www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

Friday, July 30, 2021, 5:30 AM EDT/AST




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Big Fish Day

The digital image above was taken at 4:40 AM on July 13, 2021 during the Ultra Marathon, our longest and furthest offshore trip of the season. The angler is Bryan Lewer (ME/FL) holding the 38 pound Maine state trophy white hake that he caught only fifteen minutes before, well before, sunrise. This is the Bunny Clark's largest white hake of the fishing season to date, the largest fish on that trip and the first fish boated that day. It was a beautiful day all around, not so much for the sunny weather, although we did have some sun. But more for the perfect air temperature and the flat calm ocean. The air temperature never got above 68F and the seas, at most, were chops of a foot or so and only on the way home with a following wind. Bryan is one of the excellent fishermen I invite on this trip. Two other excellent anglers also shown in the digital image (from left to right) are Dan Killay (VT) and Dick Lyle (NY). It's the people who make this trip my favorite of the year. But their ability to catch the fish I put them over makes this trip something special indeed.




This was put up online February 18, 2021 about the proposed regulations for fiscal fishing year 2021 (May 1, 2021 thru to April 30, 2022):

The New England Fishery Management Council received input from both its Recreational Advisory Panel and Groundfish Committee before voting. GARFO [the regional office of the National Marine Fisheries Service under NOAA, in Gloucester, Massachusetts] will consider the Council's recommendation, but NOAA Fisheries will make the final decision. The new fishing year begins on May 1, 2021. Here is the Council's status quo request:

Gulf of Maine Cod:

  • Private Mode Open Season: September 15-30, 2021 and April 1-14, 2022
    Bag Limit: one fish per day with a Minimum Size: 21 inches

  • Party/Charter For-Hire Mode Open Season: September 8-October 7, 2021 and April 1-14, 2022
    Bag Limit: one fish per day with a Minimum Size: 21 inches

    Gulf of Maine Haddock:

  • Open Season: May 1, 2021 through February 28, 2022 and April 1-30, 2022, leaving only March 2022 closed to recreational fishing for this stock.
    Bag Limit: 15 fish per day/person with a Minimum Size 17 inches

    Recreational fishing measures - bag limits, minimum sizes, and seasons - are determined annually by NOAA Fisheries in consultation with the Council in order for catch to achieve but not exceed each stock's sub-annual catch limit (sub-ACL). The proposed 2021 recreational sub-ACL for Gulf of Maine cod is 193 metric tons (mt). For Gulf of Maine haddock, it's 5,295 mt.

    The regulations above are the same regulations we had in fiscal fishing year 2020. The 2020 fiscal year will end on April 30, 2021.

    Friday, June 25, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg with Kyle Nelson ran the extreme day trip today with no engine problems.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 59F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind to write about, the ocean along the shore was glassy calm and the visibility over it was very good, at least. Ashore, we started to have a light rain at about 7:00 AM or a little earlier. It lasted until about 9:00 AM and then stopped for the day. The sky remained overcast with the sun trying to peek through in the afternoon but not really doing so. The fog showed up later in the morning and stayed with us throughout the rest of the day but it never really hung on the shore, just a little off the shore. This made the visibility poor, looking seaward. The wind was light all day. The wind started out of the northeast to ten knots in the morning and then light after noon to no wind at 6:00 PM with a glassy surface. The highest air temperature that I saw was 68F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 70F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 50F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 50F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten knots to start. Seas were chops of two to one feet and, then, calm as the wind died. By noon, the ocean was calm. At first, the visibility was about three miles. But, as the wind dropped, the visibility got less. It rained hard for an hour in the morning and then stopped for the day. The visibility went down to about a quarter of a mile when the wind died. There was an underlying two to three foot swell all day. The air temperature reached a high of 65F. The tide (current) was strong with the full moon cycle. The sky remained overcast all day with the fog. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61F.

    The fishing was a bit tough with the tide. I would qualify it as good with some of the tangles and the few dogfish that also added to the mix. The catching was very good as there were also a lot of cod with the dogfish and smaller fish, almost excellent. The landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. We still aren't seeing the numbers of pollock we sometimes see this time of year. Legal landings also included twenty-four pollock, fifteen cusk and a whiting. Released fish included only twenty short haddock, a few small pollock, quite a few small cod, thirty-five cod over 5 pounds, sixteen dogfish and a handful of sculpins. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

    Ian couldn't determine who was high hook. Dick Grimm (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 7.75 pound cod caught by Barry Ano (NY). The third largest fish weighed 7.5 pounds. There were two. One was a 7.5 pound cod caught by Chris Franklin (ME - who hasn't been with us for a couple of years). And the other was a 7.5 pound Maine state trophy haddock, caught by Ken Murphy (NH). This is the Bunny Clark's fourth largest haddock of the fishing season to date. Captain Ian took a picture of Ken with his haddock. It's not a great picture (except of Ken) because Ken wanted to get the photo shoot over as quick as possible so he could go back to fishing. This digital image appears on the left. Chris Franklin caught the second largest pollock at 7 pounds.

    Other Angler Highlights: Anna Benitez (ME) landed the hard luck award for becoming the high hurler of the trip. So much for deep sea fishing on the Bunny Clark!

    Saturday, June 26, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Tyler Carpenter with Kyle Nelson ran the full day trip today. Today, with such draining full moon low tide, the Bunny Clark was not be able to leave the dock until 8:00 AM. This really wasn't something we anticipated this season as we have always been able to leave Perkins Cove on the lowest of tides. But this year it seems the channel leading out has filled in more than we thought it would. And this without any major storms this winter to do so.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 61F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind to write about, the ocean along the shore was calm with light wind patches and the visibility over it seemed good in haze and fog.

    Also, I attended the wedding of my daughter's best friend in Hartford, Connecticut. So I was not here to know what the weather ashore was. These were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 86F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 61F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 61F).

    On the fishing grounds, the weather was better than I would have expected noting the warmer termperature predictions. Wind were out of the south southwest at five to ten knots or ten to five knots, I wasn't told if it go windier or calm as the day progressed. Seas were chops of a foot or less over a sea swell of two feet. The air temperature reached a high of 62F. The visibility ranged from one to five miles in haze and fog. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The sky was sunny all day (It was overcast all day in Hartford). The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

    The fishing was good to very good; the current and the dogfish didn't allow a higher category designation. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock with very few sub-legal haddock that had to be released. Legal landings also included eight pollock, ten cusk and nine mackerel. Released fish included twelve short haddock, a handful of short pollock and cod, nine cod over 5 pounds, twenty-four dogfish and one wolffish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

    Chris Albert (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. He usually brings good luck. And I guess he did this time too as we didn't have to come home due to engine problems. Apparently he didn't catch any fish worth weighing or Ian would have told me. Charlie Muzzey (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound cod. There was a tie for the second largest fish at 8 pounds. Jon Langlois (RI) caught one, an 8 pouind cod. Tim Gautot (NH) caught the other, an 8 pound pollock. Jon also caught a 7 pound pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Larry Shippee (NH) caught a 7 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Ben Ehrlich (MA) was the high hurler and was rewarded with the hardest luck of the day award t-shirt.

    I received three donations in the last two days sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge. The most generous of the three was an $100.00 gift from Lisa & Jimmie Castillo (CA) in the form of an "eGift" through the PMC site. I also landed a $20.00 anonymous donation and a $10.00 donation from Roger Rivet. Thank you all so very much for your support. I do really appreciate your help in this project.

