www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

September 4, 2015, 8:30 AM EDT



Two Trophy Full Day Trip

The digital images above were taken during the full day trip of Tuesday, August 4, 2015. The shot on the left shows Brian Walsh (NJ), during the middle of a thunder shower on the fishing grounds, holding his 15.75 pound Maine state trophy cusk. This is the largest cusk that Brian has ever caught. Brian has been fishing with me since he was about four feet tall. He's now well over six feet! The cusk is the Bunny Clark's fourth largest cusk of the season to date. The shot on the right is a picture of Tom Ruggles (FL) holding his 4 pound Maine state trophy redfish. I don't believe Tom had ever caught a redfish before this trip. This is the largest redfish I have seen caught on the Bunny Clark since we started weighing them for trophies in 1990. We probably caught a couple larger ones in the early 80's. But, if we did, I wouldn't have known what they weighed. We caught thirty redfish on that one spot where Tom caught this fish. The closest one to this fish in weight was one that weighed 1.75 pounds. Tom's fish was well past spawning time and would have weighed more had we caught it three monthes earlier. Still it remains the largest redfish that has ever been weighed on the Bunny Clark. Thanks, Tom. I really appreciate that!




The new recreational fishing rules came out officially on April 28, 2015. They appear below.:





These regulations could have been much more onerous for the recreational angler and the for-hire fleet. If you ever see Frank Blount in Point Judith, RI (he owns the Francis Fleet) you want to make sure you thank him for the help he provided at the Council level to keep us in the fishery.

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 68F, the sky was clear, there was zero wind, there was not a ripple on the ocean's surface and the visibility over it was good. Ashore, it was warm and calm all day. Actually, it was more like hot and muggy. The air temperature reached 87F at least, probably higher. The sun was out in a clear but hazy sky. The visibility was good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 88F (with a low of 63F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 92F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 96F (with a low of 62F). The high temperature in Concord today set a record for the highest air temperature recorded on this day. The previous record was 95F set in 1949.

On the fishing grounds, the wind variable in direction (when there was wind) and very light. Most of the day there was no wind and the ocean was like a glass table. There was also very little tide (current). The air temperature was hot. Captain Ian didn't look at thermometer today. The sky was hazy clear. The visibility ranged from five to ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.2F.

The fishing was good to very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, again, by far. Legal landings also included half the boats bag limit of legal haddock, three redfish and two cusk. They were hampered in landings by the large number of dogfish that were also caught, about one hundred or less approximately. They seem to come and go as we had very few yesterday. They also released four market cod and one barely sub-legal halibut. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Ron Alpine (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 25 pound halibut. I met Ron for the first time at Breton's Bike shop on Monday. We talked about deep sea fishing and I suggested that he go with us. The rest is history! This is Ron's first Atlantic halibut and the Bunny Clark's second largest of the fishing season to date. Ian realized it was sub-legal when it was beside the boat. To get the fish in he leaned over the rail and grabbed the lower jaw as you would a fresh water bass and brought it in the boat. He weighed the fish, measured it, took a quick picture and released it. The digital image with Ron holding his prize appears on the left.

Russell Mott (ME) caught the second largest fish, a 17 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 14 pound pollock caught by Kris Gentzke (NY).

Other Angler Highlights: Bob Best (NH) caught a 12.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, his two "best" fish. Sorry, Bob, I couldn't help myself. Shawn Lynch (NH) boated an 11.5 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock, his two largest fish. Justin Mallory (NY) landed a 13 pound pollock. Anthony Best (NH) caught a 12.5 pound pollock. Bob DeSantis (NY) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the dreaded mal de mer!

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots, more or less. Seas were chops of a foot over rolling sea swells of two feet. The sky was clear. The air temperature was a comfortable 70F. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze.

The fishing was good for catching fish, mostly sub-legal. Legal landings included four cusk, a pollock and a redfish. They released quite a few sub-legal pollock, three sculpins, a sea raven, eight cod and a mackerel. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait.

Marc St. Lawrence (VT) was high hook with two legal fish. His largest, a 4.5 pound cusk, was the third largest fish of the trip. Kyler Schmitz (VA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8 pound cusk. Twelve year old Camden Tavares (VA) caught the second largest fish, a 5.5 pound pollock. Colin Burgess (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines!

Peter & Kerrie Breen (MA) sponsored me with a very generous donation of $500.00 towards my ride in the Pan-Mass Challenge, the event starting in Sturbridge, Massachusetts on Saturday morning. The bicycling event, of course, is designed to raise money to fight cancer through the Jimmy Fund/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. This is the first time the Breen's have supported me in this event. And I am humbled at the seriousness with which they do so now. Thank you both so very much for your help!

I had two more sponsors for my Pan-Mass Challenge ride later today. One was Kevin Andros (CT) with a $20.00 donation. The other donation was from Blake & Pam Love (NH) for a generous $100.00 in the form of an "egift" through the PMC website. Thank you all so very much for your help!

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility was at least ten miles looking southeast out to seas. After 10:00 AM, we had a light southwest breeze along the shore. The sky was sunny for most of the day. Clouds started to roll in around 2:30 PM. It was raining lightly by 3:30 PM. The air temperature was very warm today with a high in Ogunquit of at least 85F, probably more. It was certainly hot, hazy and humid. The visibility ranged to seven or eight miles. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 91F with a low of 74F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 93F (with a low of 63F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or more over rolling two foot seas/swells. The sky was overcast, or appeared to be overcast in the fog. And fog was what they had all day in varying degrees. At times the fog would shut right in. They also had periods of two mile visibility. The best visibility was five miles. The air temperature reached a high of 68F. The drift was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61.6F.

The fishing was good to very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock. The haddock fishing wasn't as good as it has been. But, then, they caught the most dogfish we have seen this season so far too. So did the haddock not bite or were the dogfish so ravenous that the haddock didn't have a chance? That was the question. Of course, when you get dogfish, you also get tangles - which also slows the fishing down. Legal landings also included a cusk and a whiting. Released fish included six market cod, over one hundred dogfish and one mackerel. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

A Harris could have been high hook but I didn't get the official word. Krystin Morris (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17.5 pound pollock. She also caught a cod that weighed 10 pounds, the largest cod of the trip. The second largest fish was a 14.5 pound pollock caught by Dave Harris (MA). Dave also caught a 12.5 pound pollock. Sara Tackson (NH) caught the third largest fish, a 14 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: John LaBrecque (ME) caught a 13.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Donna Flood (NH) landed a 12 pound pollock, her largest fish. Jed Astbury (VT) boated a 13.5 pound pollock, his best. Jacob Sawyer (VT) landed a 10 pound pollock and a pollock of 11.5 pounds, his two largest fish. Donald Maynard (ME) caught a 13 pound pollock, his largest fish. Ezra Astbury (VT) caught the largest haddock of the day. It weighed 5.5 pounds. Emma Astbury (VT) landed the hard luck award for calling the fish names. "Ralph" was one of them.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. It was hot, muggy, cloudy and raining lightly ashore when anglers boarded the Bunny Clark for the trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of one to two feet over rolling sea swells of two feet. The sky was overcast. It rained lightly most of the evening. The air temperature remained at 70F. The tide was moderate to strong (into the wind). The visibility ranged from eight to twelve miles in haze and precipitation.

The fishing was fair to good. They caught plenty of fish. Most of the fish were sub-legal or mackerel. Over fifty mackerel were landed. Released fish included two cod, close to one hundred pollock and two sculpins. Drifting was the method. Only bait and cod flies were used.

Dan Santomero (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.5 pound cod, released, of course. The second largest fish was a 4 pound cod caught by eight year old Isaac Osinchuk (VT). Rosemarie Zoda (NY) landed the hard luck award for being the most soaked individual. There were too many anglers who were sea sick to pick just one!

While the Bunny Clark was out to sea, we had a micro-burst that hit Barnacle Billy's deck with the full awnings out. It went from flat calm and rain to forty plus knots of wind in an instant. People got soaked because they couldn't get off the deck quickly enough (the deck was full), one of the awning was broken so it can't be used until fixed and a lot of food was left behind. No one got hurt. But there were several patrons who helped to try to save the awnings will my brother, Court, and crew tried to roll the awnings back in. To those who risked their dry clothes to help: Thank you! Where was I? I was in the office next door working on menus.

I received two donations of sponsorship towards my cancer fund raising ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a very generous $300.00 gift from Richie & Barb Jeffers (ME). The other was a $25.00 donation from Sandy Magill (ME/MA). Paul Haseltine and I leave for Boston tomorrow in order to start the event on Saturday morning in Sturbridge, Massachusetts. I know Richie & Barb wanted to get me their donation before the start of the ride (it's a good luck thing - thank you very much!) but the fund raising continues until December 30, 2015. And, some years, I raise more money after the event than I do before it! Anyway, a huge thank you to Richie, Barb & Sandy for their support and to everyone else who has donated to this special event and cause! All the best to all of you!

Friday, July 31, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was light from the west and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot over two foot seas from the south. The sky was sunny all day.The air temperature reached a high temperature of 68F (the air temperature was fourteen degrees higher ashore this day.). The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61.6F on the fishing grounds. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze.

The fishing was very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-one haddock and a cusk. Released fish included ten cod of market size, forty dogfish and a few sub-legal & legal haddock. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Chris LeBlanc (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish. Some of the better fish that Ian weighed for him included a 10.5 pound pollock, a 12 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock, a 13.5 pound pollock and another 12 pound pollock. The 13.5 pound pollock was the second largest pollock of the trip. Adam Noyes (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Biship Miller (NH).

Other Angler Highlights: Jeremi DeJesus (NH) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, his best fish. Rhianna Dimick (NH) caught an 11 pound pollock, her largest fish. She also landed the hard luck award for getting the greenest of any of the anglers of the trip. Gary Dimick (NH) caught a 12.5 pound pollock has his largest. George Nai (CT) boated a 10.5 pound pollock. Rita Sussenberger (NH) caught a 12 pound pollock, her best fish.

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. At the dock it was warm and sunny. On the fishing grounds, the wind had dropped to light and variable in direction. The ocean was calm all evening. The sky was clear. The air temperature was about 76F, the warmest evening trip of the season to date. The tide (current) was moderate to light.

The fishing was different. It was different in that forty-five dogfish were caught and released, the first dogfish we have seen in so close to shore in three seasons - this one included. So there were plenty of fish being caught. Those fish were mostly dogfish. Legal landings included two cusk, one pollock, one redfish and a mackerel. They released nine cod. Anchoring and drifting were both tried. Only bait and cod flies were used.

Tim Weed (VA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 6 pound cusk caught by Steve Johnson (CT). Marcus Logan (DC) caught the largest afternoon trip pollock of the season, to date, with a 3.5 pounder, the third largest fish of the trip. Chris Sullivan (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting sick. I'm not so sure it had anything to do with the motion of the ocean.

I received two more donations of sponsorship toward my cancer ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a generous $100.00 from the Barnacle Billy's "Dunn Family", Stu, Kamrie and Chris. The other was from Peter & Patti Vangsness (MA). Thank you all for thinking of me on the eve of the great weekend. I very much appreciate the support just knowing how much good we all do for medicine in New England. I will be riding was many cancer survivors this weekend. I know it means a great deal to them!

Pan-Mass Challenge, The Registration:

Paul "Hez" Haseltine and I headed to Boston at 9:30 AM this morning. This is Hez's tenth time and my ninth. On the way down I thought that here I am, being driven down to Boston to start our annual PMC journey and it will be over in the blink of an eye. Time goes so fast for me. But I savored the time with my best friend of more than fifty years. Hez usually drives, the last few years anyway. We get to Boston and go right to the Yankee Lobster Company restaurant. Here we have lunch. It's tradition. I have fried oysters. Again, tradition. Afterward, we drive the short distance to the ferry terminal parking lot, drop our gear off, Hez parks the car and we load bikes and gear for the trip to Sturbridge. We then board a bus to Sturbridge. We are usually on the road out of Boston by 1:00 PM.

When we get to Sturbridge, we register for the ride, get our room, find our bikes, get all the gear on the bikes (including identification) we will need for the ride and then meet friends in the Host Hotel. Dinner is provided for us. That starts around 4:00 PM. I am usually in bed by 5:30 or 6:00 PM. This time I got to bed at 6:30 PM. It's easy for me to fall asleep because, in my mind, I know I can't go back home and work. The life just gets sapped right out of me.

Nothing unusual happened on this day. I didn't see as many riders as I have come to know over the years. They were all there but I think my timing was a bit off. And there are many riders. And it's loud at dinner with a huge tent and hundreds of people. All these people with a common cause being treated to a sanctioned bike ride as their prize for raising money to fight cancer. There are many rides all over the country that are probably more fun and certainly a lot less money. But it's not about the ride. And, in fact, there have been a couple of times when I was on the fence about even attending. But you also become a symbol when you ride. You are representing the best of humanity. The cancer fight. And this is what you have to think about when you join up in the first place. Yes, it's a gift to you (me) as a cyclist but it's also a responsibility. And I do take my responsibilities seriously. It was easy to fall asleep.

Pan-Mass Challenge, Saturday, August 1, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot over a rolling sea swell of two feet. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The air temperature ranged from 66F to 69F. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.2F on the fishing grounds. The visibility was well over twenty miles, or excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 90F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 57F).

The fishing was excellent, one of the best trips of the season. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. The haddock count was just a couple fish shy of the boat bag limit. Legal landings also included one cusk. Released fish included twenty dogfish, seven market cod, a cunner and a blue shark. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

John Russell (ME) was, far and away, high hook with the most legal fish. Some of his fish included a 12.25 pound pollock, a 10 pound cod, a 10 pound pollock, two pollock of 14 pounds each and a 15 pound pollock. He also landed a double keeper catch that included a 13.5 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. John's 15 pound pollock tied for the second largest fish of the trip. Seamus O'Doherty (AL) caught the other 15 pound fish, a pollock, to tie John's fish for second place. Seamus also caught a 12.25 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. Dennis Raju (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. Dennis also caught a 14.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Paul Kostopoulos (CT) landed the largest haddock. It weighed 5 pounds. Paul also caught a double keeper catch that included a 10.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. Some of Paul's other good fish included another 10 pound pollock, a 14.5 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. Joe Laporte (MA) landed a 10.5 pound pollock and a 13.5 pound pollock, his two best fish. Jibin Manimala (NY) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the trip.

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind had dropped five knots out of the southwest. The sea was calm over two foot long rolling sea swells. The sky was clear and sunny. The air temperature hung around 75F all evening. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature got up as high as 67F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was good. Mostly sub-legal pollock were caught and released as well as four small cod. One cod would have been large enough to keep had we been able to. Legal landings included six cusk and six mackerel. Anchoring was necessary with the current situation. It was much too strong to drift. Only bait and cod flies were used.

Heather Colvin (NY) was high hook with two legal fish, both cusk. One weighed 4.5 pounds. The other weighed 4 pounds. Kristi Weber (CO) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 6.5 pound cusk caught by Karl Weber (CO). There was a tie for the third largest fish, both fish 5 pounds. Julie Perron (VT) caught one, a 5 pound cusk. Brian Perron (VT) caught the other, a 5 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Jay Spaulding (VT) caught a 4 pound cusk, the only other legal fish caught this evening. Brendan Weber (CO) landed the hard luck award for making unsuccessful attempts at chumming in the fish.

Pan-Mass Challenge, The First 112 Miles:

When 3:00 AM came around I was already awake, just like at home. But with a little extra sleep than I get at home. Hez and I rallied, grabbed our bikes, pumped tires, got water bottles aboard and brought our bikes to the start line. At 3:15 AM, we are usually the first two to put our bikes on the line. Then we go to the breakfast room, pick up something to eat and go back to our room at the Host Hotel. Here we eat. The night before, at dinner, I had a plastic bag with me. After I ate I filled the plastic bag with pasta and pieces of chicken. So, along with my orange juice, I ate pasta out of a plastic bag. And, you know, it was the best breakfast I have ever had at the start of the PMC!

