www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

Tuesday, October 26, 2021, 6:30 AM EDT/AST




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Our Best Trip of the Season for Cod

The digital images above were taken at the end of the marathon trip on September 14, 2021. The image on the left is a shot of Keith House (NY) holding his 17 pound cod that he caught that day. It was the largest and pool winning fish of the trip. At the time of this writing, it's also the third largest cod caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. The shot on the right shows Sam Sweenor (NY) holding up a cod double (both fish caught on the same line at the same time) that he caught after Keith caught his bigger fish. We already had a cod for every person on the boat so these two fish went back alive after the picture was taken. The bigger fish weighed 11.5 pounds and the other was 10 pounds, our largest cod double of the season so far. I took the boat that day as deck hand and captain with the help of all the anglers aboard. It was a perfect weather day to do this. And I believe we also had a great time as a fishing team. Most of the anglers aboard I have had fishing with me for many years. I certainly hope they had as much fun as I did having them there!




Tim Tuesday, September 28, 2021

Happy Birthday to my sister, Meg, Paul "Hez" Haseltine, Dick Lyle & Rosie Geer!!!!!

David Girard and I (with Nick Andrus in training) ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 62F, the sky was partly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at six knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

We had clear skies and a light southwest wind on the ride to the fishing grounds. Seas were left over two foot rolling chops over a three foot swell from the southeast. From my description, you might think the sea was a bit confused. But that wasn't the case. The seas and chops were so far apart that it made for an easy ride to the fishing grounds. The air temperature was 63F and the visibility was excellent.

On the grounds, we continued with sunny skies, an excellent visibility and barely any wind from the southwest. There was just a slight left over chop, maybe a foot in height and the same long sea swell. At 10:30 AM, we could see thunder showers headed our way. This was strange because I've only seen thunder showers two other times in my life as far offshore as we were today. By 11:00 AM, the thunder showers were upon us with lightning strikes in the water all around us. The lightning was never close enough to bother. It poured rain as well. For an hour and more it rained, mostly a hard rain. Afterward, we had periodic rain for another hour. It stopped raining after 1:00 PM but it stayed overcast for the rest of the trip. The wind backed out of the northeast at eight knots for the ride back to Perkins Cove. The high air temperature was 66F. The visibility dropped to ten and fifteen miles, less in the rain. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F..

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 50F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 53F).

The fishing, the catching and landings were very good today. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. No other species was even close. And we found pollock everywhere we went. Legal landings also included thirteen cod, twenty-nine haddock, two redfish, four cusk, six white hake and seventy-seven mackerel. Released fish included two blue sharks with jewelry, fifty-seven dogfish, two sub-legal haddock, three sub-legal cod, two cod over 5 pounds, a few mackerel, a mud hake and a sculpin. We drift fished and anchored. Jigs and flies caught the most fish, even the most haddock.

Birthday boy, Dick Lyle (NY) was high hook with, by far, the most legal fish. He had over three totes of pollock alone. Some of his better fish included a 14.5 pound pollock, a 16 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. Jim Taylor (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 25.5 pound Maine state trophy cod. The is our largest cod of the fishing year to date. I took a picture of Jim and his cod. This digital image appears on the left. Jim also caught the largest double of the year. His double included a 15 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. He also caught an 11 pound pollock early in the day and a 12 pound pollock a bit later.

Ryker Allred (NC) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 20 pound pollock. This ties for our sixth largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. The third largest fish was tied at 17 pounds with two anglers. One was a 17 pound cod caught by Alex Hersom (ME). The other was a 17 pound barndoor skate caught by Mike Stump (MA). The cod is tied for the fourth largest cod of the 2021 Bunny Clark season to date. The skate is the fourth largest caught so far. Mike also caught an 11 pound pollock, a 15 pound pollock, the largest haddock at 5 pounds and the largest white hake at 11.5 pounds. Alex also landed the hard luck award for, one, getting the worst tangle of the day and for, two, losing at cod that had to be between 40 and 50 pounds. I almost cried. As he was getting off the boat a pigeon shit on his shoulder, a signature ending for the day of Alex!

Other Angler Highlights: Mark LaRocca (NY) caught two pollock of 13 pounds each, a 12.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. I didn't weigh all his bigger pollock. David Washburn (NH) caught a 10 pound pollock right off the bat this morning. I know he caught bigger fish but they weren't of a size to compete for the boat pool. But he probably did get one of 12 pounds or so. Scott Miller (VT) caught a 13 pound pollock, his biggest fish that I weighed. I weighed two fish for Mike Dryver (ME) that were pollock of 11 pounds each. Smokey Dorsey (NC) caught an 11 pound pollock. Dennis Pine (NC) landed a 12.5 pound pollock, his biggest that I weighed. Stephan James (VT) caught a 12 pound cod and a 15 pound cod. Barry Ano (NY) landed an 11 pound pollock, his biggest fish. He also caught more haddock than most today.

I received three donations sponsoring me in this year's Pan-Mass Challenge today. These donors and their donations included Dennis Hartigan for $20.00, Stefan James for $10.00 and Scott Miller for $30.00. Thank you all so very much for your kindness, thoughtfulness and support. I do so appreciate it!

Wednesday, September 29, 2021

We had not nearly enough interest in today's trip to remove the Bunny Clark from the float at Barnacle Billy's dock. Ah, she's a sad girl today.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 53F, the sky was almost overcast, the wind was blowing out of the north at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind increased out of the north to about twenty knots or so and then backed off as the day progressed. We had barely ten knots at 1:00 PM and no wind at all by 4:00 PM. The sky was clear with a few clouds for most of the day until the later afternoon, when the gray clouds started to move in. The sky was mostly overcast by 5:30 PM with an air temperature of 60F. The highest air temperature that I saw today was 65F. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 66F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 65F (with a low of 40F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 50F).

Today was a monumental day of catching up in the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. I really did not much else today.

Thursday, September 30, 2021

David Girard and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 54F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the north northwest at ten knots max and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

The sky was still overcast when we cleared the can buoys and left the gate behind. A little ways out it was choppy, the wind out of the north at fifteen knots. Chops were two to three feet. The air temperature was cool The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north all morning. Wind speeds were up to twenty knots in gusts. Seas were chops of three feet, more or less. The wind gradually subsided. By noon, we had ten to fifteen knots of northerly wind. By 1:00 PM, we had five knots with seas in chops of a foot. A short time later, the wind backed out of the northwest and dropped even lower. It was calm when we started back for home. But we picked up a ten to fifteen knot north northwest wind fifteen miles from shore. The air temperature was 61F for high. The sky cleared a couple hours after sunrise but was still mostly cloudy for the day with sun patches. We had some small low pressure areas with rain pass around us in the afternoon. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty-five miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 64F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 41F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 44F).

The fishing, the catching and landings were very good today. I could have called it excellent as we saw not a single dogfish or a single blue shark. That's amazing. But I drift fished, which made the catching and landings better but it presented a medium with which the tangles were frequent and complicated. Added to this was the fact that there were many different types of fishing lines. This is never a good thing. Most legal fish landed were pollock. They were absolutely ferocious today. It was nothing to get a double. We carried them through ninety fathoms of water with no problem, pollock chasing us the whole way. It was our best pollock trip of the season to date. With the added depth we also ran into a good sized hake here and there. Legal landings also included one cod, seven haddock, eight redfish, four cusk, eleven white hake, two silver hake and two butter mullet. Released fish included seven sub-legal cod, nine sub-legal pollock and one redfish. Drifting was our main fishing method. We did anchor once for not much but most of our haddock. Everyone used jigs and cod flies.

Kenton Geer (HI) was high hook with the most legal fish. He also tied for the largest fish of the trip, a 28 pound Maine state trophy white hake. He was not in the boat pool. I took a picture of Kenton on the bow with his prize hake. This digital image appears on the left. I never weighed any of his pollock but he had to have caught a pollock of at least 15 pounds. The only other fish of his that I weighed was a 15.5 pound white hake. Tim Rozan (ME) was second hook, nipping at Kenton's heels. I only weighed two fish for Tim. One was a 17 pound pollock. The other was a 19 pound white hake.

Tom Miller (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the same size and species of fish that Kenton landed, a 28 pound Maine state trophy white hake. The largest pollock of Tom's that I weighed was a 13.5 pounder. Barry Ano (NY) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 26 pound Maine state trophy white hake. I took a picture of Barry with his wonderful hake. This digital image appears on the right. I weighed a 13 pound pollock for Barry. The third largest fish was also a hake, weighing 24.5 pounds and caught by Dave Harris (MA). Lewis Hazelwood (MA) caught the fourth largest fish, a 24 pound white hake. His largest pollock weighed 16 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Erik Grove (ME) caught a 23.5 pound white hake, his biggest fish. He caught plenty of pollock. Dennis Hartigan (ME) landed a 17 pound white hake, his biggest fish of the trip. Dennis Pine (NC) caught a 19 pound white hake, his biggest fish of the trip. I weighed two pollock for Jim Taylor (NY). One weighed 11.5 pounds early in the day. The other weighed 15 pounds, caught late in the day. Adam LeBarron (MA) caught the largest pollock of the trip at 18 pounds. Dennis Reissig (NY) caught a 15 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Jim Watson (NY) caught the best double. His catch included an 11 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Smokey Dorsey (NC) landed the second largest pollock of the trip at 17 pounds. David Dorr (ME) landed the hard luck for losing the most jigs, two! The largest pollock of his that I weighed was an 11.5 pounder.