    Sunday, June 27, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Tyler Carpenter tried to run the extreme day trip charter today. To no avail. At the 14 mile mark, they started having the same throttle communication problems that has been plaguing us for a week now. Sunday was our first discovery. Today we had to cancel again. After resetting the control panel a couple of times, the engine wouldn't let Ian go above safety mode. With a huge lack of trust that the engine was going to act correctly, Ian headed back home without even wetting a line. This is getting very frustrating.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 71F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the south southwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good in a thick haze. Ashore, the wind blew out of the southwest to start. By noon, or before that time, the wind had hauled out of the west. Wind speeds were up to fifteen knots but no more than that. The sky cleared by late morning and remained sunny for the rest of the day. The visibility remained good in a thick haze. The highest air temperature that I saw was 87F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 89F with a low of 74F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 92F (with a low of 70F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 66F).

    On the high seas, for the time they got to be out there, the wind blew out of the south southwest at fifteen to eighteen knots with seas in chops of three to four feet. I never did get any other weather features.

    And the reason I didn't get to hear about any other weather features was that the Volvo engine in the Bunny Clark started acting up again. Or, being more specific, the engine's electronic system starting acting up again, throwing the engine rpm into "safety mode" at only 700 rpm. This is about six knots of speed. Captain Ian cleared the code, could bring up the rpms again but this would only last a half mile before it went back into safety mode. Since Ian didn't feel like he could run the trip as it should be run and the future behavior of the engine could not be determined, he turned the boat around and headed back to Perkins Cove. The Bunny Clark was back clinging to her wooden anchors by 9:15 AM.

    Meanwhile, I was back in Hartford, Connecticut. Deb and I had woken at 2:30 AM, both concerned about how the Bunny Clark trip would go today. The boat had to leave an hour early to beat the tide and try to get out of Perkins Cove before the boat became stuck in the channel for two hours. We knew this but I was also anticipating potential engine problems with the information Ian gave me from the trip the day before. Deb and I got on the road a little after 3:00 AM and were back in Ogunquit by 6:30 AM. The Bunny Clark had already left the dock by then. It wasn't long before Ian called on the satellite phone, telling me he had the same engine problems. I was waiting when he got back into Perkins Cove.

    The rest of the day was centered around working on the engine, to the exclusion of the restaurant and all the customers who I wanted to ask; "How is your meal today? Everything all right?" Skip Dunning, the road tech from Power Products, Portland, Maine was down again before noon. He worked on the engine with my help until about 3:30 PM. He changed out the main computer (CPU) and some other parts of the electronic system with my insistence. I say this because I didn't want anymore down time. If we changed everything we could think of then maybe we would be able to go fishing. We wouldn't exactly find the problem but we wouldn't have any more perceived engine failures - perceived by the engine's computer.

    After bidding a hearty thank you to Skip, I went home, took a quick shower and took a forty-five minute nap before returning to the restaurant for the night. I was out of there by 9:30 PM.

    Because we couldn't find anything conclusive on the engine, I will still be wondering how the trip will go tomorrow and if, by changing everything, we hit on a solution. This is the worst part, the wondering. It's certainly not a safety issue. But the health of my business, any my health, depends on a reliable engine. This was the biggest fear I had when I repowered with a tier 3 engine, the electronics around the water.

    Monday, June 28, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Ally Fuehrer ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 76F, the sky was mostly clear with some clouds, the wind was blowing out of the south southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze. Ashore, the wind blew out of the west all day. It even seemed north of west at times. Wind speeds were ten knots at most. It wanted to blow harder at times but it just didn't have the teeth to do so. The sky was mostly sunny with clouds. The visibility was good to very good over the ocean in haze. The salient weather feature was the heat. By 7:00 AM, it was already 80F and climbing. At 1:00 PM, the air temperature was 98F, the highest air temperature we have seen this season so far. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 97F with a low of 75F). The high temperature of 97F in Boston ties the record high for this date first set in 1901 and, again, in 1991. Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 97F (with a low of 70F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 97F (with a low of 70F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots. The wind blew all day from this direction. Seas were chops of a foot over a sea swell on two to three feet. The high air temperature was 69F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The sky was sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a new high of 62F.

    The fishing was good if you weren't crazy about catching dogfish. If you love dogfish and all fish, the fishing was nearly excellent. The catching was very good. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock. There were very few sub-legal haddock caught today. Legal landings also included eleven pollock, two redfish, seven cusk, one whiting and thirty mackerel. Released fish included over sixty-five dogfish, six cod of 5 pounds or more, a few sub-legal pollock and cod and fifteen sub-legal haddock. They drift fished for the whole trip. All terminal gear worked equally well.

    Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook with the most legal fish. John Andreychak (NJ) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 9.25 pound cod caught by Mike Scott (NY). Mike T. Scott (NY) caught the third largest fish, an 8.5 pound cod.

    Other Angler Highlights: Mike Clapp (ME) was the sole hurler for the trip today. For this he landed the t-shirt.

    Captain Ian had his engine problems again after we worked all yesterday on it. This time he coded out with a number that Volvo could use, which he sent me and I passed on. Tomorrow I will be taking the trip hoping to get where I want to go babying the engine the whole way. Hopefully, I will be as successful as Ian was. We shall see.

    I received a generous $100.00 donation from Ed "Ted" Setzer (NY) sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a ride to solve the cancer riddle. Ted has helped me like many others over the years. Thank you so much for your thoughtfulness, Ted. You didn't have to go out of your way to send me this check but I do really appreciate the support.

    Tim Tuesday, June 29, 2021

    Tyler Carpenter and I ran the marathon trip today.

    At 3:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 79F, the sky was hazy clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at five knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good in haze.

    I felt the dread of anticipation heading down the channel for a shot at the offshore trip after being denied all last week with engine electronic problems. I had gone over the wiring again by myself last night with a thought in mind but no idea if it had done any good. The whole ride out I was wondering when I was going to get a read-out on the panel telling me that I had a communication problem with the throttle. We got to Jeffrey's Ledge with no problem, which surprised me. In fact, the whole ride out was a surprise. Not once did I get any legend, notice or engine rpm drop the whole ride to the grounds! This after having to cancel trips, limping home from one and all the issues Ian had yesterday!

    It was a great ride out weatherwise. The sky was clear, the air temperature was warm - but not too warm - and the wind was light from the west. The visibility was very good. The seas were chops of a foot over close swells of three feet.

    On the fishing grounds, the wind was light out of the west to start, hauled out of the west southwest and then backed out of the southwest for the ride home. The strongest wind we saw was ten knots of southwest on the ride home. Seas all were small chops of a foot or less over a short three foot sea swell. The high air temperature for the day was 72F under the shade top. The sky was hazy clear and nearly cloudless. The visibility ranged to an estimated twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.4F, the highest surface water temperature this season so far..

    Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 99F with a low of 79F). The high temperature of 99F in Boston ties the record high for this date first set in 1933. Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 96F (with a low of 74F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 96F (with a low of 75F). The high temperature of 96F in Portland ties the record high for this date first set in 1944.

    The fishing, catching and landings were very good, overall, today. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Anybody who wanted to catch the fifteen fish bag limit had no problem doing so if you fished with bait. The percentage of short haddock was so low as to be a non-factor. Legal landings also included fifty pollock and twenty-two cusk. We lost another big halibut, had our first blue shark attack and our first steaker cod. Released fish included twenty-five dogfish, ten cusk, twenty-four cod of 5 pounds or more, forty-one small cod, nine small pollock, seven legal haddock and fourteen sub-legal haddock. We tried anchoring once but caught too many dogfish in the process. Before and after that one anchor stop we drift fished. Cod flies and bait gave anglers the most success.