We have one goal after breakfast: find Steve LaPlante! Steve always drives up from Connecticut to see us off at 4:30 AM. And he is the tallest one so he's easy to spot. Plus, I knew he would be wearing this year's PMC/Bunny Clark theme t-shirt in signal green! As soon as we walked out the door Hez spotted him. We always have our picture taken with Steve on every start of every PMC ride. This year we had an added bonus; Dave Miller and his wife, Joanne, were there with Joanne's nephew, J.D. Daige. J.D. spoke at last night's ceremonies. He had three different types of cancers, all life threatening. But they worked around the edges in treatments. It wasn't until he found Dana-Farber (the hospital that the PMC supports) that his treatments changed and he became cancer free. It's quite a story. He served in two tours in Aphganistan. When he got home he found that he had testicular cancer. The story goes on from there. Today J.D. and the doctor responsible for treating him at the DFCI rode together to Mass. Maritime Academy.



So I was able to get a picture of all of us. Joanne took my defective (I later found out) camera and got a shot that I had to photoshop to get it looking good enough to post. This shot appears above. From left to right is Dave Miller, long time fellow angler and good friend, yours truly, Steve LaPlante, long time fellow angler and good friend, Hez and J.D. When this picture was taken I didn't know J.D.'s story. I didn't attend the ceremonies and I didn't know the connection between Dave & Joanne. I found out later. Had I known I would have shaken J.D.'s hand. Hell of a story.

This ride was very similar to all the first day PMC rides I have ever done. The start is en masse with only the first few riders over the line able to clip in and ride out. All the rest have to walk their bikes out to the road. The line is at the end of the parking lot at the Host Hotel. So it's about 150 feet from the start line to the road. And, yes, after the start there is a bottleneck. So if you are a couple riders back and you do clip in you will certainly have to clip out again. Over the years riders have broken bones because they tried to clip in with nowhere to go only to fall over in the process.

I was on the front so I clipped in and got right out ahead of the pack. Actually, both Hez and I were out together. I rode with Hez for a little bit until I saw my riding buddy from Kennebunkport, Jonathan Cartwright (Until this year, Jonathan was the head chef and manager at the White Barn Inn, Kennebunkport), ride by way left. I yelled to him but he didn't hear me. Then I tried to chase after him only to get caught behind a clot of cyclists. I lost him in the sea of this years PMC issued riding jerseys. At the same time, he was looking for me. And you are probably wondering why there were so many cyclists ahead of me even though I was first over the line. When the ride starts, there are many riders on the side of the main road waiting for the start gun (so to say - there is no gun). So when you do turn the corner, there are already about a hundred cyclists ahead of you. Some of these cyclists are fast so they form a little breakaway group. Others are not very good cyclists at all. It's a mix. This was the mix I was in as I made my way to the front of the "second" group. When I did make it there. I did notice that Jonathan had bridged the gap between my huge group and the breakaway group. He was up with the police cruiser. I thought about it for a minute, judged the distance and my energy level and thought about the two major crashes I have been involved in over the years. Did I really want to make this into a race again? I decided not to and let them go. Yes, I could have bridged the gap. And I probably would have taken a few riders with me. But it's these riders who you don't know that always get you in trouble. Trusting someone you don't know in a charity event can be dicey at best. Once I came to the decision that playing it safe was the decided option, I found myself an open lane and rode off on my own.

There is a fair amount of climbing during the first half of the ride to MMA. On one of those climbs a woman, Christine, went past me like a mountain goat. I hooked on to her wheel and she pulled me up the hill, past everyone else. On the crest, I went past her and she hooked on to my wheel as we went down hill and on the flats. The next hill, same thing. She pulled me up the hill and I pulled her to the next one. More riders gathered as we covered the miles. At the Franklin water stop, I asked if she wanted to continue. Her husband (who has cancer and is being treated at Dana-Farber), was to meet her there. So I took a short break and continued on alone. I ended up getting in a fast group of really good riders and, basically, sat in until the water stop seventy miles into the ride. I arrived there at 8:45 AM, the lunch stop. There were very few riders there at the time but more kept coming in as I "ate lunch". The next time I looked up, Christine was standing right next to me. She wanted to know if I wanted to ride the last forty miles with her. She had ridden in from Albany the day before (90 miles) and had given too much energy in the ride to this point. That was fine by me. With just the two of us it would slow us down but it would be a safer ride. I ended up doing most of the pulling on that last leg. Although we did pick up another rider about twenty miles into it. The three of us rolled over the line into Mass Maritime Academy at 11:30 AM. We all shook hands, thanked each other and I never saw Christine or the other rider again.

I did end up finding Jonathan Cartwright at MMA. He kept thinking I was ahead of him until he crossed the line and found out he was the fourth one in. By that point he knew who the other three riders were. It's funny because he rolled out of the lunch stop as I was rolling in! Had I looked I might have been able to find him and ride with him until the end. I also found Andy Armitage, a wonderful person whom I ride with on Sundays with the riding club I belong to. Both Andy and Jonathan are from Sheffield, England. We all got together over beers and some food.

Hez rolled in around 2:00 PM. For someone who only trains about two hundred miles a year, he did great without any soreness afterward. We hooked up after his shower, met friends, ate dinner and said goodbye. I was in bed asleep at 5:30 PM. With no chance of going to work, having to meet the boat or completing food orders, I fell into a deep slumber. A bomb could have gone off and I wouldn't have woken up.

Pan-Mass Challenge, Sunday, August 2, 2015

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at five knots or less. The ocean was calm. The sky was clear and sunny. The visibility was very clear, excellent. The air temperature reached a high of 70F. The tide (current) was very strong today. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.4F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 61F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 52F).

The fishing was good. Although, I believe it would have been better had the wind not been out of the west. Most legal fish landed were pollock followed by haddock. The only other legal fish landed was a cusk. Released fish included thirteen market cod to 8.5 pounds, one wolffish and about seventy dogfish. Drifting was the method in which they set the boat up for fishing. Cod flies caught the most fish, by far, today.

Steve Levine (ME) was high hook with fifteen legal. He did not land a fish of 10 pounds or better. Rob Foster (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11.5 pound pollock caught by Josh Foster (ME). Alison Hayden (NH) caught the third largest fish, an 8.5 pound cod. Jim Butler (MA) had a problem with the oceans motion and received the hard luck award t-shirt.

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at ten knots. Seas were chops of foot. The sky was clear but it was hazy. The air temperature hung around the 70F mark. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged to twelve miles or more in haze.

The fishing was good overall. Legal landings included ten cusk, one redfish, one cunner and three mackerel. They did not catch very many sub-legal fish today. Those fish only included two pollock and four cod. They drift fished for the evening. Only bait was used.

Steve Levine, on his second trip of the day, was high hook yet again with three legal. His largest fish was a 5 pound cusk. Karmen Bascom (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 5.75 pound cusk caught by Carlos Saat (Bolivia). Erick Rivea (NH) caught the third largest fish, a 5.25 pound cusk.

Other Angler Highlights: Roberto Deangelas (MA) caught a cusk of 4.75 pounds. Nick LeBlanc (VT) boated a 3.5 pound cusk. Nick Rabatin (NJ) also caught a 3.5 pound cusk. George Bargfrede (VT) landed a 4 pound cusk. Ryan Prescod (MA) boated a cusk of 2.75 pounds. Cara Rabatin (NJ) landed the hard luck award for being the most tangled and for not catching a single fish, a lethal combination for fishing failure.

Pan-Mass Challenge, The Last 80 Miles:

After being holed up for the night at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy in one of their dorm rooms, I got up at 3:30 AM and walked my water bottles down to my bike near the entrance and pumped my tires up. I ride sew-ups (tires). And they always lose a little air overnight. When I got back to the dorm, the place was a bustle of activity. I packed all my gear up and got dressed for the day's ride. The first day you are required to ride in the PMC kit. This day you wear your club kit, racing kit, cancer team kit or whatever you would like. I represented the Maine Coast Cycling Club from head to socks. Once packed and ready, I dropped the bag off at the truck headed to Provincetown, our destination.

Some riders start out at 4:00 AM; there is no set time to leave like there is on the first day. I don't have a light so I like to leave by 5:30 AM at the earliest. This way I can have a longer breakfast. But I like to ride with the team from Path to the Cure, a team made up of riders who devote all their donations to the Pediatric Oncology wing of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. And they leave by 4:30 AM. So I always have to catch up to them. But this never seems to be a problem because they stop at every water stop. I believe there are four. So at some point I catch up. And I always like to ride with the faster riders in their group on the leg from Wellfleet to P-town. For some reason, those roads favor my style of riding more than it does most others. And I tend to lead for the majority of that section. It's a very fun last leg and we tend to carry an average speed of 23 to 24 mph. At least, that's what it was this time.



We all eventually finish at the Provincetown Inn, take showers (group showers with a bunch of naked men is not my cup of tea), eat lunch, go to the Colony bar and then board the ferry to Boston. Above is shot of some of the guys I most like to ride with. The digital image was taken while on the ferry ride to Boston. From left to right is Andy Carver (was a professional rugby player in the UK), yours truly, Hez, Mike Parent and Jack Fitzgibbons.

This time in the trip cements the idea that this is a celebration of what we do to fight cancer. We are all in. And I suspect that we will be in for a long time. Mike Parent has done the ride for twenty years. Jack Fitzgibbons had done it for over thirty years! All are wonderful caring people as it seems all the riders are in this event. I'm not sure that I have ever been part of an event that has so much meaning. It's quite a thing. And it's very hard to describe. As I said before, a display of the best humanity has to offer.

As I got off the ferry and Hez and I said goodbye to our PMC friends, I was hit by the usual melancholy. It's finished for another year. And it goes by so fast. Cancer never sleeps. And neither does the fund raising. So I will keep trying to get as many donations as I can until the end of December, the end of the PMC's fiscal fund raising year. I would love to generate as much as $30,000.00 this year. I'm over half way. We'll see.

Monday, August 3, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was good in haze. Ashore, it wasn't long before the wind showed up. In fact, it was already blowing offshore. We started to see it at dawn when the wind hauled out of the south by south southwest and blew over ten knots. The wind ended up blowing higher than fifteen knots in gusts along the shore. The sky was sunny all day. The air temperature got up as high as 83F, maybe higher. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The visibility was good, at least. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 64F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 90F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 92F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at ten knots to begin. After a couple hours the wind piped up to fifteen knots sustained with higher gusts. Seas were one foot chops to begin and two to three foot chops near the end of the trip. The wind never dropped for the ride back to Perkins Cove. The sky was sunny all day. The air temperature ranged from 65F to 70F. The visibility ranged from a half mile in fog early to ten miles in haze later. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.0F on the grounds. The tide (current) was strong all day.

The fishing was very good, bordering on excellent all day. Landings were very good despite catching and releasing over one hundred dogfish! Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far, followed by haddock. The only other legal fish caught was a cunner. Released fish (besides the dogfish and sub-legal haddock) included a halibut and fifteen cod of market size. Anchoring was the method most effective. All terminal gear worked well.

High hook couldn't be determined. But I would have to say that it was either John Baker (ME), Paul Kostopoulos (CT) or Brian Walsh (NJ). Mike Harr (OH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20 pound sub-legal halibut. Ian took one quick picture, got a weight and released it alive. He actually got a length as well - thirty-six inches, five inches shy of legal. This is the third largest halibut caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. The digital image with Mike holding the fish appears on the left.

Ian has been grabbing these sub-legal halibut in the mouth (like you would hold a fresh water bass) while bending over the rail. I wouldn't have thought to do it this way but if I get a chance on a small one I will try it to see how it works.

John Baker caught the second largest fish, a 15.5 pound pollock. He also caught a double keeper catch that included two pollock of exactly 10 pounds each, both caught on the same line at the same time! Two other good fish of John's included a 13 pound pollock and a pollock of 11.5 pounds. Brian Walsh caught the second and third largest fish, both weighed in at 14 pounds and both were pollock. He also caught a 12.5 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock and a double that included a 13.5 pound pollock and a 7 pound pollock. This was the biggest double of the day.

Other Angler Highlights: Ken McLaughlin (ME) caught the first fish big enough to weigh, an 11 pound pollock. Paul Kostopoulos (CT) caught an 11 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Lucas Nasta (VT) boated a pollock of 12.5 pounds, his best. Mike Gushey (CT) caught a 13 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Jeannette Harr (OH) landed a 12.5 pound pollock. Jim Monroe (NY) landed the hard luck award for doing a terrible job of remaining healthy during the trip. Something about the waves I think.

I received two generous donations sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Both were "egifts" completed on line at the PMC website. One was $100.00 from Westy Lord (ME) and the other was from Dick Fox (CA) also for $100.00. Thank you both so much for the support. You know I really appreciate it. But it's even better that you support me as you do every year. And, for all those out there, the fiscal fund raising year does not end with the end of the event itself (the event ended Sunday - and I didn't fall off my bike!). The fund raising ends on December 30, 2015. So you have plenty of time to donate if you so desire!

Tim Tuesday, August 4, 2015

Alec Levine and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was clear, the was blowing out of the west at seven knots and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze.

It was raining as we arrived on the fishing grounds. We were right in the middle of a series of thunder storms, the likes of which I have only seen a couple of times that far offshore. At the time, the wind was blowing out of the west southwest at fifteen to twenty knots. So I decided to anchor and fish until it passed. We stayed there for about an hour and then moved on from there. The storms passed after that hour and left us with sunny skies and light south southwest winds. Wind speeds may have reached ten knots but it was mostly less than that. Seas were chops of a foot or so. The visibility ranged up to fifteen miles in haze. The air temperature remained at 67F for the whole trip. The tide was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66.2F on the fishing grounds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 89F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 86F (with a low of 59F).

The fishing was good to very good for the trip. This is one of the only fishing trips this where I can say that we released more cod from 5 to 16 pounds than we caught legal pollock. And we caught a lot of legal pollock. In fact, pollock was by far the number one legal fish landed today. Legal landings also included two cusk, twenty-four haddock and twenty-nine redfish. Released fish included twice as many haddock, twenty dogfish and more sub-legal pollock than I wanted to see caught. We anchored, drift fished and used the sea anchor. All were effective. All terminal gear worked well.

I would say that Arne Halvorsen (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. If market cod were included in the legal fish count, high hook would have gone to Brian Walsh. Brian caught more good sized cod than any angler today, by far. And three or four catches were double keeper catches. Arne's three largest fish included a 10 pound cod, an 11 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. Brian caught a 15.75 pound Maine state trophy cusk, his largest fish of the trip. This is Brian's largest ever cusk and the Bunny Clark's fifth largest cusk of the season to date. It was the second largest fish of the trip. His largest cod weighed 9.25 pounds and his largest pollock weighed 11 pounds.

Steve Levine (ME) was another angler who could have shared high hook status. Unless you count, you never know for sure. Steve won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound cod. This is tied for the Bunny Clark's seventh largest cod of the fishing season to date. I took a tonal picture of Steve with my iPhone (something different). This digital image appears on the left. The fish was completely unscathed (hooked in the lip), swimming to bottom as soon as it was released after the picture. Some of Steve's other good fish included a 5 pound haddock and an 11 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Alex Turnbull (OH). Alex also caught a haddock that weighed 5 pounds.

We also had something wonderful happen during the first hour right in the middle of a lightning storm. Tom Ruggles (FL) caught the largest redfish that I have ever weighed on the Bunny Clark. When Tom swung the fish aboard, I couldn't believe how big it looked. When I weighed it the fish came out at exactly 4 pounds on the scale. I weighed it twice! A Maine state trophy redfish by 2 pounds! We started weighing redfish for trophies in 1990. The minimum size to qualify was and still remains at 2 pounds. And it's very unusual these days to catch or see a trophy red. We might have seen a couple of redfish this big in the early 80's. But I would never know that for sure. It could actually be the largest redfish that has ever been caught on the Bunny Clark. Officially, it is! Tom's largest fish of the day was a pollock that weighed 10 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: John Libby (NJ) lost the biggest haddock of the trip. It had to be at least 6 pounds, maybe 7? John's largest fish was an 11 pound pollock. Rick Bemis (MA) caught a 5 pound haddock, his best fish. Kent Libby (NJ) boated an 11 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Johan Halvorsen (ME) boated a 9 pound pollock and caught a 10.25 pound cod, his two best fish. [Of course, all the cod were released today.] But Johan had the biggest cod we have seen in three years, I'm sure of it, had he got the fish to the surface. There was no doubt it was a big cod. Rolling and snapping the line as it came up, he had a hard time controlling it. Johan lost the fish about a third of the way up. We'll never know! Brian Bemis (MA) caught the second largest cod of the trip at 11.25 pounds. Tom Turnbull (OH) boated a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also landed the hard luck award for losing one of my bait rods overboard - never to be seen again! He slipped as the boat was settling in on a drift and had to drop the pole in order to save himself. I saw it all happen. And, frankly, I'm glad he dropped the pole. Otherwise, his head might have been involved. I'm much happier that he didn't get hurt!

