Steve Brown (ME) or Jim Boyd (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish. Neither angler caught any fish of size. Lewis Hazelwood (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11.5 pound cod that was weighed quickly and released back to the ocean alive. Lewis also caught the third largest fish, a 7.5 pound cod. Peter Grant (ME) caught the second largest fish, a 9 pound cod, also released very much alive. He also landed the largest pollock at 7 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: "Haddock Jack" Brouse (NH) might have caught the most haddock. I'm not positive on that. He walked off the boat with quite a few. But he did catch the largest haddock of the day at 5 pounds. George Rousseau (NH) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler and for releasing the most short haddock!

I received two donations today supporting my fund raising efforts to cure cancer by riding in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event taking place on August 6 & 7 of this year. Tim Rozan (ME) & Lewis Hazelwood gave $25.00 while Jos Orellana (MA) donated $10.00. Thank you so much for your support. I appreciate it very much!

Monday, Dos de Mayo, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 44F, the sky was overcast, it was drizzling rain, the wind was blowing out of the east at eight knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair, at best, in precipitation, haze and some fog. Lowry conditions remained on the coast all day. A steady rain started falling at 11:00 AM. Not hard, just steady. Before that it was a misty light rain with drizzle, haze and fog. And it was cool. I never did see the air temperature go higher than 45F. And it probably didn't go any higher in Perkins Cove. The wind was on shore at fifteen knots at times and white caps all day. The visibility was just fair in precipitation, haze and fog. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 46F (with a low of 43F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 50F with a low of 43F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 48F (with a low of 41F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at seven to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less over rolling sea swells of two to four feet. There was a heavy mist all day with light rain very similar to what it was ashore. The visibility ranged from one to three miles in fog & haze. The air temperature reached a high of 45.5F. The surface water reached a high of 45.0F. The tide (current) was moderate.

The fishing was very good, very much like yesterday. The fish were smaller but it was a fish a cast (mostly haddock) all day long. Most legal fish landed were haddock but sub-legal haddock showed for three out of every four haddock caught, a much higher sub-legal count as compared to yesterday's fishing. Legal landings also included four pollock and a redfish. They also caught a fair number of cod but only thirteen were over twenty-four inches. Drifting was the method again today. All terminal gear worked well. The haddock did not have a preference for terminal gear like they did yesterday; just as many were caught on jigs as on bait.

Jack Judge (CT/ME) was the fisherman of the day. He shared high hook with John Russell (ME) and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9.5 pound cod. John Russell was right behind him with the second and third largest fish, both cod of 8 pounds each. Bill Socha (NH) caught the fourth largest fish, a 6 pound cod. Adam Towle (NH) landed the hard luck award by a coin flip. No one had any hard luck today.

Tim Tuesday, Tres de Mayo, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 43F, the sky was overcast, the roads were dry, there was no mist in the air, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was good (ten miles), at least.

The flags were limp as we left Perkins Cove headed to the fishing grounds. About three miles out, the wind was light out of the northeast. The closer we got to our destination the more northerly the wind direction. On the grounds the wind was out of the north at six or eight knots, not really enough for a true white cap. Seas were about three feet in swells that diminished to about a foot or two by the end of the trip. The sky was overcast from the time we left Perkins Cove until we got home. It rained lightly for a time in the morning. We had no rain from 9:00 AM until it was time to go home. The air temperature ranged from 44F to 48F. The visibility was good in the morning but excellent after noon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 45F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 52F (with a low of 41F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 49F with a low of 45F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 55F (with a low of 41F).

Josh Lester (ME) was with us again auditioning for the swing deck hand's position. He spent some "less than quality" time at the Hotel Bunny Clark. At this time I'm not sure what this means.