    I couldn't tell you for sure who was high hook with the most legal fish but if it wasn't Scott Bradway (ME), I would be seriously surprised. He caught a pile of haddock with a few doubles included. I weighed a cod of his early in the trip that was 7 pounds. He won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 19 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the fishing season so far. I took a picture of Scott holding this pollock. That digital image appears on the left. He also fought a halibut for over five minutes as I stood beside him barking orders. It ended up breaking off as the fish had taken a Slugo on a hook at the dropper loop. The hook had to have gone deeper into the fish's mouth as it looked cut where the dropper loop used to be. I never got a look at the fish on the sounding machine; the angler was too far away from the transducer. The halibut took several short runs but never went all the way to bottom except on the first one. I really thought we were going to get a look at it. If I were to guess, I would say that it was over 50 pounds but not as big as 100 pounds. But who would really know without seeing it.

    Kevin Sarzynski (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20 pound cod. This is the largest cod that has been caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. I took a picture of Kevin holding his nice cod. This digital image appears on the right. Kevin caught one of the bigger haddock today weighing 5 pounds. His largest pollock weighed 10 pounds. The third largest fish was a 15.5 pound pollock caught by David Bennett (NY).

    Other Angler Highlights: Steve Selmer (NH) caught the fourth largest fish of the trip, a 13 pound pollock. His largest cod weighed 11.5 pounds. He also caught quite a few cod and fifteen good sized haddock. Mike Szczepanski (NY) caught a 5 pound haddock, his best but not his biggest fish. Rich Bradway (ME) caught the largest cusk at 8.75 pounds. Rich, too, caught a 5 pound haddock. Ryan Woodard (NH) caught an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also caught a 9.75 pound cod and a 9 pound pollock. Laurie Tenney (MA) caught a 4.25 pound haddock early in the trip. Jason Szczepanski (NY) caught a 4.75 pound haddock, one of the bigger haddock of the trip. Brian Giblin (CT) landed a 9 pound pollock, his biggest fish.

    Nicole Szczepanski (NY) caught a couple of nice doubles that included pollock and haddock; the doubles never included the same species! He biggest fish was probably an 8 pound pollock that I probably should have weighed. Randy Tenney (MA) caught an 8.5 pound cod. Greg Szczepanski (NY) caught an 8 pound cusk. Mike Daneault (MA) caught a 10 pound cod, his biggest fish. He also was the sole hurler on the trip. For this he landed the hard luck award t-shirt!

    I was very lucky to have people sponsor me in this year's Pan-Mass Challenge for cancer research again today. These donors and their donations included: Mike Szczepanski for a generous $50.00, Malcolm & Kathie Jepson (CA) for a generous $100.00, an anonymous $20.00 donation and Ledgy Mitchell for a very generous $250.00. Thank you all for your generosity and support. It means a lot to me but it means the world to those living in hope of a cure. And, of course, that's the bottom line!

    Wednesday, June 30, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Tyler Carpenter ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 77F, the sky was hazy clear with some thin clouds, there was no wind to write about, the ocean along the shore was flat calm and the visibility over it seemed very good in haze. Ashore, the wind was very light when there was wind. The wind direction was primarily from the southwest. We never had any wind as high as ten knots - until about 5:20, when we had a thunder storm front come through with wind gusts of forty knots for about five or ten minutes, from the northwest. The wind and rain struck at the same time on the dock as Tyler was sorting fillets at the float. After that, it rained periodically through the rest of the afternoon and into the night. The visibility was very good most of the day (except for the rainy period). The highest air temperature that I saw was 96F in Perkins Cove. The sky was sunny all day until 5:00 PM. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 100F with a low of 72F). The high temperature of 100F in Boston breaks the record high of 95F for this date set in 1945. Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 96F (with a low of 71F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 95F (with a low of 71F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less over a swell of two feet. The air temperature reached a high of 73F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was sunny all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66F.

    The fishing was excellent, if you love dogfish, very good if you thought dogfish were a bad part of the fishing experience. The catching was excellent. Landings were very good overall. Most legal fish landed were haddock followed by pollock. Legal landings also included seventeen cusk and forty mackerel. Released fish included thirty sub-legal haddock, over one hundred dogfish, eight cod of 5 pounds or more, a few small cod and pollock, a couple mackerel and four wolffish. Drifting was the thing. All terminal gear worked well.

    Howard Smith (VT) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a 13 pound wolffish, ties the Bunny Clark's fifth largest wolffish this season so far. It was also the second largest fish of the trip. Rick Gurney (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. The third largest fish was an 11.5 pound wolffish caught by Andy Kobylarcz (NY). Andy also caught an 8 pound pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Peter Allaire (MA) caught an 8 pound wolffish and a 9 pound cod, the largest cod of the trip. Alex Langenstein (IL) landed a 7.5 pound pollock. Mark Hesselink (NJ) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Dan Martin (CT) caught the largest haddock of the day at 4 pounds. Chad Grossjung (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer and for losing a jig.

    Andy Kobylarcz did the world of cancer research a solid by sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge with a $50.00 donation today. I've been working extra hard this year trying to get donations. But this was totally out of the blue and, thoughtfully, of his own volition. Thank you so much, Andy. I really appreciate the support. But so many more will appreciate the benefits that I know will come of all these donations. All the best!

    Thursday, July 1, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 72F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, there was no wind to write about, the ocean along the shore was flat calm and the visibility over it was very good. Ashore, the air was humid all day. In fact, it was uncomfortable enough so that I was surprised to find the high temperature in Perkins Cove to be only 82F. I thought for sure that the air temperature was a good eight degrees higher than that. It was not. The wind was light and variable all day. There was no wind after 5:00 PM. The ocean remained flat as a pancake until the shade of night was upon us. The visibility was good to very good. The sky remained overcast all day with rain in the evening. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 64F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 64F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction all day. The ocean was calm. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The highest air temperature that was observed was 73F under the canopy top - hot, according to Ian. The tide (current) was light. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching and landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Again, there were very few sub-legal haddock. Legal landings also included a pollock, nineteen cusk, eleven whiting and twenty-five mackerel. Released fish included twenty small haddock, twelve dogfish, only a couple small cod, a few small pollock, a couple mackerel and a small wolffish. Drifting was the method. Bait and cod flies were the only thing that was used today. No jigs were tried.

    Kevin Keegan (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish. He had mostly haddock. Mike Cronin (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.5 pound wolffish. The second largest fish was a 6.5 pound pollock caught by Buddy Cooper (ME). The third largest fish was a 4 pound Maine state trophy whiting (silver hake) caught by Carter Bogden (NY). This is a tie for the tenth largest whiting in Bunny Clark history and our first trophy whiting of the season to date. Captain Ian took a picture of Carter holding is big whiting. This digital image appears on the left.

    Other Angler Highlights: Anthony Richard (MA) landed the hard luck award to attaining high hurler status.

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg ran the afternoon (4:00 PM to 8:00 PM) half day trip today. On the fishing grounds, the ocean, again, was flat calm with not a breath of wind. The high air temperature was 68F, a little cooler and no less humid. The sky was overcast with light rain. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in precipitation and haze. The tide (current) was light. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was good to very good and landings were fair. Legal landings included two haddock, one redfish, two cusk, one whiting and two red hake. Released fish included six dogfish, two cod over 5 pounds, a couple smaller cod, forty-five short pollock and six small redfish. There were no small haddock caught. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait and cod flies.