Alec Levine and I ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. At the dock it was warm and sunny but as we were leaving for the fishing grounds it started to rain. A massive thunder storm was upon us for the first half of the ride out. Winds were variable in direction but the winds averaged twenty knots with two foot chops. Rain poured down. For fifteen minutes we had hail bouncing off the canopy top from dime size to the occasional quarter size stone. I had never seen hail so large until this moment. And watching the hail splash into the water was very unique to me. Thunder and lightning surrounded us. And then it was gone, headed to the east of us. On the grounds, the wind was light and variable, the sun was out in a mostly clear sky and the air temperature hung around 69F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was about eighteen miles or better.

The fishing was very good overall. Most fish were sub-legal but we had a good number of pollock for once. Legal landings included mostly pollock and twelve haddock. We released seventeen cod but none of them would have been legal if the size limit was twenty-one inches. We also released about ten dogfish. We drift fished mostly and anchored once. All terminal gear worked well.

Steve Levine (ME) was high hook with nine legal. He released most of the legal pollock and gave three haddock away. His largest fish was a 7.25 pound pollock. Nine year old Charles Theriault (QC) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. This fish was the last fish of the evening! And it took his grandfather's help and my help to reel it in as it was weighted down with other angler's tangled sinkers and lines! It was a great moment. The second largest fish was a 9 pound pollock caught by Charles' grandfather, John Duchaine (QC). John also caught the largest cod at 4 pounds and a 3 pound haddock. Brian Donovan (NY) caught the third largest fish, an 8.75 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Eleven year old Vinnie Congialdi (PA) caught our largest haddock of the evening trips this Bunny Clark season, so far. I had to take a picture of him with his special fish. This digital image appears on the right. The haddock weighed 4 pounds. Vinnie also caught a 3 pound haddock and a 2.25 pound legal pollock. Seamus Kelley (NY) caught two pollock of 3.5 pounds. Brian Kelley (NY) caught a 3.5 pound cod. Ruth Garrett (PA) caught a 3 pound haddock, her best fish. Erik Danie (CA) caught the best double keeper catch of the evening. His double included a 2.75 pound haddock and an 8 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Jen Garrett (PA) boated a 6.75 pound pollock, her biggest fish. Erin Kelley (NY) landed a 4.5 pound pollock, her largest of two keepers. Vinnie Congialdi, Sr. (PA) landed the hard luck award for being the only angler not to catch a legal fish! Ouch!

I received a very much appreciated $50.00 donation from Nancy Richards (ME) sponsoring me in my Pan-Mass Challenge that went off last weekend. I haven't seen Nancy for a few years. But we all grew up together in Perkins Cove during the "good old days". Thank you, Nancy, I appreciate this very much!

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was clear, there was very little wind to speak of, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was very good. The wind ashore blew out of the west all day. Ten knots was about the average speed with gusts up as high as fifteen knots in the later morning. Less in the afternoon. It was a warm day (I saw a high temperature in Ogunquit of 83F) but it felt strangely like a warm fall day. The sky was mostly clear all day. We did have small low pressure cell with rain go by to the south of us. We never saw any rain or much of any cloud cover over Ogunquit all day. The visibility was very good at least. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 54F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west southwest at ten knots, more or less, for the trip. Seas were chops of one to two feet. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The tide (current) was strong. The air temperature ranged from 67F to 71F in the shade. The visibility was well over twenty miles or excellent (in my book). The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing was good to very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings, though, saw a drop in the haddock count with only thirteen legal haddock landed and only that same amount of sub-legal haddock. Legal landings included eight cusk and two cunners. Released fish included eighteen dogfish, two redfish and fifteen cod of market size but no larger. Drifting and anchoring were the methods. All terminal gear worked well.

There was no discernable high hook as everyone caught fish equally around the boat. Frank Noble (ME) looked like he came off the boat with the most fillets. Brian Lincks (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 17 pound pollock caught by Joe Royce (MA). Joe also caught a 10 pound pollock. Frank Noble caught the third largest fish, a 13 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Connor Sully (NY) boated a 12 pound pollock, his best fish. Wayne VanZandt (NY) landed a 10 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock, his two largest fish. Alex Potapov (QC) caught a 12 pound pollock. Pat Osborne (NY) caught a pollock of 11.5 pounds. Joe Ciejka (MA) got sea sick and landed the hard luck award t-shirt for his efforts to stay healthy. Obviously, his efforts failed.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at five to eight knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less over two foot swells. The small low pressure cell that went south of Ogunquit ended up going over the Bunny Clark. They received five minutes of rain from this system. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds otherwise. The tide was moderate. The air temperature stayed at 69F. The visibility was well over twenty miles.

The fishing was slow. The bite was off. One would have expected as much with the weather and the wind direction. For sub-legal fish, only fifteen small cod and twelve pollock were caught. Legal fish included a cusk and two mackerel. They drift fished and anchored. Neither one worked any better than the other. Only bait and cod flies were used. No jigs.

George Hannafin (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the only legal groundfish of the evening, a 4 pound cusk. Ron Wichowski (CT) landed the hard luck award for losing three bait rigs.

Thursday, August 6, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the west northwest at ten to fifteen knots with higher gusts. The sky very blue with a bright sun and some very white clouds. There seemed to be no haze at all. It was warm, I saw 82F, but there was so little humidity, it seemed more like a warm fall day. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a about a foot over short swells of two feet. The sky was an even mix of sun and clouds. The sun was very bright. The tide (current) was strong. The air temperature ranged from 66F to 70F on the fishing grounds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.9 on the grounds. The visibility was excellent.

The fishing was very good for a few, good for everyone else. Those with jig sticks and cod flies did the best. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-six haddock, two cusk and a whiting. Released fish included twenty-five dogfish and twelve small market cod. They alternated between drifting and anchoring. Cod flies caught the most fish.

Captain Ian told me that he couldn't tell who, individually, was high hook with the most legal fish today. But he did say that it was between Dave Harris (MA), Erin Harris (MA) and Justin Marge (MA). Dave's largest fish was a 10 pound pollock. Thirteen year old Erin Harris, Dave's daughter, won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.5 pound pollock. Captain Ian took a great picture of her holding her pollock with her father in the background, on the bow pulpit. The digital image appears on the left. Twelve year old Justin Marge caught the second and third largest fish. Both fish were pollock of 13 pounds each!

Other Angler Highlights: Chris Smith (VT) caught an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. John Marge (MA) caught an 11 pound pollock, his best. Richard Poissant (MA) boated a 10 pound pollock. Cathy Gallegher (ON) landed the hard luck award for betting bitten by the sea sick bug.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. It was very warm, clear, sunny and very little humidity on the dock before the trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west northwest at ten knots, more or less. Seas were chops of a foot or less over two foot swells. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds otherwise. The tide was moderate. The air temperature stayed at 71F. The visibility was well over twenty miles.

The fishing was good overall. My opinion, of course. Most fish caught (and returned alive) were sub-legal pollock. Legal landings included two cusk, eleven mackerel and a cunner. Released fish included two small market cod, a wolffish, a small redfish and a sculpin. Ian anchored and drift fished. Anglers all used bait. Some used cod flies as well. Those terminal gear types worked well.

Neil Flack (NY) was would have been high hook if cod and wolffish were still legal to keep. Neil won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound wolffish. His second largest fish was a 5 pound cod. Both fish were released, of course. Nine year old Allie Blair (MA) caught the second largest fish, a 7 pound cusk. The third largest fish was a 6.5 pound cusk caught by Spencer Cobb (OH).

Other Angler Highlights: Bob Cobb (OH) caught a 6.25 pound cod, his largest fish. Justin Hennessy (MA) landed the hard luck award because "he needs some men's clothing". I have no idea what that means. Ian wrote it and I'm passing it on.

I received two very generous donations supporting my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The first donation was from John & Pat Anderson (TX/ME) for $200.00. The other donation was from Andy Barowsky (ME) for $250.00. Thank you all very much for continuing to sponsor me in this event every year. It means so much to so many people. But your help is special to me.

Friday, August 7, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was glass calm and the visibility over it was very good to excellent. At about 9:00 AM, the wind started to blow from the east. Later, east southeast. It never really changed direction much all day. There was little wind except maybe ten knots right along the shore in the late afternoon. But once you got away from land a bit there was very little wind. There was very little humidity. The sky was mostly clear with a bright sun. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature never reached 80F in Ogunquit. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 53F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 49F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north to east at five knots or less. The ocean remained calm for the trip. The sky was sunny all day with little cloud cover. The air temperature ranged from 68F to 72F. The visibility was over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63.6F on the fishing grounds. The tide was moderate to very strong.

The fishing was good overall. It was excellent for haddock landings, our best in weeks. But they also caught the most dogfish we have seen this year so far. The count was well over two hundred of the green eyed devils. Whenever you get that many dogfish, groundfish landings go down. Most legal fish landed, by far, were haddock. Legal landings also included nineteen pollock, six cusk, one mackerel and one cunner. Released fish, other than dogfish, included five market to large market cod and one wolffish. They tried anchoring and drifting. Drifting worked the best. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. There was a lot going on. Too much, really. Sam Kim (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. He caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch that also included a 9.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The second largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Dennis Keyser (ME). Two 11 pound fish tied for the third largest of the trip. One was a cod caught by Polly Phach (ME). The other was a pollock caught by Rob Didonato (ME). Polly also caught the largest haddock of the day at 5.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Cole Esposito (CT) caught the first fish of the day to be weighed, a 10 pound pollock. Harry Mesick (NY) also caught a 10 pound pollock. Harry's was caught near the end of the trip. Andrew Esposito (CT) landed the hard luck award for having to fish multiple rods with children! Thankfully, no one was sea sick!

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at five knots or less. The ocean was calm over a two foot swell. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The air temperature started at 72F but dropped to 68F before the trip was over. The tide was moderate. The visibility was excellent. The surface water reached a high temperature of 64.8F.

The fishing was good overall. There were many sub-legal pollock caught, the majority of fish, by far. Legal landings included six cusk, ten mackerel and a cunner. They released a wolffish, two market cod and a sea raven. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait. Some used cod flies.

Barry Barkauskas (NY) was high hook with two cusk. One weighed 5 pounds. The other weighed 5.5 pounds, the third largest fish of the trip. Christopher Good (ON) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.25 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 6 pound cusk caught by Rich Colarusso (MA).

Other Angler Highlights: Richie Colarusso (MA) released a 4.5 pound cod. Randy Smith (MD) caught a cusk that weighed 4 pounds. Jonas King (NY) caught and released a 5 pound cod. Ryan Wallert (CT) landed a 5.25 pound cusk. Claire Heavey (NY) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines. Another trip with no one sea sick! Yes!

I received two more donations supporting me in my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was from Deb & Thomas McDonnell (MA) for $50.00. The other was from Suzanne Graves (ME) for $25.00. Suzanne wanted me to split the donation with Paul "Hez" Haseltine. Since both Hez and I have the same donation destination, I passed the check on to Hez. Thank you all so very much. Much appreciated indeed!

Saturday, August 8, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the sky was clear, a crescent moon was hanging over the eastern horizon, the wind was light out of the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was very good to excellent. The northeast wind blew up over ten knots later in the morning but backed off again before 11:00 AM. For the rest of the day the wind was light and variable in direction from some quadrant of the east. The ocean along the shore was calm. The air temperature just made it to the mid 70s today. It was a beautiful day with sunny skies throughout. The evening cooled down into the high 60s. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 54F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 76F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north northeast at ten knots to start but dropped to five knots or less in the afternoon. There was a one foot chop over a two foot chop/swell in the morning but calm in the afternoon. The air temperature ranged from 68F to 75F in the shade. The tide (current) had backed off to moderate from the strong tides we had earlier in the week. The sky was clear and sunny. The visibility was excellent. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.7F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was good to very good overall today. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-six haddock and a cusk. There were eight market sized cod caught today, only a very few small cod were caught. Thirty dogfish were caught and released. Both drift fishing and anchoring were used. All terminal gear worked well.

Norm Herrick (MA/ME) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18 pound pollock. He also caught the largest double keeper catch of the trip. His catch included two pollock of 10 pounds each, both caught on the same line at the same time. And he shared third largest fish status with Tim LaRose (VT). Both anglers caught a pollock of 12.5 pounds. Norm also boated a 12 pound pollock.

The second largest fish was a 14 pound pollock caught by Todd Smith (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Ted Begin, Jr. (NH) landed a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Jay Hajj (MA) caught an 11.5 pound pollock. Justin Morel (NY) boated a 12 pound pollock, his biggest. Denise Floss (NY) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer!

We had a bunch of chefs on the boat today. Among them was Ming Tsai, fusion chef from the Food Network and television personality in general. If I had been on the trip I would have found out more. Ming himself was a pretty good guy to talk to, as you might expect. Between them they brought a fish box of whole pollock and haddock back to Kennebunkport with them. Once they got there, they were going to fillet the fish themselves and cook up something special I am sure.

We did not run the afternoon half day trip today.

I received a generous $145.00 donation from Norm Herrick today sponsoring me in my cancer cycling event with the Pan-Mass Challenge that took place last weekend. Cancer doesn't sleep and neither does the fund raising to fight it, the fiscal fund raising year ending on December 30, 2015. Thank you very much, Norm. I very much appreciate the fact that you keep me and the Jimmy Fund at the top of your list.

Sunday, August 9, 2015

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine were supposed to be running the full day trip today. We never did get more than two anglers to make the trip. So, after full boat yesterday, the wooden anchors are out for the day trip.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was overcast (but clear skies could be seen to the west at 6:00 AM), the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good to excellent. After sunrise, the northeast wind piped up to fifteen and twenty knots. It looked rough from the shore but the northeast wind is an on shore breeze so to look at it, you are looking right into the teeth of it. There were quite a few big white caps. The wind started to die out before noon. As it did the air temperature rose. It may have been as high as 78F at 1:30 PM. The sky cleared around 10:00 AM but you could still see the clouds from the big offshore low pressure area skirting our region headed outside Nova Scotia. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature dropped into the mid 60s after sunset. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 57F).

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at ten knots or less. Seas were chops of almost two feet with the left over gurge from the earlier wind out of the east and northeast. The sky was clear. The air temperature hung around the 70F mark. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged to ten miles.The surface water reached a high temperature of 64.7F.

The fishing was good overall. There weren't nearly as many sub-legal as has been normal. Legal landings included eight cusk, a cunner and four mackerel. There were a few sub-legal cod and pollock released. Both anchoring and drift fishing were tried. Everyone used bait.

Peter Turcotte (QC) was high hook with two legal, a 5.25 pound cusk and a 6 pound cusk. The 6 pounder tied for the second largest fish, another 6 pound cusk, caught by Cameron Brown (MI). Suzanne Rakich (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.25 pound cusk.

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Levine (ME) caught a 4.5 pound cusk. There were rumors that he used bait this evening. I refuse to believe this. Herb Jarvis (NY) landed a 5 pound cusk, his largest fish. Charles Xu (MA) also landed a 5 pound cusk. Tom Boronkay (CT) caught a cusk that weighed 4.75 pounds. Charlotte Wang (MA) was the high hurler this evening. There were several who were sea sick but Charlotte was the best. For this she received the hard luck award!

Monday, August 10, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing lightly out of the west, a crescent moon was hanging over the east northeastern sky, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was very good at least. The wind continued to blow out of the west at ten knots or less along the shore. After noon, the wind hauled out of the south. Light at first, by 6:00 PM, the southerly wind was blowing a sustained fifteen knots with higher gusts. Along the shore it was a surfers dream with long even breaking waves on the beach of at least five or six feet. The sky was clear and sunny. The air temperature reached a high of 80F. It was humid all day. The visibility ranged to ten miles or better in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 83F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 53F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction during the morning. After noon, the wind blew out of the south at five knots or a bit more. The ocean was calm over long sea swells of five feet or more from the southeast. The sky was sunny and hazy clear. The air temperature stayed around 67F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged over ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.1F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was very good overall, both in fishing conditions, catch and landings. Most legal fish landed were an even mix of pollock and haddock. Legal landings also included seven redfish, three cusk, a whiting, four mackerel and five butter mullet. Released fish included another barndoor skate, almost a hundred dogfish, over one hundred cod (mostly under twenty-one inches), a sub-legal halibut and two sculpins. Drifting was the boating method used to set up the fishing platform. All terminal gear worked well.