I received help I didn't expect to get sponsoring me in this year's Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those anglers and their donations included Barry Ano for a generous $100.00, David Dorr, who always helps when he can, for $20.00 and Erik Grove, a long time supporter, for $50.00. Thank you all so very much for the help and, indeed, support. I so appreciate your thoughtfulness and generosity!

Friday, October 1, 2021

Captain Ian Keniston and Nick Andrus ran the extreme day trip today.

At 4:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 47F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west northwest at ten knots or a bit more and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northwest at about ten knots all day. The sky was mostly sunny with some cloudiness. The visibility remained excellent. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 64F. It felt like a warm fall day, which it was! In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 69F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 64F (with a low of 36F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 41F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at ten to five knots. Seas were chops two feet to start and a foot later as the wind dropped. The air temperature reached a high in the low 60s. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was mostly sunny. The tide (current) was light. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

The fishing was very good, the catching was very good and landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, like yesterday. However, today, they had a nice mix of species, including cod. Legal landings also included eleven cod, twenty-one haddock, three redfish, seventeen cusk, nineteen white hake and twenty-four mackerel. Released fish included forty dogfish, nine small cod, three sub-legal haddock, some small pollock and a couple mackerel. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

There were three or four anglers who could have been high hook including Dennis Reissig (NY), Fritz Heckel (NH) and Si Heckel (NH). Ian told me the name of the other which went in one ear and right out the other. Dennis tied with Robert Cobb for the third largest fish at 11 pounds. Dennis' fish was a cod, the largest cod of the day (he caught the only cod yesterday). Robert's was a pollock. Will Buesser (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. Fritz landed the second largest fish, a 12.5 pound pollock. He had caught a 10.5 pound pollock earlier in the day to start off the boat pool.

Other Angler Highlights: Mark Bernier (CT) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for getting involved in most of the tangles today.

Saturday, October 2, 2021

Captain Ian Keniston and Nick Andrus ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 54F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the west northwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the ten knots of northwest wind was the strongest wind we saw. The wind was more westerly by 8:00 AM, the same strength. But, by mid morning, the wind was dying. Before noon, the wind flunked out. The ocean went flat calm and stayed that way for the rest of the day. There wasn't enough wind to blow a candle out. The sky was overcast all day. The visibility was excellent. The highest air temperature that I saw as 62F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 76F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 45F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 58F (with a low of 46F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots with seas in chops of one to two feet. The air temperature was warm, lower 60s. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was light. The sky was overcast all day, as it was ashore. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

The fishing was very good. There were a few dogfish but not enough to be a problem. There were no blue sharks. The weather was perfect for fishing. Without the dogfish, the fishing would have been excellent. The catching was very good. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. The pollock were smaller today. Legal landings also included sixteen haddock, four redfish, a cusk and eight white hake. I think we have seen more white hake on the open bottom than we have in years. This is good as we haven't really found them where we normally do. Released fish included forty dogfish, two small cod, and a handful of small pollock. Drifting was the method. The current was too slow to anchor. Jigs and cod flies or just cod flies caught the most fish.

Ian couldn't tell who was high hook. There were three anglers who were jig fishing all day, together, any one of whom probably had the most legal fish. But they pooled their fish. It almost looked to me like Darlene Chin (VT) had the most fish. But she had a couple of bigger fish. In fact, Darlene caught the largest fish of the trip, a 12 pound pollock. She did not enter the boat pool. Robert Didonato (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 10 pound pollock. He also caught the third largest fish, an 8.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Polly Phach (ME) caught the largest white hake at 8 pounds. Zack Hoober (NH) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single legal fish, the only angler to miss out on bringing some fish home.

Sunday, October 3, 2021

Captain Ian Keniston and Nick Andrus ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 56F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at about ten knots, more or less, and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northeast. In the morning, the wind never blew more than ten knots. Mostly the wind was about five knots or less. The wind picked up a skosch after noon, remaining at about ten knots until after sunset. The wind increased again at 9:00 PM, where it was blowing about fifteen knots at one point. It was damp at that time but not raining. The sky was overcast all day with a very light rain for a few minutes in the morning. This rain was so light it just barely made the roads wet before stopping altogether. The visibility was, generally, very good, or better than that. The air temperature reached a high of 61F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 68F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 60F (with a low of 54F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 54F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east northeast at ten to five knots. Seas were chops of about a foot or more decreasing to calm during the trip. The air temperature rose to 60F. The visibility ranged from five to ten miles in fog and light rain. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was overcast all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61F.

The fishing was so so. They had quite a few dogfish in the morning, making it hard to catch the targeted fish. Everything else was pretty good as far as the fishing goes. The catching was good. Landings were fair to good. Most legal fish landed were haddock. Legal landings also included sixteen cod, fifteen pollock, four redfish, seven cusk, three white hake, a monkfish and three whiting. Released fish included about one hundred and fifty dogfish, four cod of 5 pounds or more, twelve sub-legal cod, three sub-legal haddock and some small pollock. Drifting was the method. Cod flies seemed to work the best.

High hook could not be determined today. Marty Buskey (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11 pound cod caught by Adam Theriault (ME). Andrew Orkin (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 10 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Stacy Rowe (NH) caught a 9 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Cameron Baker (NY) landed the hard luck award for the most tangled lines.

Marty & Elise Buskey donated another $50.00 to sponsor me in this season's Pan-Mass Challenge today. Always appreciated, this couple supports me through the year, every year. Thank you both so much for your generosity and help. It is very much appreciated by the researchers who need the funding. And, of course, it's very much appreciated by me!

Monday, October 4, 2021

We only had one angler interested in today's fishing trip. The Bunny Clark is back at her favorite resting spot, the float off the Barnacle Billy's dock.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 57F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots, more or less, and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind continued out of the east at fifteen knots, more or less, for most of the day. There was never a very big chop; it was certainly manageable for a fishing trip. By 5:00 PM, it was blowing out of the east at ten knots. The sky remained overcast all day. It never did rain. Although, it did rain about twenty miles south of us for most of the morning. The highest air temperature that I saw was 59F. The visibility was nearly excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 63F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 58F (with a low of 53F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 59F (with a low of 52F).

At this time of year, the year end stuff keeps me in the office for longer periods of time. Today was just that kind of day. I spent the time from 6:00 AM until 8:00 AM at the restaurant. Then I worked in the home office for a couple of hours before I could take a break, a break to ride my bike until 11:30 PM. I was in the restaurant, in my whites, by 12:20 PM, after I had gotten all my stuff ready to take the Bunny Clark tomorrow. I actually loaded the Bunny Clark with my gear before I started working today.

I spent the rest of the time in Barnacle Billy's and Billy's, Etc. I was back home getting the last minute things ready for tomorrow's marathon trip by 6:00 PM.

Tim Tuesday, October 5, 2021

David Girard and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:30 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 54F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly and had been for most of the morning, the wind was blowing out of the east at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was good or better than that in precipitation and some haze.

Unlike the weather report from the last two days, the we had light northeast wind with a two foot chop, or less. as we headed to the fishing grounds. Most of the chop, I'm sure, was left over from the wind the day before. The visibility was initially as it was raining. We had light rain almost to the half way mark. We had no more rain for the rest of the day. The visibility was excellent for the last few miles to the grounds. The air temperature was mild.

On the grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast all day. The velocity was about ten knots when we first arrived. It increased to fifteen knots with higher gusts an hour after and remained that way until 11:00 AM. Seas were about three feet, more or less. At departure time, the wind was light out of the northeast with a left over two foot long chop over a four foot long swell from the southeast. The air temperature reached 61F for a high. The sky was overcast all morning and mostly cloudy in the afternoon with some clear patches. We had no rain while fishing. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The visibility ranged to thirty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 63F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 65F (with a low of 51F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 49F).

The fishing was good today. We had a few dogfish, some blue sharks bothering, the weather wasn't the greatest and the tangles, for some reason, were many. The catching was very good. Landings were good to very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. We caught pollock everywhere we went. Legal landings also included nineteen cod (our limit at one cod per person), twenty-five haddock, fourteen redfish, three cusk, one butter mullet and five white hake. Released fish included thirty-two dogfish, three cod over 5 pounds, thirteen sub-legal cod, three sub-legal haddock, six sub-legal pollock, five sub-legal redfish and five blue sharks with jewelry. We anchored for most of the morning but drift fishing caught the most fish. Jigs and cod flies were best.