The fishing/catching was excellent overall. Most legal fish landed were haddock followed by pollock. It was our best day for both, by far, this season. The cull worked out so that out of every four haddock only one was sub-legal. Most haddock were in the 2 to 3 pound range but we had a few from 4 to 6.75 pounds. The legal pollock were mostly in the 3 to 4 pound range but we had a significant number of pollock in the 7 to 12 pound range. Legal landings also included five redfish and two cusk. Noteable released fish included one porbeagle shark (it broke the line forty feet from the boat), a handful of larger cod (all released, of course) and one 8 pound wolffish. We drift fished and anchored, both had their time and place. All terminal gear worked well.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. Too many anglers were constantly catching fish on a regular basis. Randy Rivette (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.25 pound cod and he also won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, an 18 pound cod. Another fish of his that I weighed was an 11.5 pound cod. I took a quick picture of Randy's largest cod with my iPhone. This digital image appears on the left in this entry. These fish are the Bunny Clark's two largest fish of the 2016 fishing season so far. The third largest fish was a 13.5 pound cod caught by Buzz Leonard (ME). Buzz also caught a cod that weighed 9 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Adam Abel (CT) caught our first Maine state trophy cusk of the season today. It weighed 13 pounds, one of the earliest trophy cusk of the last few years on the Bunny. That was his biggest fish of the trip. It's also the largest cusk he has ever caught. Two of his other fish that I weighed included a 9 pound pollock and a 12 pound cod. Greg Fitzgerald (NY) caught a 9.5 pound cod, his largest fish. Matt Steves (NY) landed the three largest haddock of the day. His two largest weighed 6.75 pounds and 6 pounds. He also had one I didn't weigh that looked to be 5 pounds. Greg also had one that looked to be 5 pounds as well. Matt's two biggest fish were a 10 pound cod and a 10.5 pound cod. Pat Collins (NY) caught a 13 pound cod, a tie with Adam for the fourth largest fish of the trip. Two other cod of Pat's that I weighed were a 9 pounder and a 9.5 pounder. Rodger Aldridge (NY) caught an 11.5 pound cod and an 8.5 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. John Baker (ME) caught the largest pollock of the day at 12 pounds. He also caught a 10 pound cod and a 10.5 pound cod, a tie for the largest cod of his life. Bill Hunsicker (NY) caught a 10 pound cod, the biggest fish of his that we weighed. He almost got the largest fish of the day, a good sized porbeagle shark, to the boat. But it wasn't in the cards. As he was reeling this big shark to the boat the line broke at the fly loop. Wade Colby (ME) caught three nice cod. They weighed 10 pounds, 11.25 pounds and 9.75 pounds, all nice fish. He also landed the hard luck award getting sick. I don't believe it was sea sickness as he was totally recovered an hour after we started fishing. But it looked bad and he seemed to be the most qualified! I felt some compensation was needed.

I received two donations helping me raise money to fight cancer with good research through the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event starting on August 6, 2016. John Davis (NY) gave $10.00 while Ray Washburn (VT) donated a generous $100.00 to support me in the cause. Thank you both so very much for your contributions. I appreciate it very much!

Wednesday, Cuatro de Mayo, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 41F, the sky was overcast, the roads were dry, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was good, ten miles or better. At daylight, the wind started to blow from the east. Very light at first, by noon we had ten knots. At sunset, the easterly wind was blowing seventeen knots sustained. Seas looked from the shore to be two feet. But chops they were. The air temperature labored up to 50F, what I saw as the high temperature in Perkins Cove today. The sky was overcast with very occasional very light rain all day. The visibility was good or even better than that. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 50F (with a low of 40F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 50F with a low of 43F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 50F (with a low of 42F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east northeast at five to ten knots in the morning. After noon, the wind increased to fifteen knots sustained. Seas were chops of two feet over rolling sea swells of two to four feet. The sky was overcast all day without rain. The air temperature reached a high of 46F. It was raw with the easterly wind. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility was very good (over twenty miles). The surface water temperature reached a high of 43.8F.

The fishing was a bit different than what we saw off shore yesterday. They didn't see the pollock we saw. But where we saw resident cod, every one, Ian's crew saw quite a few new fish today. Haddock sizes were smaller. For every two haddock caught, one was sub-legal. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. It wasn't even close. Legal landings also included two small pollock, one redfish and three cusk. The fishing/catching was very good overall. They drift fished in the morning, anchored in the afternoon. All terminal gear worked well.

Jim Feeney (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish or with the most fish, period. His best fish was a 6 pound haddock but he caught quite a few cod as well. Ray Washburn (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound cod. This is the third largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date and our fourth largest fish of the our season as well. Ray caught his larger than normal cod as part of a double keeper (sized - we don't keep or kill cod) catch with another cod of 8.5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Captain Ian took a picture of Ray with his double. This digital image appears on the right. Ally Fuehrer (ME) caught the second largest fish, a 14 pound cod. This is the Bunny Clark's fourth largest cod and fifth largest fish of the season. She also caught another nice cod of 9.5 pounds. The third largest fish was a 13 pound cod caught by John Davis (NY). John also caught his fish as part of a double with another cod of 10.5 pounds. John's largest haddock weighed 6 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Matt Steves (NY) caught a 12.5 pound cod, his largest fish. Bill Hunsicker (NY) landed a 6.5 pound haddock, the Bunny Clark's second largest haddock of the fishing season to date. Bill also landed the hard luck award for losing a jig. Randy Rivette (NY) caught a 10.5 pound cod, his best fish of the trip today.