Lane Winney (NY) was the fisherman of the day. He and Mike Murray (VT) most probably shared high hook status for the most legal fish landed. And Lane won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 22 pound halibut. This is the ninth halibut caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far and the third largest of the Bunny Clark's season to date. Ian took a picture of Lane with his nice fish just before releasing it. This digital image appears on the left. Lane didn't catch another fish of 10 pounds or better. Mike's most significant fish included two pollock of 12 pounds each, a 12.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock.

Bill Baum (VT) caught the second largest fish, a 20 pound pollock. He also caught a pollock that weighed 13 pounds. The third largest fish was a 19 pound pollock caught by Hunter Murray (VT). Hunter also landed a pollock that weighed 17 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Bill Fraumeni (NJ) caught our fourth barndoor skate of the season today. It weighed 18.5 pounds, the fourth largest fish of the trip. We have never caught more than two in a season. And that was only in the last five years. Ten years ago and earlier, we never saw one! You can't tell me that with all the halibut we are catching and the barndoor skates we are catching that the closed areas aren't helping tremendously.

Jeff Corey (MA) caught a 12.5 pound pollock, a 16.5 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock as his three largest fish. Sandy Mitchell (NY) landed the hard luck award for not being one with the motion of the ocean. Ouch.

It was a good day for donations supporting my quest for a cancer free world with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those individuals and their donations included David Yerke (NY) for $30.00, Ray Vaillancourt (OH) for $25.00, Lou & Barb Carangelo (MA) for $25.00 and Malcolm & Nancy MacKenzie (MA) for a generous $50.00. Thank you all so very much for your sponsorship. I appreciate the help and trust so very much!

Tim Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Alec Levine and I ran the full day trip today.

At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing lightly out of the south, a sliver of a moon was hanging over the northeastern horizon and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

The rain and clouds followed us out to the fishing grounds. Ahead of us was blue sky headed east and behind us you could see the dense overcast over the land. We had ten knot southerly winds with a one to two foot chop all the way to our first stop. On the grounds, the sky was overcast. The wind was still out of the south at ten knots or a little more. Seas were chops of a couple feet, max. By 9:30 AM, it had started to rain. It was drizzling light rain at first but got heavier as the day progressed. By noon, the wind had hauled out of the southeast. The wind picked up to twenty knots. Seas were four feet in chops on average. The rain, too, had picked up but it wasn't pouring. The wind was blowing over twenty-five knots with gusts or thirty knots or more when we left the fishing grounds. Seas had increased to an average of six feet. We had fun surfing down these seas on the ride home. And during that ride the rain poured. The rain was so heavy at times that it was hard to see more than a few boat lengths ahead. I kept the cruising speed down for just this reason. Had it rained that hard while fishing we might have quit early. As it was we got the best part of the day at exactly the right time.

The air temperature on the fishing grounds hovered around 64F all day. The visibility, although about ten miles when we first arrived to fish, closed in to about three miles in haze, fog and rain. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.1F on the fishing grounds. The tide (current) was light; all drifting movement was wind driven. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 64F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 72F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 66F).

The fishing was very good overall. We had some excellent spots and we had some spots I had to leave because we were catching mostly cod, a species we can't keep. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty haddock and a cusk. We lost two bluefin tuna, hooked at the same time while drifting. We released eleven market cod and probably double that on scrod. We caught twenty-one dogfish that were returned. Thankfully, the dogfish didn't bite that well as I did see quite a few on the sounding machine. We anchored on the first spot, drift fished for the middle part of the trip and anchored on the last spot. All terminal gear worked well but cod flies and jigs caught the most pollock.

I believe Steve Levine (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. Dave Yerke (NY) could have been but his fish were all big and it took longer for him to get them to the surface. In the same time, Steve had already landed his fish and was already on the bottom fishing again! Plus, Steve landed the most double keeper catches. Steve's best double included a 13 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time, the best double of the day. And Steve released the largest cod of the day at 13 pounds. Some of Steve's better other pollock weighed 10 pounds, 11.5 pounds, 15 pounds, 12 pounds and 12.5 pounds. Plus he caught a few haddock. Dave caught the first good double of the day that included a 13.75 pound pollock and a 9 pound pollock. Some of his other good fish included two pollock of 14 pounds each, a 12 pound pollock, a 10.5 pound pollock, two pollock of 15 pounds each, a 15.25 pound pollock, two pollock of 10.5 pounds each and a 10 pound pollock.

Ray Vaillancourt (OH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19.25 pound pollock. He also caught the second largest fish of the trip, an 18 pound pollock. Some of his other good ones included an 11 pound cod (released), a 10.5 pound pollock, a 14.75 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock, a 12 pound pollock and a 13.5 pound pollock. J.P. Bisson (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 17 pound pollock. J.P. also caught a 13 pound pollock earlier in the trip.

Other Angler highlights: Craig Wilson (NY) caught two pollock of 11 pounds each, his two largest fish of the trip. His son (who I believe was nine years old), Jonathan Wilson (NY), laid down on the engine hatch for most of the trip. I think he felt a bit queasy but he never got sick to my knowledge. Jonathan did fish for about fifteen minutes. While he was fishing he hooked into a bluefin tuna. We were drifting and the fish was too big to handle even after Craig, and later, I took over. I believe the fish busted the line because the fly got hooked into the fish at some point. At the same time, Jack Brake (ME) hooked into a bluefin as well. His fight didn't last as long. But in Jack's case I think the drag was set too hard for the quick runs a tuna of that size makes. I have no idea how big these tuna were. Jack's two biggest landed fish were both pollock. One weighed 12.5 pounds. The other weighed 11.5 pounds.

Dave Martin (MA) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Ken Brake (OH) caught the most legal haddock. Ken's largest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock. Annette Harriman (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting into the most tangles. It wasn't so much her fault as she was constrained by her fishing spot on the boat during the drifting phase of our day.

We canceled the afternoon trip due to heavy weather.

I received two "egifts" sponsoring me on my ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The fiscal fund raising year ends in December so there is plenty of time if you would like to donate to a wonderful cause. The two donations included a generous $100.00 "egift" (through the PMC website) from Richard O'Connor (MA) and another generous $75.00 gift from Bill & Marie Pimley (NH). Thank you all for your support. I appreciate it as much as you appreciate me doing it! All the best in health and happiness!

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky seemed overcast (too much fog to tell), there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in black thick fog. The day was very warm and somewhat humid, but a perfect summer day to me. The fog dissipated after sunrise. The sky was most clear with some clouds. The air temperature had to have reached 80F. The wind was light and variable. The ocean along the shore was calm. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots or less. The ocean was calm over a rolling sea swell of three to five feet. The visibility was poor in fog during the morning phase of the trip. The range was a quarter of a mile or less. During the afternoon, the fog burned away but left a haze and a visibility of five to ten miles. The sky was overcast in the morning but clear and sunny in the afternoon. The air temperature ranged from 70F to 76F. The current was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63.4F.

The fishing was very good to excellent overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-two haddock, a cunner and a mackerel. They released thirteen cod of market size, fourteen dogfish and two sculpins. They drift fished all day. All terminal gear worked well.

Jeff Corey (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish weighed 18.5 pounds, a pollock, the second largest fish of the trip. He also caught a 16 pound pollock, the third largest fish of the trip. Three of his other good fish included a 13.5 pound pollock, a 12 pound pollock and a 14.5 pound pollock. Tom Donaghy (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 29 pound Maine state trophy pollock. This is the largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. It's the largest pollock landed off the Bunny Clark since Dave Gray (VT) and I each boated a 34 pound pollock, a month apart, in 2008. Dave's fish was 45 inches CFL and mine was 41 inches CFL. And it's the largest pollock that Tom has ever caught. Captain Ian took a picture of Tom with his big pollock. This picture appears on the left.

Other Angler Highlights: Eric Stevens (MA) caught a 12.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also landed a double keeper catch that included a 10 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Rich Atkins (PA) landed a 12.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Daren Small (VT) caught a 15.5 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip. John Brigham (VT) landed a 13.5 pound pollock. Daniel Cloutier (MA) was sea sick and landed the hard luck award.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less over two to three foot swells. The sky was sunny. The tide was moderate. The air temperature stayed at 66F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles.

The fishing was fair. Legal fish caught included a cunner, four sculpins and three mud hake, all released. They also released a small pollock and twelve small cod. Drifting was the method. Not a single cod fly was used. Everyone preferred bait.

Miranda Messier (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4 pound cod. Riley Pullan (UK) landed the hard luck award for the most tangled lines.

Thursday, August 13, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was very good. Ashore, it was a beautiful summer day. There wasn't the humidity there was yesterday. And there wasn't the haze. Winds were light and variable for most of the day. However, morning gave us light westerly winds while the mid afternoon showed us light southerly winds. The sky was clear with cumulus clouds in some of the deep blue spots. The ocean along the shore was calm. The air temperature reached a high of at least 80F. And the visibility was very good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 55F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew lightly out of the west to start, went calm, and then hauled out of the southwest with very light winds. The ocean surface was calm with sometimes a light ruffle over long sea swells of three feet in height. Upon arrival, the air temperature was 67F in the shade. The air temperature reached a high of 72F under the canopy top. The tide (current) was strong today. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.9F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was very good overall. Most legal fish landed were haddock today. The pollock did not bite as well so there were spaces for the haddock to move into. Legal landings also included thirty-three pollock and one cusk. Released fish included eighteen cod of market size or a bit larger, thirty-one dogfish, two sculpins and a sub-legal redfish. Drifting was the method of the day. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook (the most legal fish) but it was between David Yerke (NY), Ray Vaillancourt (OH) and eleven year old Josh Busch (NY). Dave's two best fish were two pollock of 13 pounds each. Ray's best fish included a 10 pound pollock, two pollock of 13 pounds each and a 14 pound pollock. The 14 pound pollock tied with another 14 pound pollock caught by Josh for the second largest fish of the trip. Josh also caught an 11 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock.

Dina Christians (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. She also caught an 11 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Jonathan Busch (NY) caught a 12 pound pollock, his largest fish. Tom Tatko, Sr. (NY) landed a 10 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Tom Tatko, Jr. (NY) caught the best double keeper catch of the trip. His double included an 11 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Dan Christians (NH) landed the hard luck award for being the only angler (in quite a few day trips) not to land a single legal fish! All those fish down there and he managed to avoid hooking every single one! Ouch, that has got to hurt.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less over three foot swells. The sky was sunny. The tide was moderate. The air temperature ranged from 70F to 73F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles.

The fishing was good but largely for sub-legal pollock. In among the small pollock there were a few legal sized pollock. There were very few cod flies used, something we suggest highly when on a school of pollock. And no one used a jig or jig and fly combination either. So the anglers were very limited in capabilities. Still, anglers did catch four smaller legal sized pollock and one cusk. Ian anchored the boat for two stops. And, as I said, almost everyone used bait alone.

Derek Abbott (QC) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.25 pound cusk. Second largest fish of the trip status was shared between two anglers, Mike Fitzsimmons (CT) and Gabriella Fitzsimmons (CT). Both anglers landed pollock of 2.5 pounds. Shaun Wheatley (CT) caught a legal pollock of 2 pounds. Liz "Pulled Pork" Sherzer (MO) landed the hard luck award for, well, it wasn't a pretty picture. I'm talking about her health on the open ocean, not how she looked.

Friday, August 14, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was very good. The sky stayed mostly clear all day with few clouds, unlike yesterday. The wind blew out of the south after sunrise and stayed out of the south for the rest of the day. Until 3:00 PM, wind speeds were in the five to seven knot category. After that the southerly wind picked up to ten and fifteen knots. The air temperature was warm and dry in the morning. But after noon, the humidity started to kick in. The air temperature in Ogunquit got up to 81F, at least. And it wasn't terribly humid, just humid. The visibility was at least ten miles along the shore. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 86F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots, tops. The surface of the ocean was calm over long rolling sea swells of two feet in height. The sky was sunny all day. The air temperature ranged from 66F to 70F under the canopy top. It was hot out on deck in the sun. The tide was not as strong as yesterday's trip, moderate. The visibility ranged over fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.3F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was excellent, probably the second best day trip of the fishing season. But they also had a lot of tangles - as happens when the fishing is good and the fish are bigger than normal, as they were today. Most legal fish landed were pollock. But they also had a good number of legal haddock, two cusk, a mackerel and a redfish. Released fish included another halibut, the Bunny Clark's tenth of the season, fourteen market cod and thirty-five dogfish. Drifting was the boating method when fishing. All terminal gear worked well.

Jeff Corey (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a 22.5 pound sub-legal halibut, the third largest halibut of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Captain Ian took a picture of Jeff with his prize after measuring it (36 inches long). The digital image appears on the right. This is the first Atlantic halibut that Jeff has ever caught. Some of Jeff's other good sized fish included an 11 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock, a 17.5 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. Steve Giuffre (CO) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 24 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the fishing season to date. Steve also caught a 15 pound pollock. The third largest fish was an 18 pound pollock caught by Ernie Searles (NH).

Other Angler Highlights: Sefik Kosut (NH) landed an 11 pound pollock, an 11.5 pound pollock and a 16 pound pollock, his three largest fish. Dave Piel (CT) boated an 11 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock, a 12 pound pollock and a 16 pound pollock. He released an 11 pound cod, the second largest cod of the trip. Chris Leanzo (NJ) caught an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. Dave Tack (NH) landed a 12 pound pollock. Bob Piel (CT) caught two pollock of 12 pounds each. Matt Cole (NY) caught the largest cod of the day at 12 pounds. His biggest fish was a 14 pound pollock. And Matt also landed the hard luck award for burying a hook deep into his finger! Jared had to push it through and cut the barb off before backing it out of his finger. It was a bit of a mess.

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at ten knots. Seas were chops of one to two feet over a two foot swell, seas and swells from the same direction. The sky was sunny. The tide was moderate. The air temperature was warm. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles.

The fishing was good but only for small fish. Legal fish included one cusk, a cunner and two mackerel. However, they did catch a couple of cod that they could have kept had the same regulations of last year applied to this year as well. Twelve cod were released altogether. Anchoring was the method. Mostly bait was used.

Frankie Cloutier (NH) was the fisherman of the evening. She was high hook with two good sized fish and the two fish she caught, each would have won the boat pool for the largest fish. They were the two largest fish of the trip. Unfortunately, she did not enter the boat pool. Her two fish included a 5 pound cusk and a 4.5 pound cod. Bernie Rogers (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the third largest fish, a 3.5 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Emily Cremins (VT) caught a 3.25 pound cod, her largest fish. Donna Galpin (MA) was the high hurler of the evening and landed the luck award t-shirt for her efforts.

My son, Micah, has been working on the Petrel, our lobster boat, when he hasn't been tuna fishing. Today he changed the oil, zincs, fuel filters, etc. As he was taking the boat off the morning the tag line parted. This is the thinner line that connects the bow mooring line to the stern morning line. It parted at the bow. When I noticed Micah in a skiff from the deck of Barnacle Billy's restaurant, he had a grapple stuck on the bottom. Since he doesn't do any diving and I have had a long history of it (and it wasn't busy at the restaurant at the time), I offered my services. I went home, suited up in my tri-suit, grabbed a mask and fins and headed back down to the Cove. The grapple was hooked into a mooring chain. That was easy enough to fix. The next was finding the bow mooring. And that was easy too. It was high tide so the most I had to go down was a little over fifteen feet. I have always been able to free dive to seventy feet but haven't done so in years. Anyway, disaster averted - so to say. It was a nice diversion. And just another chance to do something with my son.