Jody Clark (NY) was high hook with the most legal fish, I think. There were three others, one of whom, might have tested my claim. Jody's largest fish that I weighed was an 11 pound cod. He also caught another cod of 10 pounds and a pollock that I didn't weigh that was 10 or 11 pounds. He also caught six haddock, all with a jig. But, then again, he is a Clark. We are definitely related! Ron Terrio (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.25 pound pollock. Marc Lambert (NY) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 12.25 pound cod caught by Harvey Kalme (NY). His biggest pollock weighed 11 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Rickey Hagadorn (NY) caught the most haddock with a count of, at least thirteen. He was using squid for bait. He was one of the top four high hooks of the day. His largest fish was a 10.5 pound pollock. Darlene Chin (VT) was also one of the top four hooks of the day. She started off leading the boat pool with an 8 pound pollock. She fell behind in the size category (for the boat pool) but, still, caught some nice fish. Her two largest were a 10 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. It was her birthday today. She wanted to celebrate her birthday with a trip on the Bunny Clark. I, of course, was flattered and honored. John Lambert, Jr. (NY) was also one of the four high hooks today. He caught the first good sized cod at 10 pounds. The largest fish of his that I weighed was an 11 pound pollock. He also caught the largest haddock. I didn't weigh it but it looked to be 4.5 to 5 pounds. He also walked off with the most bags of fillets.

Phil Wadsworth (NY) caught a 9 pound pollock and a 10 pound cod, his two best fish. Ray Lambert (NY) caught a 10 pound cod. This ended up being his biggest fish. He did lose a fish right at the end of the day that was certainly bigger and might have been a cod. We never did see it. Newt Bacon (NY) caught a 10 pound pollock. Anthony Sorbello (NY) caught a 12 pound cod, his best. Mark Mahay (NY) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for losing six jigs, getting sea sick (he was one of two with the malady) and for getting tangled all day long. Despite this, he did catch a lot of fish!

I received three donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today, a cycling event to raise money for cancer research. Those donors and their donations included Rickey Hagadorn for $35.00, Mark Mahay for $50.00, Jody Clark for $10.00 and Newt Bacon for $25.00. Thank you all so much for helping me fund a team of researchers who, I feel, are doing a wonderful job in the fight against cancer. I really do appreciate the support. They, of course, appreciate it more.

Wednesday, October 6, 2021

Captain Ian Keniston and Steve LaPlante ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 51F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the north and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind was light and variable indirection all day. The ocean was flat calm with a ruffle on the surface every now and again. I think you could have floated a scallop shell on it's surface, it was so calm. The sky was cloudless. The visibility was excellent. The highest air temperature that I saw was 70F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 68F with a low of 56F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 52F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 47F).

On the fishing grounds, there was no wind. The air temperature got up over 70F for a high. It was hot on deck. The sky was cloudless. The tide (current) was very light. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles or more in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61F.

The fishing was excellent as was the weather and the sea conditions. There were few dogfish. The catching and landings were very good and consistent. Most fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included eight cod, twenty-three haddock, eight redfish, two cusk six white hake and five whiting. Released fish included twelve dogfish, eight cod of 5 pounds or more, twelve sub-legal cod, ten short haddock, sixteen sub-legal pollock, twelve sub-legal redfish and a mackerel. Drifting was the only fishing method available as the tide was so light. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish by far.

Matt Fletcher (NY) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish. And, he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 24 pound cod. This is the second largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Captain Ian took a picture of his nice cod. This digital image appears on the left. Some of Matt's other great fish included an 11 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. There was a tie for the second largest fish with two anglers. Both fish weighed 18 pounds. One of these fish was an 18 pound barndoor skate caught by Seth Wakefield (ME). The other was an 18 pound pollock caught by John Cavino (NY). Captain Ian took a picture of Seth holding his barndoor skate just before it was released back to the ocean alive. This digital image appears on the right. Some of Seth's other good fish that Ian weighed included two pollock of 12 pounds each and an 11 pound pollock. John also caught a 13 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Dan Kelley (ME) caught an 11 pound pollock, a 10 pound pollock and a cod that weighed 11 pounds. Mark Wakefield (ME) caught the largest double of the trip. His double included a 13 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. He also caught a 16 pound cod, the eighth largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Steve LaPlante (CT) landed a 14.25 pound pollock, his largest fish. Joe Snide (NY) landed two pollock of 12 pounds each, his two biggest fish.

Steve LaPlante donated $50.00 to my cancer research campaign with the Pan-Mass Challenge today, the second exact sum of money he already donated a month or two ago. Actually, he has been responsible for three donations this season. Not only that, he has seen me off in almost all of the PMC rides/events, has donated since my involvement in 2007 and has talked this project up to others. His support has been tremendous and much appreciated over the years. Thank you so much, Steve, for being who you are and the generosity and thoughtfulness you have shown me.

Thursday, October 7, 2021; The Last Day to Keep a Cod for 2021

David Girard and I (with Jon Calivas in training) ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 54F, the sky was clear, the wind was light from the west and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

We had a light northwest breeze on the ride to the fishing grounds. By light, I mean a couple knots. Seas were two to three foot very long rolling sea swells from the southeast with just a ruffle of wind on the surface. The visibility was very good, the sky was clear, the air temperature was mild and the ride was super comfortable.

On the grounds, the wind was light and variable (in direction) all day. The northwest wind had left us by the time we arrived at our destination. There was no wind. Nor was there a drift. We stayed on one spot moving about a half a boat length after about a half hour. In fact, it was only on the last drift of the day that we had any real movement over the bottom. We saw our first established wind direction as we were leaving the fishing grounds, headed home. The wind was south southwest at five knots. The wind velocity increased to ten knots on the way back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature reached 70F for a high. The sky was cloudless all day. As mentions, the tide (current) was zero to light. The visibility ranged to twenty-five miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 74F with a low of 56F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 49F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 48F).

The fishing was nearly excellent today. I say nearly because we did lose a jig to a blue shark, there were dogfish that bothered (although not too many) and we did have some tangles. The catching and landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock and redfish, in that order. Legal landings also included fourteen haddock, eighteen white hake (mostly small), seven mud hake, nine cod, twenty-eight cusk, a whiting and a few mackerel. Released fish included about thirty or more dogfish, one blue shark with jewelry, a sculpin, fifteen sub-legal redfish, three sub-legal haddock, three or four sub-legal pollock, seven sub-legal cod, a hagfish (slime eel) and a few mackerel. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the best fish.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook with the most legal fish. I would suspect it was Jonathan "Griff" Griffin (MA). But it could have been David Macklin (MA), as he had a pile of redfish where Griff didn't have that many. For big fish, Griff was the king today. He won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish and he won the boat pool for the second largest fish with third largest fish. Both his fish were white hake. Both his fish weighed 24.5 pounds. He also caught a twenty-one pound white hake and another white hake of 15.5 pounds. Griff also caught the largest pollock of the trip at 19.25 pounds. David caught two legal sized cod. One of them was the largest cod of the trip. I didn't weigh it but it was probably 10 pounds more or less. Some of David's other good fish included an 18.5 pound white hake, a 23.5 pound white hake and the largest cusk of the day at 11.5 pounds. I believe he also caught the most haddock.

Nate Beachy (ME) caught the largest fish of the trip, a 26 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the largest hake he has ever caught and, also, his largest groundfish. I took a picture of Nate holding his prize. this digital image appears on the left. Nate also caught a few pollock, his biggest weighed 11 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: The fourth largest fish came in at 24 pounds, both white hake. One was caught by Marcin Korszen (NJ). The other was caught by Chris Yoder (ME). Marcin also caught a couple of pollock in the 11 pound class. Chris caught pollock as well but I don't recall the weights.

Thomas Smietanka (NJ) boated a 22.5 pound white hake. I took a picture of Tom holding his big hake. This digital image appears on the right. Mark Bellaire (ME) caught a 22.5 pound white hake. Mark is a good friend of Captain Phil Eastman from the Eastman Docks fishing fleet. Mark usually has a wonderful time sailing with Phil and with Nate Ribblett, on one of the Eastman's smaller boats. Of course, I had to listen to how great the Eastman fleet is. And, of course, I know it's true! This was Mark's first trip with me.

Chris Albert (ME) caught an 11 pound pollock that I weighed. He didn't catch that halibut I was promised. Jon "Jonny Bravo" Langlois (RI) landed a 13 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Michael Fisher (ME) caught an 18.5 pound white hake and a 12.5 pound pollock, his two best fish. Chao Zou (MA) caught a 15.5 pound white hake. He actually caught quite a few fish today. Dwayne Stoll (ME) landed a 21.5 pound white hake. Kevin Zimmerman (ME) caught the second largest pollock of the trip at 15 pounds. He also landed the hard luck award for losing five jigs, one to a blue shark.

I received a nice $30.00 donation from Jonny Langlois sponsoring me in this year's Pan-Mass Challenge today, a cycling event to raise money for cancer research. Jon hasn't been with me for a couple of years but used to go as a team with Chris Albert, slaying the fish and impressing his fellow anglers. It was good to see the team back together again. And I certainly appreciate the donation. Thanks so much, Jon!