    Justin Holmes (VT) was the fisherman of the evening. He was high hook with the most legal fish and he caught the largest fish of the trip, an 8.5 pound cusk. He did not enter the boat pool. Justin also caught the second largest fish, a 5.5 pound cod. Plus, he caught a smaller cod of 3.5 pounds. Andy Cotzin (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the third largest fish, a 5.25 pound cod.

    Other Angler Highlights: Tracy Marino (SC) caught a 3 pound haddock. Justin Copley (FL) caught a haddock that weighed 3.25 pounds. Wyatt Reiss (NY) landed the hard luck award for getting the worst tangle of the evening.

    I received two donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a much appreciated $25.00 donation from Mike Cronin from the day trip. The other was a very generous $500.00 donation from two of the most wonderful people I have the great pleasure to know, Jon & Fran Leavitt (NH). Thank you all so very much for your confidence in me and the support for this cancer project. As you know, I really believe in the research that we are helping to move forward. And we are seeing a lot of positive results.

    Friday, July 2, 2021

    I canceled the trip this morning when I saw the weather. I knew the National Weather Service had said that it was going to be windy out of the northeast but gale warnings had only been posted late yesterday. So since the wind could have blown the hair off a dog this morning, I terminated the trip before Captain Ian drove down to take a look at it. There was no way we were going to take anglers out in this weather.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 58F, the sky was overcast, it was raining steadily and had been all night, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair in haze, fog and rain. The wind continued to blow out of the northeast but the velocity became higher and gusts were thirty-five knots at times. The ocean looked angry but, with northeast wind, you are looking right into the teeth of it from the parking lot in Perkins Cove. It was overcast all day and rained for most of it. By 2:00 PM, the wind speeds had backed off a bit. I saw twenty-three knots at that time. By sunset, we had barely fifteen knots of wind, mostly less than that. The visibility had improved to very good. The high air temperature that I saw for the day was the value that I saw at 5:00 AM. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 69F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 65F (with a low of 56F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 56F).

    I spent the early part of the morning tying storm lines off the Bunny Clark to shore. With the stronger than normal northeast wind and so many boats tied to the float, I didn't want to take the chance of lines breaking while I was in the middle of managing Barnacle Billy's. Piece of mind in my world is huge.

    It was not a busy day in the restaurants. But it was a day and we did some business.

    Saturday, July 3, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Tyler Carpenter ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 57F, the sky was overcast, it had been raining lightly only a couple of hours earlier, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, the wind increased to fifteen and twenty knots out of the northeast. As northeast wind does, it diminished in strength after noon, slowly. By 5:00 PM, the ocean only saw northeast wind in gusts to fifteen knots. Mostly it was ten to twelve knots. After sunset, the northeast wind had more north in it. But the velocity stayed in the ten to fifteen knot range. The sky was overcast all morning with no rain into the afternoon. But it started to rain in the afternoon and never let up. We had heavy rain after sunset for a couple of hours. But the rain, in general was a mixture of heavy and light during the night. The air temperature hung under 60F all day. The visibility was very good over the ocean until the rain came. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 60F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 59F (with a low of 54F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 55F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen to twenty knots. Seas were confused at five to seven feet, kind of a chop/swell mixture, as it normally is with this wind and of that strength. The high air temperature under the canopy was 60F. The sky was overcast. It didn't rain. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to about fifteen miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61F.

    The fishing was poor, the catching was fair and landings were fair. It just wasn't a good biting day. And, to be fair, the anglers didn't have their hearts in it with the way the weather conditions were. One gentleman, on the way out, was found on his knees mumbling; "I'm terrified; I miss my children." So the fishing conditions dictated the day. Captain Ian slowed the boat down twice on the way out to ask if everyone wanted to go back in. But the vast majority wanted to keep going. And the man on his knees finally realized that they were not going to die. The bottom line is that it was not dangerously rough. It just seemed that way to some. And, in these conditions, you get many who become sea sick. Today was no exception with half the people staring into a gallon bucket.

    Legal landings included six haddock, two pollock, one cusk, four whiting and one mackerel. Released fish included two small haddock, twenty-two pollock, twenty-five dogfish and eight small redfish. They anchored for every stop. Everyone used bait and cod flies.

    There was a high hook but Ian didn't tell me who it was. I didn't ask. Terrell Johnson (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 6 pound pollock caught by Kayla McKenna (ME). Christian Trott (ME) landed the third largest fish, a 3 pound haddock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Gary Collins (ME) landed the hard luck award for catching only dogfish today. He caught twelve of them and not a single legal fish!

    We canceled the afternoon trip. The seas hadn't diminished much and we had all families with kids. It wouldn't have been a fun first experience for the kids, for sure!

    Independence Day, Sunday, July 4, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Tyler Carpenter ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 57F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly (it had been raining all night), the wind was blowing out of the north at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze and precipitation. It continued to rain all morning and during the early part of the afternoon. There was very little wind out of the north or northeast to start the day and no wind by mid afternoon. The ocean along the shore showed big glassy rollers. Without the wind, the air temperature got up as high as 63F. The visibility was very good. The sky remained overcast all day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 68F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 72F (with a low of 54F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 62F (with a low of 53F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast from ten to five knots. Seas were chops of a foot and less over a rolling sea swell of three feet, more or less. The highest air temperature that Ian saw was 59F. The sky was overcast all day with light rain. The tide was light to moderate. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze (and rain). The surface water temperature reached a high of 61F.

    The fishing was very good. The current was light, there were a few dogfish but not too many and the weather was so much better than yesterday as to make one cry, particularly if you were on yesterday's trip. The catching was very good. Landings were fair, except for Darlene Chin (VT), who did very well. Most legal fish landed were haddock by far. The haddock cull was 55/45, favoring the legal sized fish. Legal landings also included two cusk, a pollock, twenty-one whiting and twelve mackerel. Released fish included thirty-five dogfish, two cod of 5 pounds or more, a handful of small cod and pollock and a mackerel. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked about the same.

    Darlene Chin was high hook with the most legal fish. She probably caught the most whiting as well as the most haddock. Steve Ford (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 5 pound cod caught by Chad Bartlett (NH). Chad also landed our second largest whiting of the year with a fish that weighed 2.75 pounds. That fish missed gaining trophy status by a quarter of a pound but it's still a big whiting! Altin Bicaku (CT) landed the third largest fish, a 4 pound haddock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Erick Colby (ME) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for the label of high hurler today. Why today? You never know the motion the ocean is going to throw at you from trip to trip!

    I received three donations today supporting my cancer research project with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Those donors were Wally Sheffer (NY) for $20.00, Erick Colby for $50.00 and Bill & Roseann Pakenham (MA) for a generous $200.00. Thank you so very much for your thoughtfulness and support. As I always say, some patients will get through this disease thanks to the generosity of wonderful people they will probably never know. Thank you so much for being those people and for supporting this project. I really do appreciate the help.

    Monday, July 5, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Tyler Carpenter ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 52F, the sky was clear, the wind was light from the northwest showing a light ruffle on the surface of the water along the shore and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. The ocean stayed calm almost all morning. By noon, a light southerly wind was starting to blow. This turned into ten knots of southerly wind. The air temperature was perfect today. The highest value that I saw was 71F. The visibility was excellent at sunrise. The sky was mostly clear and sunny all day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 56F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 49F).