Saturday, August 15, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was very good. By noon, the air temperature was already over 80F. The highest air temperature I saw was 88F. It was humid. It was hazy with a visibility of about twelve miles along the coast. The wind along the shore was light out of the southwest. The ocean was calm. The sky was sunny with a mix of high cirrus and cumulus nimbus clouds. At 5:00 PM, thunder showers rolled in. The thunder and lightning didn't last but it rained continuously and lightly until 7:30 PM and remained overcast into the night. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 91F (with a low of 68F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less over long rolling sea swells of two to three feet in height. The sky was clear and sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The air temperature was very warm. The visibility ranged to over fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.1F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was very good overall. It could have been even better than that had they not caught so many dogfish. Legal landings included mostly pollock haddock close behind. Released fish included fifteen market cod and fifty-six dogfish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian's best guess for high hook was Phil Moon (ME). But it was really too close with two other anglers to be certain. Phil's largest fish was a 12 pound pollock. Bruce Randall (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. Bruce also caught a 12.5 pound pollock, the third largest fish of the trip. The second largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Brandon LaFlamme (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: I believe Devin Randall (VT) was the first person to catch a fish worth weighing. The fish was a 12 pound pollock. Armand Rousselle (ME) landed a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Cody MacFarland (ME) boated a 12 pound pollock, his largest. Jake Zeisler (ME) caught an 11.5 pound pollock. Dylan Elie (ME) landed a pollock that weighed 11 pounds, his biggest fish of the trip. Zack Haskell (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick!

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at less than five knots. The ocean was calm over a long slow rolling swell with a height of two to three feet. The sky was overcast all evening. The tide was light. The air temperature stayed at 71F. The visibility ranged from three to fifteen miles in haze and light precipitation. The rain was all around them but they never really did get any over the boat. Maybe a couple drips was all.

The fishing was good overall. Mostly they caught cod, the size of them would not have made the minimum had we had the same rules as last year (twenty-one inches), except for one. They also released a few sub-legal pollock. Legal landings included four cusk. They drift fished for the evening. Everyone used bait only. No jigs or cod flies were used.

Jeff Swenson (MA) was high hook with three legal fish. He also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 7.5 pound cusk. His second largest fish, a 6 pound cusk, was the third largest fish of the trip. And Jeff also caught the fourth largest fish, a 4.5 pound cusk. Janice Dallaire (MA) caught the largest fish of the evening, an 8 pound cod. She did not enter the boat pool.

Other Angler Highlights: Eric Fortin (QC) landed a 4 pound cusk, his largest fish. Karen Landis (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick and for not catching a single fish!

Sunday, August 16, 2015

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine hosted the Adam Kersonski, Model Masonary & Tile Company (MA), full day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility over it was about ten miles. By 9:00 AM, we saw the start of a beautiful, hot, humid and hazy summer day. I appreciated it. The air temperature got up to at least 88F ashore. It was probably higher. The sky was clear. There wasn't a breath of wind all day. The ocean was mirror calm. The visibility was good or about ten miles in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 85F (with a low of 65F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 90F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 90F (with a low of 62F).

On the fishing grounds, there was not a breath of wind. The ocean was flat calm for the trip without chop or swell, flat. The tide was light to moderate. The sky was clear and sunny. The air temperature stayed right around 78.8 under the canopy in the shade. On the back deck or in the bow, in the sun, it was hot, the warmest day on the ocean this season. The visibility ranged to 11 miles in haze. The surface water reached a high of 66.1F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was fair to good. It was not a pollock biting day. There were plenty of that species around and on the sounding machine. But flat calm hot weather is not good pollock biting conditions - except early morning. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty pollock, three cusk, a whiting and twenty mackerel. Released fish included seven market cod and sixty-seven dogfish. Drifting was the method - they had no choice. Everyone used bait and cod flies. No jigs were used today.

Jared couldn't tell me who was high hook. They were all pooling their fish together. Mauricio Elejandro (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. His second largest fish, a 10 pound pollock, tied with another 10 pound pollock caught by Kyle Purington (ME) for the third largest fish of the trip. Kyle caught the largest cod of the day at 9 pounds. The second largest fish was a 10.5 pound pollock caught by Melvin Flowers (MA).

Other Angler Highlights: Yori Ochoa (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick on the calmest trip of the season!

Adam also owns a company that provides a drone service. He has drone pilots all over the country. And they had a drone on the boat today which they flew. They had it take off from the canopy top and land back at the same place on the return. They took all kinds of pictures of the Bunny Clark from the air while fishing. Jared told me that the fishing was slow at the time so I don't believe that we will see anglers boating fish. But I wasn't there so I don't know. It will be fun to see what they did get.

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at less than five knots. The ocean was calm with no sea swell whatsoever. The sky was clear and sunny. There was no tide (current). The air temperature was warm. The visibility ranged to eight miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66.3F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was okay. Most fish caught were sub-legal pollock and cod that are illegal to take but would have been too small to keep anyway. Legal landings included eleven mackerel, one redfish and four cunners. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait. Some used cod flies as well.

Jim Schaible (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 2.25 pound cod. The second and third largest fish were both caught by Jimmy Schaible (NY). The fish were a cod of 1.75 pounds and a fairly large redfish that weighed 1 pound. To keep it all in the family, Lexi Schaible (NY) landed the hard luck award for catching not a single fish!

I received a very generous donation supporting my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. James & Linda Hargrove (MA/ME) gave $250.00 to the cause. Thank you both very much for your help. This has become an annual thing. So I appreciate the donation and the fact that you think of me and what I do for cancer. All the best!

Monday, August 17, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good. Ashore, it was another hot, hazy and humid day. The air temperature seemed to warm up right away. And, like yesterday, there was no wind; the ocean was flat calm along the shore. The sky was hazy clear with a sun that could have been brighter on a much clearer day. By noon, the air temperature had reached 88F in Ogunquit for the third day in a row. I'm not sure if the mercury climbed any higher than that. Whatever it settled in at, the air felt hot to me. The visibility was ten miles at least in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 89F (with a low of 65F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 91F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 93F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the ocean was calm with a very light southwest wind and zero seas to begin the fishing. The sea conditions and wind remained the same for the day. The tide was light. In fact, they drifted over a piece of bottom while fishing, drifting away and then the drift reversed and drifted them slowly back over the piece again! The sky was clear. The air temperature stayed at 75F under the canopy but it was hot in the sun on deck. The visibility ranged to ten miles in haze. The surface water reached a high of 67.8F.

The fishing was very good overall. It was a steady pick of fish from beginning until end. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far, followed by haddock. The boat total haddock bag limit was easily attained. Legal landings also included four redfish and four cusk. Released fish of note included nineteen cod of small market to large market size and forty-five dogfish. They had one spot where they were plagued by blue sharks. Drifting was the boating method employed for fishing. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish by far. But bait worked very well on the haddock.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. There were just too many good regular anglers on the boat today. It looked like old home week when the Bunny Clark got back to the dock. Marty Buskey (NY) won the boat pollock for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20.5 pound pollock. This is the largest pollock that he has ever landed. He also caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 20 pound pollock! Some of Marty's other good fish included a 14 pound pollock and an 18 pound pollock. Tod Benjamin (VT) caught the third largest fish, a 19 pound pollock. Tod had a bunch of good fish, his own school! Some of the other's that Ian weighed included two pollock of 15 pounds each, a 14.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. Both Marty and Tod could have been high hook as well.

Other Angler Highlights: Mark Majewsky (MN) caught the first fish large enough to weigh today, a 10 pound pollock. Jason Perrin (ME) caught the fourth largest fish, an 18.5 pound pollock. He also caught a 13 pound pollock and an 18 pound pollock. Mike Lewis (MA) landed a 12.5 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. Ray Westermann (MA) caught a 14 pound pollock and a 16 pound pollock, his two largest fish. Ed Dufur (MA) boated a 12 pound pollock. Our own Ken McLaughlin (ME) caught a 14 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Jeff Bartley (ME) landed an 18 pound pollock. Tim Pedersen (MA) caught a 14 pound pollock, his best. John Russell (ME) landed a 13 pound pollock, his biggest fish. He also caught the largest cod of the trip at 11 pounds, released alive, of course. And he lost five jigs, the largest jig loss, by one angler, of the Bunny Clark season to date. I must say the hard luck award t-shirt looked good on John!

Tim Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Alec Levine and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good. Ashore, I was told, the air temperature in Ogunquit got up to 92F, there was little wind all day, it was humid and muggy and the sky was clear in a hazy way.

The ocean was mirror calm when I got down to the Cove at 5:15 AM. Not a breath of wind. It was the same most of the way to the fishing grounds. With ten miles to go we picked up a light southerly wind. This gave us a ripple on the surface. On the fishing grounds, the wind remained the same; about two knots from the south. The ocean was flat calm with a wind ripple on the surface. There was no swell. The air temperature hovered around 78F, more or less (in the shade). The air temperature was warmer (hot) on deck. The tide was light to moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 70.3F on the fishing grounds. We had ten miles of visibility. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 87F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 94F (with a low of 62F).

The fishing was good to very good overall. It could have been much better but we were plagued with blue sharks from 9:30 AM until we had to head back in. For two of the hooked sharks I couldn't tell if it might have been a bluefin so I had everyone reel up only to find out the bad news a few minutes later. This took some time. We lost eleven rigs to "bluedogs". And we lost numerous hooks as well. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. We had a few very nice sized ones. Legal landings also included nineteen haddock, seven redfish and eight cusk. Released fish (besides the blue sharks) included five market cod to 9 pounds, seven dogfish and one big halibut. Drifting was the method. Only two anglers used jigs. Cod flies caught the most fish. Bait caught a pile of sub-legal haddock!

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. Brian Monaco (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 17.25 pound pollock caught by William Decker (FL). William also tied with Morgan Palmer (ME) for the third largest fish of the trip. They each caught a pollock of 17 pounds. I took a picture of Morgan holding her fish. Her fish was, by far, the better looking of the two! This digital image appears on the left.

Other Angler Highlights: Seamus O'Doherty (AL) caught the first fish decent enough to weigh, a pollock of 13 pounds. Chantal Margolis(ME) landed a 10.5 pound pollock, her largest fish. Later in the day we chased down a huge blue shark that she had hooked in the tail. It acted like a small bluefin because of where it was hooked. So I took the bait on that one! John Flagler (ME) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, his best fish. Mike Iosua (ME) boated a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. James Shorey (ME) landed a 13.5 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock, his two largest fish. Liam Jenks (MA) caught a 13.5 pound pollock and quite a few haddock. Les Delworth (NH) caught a 13 pound pollock, his biggest fish. He also caught the largest cod of the day at 9 pounds. Gerry Prager (NY) caught an 11 pound pollock, his best fish of the trip. Alex Bryan (NH) landed a 10.5 pound pollock, his best.

Patty Prager (NY) had the fish of the day, a big halibut. She hooked it on the bottom. And, in fact, I thought it was the bottom until Alec told me she was gaining line. She got the fish more than half way up from bottom - the line straight up and down - when it bolted straight back down. Halfway there the line started to vibrate; the fly hook must have got hooked in the tail. It wasn't long before the line broke at the fly loop! We were all disappointed as it would have surely been our biggest halibut in a while. But that's fishing!

Steve Levine (ME) had one of those days. He lost two jigs to blue sharks and lost two really nice fish. I have no idea what species they were but I would suspect they were good sized pollock. He would have won the hard luck award t-shirt. However, Betty Flagler (ME) upstaged Steve with her inordinate number of tangles today. In fact, she was tangled so often that I thought she wouldn't catch a fish today. But she proved me wrong!

Alec Levine and I ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. It was hot at the dock, there was no wind and the sun shone through a hazy sky. On the grounds, the wind was light from the south southeast and waves were about a half a foot. The wind velocity might have blown more than five knots but I doubt it. The air temperature ranged from 79F to 74F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was about ten miles. The surface water temperature reached a high temperature of 71F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was good overall. Most fish caught were sub-legal pollock. However, there were nearly as many legal pollock landed as well. Legal pollock sizes ranged from 2 pounds to 6 pounds. Legal landings also included seven haddock, one cusk, a mackerel and two butter mullet. There was one blue shark hookup but the fish was lost after a five minute fight. Two spots were anchor stops. We drift fished once. All terminal gear worked well.

Steve Levine (ME) was high hook with 12 legal. He released most of the legal pollock but did give some away. His largest fish was a 4 pound haddock. He released his largest pollock. The largest pollock of his that I did weigh was 3.75 pounds. Allison Christensen (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 6 pound pollock caught by Pierre Chalifour (ON). Courtney Ramsdell (NY) landed the third largest fish, a 4.75 pound haddock, the largest haddock of the last few trips!

Other Angler Highlights: Nine year old Noah Alimandi (CT) caught the first fish I could weigh, a 3 pound pollock. Dawn Darnowski (CT) caught the second one, a 3.25 pound pollock. Sarah Knecht (CT) landed a pollock of 2.7 pounds. Quinn Toner (CT) caught the largest cod at 4.5 pounds. Art O'Connell (CT) boated a 3.5 pound pollock. Jacques Beauchemin (QC) landed the hard luck of the evening award for losing a big blue shark right next to the boat!

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 71F, the sky was hazy clear, there was no wind to speak of, the ocean was calm (with no surf either) and the visibility over the ocean was about eight miles or better in haze. The wind started out of the southwest at sunrise. The southwest wind was light and remained light, five knots or better, for the rest of the day. It was hazy, hot and humid today with air temperatures as high or higher than 87F. The visibility ranged from eight to ten miles in haze. It was sunny all day from a hazy sky. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 69F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was ?F (with a low of ?F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or two (with the short swell). The tide was moderate. The air temperature ranged from 71F to 72F in the shade. The extra wind as compared to the last two days was a cooling factor today. The visibility ranged from five to ten miles in haze. The sky was sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.2F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock followed by haddock. legal landings also included a mackerel, seven cusk and a redfish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well but cod flies caught the most fish.

Andy Meleady (QC) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17 pound pollock. He also caught a pollock that weighed 13.5 pounds. Patrick Viscosi (NY) caught the second largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock. His second largest fish was a pollock that weighed 14.5 pounds. The third largest fish was a 16 pound pollock caught by Greg Porcello (CT). Greg also caught a 13.5 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Sam Porcello (CT) landed a 12.5 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock. Norm Willey (NH) caught a 14 pound pollock, his largest. Mia Porcello (CT) landed an 11 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. Jerry Agresti (FL) caught a pollock that weighed 12 pounds. Seven year old Jeremy Agresti (FL) caught an 11 pound pollock. Ryan Steiner (MA) caught a 12 pound pollock. Richard Pin (MA) landed a pollock that weighed 13 pounds. Kelly Viscosi (NY) landed the hard luck award for attaining high hurler status. Not good.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to twelve knots. Seas were chops of a foot or two. The sky was sunny. The tide was moderate. The air temperature ranged from 74F to 76F. The visibility ranged from five to ten miles.

The fishing was good or better than that. Most fish caught were sub-legal pollock and cod. Legal fish landed included nine cusk and fifteen mackerel. They anchored for the evening. In fact, they only made one stop. Everyone used bait.

Bethany Cole (CT) was high hook for the most legal fish with at least three fish. Her largest was a 6.5 pound cusk, the second largest fish of the trip. She also caught two cusk of 6 pounds each to tie for third (largest fish) with Paul Barbey (NJ) who also caught a cusk that weighed 6 pounds. Paul also landed a cusk that weighed 5 pounds. Eric Sharrow (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.5 pound cusk. Eric also caught a cusk that weighed 4.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Emily Barbey (NJ) landed a 5.25 pound cusk. Jim Belcher (IN) boated a 3 pound cusk. James Kenny (CT) caught a cusk that weighed 5 pounds. Monique Davis (NY) caught the largest cod at 4.5 pounds. Jake Maisto (CT) landed the hard luck award for letting the motion of the ocean control his health.

Thursday, August 20, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was overcast (or appeared so), the wind was blowing lightly out of the south and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog. The salient weather feature of the day was the fog. At times the fog backed out to sea so you could get a view of the coast. Mostly it was so thick you couldn't see the rocks on either point of Oarweed Cove. There was no wind to speak of today. The flags were limp. The air temperature hit the 80F degree mark but just barely and not along the shore. That temperature was broached a couple miles inland. The visibility was poor. You could not tell if the sky was clear or cloudy due to the fog. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 67F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was ?F (with a low of ?F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots or less. The ocean was calm over a long rolling sea swell with a height of two to three feet. There was more visibility off shore even though there was fog all day. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to three miles at any given time. The sky seemed overcast. The air temperature ranged between 67F to 70F. Very comfortable. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water reached a high temperature of 67.6F.

The fishing was very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far, followed by haddock. No other legal fish was caught, except for twenty-two unwanted dogfish. Released fish included seventeen market cod, two barndoor skates, one wolffish and two sculpins. They broke off quite a few blue sharks. But they were not as much of a bother as they were the last two day trips. Drifting was the boating method of the day. All terminal gear worked well.