Friday, October 8, 2021

Captain Ian Keniston and Nick Andrus (with Jon Calivas in training) are running the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 54F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the north northeast at eight knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind along the shore went calm. There was hardly a breath of wind. What wind we did have was from the north. But the ocean was flat with calm patches and wind patches, as view from the land. The sky was cloudless all morning. The northeast wind struck at 1:00 PM. It was blowing at fifteen to twenty knots at that time. The wind had increased to twenty and twenty-five knots. This didn't last. By 4:00 PM, the wind was backing off with no gusts approaching twenty knots. When I left the restaurant at 9:00 PM, the wind was out of the east at less than fifteen knots. The sky became partly cloudy at 2:00 PM, mostly cloudy after that. But it never rained. The air temperature reached a high of 72F in Perkins Cove. The visibility was excellent throughout. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 46F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 49F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light from the north and calm. Around noon, the wind started to pick up out of the northeast. By 1:00 PM, the wind was east northeast at twenty knots with higher gusts. Seas increased from calm to three feet, more or less. The sky was sunny all day. The air temperature got up into the high 60s. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

The fishing was excellent to start or nearly so. If you didn't like dogfish, "nearly so" was appropriate, as there were a few. After noon, the fishing deteriorated to good with the stronger tide and the sea conditions. The catching was very good. Landings were good - more toward that level/category because the anglers could no longer keep the few cod they caught today. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-seven haddock, thirty-one redfish, four cusk, a white hake and twenty or so mackerel. Released fish included fourteen cod from 6 to 17 pounds, ten small cod, six sub-legal haddock, a couple small redfish, three blue sharks with jewelry and a couple mackerel. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Richard Gipp (NY) was high hook with the most legal fish. Most of his fish were smaller. Rich Callahan (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17 pound cod. This fish ties with two other cod caught this season for our fifth largest cod this year to date. The second largest fish was a 14 pound pollock caught by Joe Heron (RI). Buzz Leonard (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. Buzz also caught a 12 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Jim LeMay (ME) caught a 13 pound pollock and was leading the boat pool for a while. Tim Rozan (ME) caught an 11 pound pollock. Ian Wood (PA) caught a 12.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Harry Irving (ME) caught the second largest cod at 13 pounds. Kevin Viel (NH) landed the hard luck award for losing his car keys overboard. Ouch!

I received two donations today sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising project with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Those wonderful individuals included Bob Munroe & Linda Burgess (MA) for $40.00 and Ian Wood for $20.00. Thank you so very much for your continued support. [Ian donates every year. The same for Bob & Linda except that they already gave another $60.00 to me in May.] I do so appreciate it!

Saturday, October 9, 2021

Captain Ian Keniston and Nick Andrus (with Jon Calivas in training) ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 52F, the sky was mostly cloudy with clear patches, the wind was blowing out of the east northeast at twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. By 9:00 AM, the air temperature had only warmed up to 56F. In fact, the highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 63F. The wind blew out of the east northeast at ten knots after sunrise, worked out of the east and then east southeast. Wind speeds were all about the same, about ten knots. The sky stayed overcast all morning and most of the afternoon. Unlike yesterday, the visibility was good to very good with some haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 66F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 60F (with a low of 43F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 58F (with a low of 44F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at five to ten knots. The air temperature was in the lower 60s. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds, sometimes overcast and sometimes sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

The fishing was excellent. The weather conditions were fine, there were very few dogfish and the blue sharks weren't many. The catching and landings were fair. It just was not a good bite today. I couldn't tell you why and I was surprised when Ian told me how the day went. Legal landings included seven haddock, thirteen pollock, three cusk, three white hake and twenty-two mackerel. Released fish included ten dogfish (even the dogfish weren't biting), one cod of 6 pounds, nine small cod, two sub-legal haddock, a couple small pollock and a couple mackerel. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked the same.

Bob Cousins (ME) was the story of the day. He won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. But he could have won the boat pool with a small bluefin tuna. He fought the tuna until the leader was out of the water and you could get a look at the fish. Then the line parted. Estimates on size were 60 to 80 pounds. It would have been a perfect fish to land. The second largest fish was a 7 pound pollock caught by Amy Finn (MA). Hal Flanagan (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 6.25 pound cusk.

Other Angler Highlights: Ning Zhang (OK) caught the largest cod at 6 pounds. Elina Richardson (CT) landed the hard luck award for taking the lead in the high hurler category. She was not alone but, Ian felt, she was the best.

Sunday, October 10, 2021

Captain Ian Keniston and Nick Andrus are running the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 53F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the east at eight knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. It stayed cooler this morning for a longer period of time. At 7:00 AM, the air temperature was still only 54F, 60F by noon. The highest air temperature that I saw was 64F, still mild for this time of year. The wind was light out of the east all day. Wind speeds of five to seven knots was the theme all day. The visibility was very good in some haze. The sky was overcast, at times thin. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 66F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 64F (with a low of 47F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 61F (with a low of 44F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at five to ten knots. Seas were small chops to a foot over a rolling sea swell of two to four feet. The air temperature was in the low 60s. The sky was a thin overcast. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

The fishing was nearly excellent with few dogfish and good weather. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed today were haddock, the most haddock we have caught on a trip in a couple of weeks. Legal landings also included twenty-two pollock, nine cusk, three white hake, three whiting and about seventy-five mackerel. Released fish included fifteen cod of 5 pounds or more, eighteen small cod, six sub-legal haddock, a few short pollock and a few mackerel. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well today including bait, Jigs and flies.

The story of the day was Art Kemler, Jr's (PA) big halibut. Like the tuna yesterday, Art lost his halibut just out of gaffing range. In fact, the halibut was so big, had Ian been able to gaff the fish under water, he never would have been able to hold on. Well over 100 pounds, the fish went directly back to bottom and broke the line, once there. It had already taken other runs to bottom. I know that the fly above the jig was probably responsible for the loss. And it was so too bad they couldn't boat this fish. Art has caught a halibut before on another boat. But this one was decidedly bigger. Art did go on to win the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.5 pound cod. He also caught the largest white hake at 11 pounds. There have been a lot of hake this year, a good sign to me.

The second largest fish was a 12.5 pound pollock caught by Steven Balevre (NH). Steven also caught a 10 pound cod and another pollock of 10.5 pounds. Rod Sadlon (NY) landed the third largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Brian McLaughlin (NY) caught a 10.5 pound cod. Andrew DeFlumer (NY) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for, again, like yesterday, for attaining high hurler status. Yes, there were others today. The swell was not so underlying to some, obviously.

Columbus Day, Monday, October 11, 2021

Captain Ian Keniston and Jon Calivas hosted the Charlie Brown (ME) extreme day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 55F, the sky was hazy clear, the wind was light out of the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, we had northeast wind up to ten knots in the morning with very little wind in the afternoon. The sky was mostly clear and sunny. It was a beautiful fall day. The air temperature reached a high of 68F - that I saw. The visibility was very good in some haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 69F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 51F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 52F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east southeast at five knots. The surface was calm over a long rolling three to five foot sea swell. The air temperature reached the mid 60s. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was mostly sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

The fishing was very good. There were a few more dogfish than yesterday but it wasn't bad and the swell posed a bit of a problem but not so bad that you couldn't hold bottom. The weather, other than the swells, was very good. The catching and landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, the most haddock we have seen in three weeks. Legal landings also included nine pollock, twenty-one cusk and two white hake. Released fish included twelve short cod, thirty dogfish, ten sub-legal haddock, a few small pollock and a sculpin. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait and cod flies. No jigs were used today.

The story again today was the loss of a big halibut. Leon Fanning (NE) was the angler. He hooked it with a bait rod, fought it for quite some time (I don't know the minutes) and lost it. Ian thought he had bottom. Leon's reply; "No, this is a fish." So Ian told him to fight it. He did. And it was a fish, a big halibut. Leon caught haddock but nothing else worth writing about.

Ron Oaklund (NE) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound cusk, one of the bigger cusk we have seen as of late. He wasn't the hero all day, though. At first, all he could catch was dogfish. When asked what he was catching his reply was; "All I can catch is the son of a dog toothed bitch fish!". That about describes those pests. The second largest fish was a 9.5 pound pollock caught by Brett Rupprecht (NE). Tiffiny Minnick (NE) caught the third largest fish, a 6 pound cusk.

Other Angler Highlights: Emet Fanning (IN) landed the hard luck award for being the first and the most sea sick. Ouch! Welcome to the Bunny Clark!

Tim Tuesday, October 12, 2021

David Girard and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 4:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 55F, the sky was clear, the wind was barely blowing out of the west and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

The wind was light out of the northwest when we slid out the gate on the ride to the fishing grounds. This wind died before we arrived on the fishing grounds. The ocean was calm with a larger than normal ocean swell out of the southeast. The sky was clear. The air temperature was 58F at the ten mile mark. The visibility was very good.

On the grounds, there was no wind to start. The ocean surface was smooth over a rolling sea swell of six to eight feet with a few queer ones in between. The swells lasted all day but were a bit diminished in the later afternoon. The wind was blowing out of the west by mid morning. Wind speeds were light. By mid afternoon, the wind had backed out of the southwest. We carried southwest wind all the way back to Perkins Cove. The wind never blew over eight knots today. The air temperature was in the low 60s. The sky was cloudless in the morning and mostly sunny in the afternoon through wispy high thin clouds and mare's tails to the south. The air temperature reached 64F for a high. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty-five miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59.8F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 51F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 48F).