I received two more donations toward my involvement in the cancer fight with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a $25.00 donation from Katelyn Feeney (MA) the other was a nice $50.00 donation from one of our former best reservationists, Katherine "Katie" Graichen (LA). Thank you both so very much for your thoughtfulness and generosity. I appreciate it very much but so many others appreciate the benefits of your donation so much more.

Thursday, Cinco de Mayo, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and I were supposed to be running the marathon trip today. I made the decision at 3:00 AM to cancel the trip, figuring the wind would come on the tide. I believed I was wrong; the wind (at least along the shore here) died on the tide. I do so hate to screw up and jeopardize a day out on the ocean. I have so few of those opportunities anymore. But when I listened to the buoy reports at 7:00 AM, in the area we were going to be fishing, seas were eight feet every seven seconds. This renewed my faith in decision making - sort of! Anyway, nothing I can do about it now. And I'm not going to kick myself all day; maybe just this morning!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 43F, the sky was overcast, a very light rain was falling, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair in fog, mist, haze and precipitation. The mist, light rain and drizzle hung around until at least 10:00 AM. After that the rain stopped but resumed around sunset. The rain was very light, intermittent but continued into the evening. The sky remained overcast throughout. The wind blew out of the northeast. Wind speeds ashore were in the fifteen to twenty knot range. Off shore, the wind was quite a bit stronger. The wind hauled out of the north around sunset and blew up to twenty knots. This continued with the rain. The air temperature reached a high of 48F in Perkins Cove, located in the teeth of the on shore wind. The visibility was good after 10:00 AM and remained so even with the light rain at the end of the day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 48F (with a low of 43F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 47F with a low of 44F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 52F (with a low of 42F).

I spent the rest of the day in the restaurants (Barnacle Billy's & Barnacle Billy's, Etc.). I ended up leaving at 6:00 PM. I had been up since 1:30 AM and decided to work through. So when I got home I ate a wonderful dinner prepared by my wife, Deb, and went right to bed.

Mike Remkiewicz, a wonderful person, my sister, Meg's, number one and a local lobsterman out of the Perkins Cove, donated a blue lobster to the restaurant for a few days before he plans to release it back into the wild. Meg has been the lobsters Secret Service agent until that time. It's been fun to show people. I teased her after she left work at 4:00 PM today that someone had cooked it by mistake. But she didn't bite. A blue lobster turns red just like every other lobster when cooked. So she never would have known. But I wouldn't do that to her. It's appropriate that the lobster was caught during one of the coldest Aprils we have ever experienced. I've been blue since April started! And I don't think Mother's Day will get to 85F this year like it did last year! I took a picture of the blue lobster. This digital image appears below.



After the cancellation this morning, I was handed a $1,000.00 donation supporting me in my quest for a cancer free world with the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event with the Jimmy Fund. This donation was made by the "Pittsfield Gang" in loving memory of Chris Porter who passed away late last year of a heart attack during a hunting trip with his best friends. Chris was a very caring individual and also cared very much about making monetary contributions to the Jimmy Fund. He wrote me out quite a few $1,000.00 checks supporting my role but I'm sure he gave in other avenues as well. A very unselfish guy. And one of the nicest people you will ever meet. I was very sorry to hear about Chris. And my first thought when it happened was; "How do we deserve this?" And maybe that's selfish. But we lost a good man. Thanks very much, "Gang". Nothing is more meaningful to me right now.

Friday, May 6, 2016

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light out of the north and the visibility over the ocean was very good or better. More later.

We have available fishing spots on the following trips: the full day trip on Saturday, May 7, has twenty fishing spots available, the extreme day trip on Monday, May 9, has fifteen fishing spots available, the extreme day trip of Wednesday, May 11, has thirteen fishing spots available, the marathon trip of Thursday, May 12, has ten fishing spaces available, the full day trip on Saturday, May 14, has twenty-two fishing spots available and the extreme day trip on Monday, May 16, has ten fishing spots available.. Sunday's first May trip started the haddock season. There were plenty caught that day. There were even more caught on the marathon trip, May 3rd. The regulations give us 15 haddock per person straight through the season until the end of February. The minimum size is seventeen inches, a bit too small in my opinion. Now is the time to go if you want to take advantage of the best haddock fishing we have seen in years. Be there or wish you were! You can call 207-646-2214 for reservations.

Also, I am looking for a deck hand to take four trips a week. Alec Levine is making a career choice and won't be with us after June. If anyone is interested give me a call. At the present time I am auditioning Josh Lester for the job.









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