    On the fishing grounds, the ocean was calm all morning, like it was inshore. After noon, the wind came up out of the southwest at five and ten knots. There was a two to three foot ocean swell all day. The swell was under a smooth surface in the morning and under a one foot chop in the afternoon. The air temperature reached a high of 67F. The visibility ranged to at least thirty miles. The tide (current) was light. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

    The fishing was excellent if you liked dogfish; it was our biggest dogfish day of the year. In fact, there were so many dogfish being caught on jigs, Ian had everyone go to bait and cod flies to diminish the count. That brought the dogfish to reasonable levels. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. There were very few short haddock caught today. Legal landings also included sixteen pollock, eighteen cusk, a whiting and four mackerel. Released fish included twenty-one haddock, one cod of 7 pounds, over one hundred and fifty dogfish and a few small cod and pollock. Drifting was the method. Bait worked best.

    Tim Rozan (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a 6.5 pound pollock, the third largest fish of the trip. His best fish was a 5 pound haddock, the largest haddock of the trip. Ashley Atwater (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9.5 pound pollock. Rob Fiorino (NY) caught the 7 pound cod which was the second largest fish of the trip.

    Other Angler Highlights: Glen Dore (ME) caught a 6 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Carrie Dore (ME) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the trip.

    Glen Dore also donated $25.00 to my cancer project with the Pan-Mass Challenge after the trip. Thank you for doing so, Glen. I very much appreciate the support. Others will appreciate it so much more! All the best to you!

    Tim Tuesday, July 6, 2021

    Kai Rosenberg and I ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 65F, the sky was mostly overcast, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze.

    We had a surprisingly good ride to the fishing ground, despite the weather forecast. Seas were two feet in sea/chops and the wind was out of the south southwest. But we were able to go at full cruise and the wind was about ten knots or less for most of the way, giving us minimal spray. The sky remained overcast for the whole ride out and we had periodic light rain. The visibility was good in haze.

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest for most of the morning. Wind speeds were about fifteen knots or more to start. This wind diminished throughout the morning. By noon, the wind had dropped to ten knots or less and was blowing out of the southwest. By 1:00 PM, the wind was about five knots. Seas started as chops of two feet, more or less over a three foot swell. We ended with the same swell with less than a foot chop. The high air temperature for the day was 68F under the shade top. The sky was overcast all morning and hazy clear in the afternoon. The visibility ranged to an estimated miles. The tide (current) was light and into the wind. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F..

    Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 92F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 65F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 62F).

    The fishing, catching and landings were good, no more or, certainly, any less. Most legal fish landed were haddock. We had very few sub-legal haddock but, in general, the haddock were smaller than I have seen them. Legal landings also included twenty-one pollock, nine cusk and fifteen mackerel. Released fish included seven cod of 5 pounds or more, fifty-two dogfish, thirty-five small pollock, two small cod, two sculpins and seven small haddock. We anchored and drift fished. Only bait and cod flies were used. Bait worked best.

    Fred Buthe (NY) was the fisherman of the trip. He won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. And he was high hook with the most legal fish. The pollock is Fred's largest pollock ever and ties for the Bunny Clark's fifth largest pollock of the fishing season so far. I took a picture of Fred holding his good sized pollock with Karen Allen (NY) in the foreground. This digital image appears on the right. Fred also caught a 7 pound pollock that I weighed. Larry Halliday (VT) caught the second largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. Larry caught this as part of a double that also included a 9 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's largest double of the fishing season so far. There was a tie for the third largest fish with three fish, all at 10 pounds each. Joe Springer (ME) caught two, a 10 pound cusk and a 10 pound pollock. The cusk is in a tie for the Bunny Clark's second largest cusk of the fishing season so far. Jim O'Keefe (MA) caught a 10 pound pollock, the other 10 pound fish.

    Other Angler Highlights: Daniel Paradis (VT) caught an 8 pound cod and a 9.5 pound pollock, his two best fish. David Ferrarini (NH) caught a 9 pound cusk and the largest haddock of the day at 4.75 pounds. Dave Laskey (VT) caught an 8.5 pound cusk, his biggest fish. Ron Burrowes (MA) caught a 7 pound cod. Wendy Paradis (VT) landed the hard luck award for getting in one of the worst tangles I have seen this season so far.

    Kai Rosenberg and I ran the afternoon (4 PM to 8 PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at barely five knots, mostly less. Seas were about a foot or less in chops over a three foot chop/swell from the previous winds before. The air temperature reached a high of 72F in the shade. The tide (current) was light. The sky was mostly overcast. The visibility increased from the day trip to over fifteen miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61F.

    The fishing was excellent. The weather conditions were good, there were no dogfish, there was very little current and no tangles to speak of. The catching was fair. Landings were poor. Legal landings included five redfish and one mackerel. Released fish included two short pollock, two sub-legal cod and twelve sub-legal redfish. We anchored twice and drift fished twice. We caught more on anchor. Cod flies caught the most fish.

    There was no high hook this evening. Matt Paquette (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 1 pound mackerel. The second largest fish was a .8 pound redfish caught by Shawn Sheehan (MA). Tom Cardwell (MA), Kaity Nugent (MA) and eight year old Fionn Glynn (MA) all tied for third place, each with a redfish of .75 pounds.

    Other Angler Highlights: Tucker Matthews (NH) caught a .6 pound redfish. Courtney Nugent (MA) landed the hard luck award for becoming the sole hurler of the trip. It didn't appear to bother her even a little bit, that she was sea sick.

    I received two donations sponsoring me on my ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those donors and their donations included Wendy Paradis for $25.00 and Tom Cardwell for $25.00. Thank you so very much for your support and generosity. This has been a harder year than normal for generating the funding I want. So I appreciate this very much.

    Wednesday, July 7, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Ally Fuehrer ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 70F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind to write about, the ocean along the shore was flat calm and the visibility was good in haze. Ashore, the wind was light for the day, calm for most of it. The sky remained clear, cloudless in the morning. The visibility was good to very good in haze. The dew point wasn't conducive to creating fog. The air temperature reached a high of 85F in Perkins Cove. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 92F with a low of 70F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 86F (with a low of 67F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 66F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west southwest at five knots. The ocean was calm over a long rolling sea swell of about two feet. The air temperature reached a high of 72F on the fishing grounds. The sky was clear and sunny. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze. The tide (current) ranged from light to moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

    The fishing was nearly excellent. The weather couldn't have been much better for it and the dogfish were kept at bay. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was 85/15, favoring the legal sized fish. Legal landings also included two pollock, eleven cusk, five whiting and over two hundred mackerel. There were so many mackerel, at times, that they couldn't get to bottom to catch a groundfish! Released fish included twelve dogfish, a couple short cod, a few small pollock, the haddock and a few mackerel. Drifting was the method. Bait worked best.

    John McCurry (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish. There was no question today. Ten year old Mason Hatch (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8 pound pollock. Scott Houle (MA) came in second with a 5 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 3 pound haddock caught by John McCurry.

    Other Angler Highlights: Olivia Houle (MA) was the only angler to be sea sick today. For this, she won the hard luck t-shirt!

    Captain Ian Keniston and Ally Fuehrer ran the afternoon (4:00 PM to 8:00 PM) half day trip today. The ocean was calm from the time they left the dock until they got to the fishing grounds. The ocean was calm for the trip and the whole ride home. They had no wind. The air temperature reached a high of 70F. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles. The sky was overcast. The tide was light. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

    The fishing was excellent. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Landings included six cusk, four whiting and two squirrel hake. Released fish included over forty-five sculpins, four short cod, twelve small redfish and forty sub-legal pollock. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait and some cod flies.

    Peter Flanagan (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound cusk. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest cusk of the fishing season to date. It was also only a pound away from attaining Maine state trophy status. The second largest fish was an 8 pound cusk caught by Nate Bohake (MA). Paul Wietenga (MI) caught the third largest fish, a 7 pound cusk.