The fishing was excellent. The weather was perfect, the drift was perfect, there were few dogfish and only one blue shark took a jig. In fact, we only lost two jigs all day. The catching and landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-two haddock, eight cusk, twenty white hake, forty mackerel and three whiting. Released fish included a few mackerel, five sub-legal pollock, seven small cod, twelve cod of 5 pounds or more, nineteen sub-legal haddock, sixteen dogfish, three long horn sculpins, a sea raven and one blue shark with jewelry. We drift fished for every area. All terminal gear worked well.

There was a tie for high hook between Shawn Rosenberger (PA) and David Macklin (MA). Both seemed to have the same number of legal fish. Dave won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 31.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is Dave's largest white hake, ever! Dave also caught a 26 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 26.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 21.5 pound white hake and a 30 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Dave also caught the most legal haddock of the trip.

Shawn Rosenberger caught the biggest double of the 2021 Bunny Clark fishing season today, so far. His double included a 30 pound Maine state trophy white hake and a 30.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! He also caught the third largest double of the 2021 Bunny Clark fishing season today. This double included a 14.5 pound white hake and a 26.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. The 30.5 pound white hake was the third largest fish of the trip. Some of his other good fish included a 12 pound pollock, a 25.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 13 pound pollock and another double that included a 13 pound pollock and a 9.5 pound pollock. Shawn also caught the Bunny Clark's fifth largest pollock of the fishing season, today, at 21.25 pounds.

Tim MacDonald (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 36.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the largest hake that he has ever caught. It's also the third largest hake of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. I took a picture of Tim holding his big hake. This digital image appears on the left. Some of his other good fish included an 18 pound pollock, an 18 pound white hake and a 17 pound white hake.

Other Angler Highlights: Chris Bergier (MA) landed only the second Maine state trophy pollock that we have seen this year, today. The pollock weighed 26 pounds, the second largest pollock of the season so far. I also took a picture of Chris holding his trophy pollock. This digital image appears on the right. His largest fish was a 28.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake which he caught as a double with another white hake that weighed 20.5 pounds. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest double of the fishing season so far. Some of his other good fish included a 28 pound Maine state trophy white hake, an 11.5 pound pollock and a 14.5 pound pollock. Chris landed the hard luck award t-shirt for losing a jig to a blue shark and for getting sea sick!

Bill Otto (PA) caught the largest cod of the day at 14.25 pounds. He also caught a 9.75 pound cod the first thing in the morning. His largest pollock weighed 14.75 pounds. And he also caught a 27 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Ray Westermann (MA) landed the Bunny Clark's fourth largest pollock of the fishing season today with a 21.5 pounder. His largest fish was a 25.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. He also caught a 25 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 15.5 pound pollock, a 12 pound cod (released, of course), a 16 pound white hake and another white hake of 23 pounds. Ray caught the most short haddock!

Also, there were some of you, including Dave Macklin and Chris, who I didn't get phone numbers or email addresses to send your digital images to. I had planned to ask for this information when I got to the dock. But I never followed through - I forgot! So let me know so I can send them to you.

Wednesday, October 13, 2021

Captain Ian Keniston and Jon Calivas ran the extreme day trip today.

At 4:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 57F, the sky was crystal clear, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at five knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good, at least. Ashore, we had very little wind all day. The wind was from the southwest but it never blew more than eight knots, at most. The sky was sunny all day with few clouds. The visibility was very good. The air temperature reached a high of 73F in Perkins Cove. It might have actually been a little warmer than that. But that was the highest value that I saw. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 50F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 51F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less. I guess that there was no discernable swell as Ian never mentioned it to me. The air temperature reached the mid 60s. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good and landings were also very good. There were few dogfish, the weather was great and the tide was just perfect for drifting. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included seventy-one haddock, two redfish, twelve cusk, five white hake and thirty-five mackerel. Released fish included a few small pollock, a mackerel or two, seven sub-legal haddock, fifteen small cod, a cod over 5 pounds and a couple sculpins. They drift fished all day. All terminal gear worked well.

Fred Kunz (NH) and Shawn Rosenberger (PA) were high hook. Fred caught the most haddock of the trip for an angler. His largest fish was probably a 10 pound pollock. Shawn caught an 11 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Zach Pearson (NH) caught the largest fish of the trip, a 17 pound pollock. He was not in the boat pool. Ken Lemke (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. There was a tie for third place with two pollock of 13 pounds each. Joe Gamble (NJ) caught one. Jack Berghof (NJ) caught the other.

Other Angler Highlights: Greg Ludington (ME) caught a 12 pound pollock, his largest fish. Dave Dinsmore (ME) caught a 12.5 pound pollock. Marty Buskey (NY) caught a 12 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Mark Simpson (NH) caught a 12 pound pollock. Zach Berghof (NJ) landed the hard luck award for being the best at being sea sick. I guess that there were a couple who were.

I received two donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a ride to generate funding for cancer research. Dave Dinsmore, himself a cancer survivor, gave $50.00 and Marty & Elise Buskey gave another $50.00 donation. Marty & Elise have probably given $250.00 in $50.00 donations.It may even be more. I will have to look or you can do that for yourself. Thank you all for the support and your generosity. I do very much appreciate your help!

Thursday, October 14, 2021

David Girard and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 57F, the sky was crystal clear, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at five knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

The wind was light out of the southwest when we poked the bow out between the gate. There was no chop but it wasn't flat calm either. The air temperature was in the middle 50s the whole ride out. The sky remained hazy clear. The visibility was very good. The ride was very comfortable the whole way to our destination.

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light out of the southwest. The wind created a ruffle on the surface but not much more than that. Around mid morning, the wind hauled out of the north and then northeast. Wind speeds increased to about ten knots. The seas became chops of about a foot. A half hour later, the wind had dropped to five knots, the chops dropped and the wind decreased a little more. By late morning, the wind was gone. The ocean was flat calm from noon until we could see the can buoys of Perkins Cove. The air temperature reached a high of 72F. The sky was mostly sunny all day, cloudless most of the morning. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty-five miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60.5F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 49F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 50F).

The fishing was very good. It could have been excellent had there not been so many blue sharks and dogfish. The weather was perfect for fishing and perfect for drifting. The catching was excellent. Landings were a little bit better than good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included sixty-five haddock and fifty-two cusk. Released fish included over two hundred small pollock, sixty-seven dogfish, fifteen blue sharks released with jewelry, seven sub-legal haddock, two cusk, twenty-seven small cod and seventy-four cod between 6 pounds and 30.5 pounds. Most cod were in the 10 pound range. We drift fished all day. All terminal gear worked well but jigs and cod flies caught the most legal fish.

Tim Rozan (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. There was no one close. I didn't weigh all his fish over 10 pounds but I did weigh some of them. The fish I did weigh included a 10 pound cod, a 12 pound pollock, a 16 pound pollock, a 15.5 pound pollock, a 13 pound cod and a 12 pound pollock. Tim's dory mate, Lewis Hazelwood (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 30.5 pound cod. This is the largest cod we have seen on the Bunny Clark for at least two years. I took a picture of Lew holding his big cod before releasing it back to the ocean alive. This digital image appears on the left. Lew caught quite a few pollock and cod.

Mark LaRocca (NY) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 20 pound pollock. The two largest fish I had weighed for him before was an 8.5 pound cod and an 11 pound cod. I took a picture of Mark holding his slammer pollock. This digital image appears on the right. The third largest fish of the trip was an 18 pound pollock caught by Karl Day (ME). The reason I went where I went today was to, hopefully, catch a halibut. Karl was the only person to hook one. He brought it off the bottom half way to the surface when it screwed back all the way to bottom. A few seconds after it got there, there was a head shake and the fish was gone. For the first three hours of the day I could see big halibut following us (while looking at the sounding machine) on three different drifts. We could not get one to bite, except for the fish that Karl hooked.

Other Angler Highlights: Ed Brozo (MA) caught a 10.5 pound pollock in the first five minutes of the day. And, like he did last time he was with me, he caught quite a few cod. The largest cod of his that I weighed was a 13 pounder. He also landed the hard luck award for losing five jigs to blue sharks!

Shawn Rosenberger (PA) wasn't high hook today but he caught a lot of good fish. He was the first angler this year, on today's trip, to catch a "quad", four fish on the same line at the same time. The four fish included a 12 pound cod, a 9 pound cod, a 10.5 pound cod and an 8 pound pollock. He also caught a double that included a 14 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Other fish of Shawn's that I weighed included a 13 pound cod, a 14.5 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound cod.

Joe Columbus (MA) caught a 15 pound pollock in the first five minutes of fishing. That fish stood as the largest fish for a couple of hours before we caught a fish bigger. I also weighed a 10.5 pound cod and a 12 pound cod for Joe. Neil Feldman (NJ) caught a cod that looked to be 12 or 13 pounds. I never got a chance to weigh it before he released it back alive.