Jim Walls (MD) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 26 pound barndoor skate. This is a tie for the second largest barndoor skate of the season. Some of Jim's other good fish included a double keeper catch that included two pollock of 11 pounds each caught on the same line at the same time. It was the largest double of the day. He also caught a 15 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. The second and third largest fish were both caught by Charley Collier (NY). The second largest was a 17.5 pound barndoor skate, the sixth and sixth largest barndoor skate of the Bunny Clark fishing season. The third largest fish was Charley's 16.5 pound pollock. Charley also caught a double that included a 13 pound pollock and an 8.5 pound pollock. And he also caught a 12 pound pollock.

These two barndoor skates make a total of six for the season so far. We still have over two months of fishing left! We have never landed more than two barndoor skates during a season. And before fifteen years ago, hell, ten years ago, we never ever caught one to see! How can anyone dispute the fact that the closed areas aren't working? It worries and bothers me that anyone would want to open up any part of the closed areas to commercial dragging (trawling) as the New England Fishery Manangement Council has voted to do. The reasons they voted in that direction are obvious: 1. The Council is made up largely of mobile trawl gear fishermen. 2. They want the fish today and are not concerned about leaving thriving fish stocks for our grandchildren. And part of the reason for number 2 is that if they don't find more fish they could stand to lose their livelihoods. So it takes a brave Council seat holder to try to implement something that will put your friends out of business even though they know, in the long run, they are doing the right thing. And I have to say that the vote to open parts of the closed areas barely made it. One vote could have swung it the other way. The question in my mind is: will the National Marine Fisheries Service allow it to happen?

Other Angler Highlights: Remington Walls (MD) landed an 11 pound pollock and a 16 pound pollock. The 16 pounder was the fourth largest fish of the trip. Adam Dragoslivich (VT) caught an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. Greg Houston (NH) landed a 13 pound pollock, his best. Steve Fortier (ME) boated a 15 pound pollock, his largest fish. Tyler Sargent (ME) caught the largest haddock we have seen in quite a while with a 6 pounder. The truth is that shortly after he landed the 6 pounder, he lost a haddock along side the boat that was easily over 7 pounds or a Maine state trophy is size! For this loss, Ian gave Tyler the hard luck award t-shirt!

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots or less. The ocean was calm over a two foot swell. The sky was overcast - or so it seemed in the fog. The tide was moderate. The air temperature ranged from 68F to 70F. They were in the fog from the moment they left the dock until the time they got back to the dock. The visibility ranged from one hundred feet to a quarter of a mile.

The fishing was good. Most fish landed were mackerel, by far. They caught quite a few sub-legal pollock but no nearly as many pollock as mackerel. They also released six redfish, eight cod and five sculpins. For legal fish, along with the mackerel, they landed two cusk. Drifting was the method. Bait and cod flies were used. The flies were most successful.

Eric Kimball (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.25 pound cusk. Dave Hagerstrom (NH) caught the second largest fish, a 4 pound cusk. Deb Fahey (MA) was sea sick and received the hard luck award t-shirt.

I received a nice $25.00 donation from "Jersey Tim" Hesselink (NJ) supporting my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. JT is a long time Bunny Clark angler and patron of Barnacle Billy's where I find he and his lovely wife, Nancy, camped out when they are up here. Thank you both for the kindness!

Friday, August 21, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was overcast, the roads were wet, it was drizzling out, the wind was blowing lightly out of the southeast and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog. By 7:00 AM, a light rain had started to fall. Ashore, it stayed like this all morning and into the afternoon. It rained so hard at times that it seemed tropical in nature. The fog hung around all morning and part of the afternoon as well. The rain stopped at 3:00 PM. The fog cleared along the shore earlier than that but there was still a fog bank a mile or so off. We had a peek at the sun later in the afternoon. It was very warm and humid today. The air temperature hit a high of just under 80F at 1:00 PM. It might have been warmer away from the coast. The wind remained light out of the south southeast. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 67F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 83F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 69F).

On the fishing grounds, they were in the fog all day. For the whole trip the visibility was about one hundred yards or less. It was only until the ride home that they had the occasional visibility to over a mile. And they didn't have a drop of rain on the fishing grounds. Half way back in it rained hard for thirty seconds. That was all the rain they had all day. The wind blew out of the south at five to ten knots. There was a light chop, too small to be called a white cap, over a two to three foot seasick producing rolling sea swell. The sky was overcast, or so it appeared in the thick fog. The air temperature ranged from 68F to 70F. The tide (current) was moderate, a perfect drifting current. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.3F.

The fishing was very good overall. Most legal fish caught were haddock, by far, even though they caught the usual large number of pollock. In fact, they caught the boat's bag limit of haddock well before the end of the trip so some pretty nice sized haddock had be returned. The only other legal fish landed was a single redfish. Returned fish, except haddock, included twenty-one market cod, six dogfish, four sculpins and five blue sharks. The blue sharks didn't bother as much today. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

On an ordinary day, Steve King (NH) would have been hailed high hook as he caught a large number of pollock including some really nice ones. But the bait fishermen were doing so well that Ian couldn't come up with an angler that he could point to. Steve caught the second largest fish of the trip, an 18.5 pound pollock. He also caught the best double keeper catch too. His double included an 11 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Some of his other fish included the second largest cod of the trip at 11 pounds and a 13.5 pound pollock. Randy Cooper (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 15.5 pound pollock caught by Clayton Kandoll (NH).

Other Angler Highlights: Sean Minogue (NY) caught a pile of legal haddock, probably the most he has caught in a long time. Many went back of course. His largest fish was a 12 pound pollock. I'm not sure if he caught the most haddock for an angler during the trip but Ian made a point of calling my attention to Sean's haddock success and didn't mention another name in that context. Jeremy Way (NY) caught the biggest cod we have seen in a while at 14.5 pounds. He also caught the largest haddock of the trip at 6.5 pounds. Lowell Way (NY) caught the first fish worth weighing, a 10.5 pound pollock. Alex Pendenza (NH) caught a 13 pound pollock, his largest fish. Jewell Weightman (NJ) landed a pollock slightly larger at 13.5 pounds. James Lemmond (NH) landed a 12 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock, his two largest fish. Vincent Rizzio (VT) landed the hard luck award for being today's high hurler. During the times he has fished with us over the years I don't recall him getting sea sick. It may be just a case of not remembering this. But I would sooner think that the fog and swell roll did him in. Sometimes I think the fog was invented by God as a reminder that not every day is perfect and to build a bit of humility into the angling cult!

We did not run the afternoon trip today.

I received a $150.00 donation from Marc & Claire St. Onge (ME) sponsoring me in my Pan-Mass Challenge cycling event (for a cancer cure) today. Thank you both so very much for your support. I appreciate your help in this over the years!

Saturday, August 22, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston hosted Brian Carle (all Maine) full day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was overcast, the roads were dry, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was good to very good.

Ashore, the sky was overcast in the morning but there was no rain on the weather radar. All the rain was moving in a northerly direction but well east of us. You could see the rain clouds on the horizon. The air temperature didn't take long to get into the upper 70s. The wind along the shore blew out of the north northeast at ten knots. The wind had died out along the shore by mid-afternoon. The air temperature in Ogunquit reached a high of 77F. The sky was overcast for the first couple of hours after sunrise. By 9:00 AM, the sky was mostly sunny. The sky stayed partly sunny/partly cloudy for the duration of the day. The visibility was good to very good over the ocean. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 64F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at twelve to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The sky was overcast for the trip with periodic light rain. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The air temperature ranged from 66F to 68F in the shade. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was very good. But they had a problem. All but three anglers were incapacitated with sea sickness (it was a bachelor party so fun things happened the night before - that might have had something to do with it.). And those who were fishing were sea sick as well but not so bad that it kept them from their appointed goals. It got to the point where no one was having any fun. So Brian, the party chief, called the trip with a couple hours to go. I was told that, collectively, there was a 100% agreement on the decision to head back in.

Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included two haddock and five cusk. Ian's initial idea for a first spot didn't pan out according to plan so he was really in the process of making fishing improvements when they decided to go in. Six market cod were released and no dogfish or blue sharks were seen. They anchored for the two spots they fished. No jigs were used, only bait and cod flies. Cod flies worked the best.

Billy Baker was high hook with the most legal fish. Andy Curtis won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.5 pound pollock. Lucas Stiles caught the second largest fish, a 6 pound cusk. There wasn't another fish weighed as Ian expected the normal fishing time. Kyle Mahan (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick (he wasn't the worst) and for his position as the new bachelor on the boat, the reason for the trip.

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at least five knots. The oceans surface displayed chops of a foot or less over sea swells of two to three feet. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The air temperature ranged from 68F to 70F in the shade. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze. The tide was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing was very good overall. Most fish caught, by far were sub-legal pollock and mackerel. In fact they released fourteen mackerel because they had caught all that they wanted to keep. Legal landings also included a cunner and ten cusk. They anchored for almost all of the evening after starting with a short drift. Everyone used bait with some cod flies. Cod flies caught the most fish.

It was old home week on the Bunny Clark this evening as some of my favorite local people were aboard including Deb and her brother, Stu, MacNeill (ME). Their father was a close friend of our family. Lest I forget, Shane MacNeill and Michael & Chris Hunt (ME) were also with the MacNeills. Aimee Campbell (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. Her best were all cusk that weighed 5.5 pounds, 3.5 pounds and 5.75 pounds. Her largest cusk tied for the second largest fish of the trip with Chris Hunt who also caught a cusk of 5.75 pounds. Chris ended up winning the boat pool for the largest fish because both Aimee and Ryan Lawn (NH) - who had the largest fish of the evening at 6 pounds, a cusk - were not entered in the boat pool!

Other Angler Highlights: Andon Zannini (MA) caught a 4.5 pound cusk. Stu MacNeill did us proud by landing a 3.5 pound cusk and a 4 pound cusk (I can't say the same for Deb!). Kurt George (MA) landed a 5 pound cusk. Matt Spera (ME) caught a 3 pound cusk. Wes Falk (NH) was sick and landed the hard luck award t-shirt!

I received a generous $100.00 donation from Arnie Buza (NJ) helping my to raise money to fight cancer with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts through the Pan-Mass Challenge, cycling event that took place three weeks ago (Hard to imagine it's been that long already.). Arnie has supported my cancer fund raising efforts for as many years as I have been involved. Thanks so much. I truly appreciate it, Arnie.

Sunday, August 23, 2015

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 67F, the sky was overcast, the roads were dry, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at eight knots and the visibility over the ocean was about ten miles or better. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten knots or better all morning and into the afternoon. Sometime around 2:00 PM, the wind blew over twenty knots but then died out. By 3:30 PM, there was barely any wind at all along the shore. It started to rain at 8:00 AM. The rain continued, heavy at times, until about 3:00 PM. The visibility was fair to good in precipitation and haze. Around 4:30 PM, with the light wind and high dew point, the fog came in. The fog and drizzle stayed with us for the rest of the afternoon and into the night. The high temperature in Ogunquit was at least 73F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 65F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at about ten knots, more or less. Seas were chops of one to two feet. It was foggy for the trip with a maximum visibility of a half mile. The sky was overcast or so it seemed. They had rain but only a light misting rain that lasted for about fifteen minutes. The rest of the day was rain free. The air temperature was warm (Jared didn't give me an air temperature). It was humid as well. The tide was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.9F.

The fishing was very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty haddock, two monkfish, three mackerel and three cusk. No dogfish were caught. Ten small market cod were released. They had encounters with only two blue sharks. They anchored on the first spot and then drift fished for the rest of the trip. Cod flies caught the most fish.

Steve Levine (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a 17.5 pound pollock, the third largest fish of the trip. Steve also caught a 13 pound pollock and another pollock that weighed 10.5 pounds. Corey Benish (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 21 pound barndoor skate! Kaden Stearns (MA) caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 20.5 pound barndoor skate! These two barndoor skates make a total of eight caught during this years Bunny Clark season, by far the most we have ever seen in a season. And it's only the second time that we have seen two barndoor skates caught on the same trip - ever! And both events occurred within three days of each other! We may have had one of these bite a line but it's very unusual. Usually they are snagged. Of course, barndoor skates have been on the endangered species list internationally for quite a few years now. I believe they are making a comeback due to the closed commercial fishing areas - as I have mentioned before.

Other Angler Highlights: Kyle Quintana (MA) and Peter Quintana (MA) each caught a monkfish of about 4 pounds. Jared didn't weigh them but I did see the heads. This makes four for the Bunny Clark season so far. The biggest on the season was a 9 pounder caught by Ken McLaughlin (ME). Wobby Barnes (MA) also caught a 4 pounder with me earlier in the year. Kyle caught a 12 pound pollock as his largest fish. Peter's largest was a 16 pound pollock. The 16 pounder was caught as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 13 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! This is the Bunny Clark's tenth largest double of the season to date. Peter also caught a 14 pound pollock.

Marty LaTulippe (VT) boated a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Chris Trojan (NH) caught a double keeper catch that included a 15 pound pollock and a 7 pound pollock. Rick Martus (IL) landed an 11.5 pound pollock. Ray Clark (VT) also caught a pollock that weighed 11.5 pounds. Cam Gagne (ME) landed the hard luck award for catching the dreaded mal de mer.

We had to cancel tonight's half day trip because all but one passenger who had signed up had canceled their reservation by noon. I can't blame them. At one point along the shore it was blowing fifteen knots out of the northeast, the rain was coming down in torrents and, when you could see the ocean from the shore through the rain, the chops looked bad. Next time!

Monday, August 24, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 67F, the sky appeared clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in black thick fog. The fog hung around all morning and into the afternoon. It seemed overcast but it may just have been the fog reaching overhead along the shore. There was no drizzle; the roads were dry. The sun came out and the fog backed off around 4:00 PM. It was absolutely lovely after that: warm, zero wind, sunny and a bit humid. The air temperature reached a high of 78F, at least, in Ogunquit. There was very little wind the whole day. The visibility over the ocean was never good. Even when the sun came out late afternoon, the fog bank was hovering just off shore. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 68F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction. The ocean was calm over a three to five foot rolling sea swell out of the southeast. They were in the fog all day but it wasn't black thick. The visibility ranged from a good one hundred yards to a mile. The air temperature ranged from 69F to 73F. The tide (current) ranged from zero to moderate. The sky appeared overcast. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.9F on the grounds.

The fishing was very good overall. The bite wasn't super but Ian made up for it by trying more fishing spots. As soon as the bite would slow, Ian would move the boat to a new location. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far, followed by haddock. They had no problem getting the boat's bag limit on haddock. Legal landings also included two cusk. They had quite a few dogfish as well. Ian's count was fifty-five but there could have been more. And they were able to find areas with many less dogfish once they realized where the dogfish were mostly concentrated. They were bothered by only one blue shark. They released nine small market cod. They drift fished for the trip. All terminal gear worked well.

Kurt Gilmore (MA) or Dave Sampson (MA), one of the two, was high hook with the most legal fish today. Some of Kurt's fish included a 10.5 pound pollock, a 12.5 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock and a double keeper catch that included a 12 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Dave caught the third largest fish of the trip, a 14 pound pollock. Some of Dave's better fish included a 13.5 pound pollock, an 11.5 pound pollock and two pollock of 12 pounds each. Rich Lusis (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17.5 pound pollock. Rich also caught the second largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock. And he caught a 13 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Paul Blaine (NY) caught a 12 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, his two largest fish. Ray Martin (CT) landed a 12 pound pollock, his best. Bryan Johansmeyer (MA) caught a 10.75 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Bryan also caught the most dogfish. For this he landed the hard luck award.

Tim Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Alec Levine and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky appeared overcast, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in black thick fog.

We had a light south southeast wind barely turning over a chop on the ride to the fishing grounds. The sky was overcast, the visibility was good, the air temperature was perfect and we were making good time. We walked right into a bank of fog at the ten mile mark. We carried the fog almost to our destination. With a couple miles to go we broke out of it. On the grounds, we had a light south southeast wind that was hardly making a ripple on the surface. Indeed there was no drift or tide at that time. As the day progressed, the wind hauled out of the southeast and breezed up to about eight knots. Seas were chops of a foot over long rolling sea swells of three feet. The sky stayed overcast for the trip with one brief peek at the sun. The air temperature ranged from.68F to 71F in the shade. It was humid. The tide ranged from zero to moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67.3F on the fishing grounds. We had five to ten miles of visibility. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 68F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 65F).