    Other Angler Highlights: Nadine Terpstra (ME) caught a 5 pound cusk. Dylan Lynn (NY) caught a 4 pound cusk. Austin Kaufman (MA) landed a 3 pound cusk. Ken Corey (MA) landed the hard luck award for catching the most fish without a one being of legal size to keep!

    I received a $50.00 donation from Don & Rebecca Stedman (TN) sponsoring me again, as they do every year, in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a ride to fight cancer. It was made "in memory of a great brother, Jim Stedman". Thank you so much for all your support over the years and your thoughtfulness. Wonderful people do wonderful things.

    Thursday, July 8, 2021

    We had not a soul inquire about today's fishing trip. Without patrons, the Bunny Clark can't sail. So ashore we will be for the morning trip, anyway. The weather predictions aren't promising for the afternoon trip. But who believes the National Weather Service? Too many people, I'm afraid.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 63F, the sky was overcast, it was pouring rain, the wind was blowing out of the north at twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean was good in precipitation. Near the Perkins Cove area, the wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen knots all day, more or less. It hadn't stopped blowing at that velocity even when I went to bed at 10:00 PM, which I thought strange, as northeast wind usually dies out during the late afternoon, early evening. The sky was overcast all day. But most of the day was rain free except for the occasional light shower. By sunset, the rain was light and steady. It rained lightly on into the night. The visibility was good to very good all day. The highest air temperature that I saw was 61F in Perkins Cove. But the wind off the water was blowing right on top of us. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 58F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 58F).

    I spent all day working at the restaurant and trying to figure out if we were going to run the afternoon trip. By 1:30 PM, I had figured that the afternoon trip wasn't going to sail. The weather predictions had scared enough people off, it was raining and the wind wasn't in our favor. Instead, I tied storm lines off the Bunny Clark to shore in case the worst part of the forecast came to pass.

    I received yet another very generous donation supporting my cancer fight with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. This time the donation was from Andy Armitage (ME) to the tune of $250.00. Andy and I ride bikes together when I get that opportunity. He's faster than I but usually I can keep up if I jump on his wheel. He is also responsible for getting me involved in loving English Premier League football. And he has taken me to England twice to watch some games there. Thanks so much, Andy, for your generous donation. I do appreciate it very much!

    Friday, July 9, 2021

    Today's fishing trip was falling apart from the moment I got up yesterday morning. By 2:00 PM, the majority consensus was that it was not going to be a day of fishing on the Bunny Clark. And, of course, when so many things are up in the air, the better choice is not to take any chances. We are certainly going on that side of things today. No trip. Again.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 60F, the sky was overcast, it was raining, there was zero wind, the ocean along the shore was flat calm and the visibility over it was good in precipitation. It rained all day today. At times, it poured rain as it might in a tropical setting. Walking between the restaurants, my feet were soaked all day. The rain stopped at 5:00 PM. By 7:00 PM, the sky was nearly cloudless. The sky was clear for the rest of the time I was a awake (I had to stay up until 10:30 PM to see Mark Cavendish win his 34th stage, a tie for the most stage wins of any cyclist in the history of the Tour). There was no wind until after noon. The wind, when it did come, blew out of the north at twenty to thirty knots. There is a huge difference between northeast wind and northerly wind in Perkins Cove. So instead of the cold biting wind off the water that you get with a northeast wind, we had a warming of the air to 70F. The air temperature had been struggling to get to the mid 60s before that time as the wind, although light, had been from the northeast all morning. By the time I went to bed, there was no wind to be found. The visibility, only good during the day, was very good by 6:00 PM. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 58F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 58F).

    I spent the morning working at the restaurants, like I always do on Fridays. I usually get there at 5:00 AM and work until 9:00 AM, when manager, Matt Pedersen, relieves me and I go home to shower and suit up for the rest of the day's work in Perkins Cove. Today I didn't get down there until 6:00 AM, although I did go down at 5:00 AM to discuss an issue with the Pepsi delivery guy. I had more to do today than normal because of supply issues with some of our vendors. I did work all this out but it took more time than normal.

    By 9:30 AM, I was working with Skip Dunning who Power Products had been gracious enough to sent to try to end the engine electronics problems we have been having with it coding out on us all the time. These codes haven't prevented us from doing the normal routine but the threats of the code, if the engine followed through with the threatening read-outs, would have kept us running at a maximum of seven knots on every trip. There is nothing wrong with the engine. It's the communication problem between the different nodes and the main computer on the engine that is the true problem. Unfortunately, you can't take any of this stuff over manually so you have to get the computer stuff figured out. This has been the big problem. And it doesn't make you feel any better when one of these legends pops up on the screen telling you that the engine is going to go into creeper mode if you don't solve the communication between the throttle, power boost or whatever it brings up at the time. So, hopefully, what Skip did in the three hours that Skip was there will solve the problem once and for all. We shall see.

    The rest of the day I spent working at the restaurant. There were some wonderful patrons there today. But, because of the rain, there weren't many patrons there overall. Better days are coming.

    I received a generous $100.00 donation from John & Sue Stebbins (ME) sponsoring me via, "eGift" through the PMC site, in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. This puts me ahead of any other year for donations by this period in the season. I hope this equates to a larger donation total overall. Thank you so much, John & Sue, for your thoughtfulness and generosity. I appreciate your support so very much!

    Saturday, July 10, 2021

    Happy Birthday to my sister, Cathy Koppstein, and my brother, Courland Tower!

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 64F, the sky was mostly cloudy with some small clear patches, there was very little wind out of the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was good in some haze. Ashore, the wind blew lightly out of the northeast. There might have been one time when the wind was ten knots or more. Mostly, the wind speeds were seven or eight knots or less. The sky was overcast for most of the morning, or nearly so. The sky was still overcast for the start of the afternoon. But, by mid afternoon, the sky opened up and the clouds disappeared. It was sunny, calm and beautiful for the last few hours before sunset. The air temperature reached a high in Perkins Cove of 73F. The visibility was very good overall. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 74F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 62F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 59F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten knots to start. Seas were chops of a foot or two over a rolling long sea swell of two to three feet. The air temperature reached a high of 65F. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

    The fishing was very good. The weather conditions were just about excellent and there were just a few dogfish. The catching was very good. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far, for a change. Legal landings also included twenty-eight haddock, two cusk, a whiting, a monkfish and fifty mackerel. Released fish included thirty-five dogfish, one cod of 5 pounds or more, a couple small cod, a handful of small pollock, eleven sub-legal haddock and a mackerel. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

    Ian did volunteer who was high hook with the most legal fish. Jared Stevens (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. He also caught a 7.5 pound pollock later in the trip. The second largest fish was a 12 pound pollock caught by Andy Davis (ME). Andy also caught a double that included a 7 pound pollock and an 8 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. He also caught a 5 pound cusk. Donny Roberge (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 10 pound pollock. He also caught the fourth largest fish, a 9.5 pound pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Steve Ellis (ME) caught a 5 pound cusk. Frank Merced (ME) caught a 6 pound pollock and an 8 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Matt Lamper (ME) landed a 6 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also landed the hard luck award t-shirt for becoming the high hurler of the trip. Ouch!

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg ran the afternoon (4:00 PM to 8:00 PM) half day trip today. On the fishing grounds, the ocean was smooth over a rolling sea swell of about two feet. The high air temperature was 66F, a little cooler and less humid. The sky was sunny. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles or more. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61F.