Another couple donations helped raise the bar today for my cancer fund raising total with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Eduard Brozo donated $25.00 when he first met me on the boat this morning. Joe Columbus passed me another $40.00. Like Marty & Elise Buskey, Joe has given me a donation every time I see him. Then, when we got back to the dock at the end of the trip, Steve McGrath (NH), donated $50.00. Steve, too, has already donated to the PMC through me. Steve has helped me every year since I started funding research in 2007. Thank you all so very much for your thoughtfulness and support. I really do appreciate your help trying to reach my goal.

Friday, October 15, 2021

Captain Ian Keniston and Jon Calivas ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 61F, the sky was cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the east at eight knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, the wind was light and variable in direction all day, the ocean along the shore was calm. Basically, the wind started by blowing out of the east and then worked it's way around to be blowing out of the south in the afternoon. The sky was overcast all day. The visibility was very good. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 64F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 69F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 72F (with a low of 54F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 62F (with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at five knots and hauled out of the south by the time the fishing was completed. The ocean was calm over a sea swell that was about two feet. The air temperature was warm. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

The fishing was very good. A stronger than normal tide, a few dogfish and angler tangles kept the fishing below the excellent category. The catching was very good to excellent. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. They caught many more haddock than I saw yesterday on the offshore trip. Legal landings also included thirty-five pollock, six redfish, nine cusk, one white hake, a monkfish and eight mackerel. Released fish included twenty cod of 5 pounds or more, fifteen short cod, six sub-legal haddock, a few small pollock, a couple sculpins and a mackerel or two. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Shawn Rosenberger (PA) was high hook with the most legal fish. I believe he told me that he had nineteen haddock alone. His largest fish of the trip was a 9 pound pollock. LeAndre Hadden (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Orville Ross (PA). Adam Kendall (VT) caught the third largest fish, a 12 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: James Franklin (MA) caught an 8 pound monkfish. Believe it or not, this is only our second largest monkfish of the season so far. We have caught fewer monkfish this year than almost any year that I can remember. Darren Whearry (PA) caught an 11 pound cod, his biggest fish. Captain Steve McGrath (NH) landed the hard luck award because everyone kept pointing the finger at him when tangles ensued. I believe it was those around him who put him in this position. But if the shirt fits.........

Saturday, October 16, 2021

Captain Ian Keniston and Jon Calivas are running the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 63F, the sky was overcast (it had been raining lightly an hour earlier), the wind was blowing out of the south at ten to twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was good. Ashore, the wind blew out of the south all day with an average speed of about eighteen knots or fifteen to twenty-five knots. Big white beards could be seen from the shore all day. The air temperature was mild with a high of 72F, that I saw in Perkins Cove. The visibility was good, or better than that, in some haze. The sky was overcast all day. It never did rain again after the early morning. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 76F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 57F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at fifteen to twenty knots. Seas were chops of three to five feet. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in some haze. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was mostly cloudy with some peeks at the sun as a dull orb floating through the clouds. The air temperature was warm, 60s. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

The fishing was not good. The seas made it difficult for most to maintain their equilibrium, the dogfish were back in full force (for God knows what reason - it's really time for them to leave!) and the tide ran a river. The catching suffered because of this as did the landings. Most anglers were not fishing as they were concentrating on getting through the trip instead. Legal landings included ten haddock, twenty-two pollock, one redfish, one cusk and ten mackerel. Released fish included one cod over 5 pounds, six small cod, two sub-legal haddock and a couple mackerel. They drift fished and anchored. Drifting worked best as the tide was opposing the wind. Only one jig was used today which might have also made the landings less. Everyone used bait and cod flies today; definitely not the most productive way to catch fish at this time of year.

Danny Maines (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. He stood out like a sore thumb in this category. Maybe the thumb analogy isn't the best! And he stood out again because he also landed the boat pool for the largest fish of the trip with the largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. This made him the fisherman of the day. He also caught the second largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 10.5 pound pollock caught by Justin Saunders (CT).

Other Angler Highlights: Bobby Blake (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, the only other good sized fish that was caught today. He also landed the hard luck award for being the high hurler of the trip. Fortitude; that's what I say. A good man, that Bobby Blake!

Sunday, October 17, 2021

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 57F, the sky was overcast, it was drizzling rain after having rained for large part of the morning, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good in light precipitation. By 7:00 AM, the rain had stopped for the day. The sky was still overcast. Two hours later, there were signs of clearing. By 11:00 AM, the sky was cloudless and the sky remained so until 2:00 PM, when scattered clouds showed. The wind blew out of the west for most of the morning, hauling out of the west northwest in the afternoon. Wind speeds were fifteen knots in the morning and fifteen to twenty knots in the afternoon with higher gusts. The highest air temperature that I saw was 64F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 65F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 63F (with a low of 49F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 62F (with a low of 43F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west and then northwest at ten to twenty knots. The wind was stronger in the second half of the trip. Seas were chops of two to four feet, higher, again, in the afternoon. The air temperature was right around 60F, but a bit colder being exposed to the wind, mild overall. The visibility was over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The sky was overcast in the morning and sunny in the afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

The fishing only met the "good" category because there were no dogfish seen today. Had there been dogfish, it would have been the ultimate poor fishing day because the weather, to these anglers, was poor - which made the fishing poor. In fact, there were only one or two anglers fishing half way through the trip and all wanted to go home. Ian obliged them and got back to the town dock at Perkins Cove an hour and a half early. Because the fishing was so poor, we couldn't get a read on the catching because no one really tried. Landings were just fair. Total legal landings included one haddock, twenty-seven pollock, one redfish, one cusk, three white hake and one monkfish. Released fish included eight small cod, one cod over 5 pounds and three sub-legal haddock. As I mentioned, there were no dogfish seen. They drift fished and anchored. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Oren Everts (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 8.5 pound pollock caught by Jim Potter (NY). Rachel Cerrone (NY) caught the third largest fish, an 8 pound monkfish. This is the tie for the Bunny Clark's second largest monkfish of this season to date.

Other Angler Highlights: Doug Morrow (NY) landed the hard luck award today for, you guessed it, becoming the high hurler of the trip. Not a good day for angler health.

Monday, October 18, 2021

Today's trip was canceled. We had nary enough anglers to make the trip, the weather was suspect and we had a deck hand leave us for Florida where his father is sick. So here we are back in the throes of our deck hand woes. The Bunny Clark will have her wooden anchors out for not only today's trip but, also, for the marathon trip tomorrow. Sad but true!

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 51F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the west northwest at twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good, at least. We had clouds for a while in the early part of the morning after dawn. Later in the morning, the clouds disappeared and left us with clear, almost cloudless, skies. After 1:00 PM, the clouds started building to the point were some cells could be seen going offshore of the Kennebunkport area with rain. By 5:30 PM, we had the same with a small cell that gave us pouring rain for more than fifteen minutes, maybe even a half hour. I was in the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. at the time so I didn't really mark the exact time span. After the rain, we never saw rain again. The wind in Perkins Cove was out of the northwest or some variation of the northwest all day. Wind speeds ranged from ten to fifteen or more knots. The visibility was excellent, except during the rain. The air temperature never cracked the 60F mark. It even dropped to 47F by 7:00 AM before rebounding. The highest air temperature that I noticed was 58F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 62F with a low of 47F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 59F (with a low of 41F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 58F (with a low of 42F).

After I was done at the restaurant, yesterday; I get out of work there at 6:00 PM on Sundays unless it's a holiday weekend, I grabbed my tools and worked on replacing the electric wash down pump in the engine room of the Bunny Clark. The pump had been making noises for a couple of months or more and finally gave out on Friday morning's trip. I didn't have a chance to work replacing it then as the weekend was upon us and I had too much to do between the fishing trips coming and going and the restaurants. It took me about an hour and a half but it wasn't a complicated task to complete. And it was nice to get this behind me going forward.

Today I spent my time working in the restaurants, catching up in the office and talking to patrons, some of whom I won't see until we open again next season. I left at 6:30 PM, when the business slowed down enough and after I had talked to everyone eating at a table in both establishments. Normally, I leave earlier on a Monday night as I have to get up extra early to take the marathon fishing trip on Tuesday. We didn't have a trip so I had a leisurely dinner with Deb and got to bed by 8:30 PM.

In turn, I didn't get up this morning until 4:20 AM, quite a bit later than normal. This allowed our border collie, Gill, who just turned eight years old yesterday, to jump up on the foot of the bed to wait until I stirred. As soon as I move an arm, Gill is on me licking and pawing at me. As long as I stay still and work through a normal sleep pattern, he maintains his vigil at the foot of the bed. Of course, I get up once he's on me. And we go through the same ritual every day when I do get up; "Good boy", "Where have you been?", "What an honest dog!", "I missed you, Gill." In turn, he whines and sneezes as I scratch his back and give him his morning rub-down. On a day where fishing is not an option, I have more time because, as you know, restaurants start later and end later. Even for just an extra half an hour in the morning, it makes for an easier day and, I believe, a happier dog.