The fishing was good overall. There were plenty of fish but we didn't have the bite I thought we should with the weather we had. It's fishing. You never know. And that's a good thing! Most legal fish landed were pollock. We had some good sized pollock but the average size was down a skosch. Legal landings also included fourteen haddock and a redfish. Released fish included seven market sized cod to 10 pounds, forty-nine dogfish and one barndoor skate - our ninth of the season to date! There were no blue sharks seen today. We drifted fished for most of the trip but we did anchor on one spot for forty-five minutes. All terminal gear worked well but jig sticks, jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. If I were a betting man, I would say it was Brian Robinson (NH). Brian fished in the bow pulpit with jig and jig stick. He won the boat pool for the largest fish with largest fish, a 24 pound barndoor skate. This is the fourth largest barndoor skate of the season and the first one I have personally seen this year. It's Brian's first. I took a picture of Brian holding this fish before releasing it. This digital image appears on the left. Brian also caught the second largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. Two of his other good fish included a 13 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 14.5 pound pollock caught by Brian Spiker (NH). Brian caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch along with another pollock of 7.5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time.

Other Angler Highlights: Christian Cheney (NY) caught the first fish big enough to weigh, a 10 pound pollock. Shortly afterward he landed a double keeper catch that included a 9 pound pollock and a 7 pound pollock. Dominic Yannino (MA) caught a 9.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. I suspect that Don Cheney (NY) was second hook right behind Brian Robinson. But, again, I can't be sure. Don's two biggest fish included an 11 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. Steve Harrick (NY) caught the largest cod of the day at 10 pounds. He also caught the last fish of the trip, a 13 pound pollock, also his largest fish of the trip! Arnie Ulrich (NJ) caught (and released) the second largest cod of the day. I didn't weigh it but I would guess it was 9 pounds or so. Arnie also lost the largest haddock of the day. I would guess that that fish weighed 4 or 5 pounds. His biggest pollock was probably 9 pounds. Sophie Yurchick (ME) landed a 13.75 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip and her best. Bob Hatch (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines. In the process of untangling, he also put a hook into his finger! And, yes, he did land a legal fish or two!

Alec Levine and I ran the afternoon (4PM - 8PM) half day trip. It was warm and muggy at the dock with overcast skies and light southeast winds. On the grounds, the wind was blowing out of the southeast at five knots and waves were about a foot. The wind increased to about ten knots before the night was through. Seas increased slightly to almost two feet in chops with a three foot long rolling sea swell added to the mix. The air temperature averaged about 70F. The tide (current) was moderate to light. The visibility was about eight miles while fishing and less than a quarter of a mile in fog on the ride back to Perkins Cove. The surface water temperature reached a high temperature of 68.5F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was good overall. Most fish caught were sub-legal pollock and haddock. Legal landings included six pollock, eight haddock, three mackerel and one butter mullet. We released three dogfish and two small cod. We had two blue shark attacks that cost us a jig and a bait rig with sinker. Luckily, we didn't get the big tangle as well! Anchoring was the medium and the method. Three anglers used jigs and flies. The rest used bait and cod flies. Cod flies caught the most fish.

Michael Ungerland (NY) was probably high hook with a butter mullet and a 6 pound pollock. The pollock was the third largest fish of the trip. His nine year old son, Sam Ungerland (NY), won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 8.75 pound pollock caught by Kyle Emerson (NH).

Other Angler Highlights: Nick Hopkins (CT) landed a 5 pound pollock, his largest fish. He may also have caught a legal haddock which would make him high hook, for the most legal fish, along with Michael. I'm just not sure. Julie Westwater (MA) caught the second largest haddock of the evening at 3 pounds. Robert Westwater (MA) caught the largest haddock at 3.25 pounds. Nick Marean (CO) landed the hard luck award for losing one of my jigs on a blue shark!

Brian Robinson donated $30.00 to support my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thanks so much, Brian. I very much appreciate your generosity and your fishing efforts today!

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was eight miles at least. Later, the fog rolled in and then rolled out again. But it was, pretty much, a fog free day. It was hot (80F in Ogunquit), hazy and humid. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile early to eight miles or better along the shore for the rest of the day. The ocean was calm; there wasn't a breath of wind in the morning. In the afternoon, the wind hauled out of the southeast but blew lightly. The sky was sunny all day with some clouds. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 64F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots or less. The ocean was calm over a long swell about three feet in height. The sky was overcast. The tide was moderate to strong. the air temperature ranged from 72F to 75F in the shade. But it was very humid. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67.6F. The visibility stayed around ten miles, more or less, in the morning and a quarter of a mile or less during the afternoon in fog.

The fishing was good overall. I would say it was a little bit better than it was during yesterday's trip. Most legal fish landed were haddock followed by pollock. Legal landings also included a whiting, a big whiting. Released fish included twelve market cod, fifty-eight dogfish and a blue shark that bit a line off. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Chris Rossik (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 17 pound pollock caught by Chris Hernick (NY). Duncan Jewitt, Jr. (NY) landed the third largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. Duncan also caught an 11.5 pound pollock, a 12 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Jason Collier (VT) caught the largest whiting (silver hake) we have seen in a few years. The weighing weighed 5 pounds. Ian took a picture of Jason and his fish. This digital image appears on the right. Jason's largest fish was a 12 pound pollock. Mike Swart (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Don Boerschlein (NY) boated a 13 pound pollock. Bob Snyder (NJ) landed a 10.5 pound pollock. Duncan Jewitt (NY) caught an 11 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. Tyler Bell (MA) landed the fourth largest fish of the trip, a 15 pound pollock. Connor Forestell (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five to eight knots with a one foot chop. The sky was mostly clear. The air temperature hung around 72F in the shade. The visibility ranged to a maximum of five miles in fog/haze. The tide was strong.

The fishing was good overall. Most fish caught were small pollock, redfish and cod. Legal landings included three cusk, five cunners and three mackerel. Drifting was the method. All used bait and cod flies.

Paul Squires (NY) caught the largest fish, an 8 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 7 pound cusk caught by Veronica Fernandez (FL). Neither angler entered the boat pool. Chuck Argyle (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the third largest fish, a 6.5 pound cusk.

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Eddy (NY) caught the largest cod. It weighed 6 pounds, released, of course. David Praik (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick. Ouch!

Thursday, August 27, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the first fall marathon trip of the Bunny Clark fishing season today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was clear, the wind was light from the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

We had ten knots of northwest wind on the ride to the fishing grounds. Seas were chops of a foot or so. There was no noticeable swell. The wind had dropped off a bit by the time we got to the fishing grounds. On the grounds, the wind stayed light out of the northwest for most of the morning. By late morning, the wind had hauled out of the west. At most, the wind was five knots or so. There wasn't much of a chop. By 3:00 PM, the wind had changed again and started to blow out of the south southwest. Wind speeds increased to ten knots for the ride home with seas in chops of a foot. The south southwest wind dropped to five knots about ten miles from Perkins Cove and then let go altogether until we got in. The ocean was flat calm off the Cove. The sky was partly cloudy in the morning, nearly cloudless by mid-morning into the afternoon and partly cloudy for the rest of the day. The air temperature ranged from 70F to 75F in the shade. It was humid. The tide ranged from zero to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.3F on the fishing grounds. We had at least twenty-five miles of visibility all day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 54F).

The fishing was very good for catching legal fish, very good to excellent for catching in general. Most legal fish landed were pollock, haddock and redfish, in that order. We had no problem reaching the boat's haddock bag limit. Legal landings also included quite a few white hake, fourteen cusk and five whiting. We released fifty market cod to 14 pounds (the most I have seen since the Ultra Marathon in early July), seven dogfish, our tenth barndoor skate of the season and seven dogfish. Fishing methods alternated between drifting and anchoring. All terminal gear worked well but cod flies caught the most pollock and bait caught the most haddock. The jig/fly combination caught the most legal fish.

Fred Kunz was high hook with the most legal fish. He also won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 26 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Some of his other great fish included two redfish of 1.9 pounds each (.1 pound shy of Maine state trophies), a 12 pound cod, a 15 pound white hake, a 19 pound pollock and three pollock of exactly 14 pounds each. Fred owned the last hour of the trip. Steve Selmer (NH) was second hook. He also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 27 pound Maine state trophy white hake. I took a picture of Steve with his great hake where he fished up on the bow. This digital image appears on the left. Some of Steve's other great fish included a 20 pound barndoor skate, his first ever, a 20 pound pollock (a tie for the largest pollock of the trip), the largest cod of the trip at 14 pounds, an 18.5 pound white hake, a 10 pound cusk and a 13 pound white hake. The third largest fish was a 24 pound white hake caught by Steve Brown (ME). Some of his other great fish included the largest cusk of the day at 11 pounds, a 15 pound white hake, a 12 pound cod and a 16 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Dan Connor (NY) caught some nice fish including an 18 pound white hake, a 13 pound cod, the second largest haddock at 5.75 pounds and a 13.5 pound pollock. Art DuHamel (ME) caught a 13.5 pound pollock, a 10.5 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. Bruce Fortier (NH) started his day off with a 12 pound white hake. His second "fish", however, was a 2.5 pound lobster! It was a female "V notched" lobster and was released. Some of Bruce's other fish included two pollock of 12 pounds each, a 16 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. Jim Koster (NH) caught the Bunny Clark's largest double keeper catch of the season today, so far. His catch included a 20 pound pollock and a 17.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! Until that time, the largest fish he had caught was an 11 pound pollock! The previous largest double keeper catch was landed by Paul Smegal (MA) on the July 7 Ultra Marathon trip. His double included a 26.25 pound cusk and an 11 pound cusk. I took a picture of Jim with his double. This digital image appears on the right.

Ron Krause (MA) had a great day too. The list of good fish he caught included a 14.75 pound white hake, a 15 pound white hake, a 16 pound pollock, a 14.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. Matt Van Camp (MA) caught the largest haddock of the day at 6 pounds. His largest cod weighed 10 pounds, released, of course. He also caught a 13 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. Roger DuHamel (ME) caught a 14 pound pollock, his largest fish. John Harris (NH) landed a 13.5 pound pollock, his largest fish and the last fish boated today. Rich Knauer (NJ) caught the most legal haddock of the trip. Ten maybe? I'm guessing. Scott Weber (MA) got an hour of sleep before the trip today, felt a bit light headed and ended up spending the day in the Hotel Bunny Clark. No, he didn't get sea sick! Ed Garrett (VT) caught a 15.5 pound white hake, a 13 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock, his three largest fish. He also landed the hard luck award for losing three jigs, one to a blue shark, one to the bottom and one to a big double!

I received two donations supporting my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was from Ed Garrett for $30.00. Ed sponsors me in this ride every year, every year since I started in 2007. The other was a generous $100.00 donation from Ron Krause. Ron also has donated to the cause every year. Both donate for personal reasons. Thank you both so very much for your help. I appreciate it very much!

Friday, August 28, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was clear, the wind was light from the northwest, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was excellent. The day turned out to be very warm. It didn't feel as warm today because it was less humid than the last few days. In turn, the visibility was much better, about twenty miles or so. And the sky was a bright blue with few clouds and a very strong sun. The highest air temperature I saw in Ogunquit was 82F. The ocean was calm until around 3:00 PM when a five to ten knot south southwest breeze kicked up. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 54F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew lightly out of the northwest in the morning. It was calm during the afternoon. The ocean's surface was calm for the trip. There was no swell. The air temperature ranged from 66F at the very start to 75F near the very end of the trip, in the shade. The sun was hot and felt a lot closer than the last few days. It was almost too hot on the open deck. The sky was mostly clear and sunny. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged to about twenty-five miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66.5F.

The fishing was good to very good overall, excellent on one spot. Most legal fish landed were pollock followed closely by haddock. Legal landings also included two cusk. Released fish included forty-six dogfish, eight market cod and two blue sharks that were released when they parted fishing lines. Drifting was the meaning of the method. Flies ruled.

I don't know who was high hook for the most legal fish but I would like to think it was Porker McLean (NY). Porker has been fishing with me since 1976 on the Mary E. when I used to do six passenger charters. Some of his best fish included a 12 pound pollock, a 15 pound pollock, two pollock of 16.5 pounds and a 17.5 pound pollock. His biggest pollock tied for the third largest fish of the trip. D. J. Crouse (ME) caught the other one. But D. J. caught this 17.5 pound pollock as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 18 pounds! This double is now the fourth largest double keeper catch of the Bunny Clark fishing season. D.J.'s 18 pounder was the second largest fish of the trip. Some of D.J.'s other good fish included a 10 pound pollock and a 16.5 pound pollock. Arnie Ulrich (NJ) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Tony Brewer (ME) caught a 17 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also caught an 11 pound pollock, the first fish of the day big enough to weigh. Toby Pauly (NY) also caught a 17 pound pollock, his largest was well. Toby's second largest fish was a 14.5 pound pollock. Randy Peterson (NY) caught a 16.5 pound pollock, his best. Joe Gray (SC) caught a double that included a 10 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. Some of Joe's other fish included another 12 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Mike Mahoney (NY) landed an 11.5 pound pollock. Reed Mahoney (NY) caught the largest cod at 13 pounds. He also caught a pollock that weighed 13 pounds and another that weighed 16 pounds. D.J. Crouse (ME) ended up landing the hard luck award for losing two jigs. I'm not sure but I would be willing to bet that one was lost to a shark!

Captain Ian Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots. Seas were chops of a couple feet with no swell. The sky was sunny. The air temperature was 69F in the shade. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze. The tide was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67.5F.

The fishing was very good - for cod. In fact, there were probably more cod caught on this afternoon trip than any in at least the last three or four years. Most were under twenty-two inches. All but two. But there were plenty of cod. The only two legal fish caught were two cunners. Other released fish included thirty-six pollock, four sculpins and a sea raven. Anchoring and drift fishing were both tried. Anglers used all bait.

Josh Lester (VT) was the fisherman of the evening. He was high hook with exactly thirty cod and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 4.5 pound cod caught by Daniel Campbell (VA). Alan Bormbrock (NJ) landed the hard luck award for getting caught on the bottom more than any other angler.

Saturday, August 29, 2015

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine are running the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was clear with wisps of high cirrus clouds, there was no wind, the ocean was mirror calm and the visibility over it was excellent. The day was beautiful and sunny. It wasn't nearly as humid as the last few days. But it was just about as warm. I never did see more than 79F on the thermometer but I'm sure it must have hit 80F. The ocean was calm all morning with only a very light wind out of the southwest in the afternoon. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots. Seas were small chops of less than a foot. The ocean surface was essentially calm. The sky was sunny but with high cirrus clouds making the blue a lighter shade. The air temperature reached a high of 68.9 in the shade. The tide (current) was strong (full moon). The visibility was unlimited. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66.3F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was very good for haddock, one of the best trips of the year for landings. They were shy of the total boat bag limit but only just shy. The pollock bite was off; they only landed one. Legal landings also included two cusk. Released fish included twenty-five cod of market size, quite a few sub-legal pollock, thirty-five dogfish and our eleventh barn door skate! Driting was the method. Bait caught the most fish today, by far.

Tristan Winslow (MA) caught the largest fish of the trip, a 20 pound barndoor skate. Tristan was not in the boat pool. The fish was released unharmed as soon as it was weighed. Tristan also caught the second largest cod at about 8 pounds. The cod wasn't weighed. Norm Herrick (MA/ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 12 pound cod. Norm also caught the third largest fish, a 9 pound cod. Norm lost two big fish today. Both Jared and Norm thought they were both big cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Dan Piccoli (NJ) caught the largest haddock. It weighed 5 pounds. Kurt Karlsson (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.

Captain Jared Keniston and Alec Levine ran the afternoon half day (4PM - 8PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less. The sky held a sun peeking out of a hazy kind of sky with high cirrus clouds. The air temperature was warm (no temperature given). The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze. The tide was strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.2F.

The fishing was fair. Legal fish included five mackerel, a butter mullet and a cunner. Released fish included two small cod and six small pollock. Anchoring was the method; the tide was too strong to drift. Everyone used bait.

Ted Keith (NH) caught the largest fish of the evening, a 1 pound cod, released, of course. Ted was not in the boat pool. Cody Merrill (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a .5 pound butter mullet (squirrel hake)! Rod Wheatley (NH) landed the hard luck award for most tangled lines.