    The fishing was excellent. The catching was nearly so. Landings were fair. Legal landings included six cusk and twenty mackerel. Released fish included two haddock, three small cod, eighty sub-legal pollock and two mackerel. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait and a few used cod flies as well.

    Larry Tracey (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish a 10 pound cusk. This is a tie for the Bunny Clark's third largest cusk of the fishing season to date. The second largest fish was a 9 pound cusk caught by Joe Roy (ME). Jordan Scoville (ME) caught the third largest fish, an 8.5 pound cusk.

    Other Angler Highlights: Gabe Dore (NH) caught a cusk that weighed 2.5 pounds. Jeremy Grignon (ME) caught a 7 pound cusk, his best fish. Iryna Dore (NH) landed a 5 pound cusk. Dan Dore (NH) landed the hard luck award for being the only one to be sea sick! There seems to always be one, unfortunately.

    Sunday, July 11, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Tyler Carpenter ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 57F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind to write about, the ocean was flat calm along the shore and the visibility over it was good, at least. Ashore, the sky was sunny for most of the morning with very few clouds. This changed during the early part of the afternoon. The sky became overcast. Late in the afternoon, we had sprinkles of rain. We had no wind until after noon. The ocean along the shore was calm all morning. The wind hauled out of the south at about that time. Wind speeds increased to over ten knots. The air temperature reached a high of 77F. Or, at least, that's the highest air temperature that I saw. The visibility was good in haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 59F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 55F).

    Sundays, I like to ride with the Maine Coast Cycling Club out of Kennebunkport, Maine. I ride my bike up there, participate in any one of, usually, four rides and then ride my bike home. I was in the middle of the fastest group ride that was offered today. I had just been leading the group but had dropped back at the end of this group. Recovering a bit, I thought it might be a good time to take a picture with my phone of all the riders ahead of me. As I took the phone out of my pocket, it started to vibrate. I had a call from the Bunny Clark. I backed off from the group so I could hear and talk to Ian Keniston. He had run over lobster gear and had a tremendous vibration from the rope caught in the propeller. He wanted to know what I wanted to do. One of his suggested options was to come back home. He was only a half an hour from his destination when it happened.

    I told him to continue to his destination. Anglers had been waiting to go on this trip for a while and I would have hated to see them get almost there and not be able to wet a line. I just wanted him to be back by 2:45 PM, so I had plenty of time to dive on the boat and cut the rope out of the wheel. If there were other problems I wanted to have that time so that there would be plenty of time to get ready for the afternoon trip. So as soon as the boat came back to Perkins Cove, I was already in my wetsuit with mask and knife, ready to dive in and cut. It only took me three tries to get all the line cut out of the wheel and to give the propeller, the shaft and the stuffing box a good look over to make sure everything was okay. And it was. The afternoon trip left on time. In the meantime, because it wasn't a complete trip, I gave every angler aboard free tickets to use on a future trip of their choosing.

    In the end, it was old floating lobster line that Ian had run over. An undetected piece of line that no one could have seen except, maybe, from a low flying aircraft. And despite the having less time than a normal trip, in the end, anglers caught more fish than three other day trips of the normal length.

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots or less. The ocean was calm. The high air temperature was 71F. And it was warm with no wind and the humidity. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high 64F.

    The fishing was excellent, if you included dogfish. The catching was very good if you included dogfish and landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock. Legal landings also included fifteen pollock, eleven redfish, two cusk, three whiting and fifteen mackerel. Released fish included eighteen sub-legal haddock, over one hundred dogfish, four cod of 5 pounds or more, a few sub-legal (in size) cod and pollock and a mackerel. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

    Ian didn't volunteer high hook or who caught the most legal fish. I would imagine it was a Murphy but that is a pure guess based on forty-six years of taking anglers fishing. Marian "Merv" Murphy (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.25 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 9 pound pollock caught by Justin Saunders (CT). Will Pelczar (AZ) caught the third largest fish, an 8.5 pound pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Nick Pelczar (AZ) landed a double that included a 5 pound pollock and a 2.5 pound haddock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Brian Walsh (NJ) caught a 7.5 pound pollock. Gavin Thomas (IA) landed the hard luck award for not being able to control is equilibrium. I'm not sure if others had this problem. But if they did, they didn't do it as well as Gavin.

    Captain Ian Keniston and Tyler Carpenter ran the afternoon (4:00 PM to 8:00 PM) half day trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot over a rolling sea swell of two feet. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The sky was overcast. There was a light mist that wasn't quite rain near the end of the trip. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles. The air temperature reached a high of 66F but was still warm because of the humidity. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

    The fishing was excellent, no doubts. The weather was near perfect and there were no dogfish seen. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Legal fish landed included four cusk, fifty mackerel and two cunners. Released fish included about seventy-five sub-legal pollock, seven sub-legal redfish, two cod of 5 pounds or more and five mackerel. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait.

    Brian Walsh (NJ) was high hook with the most legal fish and the second, third and fourth largest fish of the trip, all cusk. They weighed 7.5 pounds, 7 pounds and 5.5 pounds. Kevin Bushey (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.5 pound cod. Nate LaPierre (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting spooled by a big bluefin tuna that there was just no stopping, even for a second!

    After the trip was over, we assessed the day's situation and noted that the Bunny Clark was completely free of vibration on the second trip. So it was just the rope in the wheel that was creating it.

    I received two generous donations supporting my quest for a cancer cure with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One donation was for $125.00 from Brian & Merv Murphy (NH). The other was from my sister, Cathy Koppstein (ME), for a very generous $300.00. Thank you for your help in funding for cancer research. The support means so much to me. But the funding means more to those who will benefit from the help!

    Monday, July 12, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Tyler Carpenter are running the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 65F, the sky was overcast, it was and had been raining a steady rain, there was no wind to write about, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was fair to good in rain and haze. Ashore, it rained steadily all morning and into the afternoon. It stopped around 1:00 PM and then rained again, lightly, around 3:00 PM. By 4:00 PM, the clouds had parted and the sun shone through. It was sunny until sunset. The air temperature reached a high of 70F, at least. I didn't look when it seemed the warmest. The wind was light out of the east all day. The ocean along the shore was calm, flat calm at 6:00 PM. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 59F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 55F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten knots to start and five knots or less to finish the fishing. Seas were a one foot chop over sea swells of two to three feet. The air temperature reached a high of 66F under the shade top. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile in fog to fifteen miles in haze. The sky was overcast all day. It rained for the whole ride out but was pretty free of rain, except for a light rain, for most of the morning. There was no rain in the afternoon. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

    The fishing was nearly excellent. The dogfish might have quelled it down a bit, category wise, for some. The weather was fine. The catching was very good as was the fish; "great" as quoted from one angler leaving the boat this afternoon. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was 80/20, favoring the legal sized fish. Legal landings also included sixty-two pollock, three cusk, three whiting and twenty-five mackerel. Released fish included five cod of 5 pounds or better, forty dogfish, a mackerel or two and a few small cod and pollock. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked equally well.

    I couldn't tell you whom was high hook with the most legal fish. I would have thought it would have been a Freitas but that's a guess. Alison Babcock (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.25 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 10 pound pollock caught by Matt Freitas (MA). Matt also caught a 6.5 pound pollock and an 8.5 pound pollock. Zach Freitas (MA) caught the third largest fish, the biggest cod of the day, at 9 pounds.

    Other Angler Highlights: Chip Baccei (VT) caught a 7 pound pollock right off the bat to get the boat pool started. Brian Walsh (NJ) caught a 6.5 pound pollock and an 8.5 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Ryan Fairhurst (NY) caught a 2.75 pound whiting, our third largest whiting of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Yvon Duquette (ME) caught the largest haddock of the day at 5 pounds. John Parry (VT) caught the dreaded mal de mer, the only angler to be a little green around the gills. But, unlike Covid, he will be fine when later tonight and cured tomorrow morning.