This year has been the most challenging year of my life. I usually don't want a season to end. And, in some ways, I still feel that way. But I will be happy to be over with the challenges of this year. Oh, I will still have challenges. But I will also have time to sit back and reflect on what happened and how I could improve things for next season. And things do have to improve in many aspects.

I received a very generous $750.00 donation to my cancer research project with the Pan-Mass Challenge from Howard & Barbara Goldenfarb (ME) today. Howard & Barbara have been very loyal contributors over the years. Normally, Howard, myself and two others do an 100 mile bike ride together to celebrate the normal end of a season around Labor Day. Last year and this year Covid took that away from us. Hopefully, we will get back together and do it next season. There was just so little time to fit it in during the last two seasons due to the extra time needed to cope with the changes that Covid brought upon us. Thank you so much, Howard & Barbara. I do so appreciate your support and generosity every year!

Not so Tim Tuesday, October 19, 2021

The Bunny Clark resides in Perkins Cove until the extreme day trip tomorrow.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 45F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at twenty knots plus and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind blew out of the west to start and for most of the morning. Wind speeds were over twenty knots for most of the time. By noon, the wind was mostly northwest with wind speeds increasing to over thirty knots at times. The sky was mostly clear with scattered clouds in the morning, nearly overcast in the afternoon when the wind was at it's strongest. We never did see any rain. The air temperature slowly crept up. By noon, the air temperature was 54F. The highest air temperature that I saw was 59F but it could have been higher. I saw an air temperature in Portsmouth, New Hampshire of 61F. We usually match the air temperature in Portsmouth. The visibility was excellent all day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 63F with a low of 46F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 41F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 40F).

I spent the day working at the restaurants. Much of my focus today was trying to get a crew together to stay open at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. for six days next week, our last week to be open there, instead of the five days we have been open. I hate to have a day in a week where neither restaurant is open. So, right now, it looks like Tuesday will be the only day this year where no Barnacle Billy's restaurant will be open. It looks like we will be open on Wednesday, October 27th. There are still a couple of things I have to work out before this is really the plan. We shall see.

Barnacle Billy's (original) will be closing on Sunday, October 24th. Normally, I do not like closing or seeing the end of the summer upon on. But, this time, I will be happy not to have the challenges of this season upon me. There are always challenges, of course, but they will be less once we close.

I did nothing on the Bunny Clark today except catch up on work at the desk.

Wednesday, October 20, 2021

Captain Ian Keniston and Jonathan Calivas ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 47F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the west at twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the west at ten to fifteen knots to start and then died off. By late morning there was very little wind. The ocean along the shore was calm. When the wind did establish a direction, it was from the east but very light, five knots or so. The wind hauled out of the southeast by 7:00 PM with wind speeds up around ten knots or more. The sky, overcast until 7:00 AM, cleared and was cloudless after 8:00 AM. Cloudless skies remained for the rest of the day. In fact, a full moon rose out of the ocean completely uninhibited by clouds. The highest air temperature that I saw was 65F. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 72F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 73F (with a low of 37F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 42F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at ten to five knots. Seas were chops of two feet or so to start and then dropped to a foot or so. The wind was light out of the east on the ride home. The air temperature rose above 60F. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. [I had rode on my bike today and could clearly see Mt. Washington - 40 miles away?]. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was sunny all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56F.

The fishing was good to very good, depending on the angler. There were a lot of dogfish around again today. The catching was very good. Landings were good, better than that for some. Most legal fish landed were haddock. Legal landings also included forty-four pollock, six redfish, one cusk, three white hake and twenty-six mackerel. Released fish included thirty mackerel, eighty dogfish, twelve sub-legal haddock, four cod of 5 pounds or more, eight small cod and a couple sculpins. They drift fished all day. All terminal gear worked well today.

Ron Antanavich (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock, the third largest fish of the trip. He also caught a 10 pound pollock in the beginning. Joe Ford (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. Joe also caught a 12.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 14 pound pollock caught by Matt "lefty" Clark (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: John Ford (PA) caught the largest cod at 10.25 pounds. His largest fish was a 12.5 pound pollock. Shawn Rosenberger (PA) caught a triple that included a 12 pound pollock, a 10 pound pollock and a 9 pound pollock, all on the same line at the same time! Darrus Grate (ME) landed the hard luck award for having the most tangled lines!

Thursday, October 21, 2021

Jonathan Calivas and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 4:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 50F, the sky was cloudless with a full moon shinning brightly high in the western sky, there was no wind in Perkins Cove and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

We had five knots of westerly wind as we cruised to the fishing grounds. There was a very light chop over a hubble that was left over from yesterday's southerly wind. So it wasn't completely flat. The sky was cloudless with a full moon behind us as we headed down the channel this morning. It wasn't like heading out during the day but it was close. Six miles out we ran into a low fog. This limited our visibility to three boat lengths at the most. Ten miles from our first stop, the fog cleared. We never saw fog again this day. The air temperature was in the 50s. The visibility turned out to be good.

On the fishing grounds, we had no wind at all. The wind had flunked out about a mile or two on the approach. We had no wind throughout the morning. A southerly wind showed up around 1:00 PM and might have blown up to eight knots. But just when it seemed that the wind was going to blow, the wind dropped down to about three knots. In fact, we carried three knots of light southerly wind all the way back to Perkins Cove. The sky was cloudless in the morning, mostly sunny in the afternoon. The air temperature reached a high of 65F around noon. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56.5F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 73F (with a low of 41F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 46F).

The fishing was very good. As I mention continuously, it could have been better had the dogfish not been around. This was my first time this summer and fall that we didn't see a single blue shark. The catching was very good. Landings were good overall, excellent on one spot. Most legal fish landed were pollock followed by haddock. Legal landings also included eight redfish, two cusk, eight white hake and nine squirrel hake. Released fish included two small cod, ten cod of 5 pounds or more, Thirty dogfish (or more), three sub-legal haddock, twenty-three sub-legal pollock, seven sub-legal redfish and two large pollock. We drift fished and anchored. Anchoring worked the best. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish. Bait caught the most dogfish today.

There were a number of anglers who could have been high hook. Shawn Rosenberger (PA) begged off the pollock when we started to get into them because he wanted to catch haddock. He could have been high hook had he wanted to. Fred Kunz (NH) would have been high hook had he not stopped to help Jon cut fish. Afterward, he took a bunk; he had exactly what he wanted for species and quantity today. The Fords, one of them, could have been high hook. And Tim Rozan (ME) could easily have been high hook. Tim fished for the duration, never giving up. I believe he caught the most haddock with a count of nine good sized ones.

Fred Kunz won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 35.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is one of the top ten hake he has ever caught. It's also the fourth largest hake of this year's Bunny Clark fishing season. I took a picture of Fred with his prize hake. This digital image appears on the left. I weighed a 10 pound pollock for him early in the trip. I also weighed a double that included a 9 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time.

Greg Ludington (ME) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, an 18 pound pollock. Some of his other fish that I weighed included an 11.25 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 16 pound Maine state trophy cusk caught by John Ford (PA). I was so surprised to see a cusk that big where we were fishing. I took a picture of John holding his cusk with his son, Joe Ford, on the right in the shot. This digital image appears on the right. I also weighed a 12 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock for John. By the way, Joe caught the largest cod of the day at 14.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Paul Pearson (NH) caught a 10 pound cod, one of the biggest cod of the trip. His largest pollock weighed 12 pounds. Mark "Ray" Flower (NY) caught a 12 pound pollock, his biggest fish. He also caught a 9 pound cod. David Dorr (ME) landed a 13.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. I weighed a 10.5 pound pollock for Shawn Rosenberger. Mark Belanger (ME) caught a 15.75 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Buzz Leonard (ME) caught the largest haddock of the trip at 5.5 pounds. This is the largest haddock I have seen in a while. Tim Rozan caught a 13 pound pollock, his biggest fish today. Of the nine legal haddock that Tim caught, two were 4.5 pounds each and one was 4 pounds. Jon Campbell (NY) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for catching a larger number of dogfish than most and for being the most vociferous complainer. He even complained about his own complaining!

I received four donations today sponsoring me in this year's Pan-Mass Challenge, for cancer research. These donors and their donations included Fred Kunz for a generous $110.00, Greg Ludington for a generous $70.00, David Dorr for a $20.00 and Ken & Carolyn Erikson (ME) for a very generous $250.00. Thank you all so very much for your support, generosity and thoughtfulness. It's so wonderful to have the support of you all. And I'm very appreciative!

Friday, October 22, 2021

Captain Ian Keniston and Shawn Rosenberger ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 58F, the sky was mostly clear with a waning moon high is the western horizon, the wind was out of the south at twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean seemed good to very good. Ashore, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots, more or less, all morning and into the afternoon. By late afternoon, the wind had hauled out of the west. Wind speeds were about the same at that time. The sky was mostly sunny all day overall. The sky was clearest in the morning with most of the clouds coming in the late afternoon. The highest air temperature that I saw today was a pleasant 72F. The visibility was very good. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 72F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 45F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 48F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at fifteen knots to start and dropped to ten knots at some time during the middle of the trip. Seas were chop/swells of three to five feet that dropped to two and three feet, typical of a southwest wind this time of year. The air temperature resided in the 60s. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles. The tide was moderate to strong. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56F.