Norm Herrick donated a generous $100.00 to help me in my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Norm has given me several donations this season. The total is large, made even larger today! Thank you so much for the support, Norm. It means a great deal to a lot of people!

Sunday, August 30, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was clear with cirrus clouds, there was no wind at the house, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was good to very good in some haze. The ocean stayed calm all day; the wind was light and variable in direction. The air temperature crested 80F and beyond. The sun was out all day in a hazy sky. The visibility was good or better in haze. And it was humid. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 57F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to less than ten knots. The ocean was calm over a two foot high (long) sea swell from the southeast. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was sunny with high cirrus clouds. The air temperature ranged from 68F to 74F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66.4F.

The fishing was very good, again (like yesterday), mostly for haddock. They had no problem reaching the boat's total bag limit. In fact, most legal fish landed (and released), by far, were haddock. Pollock came in second. There were no other legal fish of other species landed today. Released fish included our twelfth barndoor skate (this is something else!), twenty-seven market (or larger) cod and two blue sharks. They also saw a leatherback sea turtle today, the second one we have seen this year so far. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

I believe that Josh Cabral (RI) was the fisherman of the day. He caught the most large fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 31 pound barndoor skate. This is the twelfth barndoor skate and second largest barndoor skate of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Ian took a picture of Josh with his prize. This digital image appears on the left. Josh also caught a pollock of 16 pounds that tied for third place with two other 16 pound pollock caught by two other anglers. Some of Josh's other good fish included a 12 pound pollock, an 11.5 pound cod and a 12.5 pound pollock. The other two anglers who caught 16 pound pollock included John Keniston (ME - Jared's oldest son) and Andrew Warren (NH). John also caught a pollock that weighed 12.5 pounds. Manny Cabral (RI), Josh's father, landed the second largest fish of the trip, a 16.5 pound pollock. Manny caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch that also included another pollock of 15 pounds. This is a tie for the seventh largest double keeper catch of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Manny also caught the largest cod at 14 pounds and another cod of 10 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Felix Dauber (Germany) landed an 11.5 pound pollock, his best fish. Our own Mike King (ME) caught the largest haddock of the trip at 5.5 pounds. His largest fish was a 12 pound pollock. Jordan O'Keefe (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Tim Warren (NH) landed a 15 pound pollock, his best fish. John Caprocki (CT) boated a pollock of 11 pounds. Mike King, Jr. (MA) landed the hard luck award for losing two jigs. I know he casted off at least one of the jigs.

Monday, August 31, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was clear, there was no wind at the house and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in some haze. It was hot, hazy and humid ashore today. The wind stayed light out of the west. It might have blown ten knots or better at times. The ocean was calm all along the shore. There was no wave action on the beaches either. The sky was hazy sunny. The air temperature rose to the mid 80s. The visibility was good, no more than that. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 61F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 90F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less over long rolling sea swells that reached a height of two feet on the sounding machine. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The air temperature in the shade ranged from 68F to 71F. Jared said it was hot and humid on deck. But maybe that was because he had to work so hard today! The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged to ten miles, more or less, in haze. The surface water reached a high of 64.3F.

The fishing was very good to excellent overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock followed by haddock. The boat's haddock bag limit was easily reached. And, again, it was one of the biggest haddock days of the season for numbers (including those released). The pollock were larger than normal today with many fish over 10 pounds that Ian did not weigh. Legal landings also included a cusk. Released fish included twenty-three cod, twenty-two dogfish and two blue sharks. There was one really big fish that Dave Harris (MA) hooked that just took line until it broke. I suspect it was a tuna. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

I believe that Jim Reilly (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish. Ian said as much but couldn't prove it. Some of the bigger fish that Jim caught included two pollock of 16 pounds each, a 17 pound pollock and a 16.5 pound pollock. Ken McLaughlin (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 22 pound pollock. This is a tie for the Bunny Clark's fourth largest pollock of the fishing season so far. Ken also caught the second largest fish, a 20 pound pollock. Jack Judge (CT/ME) and Richard "picklesandthings.com" Cavallo (ME - a wonderful chef) both caught a pollock of 19 pounds to tie for third place on the big fish list. Chef Richard also caught pollock of 14 pounds and 15 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Chris Albert's daughter, McKenzie Albert (ME), caught the first fish worth weighing, a 17.5 pound pollock. That looked like it was going to be the boat pool. Close but no cigar! She also caught a 15 pound pollock later in the day. Her father, long time Bunny Clark angler, Chris (ME), caught the biggest double keeper catch of the trip. His double included an 18 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. This becomes a tie for the sixth largest double keeper catch of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Chris also caught a 16 pound pollock.

Chris Franklin (ME) boated a 17.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Charles Armstrong (ME) caught a 15.5 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock, his two best. Bill Socha (NH) landed a 17 pound pollock. Thirteen year old Riley Franklin (ME) caught a 13.5 pound pollock. Clive Roberts (NH) landed a pollock of 16.5 pounds. Gregg Kidd (ME) landed an 18.5 pound pollock, his largest fish of the trip. Charlie Harris (MA) caught an 18 pound pollock and a 14.5 pound pollock, his two best. Dave Harris (MA) did one better with an 18.5 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock. Dave also landed the hard luck award for losing two jigs!

Jim Reilly (MA) did me a solid today by donating $30.00 to my special place where cancer research it tops, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts through the Pan-Mass Challenge. Jim has always supported me in this event and is a hell of an athlete himself (as is his daughter). Thanks so much, Jim. Always good to see you!

Tim Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 67F, the sky was clear with a strong 7/8's moon overhead, there was no wind at the house and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in some haze.

The wind was light out of the northwest as we headed to the fishing grounds. Seas were chops of a foot at most. The sky was clear, the visibility was very good and the the air temperature was about 66F. On the grounds, the wind worked it's way clockwise around the compass from northwest to southerly. While fishing, the wind never got any stronger than about three knots. The ocean was calm. For the trip back to Perkins Cove, the wind picked up out of the south to ten to twelve knots or better. Seas were white caps over a foot in height. The air temperature ranged from 68F to 76F in the shade. It was hot on deck. The air temperature dropped a bit when the southerly wind picked up. The tide ranged from light to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66.3F on the fishing grounds. We had at least twenty-five miles of visibility. The sky was hazy clear with a bright sun shinning down on us all day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 61F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 56F).

The fishing was good overall. We picked at them continuously all day. There were never any dead moments but we never saw an excellent spot all day. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included fifteen white hake, three butter mullets, one redfish, sixteen cusk and one whiting. We released three dogfish, forty-two haddock (most were under seventeen inches but we did get five between 4 & 5 pounds) and seven cod from 5 to 9 pounds. We had the second worse day with blue sharks that I (personally) have seen this year to date. We lost ten rigs to them including the most lost jigs I have seen this year to date. Drifting and anchoring were the methods. I alternated between both all day long. All terminal gear worked well. Cod flies caught the most pollock.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. Eric Richards (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 30 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the largest hake that Eric has ever caught. In fact, I think it's the only hake Eric has ever caught! I took a picture of Eric with his big trophy. This digital image appears at the lower left. Jim Morrell (ME) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 26 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Jim has caught hake before but this is the biggest one that he has ever caught. I took a picture of Jim as well. His picture with said hake appears at the upper right of this entry. Jim also caught a 24.5 pound white hake. His largest pollock weighed 13 pounds. The third largest fish was a 25.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake caught by Collin Kennedy (VT). This is the largest ocean groundfish that Collin has ever landed. His largest pollock weighed 10.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Jason Rochette (VT) landed a 24 pound pollock. This isn't his largest pollock ever but it is the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the fishing season so far. He is the only one to get a double keeper hake catch this season as well. He caught it today. The catch included an 18 pound white hake and a 10 pound white hake, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! Two of Jason's other good fish I weighed included a 12.5 pound pollock and a 13.5 pound pollock. At the same time that Jason hooked into his big pollock, Jay Kennedy (VT) hooked into a 20.5 pound pollock! Both fish were brought to gaff at about the same time. Some of Jay's other good fish included a 13 pound pollock, a 15.75 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock.

Bob Jones (ME) caught a 21.5 pound white hake, a 20.5 pound white hake and a 13.5 pound pollock, his three largest fish.Larry Reed (ME) caught the largest double keeper catch of the trip today. His catch included a 17 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock. This is the eighth largest double of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Some of his other good fish included a 20 pound white hake and another pollock of 11 pounds. I tried to abuse Larry all during the trip but, sad to say, I never really did get the upper hand as in previous trips. He must have had a good nights sleep as he was well prepared for me from the beginning! Rand Richards (ME) landed an 18 pound white hake, his biggest fish. John Charette (ME) caught three good sized pollock that I weighed. The pollock were 15.5, 17.5 and 18 pounds!

Boo Whitten (ME) landed a 15 pound pollock, her largest fish. Karilyn Bonney (ME) caught an 18 pound white hake as her largest fish of the trip. Bryan Lucas (ME) landed an 11 pound pollock and an 18 pound pollock, his best fish. Jim Bonney (ME) boated an 11 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Matt Charette (ME) might have lost the largest pollock of the day. It could have been a double but it took line like a single fish. But the drag was a bit too tight and the fish (singular or plural) busted off! The largest fish that Matt landed was a 12 pound pollock. Jim Iams (ME) caught our fourth Maine state trophy fish today, a 25.25 pound white hake. Three other good fish of his included a 15 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. He landed the hard luck award t-shirt for losing three jigs. I believe he lost them all to blue sharks!

I received two donations sponsoring me in my ride for a cancer free world with the Pan-Mass Challenge, an event that has already taken place but for which I take donations until the end of the season. The end of the fiscal donation year ends at the end of the year. One donation came from Larry Reed & Crew for a generous $70.00. The other was a $25.00 donation from Jim Morrell, who is also part of the Reed Crew and probably put some money in the pot to begin with! Thank you all so very much for thinking of me and supporting me in this continuing project of mine. Many appreciate your kindness!

Wednesday, September 2, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the sky was clear, there was no wind at the house and the visibility over the ocean was good (at least) in haze. By 7:00 AM, the air temperature had dropped to 58F, there wasn't a breath of wind and the ocean was flat mirror calm. The ocean was calm all morning with a light southwest wind starting before noon. After noon, the wind hauled out of the south but it was light. The ocean remained calm for the day. It was hot, hazy and humid. The air temperature in Ogunquit reached a high temperature of at least 86F. The sky was hazy sunny all day. The visibility ranged to ten miles or better along the coast. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 91F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 90F (with a low of 56F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots for the trip. Seas were chops of a foot over a long sea swell about two feet in height according to the sounding machine. The sky was sunny all day. The air temperature ranged from 68F to 70F in the shade. It was hot in the sun. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged around ten miles (more or less). The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.5F.

The fishing was good overall, very much like yesterday's trip. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Even if we could have caught haddock, pollock would have reigned supreme. Legal landings also included two cusk and a monkfish. Released fish included thirteen cod of market size to 10 pounds, forty-seven haddock, one dogfish and one blue shark. Drifting and anchoring helped them catch fish. Cod flies caught the most legal fish but all terminal gear worked well.

Mark Telerico (NY) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19 pound pollock. He also had a pollock that tied with a pollock that Berry Hall (NY) caught for the third largest fish. Both fish were 16 pounds. Mark caught his singly while Berry caught his as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 6 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Mark also caught a 12 pound pollock. Berry landed two other pollock, both weighed in at 14 pounds. The second largest fish was an 18 pound pollock caught by Melissa Hall (NY).

Other Angler Highlights: Sabin Shepard (ND) landed a 15 pound pollock, his largest fish. He is also one of only five anglers this season to have caught a monkfish on the Bunny Clark. His monk today weighed 3.5 pounds, a small one. John Giordano (CT) caught the biggest cod. It weighed 10 pounds (as mentioned above). His largest fish was a 13 pound pollock. Wayne Lacy (ME) landed the hard luck award for catching nary a single legal fish. He probably wouldn't have been left out if we could keep cod or haddock.

I received two donations supporting my Pan-Mass Challenge bike ride for a cancer cure and care with the Jimmy Fund today. Bill & Anne Briggs from Barnacle Billy's fame gave me $50.00 while Sabin Shepard gave $5.00. Thank you all very much for the help. Much appreciated!

Thursday, September 3, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was clear, there was no wind at the house, a half a moon was hanging over head and the visibility over the ocean was good (at least) in haze.

The ocean was as calm as glass when dawn came on the fishing grounds. In fact, the ocean was flat calm all day. We did have wind but it was variable in direction and it never blew over a knot or two. The air temperature ranged from 70F to 80F in the shade. It was hot on deck. (Friends in Ogunquit reported seeing 90F near the coastal border of the town of Wells today.) I believe it was our warmest day out here this season. The tide ranged from light to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.5F on the fishing grounds. The visibility ranged from eight to twelve miles at most in haze. The sky was hazy clear most of the day with clouds in the form of thunder storm activity near the end of the trip and on the way in. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 64F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 70F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 90F (with a low of 61F).

The fishing was good overall. We had some excellent fishing in the morning, a slow bite at mid trip and good fishing in the later part of the trip. Most legal fish landed were pollock followed by white hake. Except for the Ultra Marathon, it was the best hake fishing we have had all year. Legal landings also included ten redfish, two butter mullet, five cusk and a big whiting. Released fish included two market cod (5 & 7 pounds), twenty-six haddock (mostly too small anyway), fifteen dogfish and a lobster. We drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well.

It was much to hard to tell who was high hook today. Wobby Barnes (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 30.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Some of Wobby's other great fish included a 12.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk, a 15 pound white hake, a 25 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 15.5 pound white hake and a 26 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Terry Long (PA) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 30 pound Maine state trophy white hake. I took a picture of Terry with his big hake, his largest ever. This digital image appears on the left. Terry also caught a 23 pound white hake and an 11.5 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 29 pound Maine state trophy white hake caught by Chuck Lennon (MA). Chuck's list of good fish included a 14 pound pollock, a 24.5 pound white hake, a 26.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 28 pound Maine state trophy white hake, an 18.5 pound pollock, a 22.5 pound white hake and a 21 pound white hake.

Other Angler Highlights: Jon "Griff" Griffin (MA) lost his biggest hake of the day after he got sawed off by another crossing line. [In fact, Ian told me he lost three big hake in total for the same reason! Ian was at the cutting table right next to where Griff was fishing.] The hake he did catch weighed 20, 16 and 23 pounds. His largest pollock weighed 14 pounds. Jeff Gellatly (ME) landed the fourth or fifth largest whiting the Bunny Clark has ever seen. It weighed 4.5 pounds, the second largest whiting of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far and a Maine state trophy by a pound and a half.. I took a picture of Jeff with his fish. This digital image appears on the right. Jeff's largest fish was a 27 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Some of his other great fish included a 24.5 pound white hake, a 17 pound white hake, a 24 pound white hake and a 15.5 pound white hake. His largest pollock weighed 11.5 pounds.

Ray Westermann (MA) landed a 27 pound Maine state trophy white hake, his largest fish of the trip. His two biggest pollock weighed 15 pounds and 16.5 pounds. Chris Porter (MA) landed a 24 pound white hake, his best fish. I fished for a bit today as there was more room than normal. I created the worst tangle of the trip, I hate to say. But, 'tis true. That kept me from fishing for a while. I got my courage back near the end of the trip and caught a strange double keeper catch. The double included an 18.5 pound pollock snagged in the belly with a cod fly and a 2 pound female "V" tailed lobster on the jig! This is our third lobster of the season to date! Chris Deschambault (ME) landed the first two hake of his life (both under 15 pounds). Some of the pollock that I weighed for him included a 10.5 pounder, a 16 pounder and a 14 pounder. Chris also landed the hard luck award for whining and complaining about catching too many haddock. He did catch the most haddock so he did return the most haddock!

Wobby Barnes (MA) gave me a $40.00 donation towards my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. And, yes, Wobby gives me something every year. Thanks so much. I certainly appreciate the support!

Friday, September 4, 2015

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was mostly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. More later.

We have openings for the following special trips: There are fifteen fishing places available on the Friday, September 4, extreme day trip, sixteen fishing spots available on the Monday, September 7, extreme day trip, fourteen fishing places available in the Tim Tuesday, September 8, marathon trip and fourteen fishing spots available on the Thursday, September 10, marathon trip. The fishing has been exceptional this summer. And this seems to be continuing into September. Hope to see you there! You can make reservations by calling 207-646-2214.









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