The fishing was very good, the catching was very good and landings were a shade more than good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-three haddock, two redfish, a cusk, a white hake and two whiting. Released fish included twenty-five dogfish, two cod over 5 pounds, six short cod, four sub-legal haddock, a few small pollock and a butter mullet. They anchored, motor drifted and drifted. All terminal gear worked about the same today.

Tim Rozan (ME) was the fisherman of the day. He tied with Shawn Rosenberger (PA) for high hook with the most legal fish. He also caught the largest, second largest and tied for the third largest fish of the trip. Tim's largest fish was a 14 pound pollock. His second largest fish was a 13 pound pollock. And he tied with Shawn and Joe Ford (PA) with the third largest fish, all three fish being pollock of 12 pounds. Tim also caught a 10 pound pollock that Ian weighed.

Some of Shawn's other fish included an 11 pound pollock and two pollock of 10 pounds each. Some of Joe's other fish included an 11.5 pound pollock and two pollock of 10 pounds each. John Ford (PA) caught an 11 pound pollock and two pollock of 10 pounds each. Joe landed the hard luck award t-shirt because of the sizes that were left (at the end of the year), Joe fit a size XL perfectly!

Saturday, October 23, 2021

The Bunny Clark resides in beautiful Perkins Cove as we had not enough interest (passenger count) to sail today.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 51F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the north northeast at fifteen knots, more or less, and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The air temperature dropped to 48F by 7:00 AM. By noon, the air temperature was back up to 52F. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 55F. The sky remained overcast all day with an occasional peek at the sun. The wind blew out of the northeast most of the morning. Wind speeds were ten knots or more. By noon, the wind was done. The ocean calmed down. I noticed a light southerly wind near sunset. By 7:00 PM, the wind was blowing out of the west at twelve knots. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 60F with a low of 49F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 56F (with a low of 33F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 55F (with a low of 41F).

After getting the morning set-up done at the restaurant, I rode for fifty-two miles on the bike, most with my cycling friends out of the Kennebunkport. This season and it's challenges have not allowed me the time I would have liked to have had to ride the bike. But, c'est la vie. La vie continue, avec un sans toi!

The rest of the day I spent in the restaurants. It was very busy. With the last weekend of the Barnacle Billy's season upon us, a good weather weekend and the weekend of Ogunquitfest, it was busier than we thought it would be. In fact, we ran out of clam chowder at 6:30 PM. That is the first time that this has happened. Except for a short break to go home to eat dinner, I worked from noon until 10:00 PM.

Sunday, October 24, 2021

Barnacle Billy's (Original) Closes for the Season this Evening

Captain Ian Keniston and Jonathan Calivas ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 40F, the sky was crystal clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at seventeen knots, more or less, and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the air temperature dropped to 38F before rebounding, slowly, through the 40s and into the 50s. The air temperature reached a high of 57F by the time it stopped climbing up. The wind blew out of the northwest all day. Wind speeds were approaching twenty knots in the morning but this wind diminished as the day progressed. The northwest wind dropped to ten knots approaching sunset. By sunset, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots. There was no wind at all around 9:00 PM. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The visibility remained excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 58F with a low of 44F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 57F (with a low of 27F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 56F (with a low of 32F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at fifteen to ten knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The air temperature remained in the 50s all day. The visibility ranged to well over twenty miles. The sky was clear and sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55F.

The fishing, catching and landings were very good today. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-three haddock, three redfish, one cusk and three white hake. Released fish included a few pollock, eight cod over 5 pounds, six small cod, eighteen dogfish and a porbeagle shark. Anchoring/drifting was the method. Cod flies worked the best.

Former class 1 deck hand, Anthony Palumbo (NH), was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a 15 pound pollock, the second largest fish of the trip. He also caught two pollock of 12 pounds each and an 11 pound pollock that Ian weighed. Shawn Rosenberger (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 26 pound porbeagle shark. This shark was too small to keep so Ian tailed it, weighed it and took a quick picture with his iPhone before letting it go back alive. Porbeagle sharks aren't the most aggressive sharks so this was a fairly easy thing to do. Had it been a mako, Ian wouldn't have had as much luck. The digital image of Shawn holding his mackerel shark appears on the left.

The third and fourth largest fish of the trip were caught by Steve Balevre (NH). He caught these fish, both pollock, on the same line at the same time. They weighed 13 and 14 pounds, a tie for the fourth largest double of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. He had previously caught, earlier in the trip, an 11 pound pollock that Ian had weighed.

Other Angler Highlights: Darlene Chin (VT) caught the most haddock and the most dogfish. She was fishing with bait. Her largest fish was a 10 pound pollock. Marty Buskey (NY) landed an 11.5 pound pollock. And no one broke down his fishing equipment and stowed it as if it were Bunny Clark gear! Nilton Pechejosvski (MA) caught the first fish to be weighed for the boat pool, an 11.5 pound pollock. His largest fish was a 12 pound pollock. Sergio Aguiar (MA) landed the hardest luck of the day award by getting a touch of the mal de mer.

Marty & Elise Buskey went overboard, so to say, in the cancer fund raising department by sponsoring me yet again in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a ride to support a team of researchers at Boston Childrens/Dana-Farber. Their donation was $50.00. I haven't counted up the number of $50.00 donations they have passed my way this year but there have been a number of them. They are always so thoughtful and kind and, of course, supportive. Thank you both so very much for your generosity and thoughtfulness. It means so much to me but more to those who are working on the cancer problem.

Monday, October 25, 2021

Today's extreme day trip was canceled due to anglers bailing because of the weather forecast. We weren't supposed to get very much wind this morning but the afternoon will herald in a week of wind from the northeast. On selected days the wind will be strong. It's been a crazy year.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 47F, the sky was overcast, there was no rain or drizzle despite the note on my phone telling me that there was drizzle in Ogunquit, the wind was light out of the east and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. It started to lightly rain around 6:30 AM. For the rest of the day it rained and drizzled with no let up. For fifteen minutes here and there you could go outside without a rain jacket. Most of the time you needed one. The wind remained light until the wind piped up at 7:30 AM. By 8 AM, the wind was a sustained eighteen knots with higher gusts out of the east. Throughout the day we had easterly winds of twenty to twenty-five knots. Seas were big chops as observed from the shore. The visibility dropped to fair with a few good periods that were short in duration. The air temperature remained about the same all day. Despite the warmer than normal water temperatures (56F in Perkins Cove this morning) and the wind blowing off it on to Perkins Cove, the highest air temperature that I saw was 48F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 56F with a low of 50F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 45F (with a low of 41F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 46F (with a low of 42F).

I spent part of the morning tying storm lines to the Bunny Clark while my son, Micah, did the same with the Petrel. The rest of the morning I spent in the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. setting up appointments and reservations for hood cleaners, carpenters, vendors and businesses we deal with at every closing time of year. The crew at Barnacle Billy's, at the same time, were getting that building organized to clean it before shutting the town water off and getting it buttoned up for the winter.

At noon, Barnacle Billy's, Etc. opened. I spent the first three hours there. Went home to take the first nap I have been able to have for three weeks (that lasted over two hours), had dinner and spent the rest of the night working back at the restaurant. We had a party of twenty-five that turned into a party of eight. We had a party of fourteen that turned into a party of seven. No doubt all this change in numbers due to the weather. I, kind of, suspected this was going to happen - but I was hoping..... Basically, the night was slow but busier than I suspected it would be with the weather and the weather predictions.

Not so Tim Tuesday, October 26, 2021

The marathon trip today was canceled a couple of days ago. At that time, I thought that the wind was going to a be a little too strong to run the trip. Now, I have realized that this system has become much larger than I thought it was going to be and, certainly, much larger than the National Weather Service had predicted. Predictions went from peak gusts out of the northeast to thirty knots to, today, predictions of gusts to over forty-five knots. At the same time sea heights went from a high of ten feet to, now, predictions of eighteen feet. There is a hell of a lot of difference in fifteen knots at the top end. And there is a huge difference in Perkins Cove with ten foot seas as opposed to eighteen foot seas. And looking at the weather charts this morning, this system extends from Delaware to Ottawa, Canada, out past Bermuda and far downeast Maine. The NWS didn't seem to have a clue that this was going to happen. Makes one wonder where you can find European predictions as they seem far more accurate than the US model.

At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 47F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly with drizzle, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at twenty-five knots with seas over seven feet at the closest weather buoy and the visibility over the ocean was fair in precipitation and haze. More later.

We have extra room on upcoming fishing trips after this weekend. These trips, dates and availability are as follows: We have canceled all future fishing trips through Thursday. The extreme day fishing trip of Friday, October 29 has all twenty fishing spots available (Yikes!) and the full day trip of Saturday, October 30, has all twenty-five fishing spots available (Yikes, again!). You can call 207-646-2214 or book online at www.bunnyclark.com. Be there or be square!










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