    After the boat was cleaned, I met most of the anglers who are leaving on the ultra marathon this evening. After loading some the provisions, I ran home to get some of the stuff I will need so I could eat dinner and get a nap.

    We left the dock around 9:30 PM. I wanted to make sure we could get to the first spot before daylight but at a speed that would be comfortable in any weather that we might encounter. That meant a slower speed. It was very calm when we left Perkins Cove. The sky was mostly clear but the ocean was flat calm and the visibility was very good. After less than an hour, Captain Ian Keniston took the helm and I retired to a bunk.

    Tuesday, July 13, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston, Anthony Palumbo, Captain Bryan Lewer and I ran the ultra marathon today.

    I crawled out of the rack around 4:00 AM, maybe a tad later, and relieved Ian at the wheel. There hadn't been a breath of wind all night. And it was mirror calm as daylight started to arrive. I had enough time at the wheel to have a couple cups of coffee and three chocolate eclairs that Deb had surprised me with for the morning meal. The air temperature was 65F, we had a canopy of clouds directly over head but clear skies to the east to allow us a most beautiful sunrise.

    On the fishing grounds, it was flat calm without a ripple on the surface. Actually, most of the morning was like that. Halfway between sunrise and noon, the wind started blowing out of the northeast. It was very light. The sky started to become overcast at about the same time. We had had mostly sunny skies before. The wind increased to about five knots at noon; not enough to create a chop. An hour later, we had intermittent light rain. The rain stopped the moment we started to head home. The sky remained overcast but we never saw rain again. We experienced a two to three foot long ocean swell most of the day. The highest air temperature we saw was 68F. Of course, it was mostly less than that, the most comfortable ultra marathon we have had since I can't remember when. The visibility ranged to about twenty miles. The tide (current) was strong and mostly into the wind. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F..

    Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 70F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 63F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 62F).

    The fishing was good, no better. The strong current bothered as did the larger than normal dogfish population. The dogfish were everywhere and in all depths of water that we fished. The catching was good. Landings were good, excellent for average fish size. Most legal fish landed were white hake. They are a tough fish to catch anyway because of their habitat. But the current gave us few options in fishing methods and created tangles we don't see with the caliber of fishermen who were with us today. It also took more time to work those areas leaving us less time to chase halibut. Legal landings also included six haddock, three pollock and twenty-five cusk. Released fish included over sixty-five dogfish, eight cod of 5 pounds or more, three small cod, about twenty-five sub-legal pollock, one sub-legal haddock, four wolffish, ten cusk, one white hake and two halibut. We drift fished, motor drifted and anchored. Bait worked best.

    Bryan Lewer was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish of the trip with the largest fish. He also won the boat pool for the second largest fish of the trip with the second largest fish. His biggest was a 38 pound Maine state trophy white hake. His second largest fish was a 37 pound Maine state trophy white hake. The 38 pounder is the Bunny Clark's largest hake of the season so far. It was the first fish in the boat today. His 37 pounder is the second largest hake caught this year to date. Bryan also caught a 33 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 32.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake and the largest cod of the day at 12 pounds. I do know that his cusk count was seven.

    Mark LaRocca (NY) won the boat pool for the third largest fish with the third largest fish, a 35 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Mark also caught our second largest cusk of the season so far, an 18 pound Maine state trophy. Some of his other fish included a 10 pound cusk and a 20 pound white hake.

    Other Angler Highlights: Dick Lyle (NY) caught an 11 pound cusk and a 9 pound cusk. Jonathan "Griff" Griffin (MA) landed the Bunny Clark's third largest cusk of the season today, a 15 pound Maine state trophy. His two best fish included a 31 pound Maine state trophy white hake and a 33 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Steve Selmer (NH) caught an 18.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk. This is the Bunny Clark's largest cusk of the fishing season to date. I took a picture of Steve holding his big cusk. This digital image appears on the left. The angler to Steve's right in the picture is Steve LaPlante. Steve Selmer lost a sub-legal halibut on the surface that, looked to me, to be about twenty pounds, more or less. Steve never got a chance to see his first halibut!

    Dan Killay (VT) caught a 12.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk. His largest fish was a 24.5 pound white hake. He also caught the second largest cod at 11 pounds and an 11 pound wolffish. Troy Boyd (ME) also caught a 12.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk. His largest fish was a 29 pound Maine state trophy white hake, the largest hake of his life and his second largest fish ever. He also brought a sub-legal halibut to the surface that looked to weigh about 15 pounds. I was going to weigh this fish and release it but it fell off the hook when Ian picked it up out of the water by the leader. He would have got it into the boat if he had grabbed it by the lower lip as he was going to do until I got involved.

    Joe Columbus (MA) landed a 34 pound Maine state trophy white hake, his best fish of the day and his largest of the year so far. It's also the Bunny Clark's fifth largest hake of the fishing season so far. He also caught a 13 pound Maine state trophy cusk, a tie for the Bunny Clark's fourth largest cusk of the fishing season so far. Joe also caught a 24 pound white hake. Steve LaPlante (CT) caught a 34.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake, the Bunny Clark's fourth largest hake of the season to date. Steve also caught a 32.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake and the third largest cod of the day at 10 pounds. Dave Miller (MA) caught our largest wolffish of the season with a 19.5 pounder. This is his largest ever wolffish. I should have taken a picture of it but, in my mind of minds, I thought it was the second or third largest wolffish of the season. I didn't realize my mistake until the next morning. Tim Rozan (ME) caught a 19 pound wolffish right after Dave caught his. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest wolffish of the season so far. I did take a picture of Tim's as it had become more subdued in the process of getting it off the hook. - which is another reason why I didn't take a picture of Dave's. Dave's fish was a thinner and longer fish. Anyway, the digital image of Tim's fish appears on the right. I owe you one, Dave. Lewis Hazelwood (MA) landed a 31.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. He also landed the hard luck award t-shirt for catching the most dogfish!

    I received two donations helping me rid the earth of the curse of cancer with the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event to try to get money for a team of scientists who working with genetic profiling. Their method is to find the gene that is responsible for creating the cancer, find a drug that will turn the gene off while also bypassing the need for chemotherapy and radiation treatments. The chemo and radiation are enough sometimes to make you give life up. So, to me, this is really an important research step. Dave Miller gave me $30.00 in the name of tradition - he donates after every Ultra. Steve LaPlante gave me $50.00. Actually, Steve gave me this donation a couple weeks ago but I had since forgotten about it as I had put it in my wallet. Thank you both very much for being part of my top angler contingent and for being the generous individuals who you are. The support means so very much to me.

    Wednesday, July 14, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 64F, the sky seemed overcast, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was poor in black thick fog. Ashore, the fog stayed fairly thick for a good first half of the daylight morning. The fog backed away from the shore at times but could always be seen and did come back at times. By noon, the fog had backed off enough so that it was clear enough along the shore. It stayed that way until before sunset when the fog rolled back in again. The sky was overcast all day but thin enough at one point to know that a sun was over head. The wind blew light out of the southeast all day. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 71F. It was humid. The visibility over the ocean was poor. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 74F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 63F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 62F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at five knots or less. The ocean was calm over a sea swell of two feet. The air temperature reached a high of 69F under the canopy top. The visibility ranged from an eighth of a mile to three miles. The sky was overcast all day. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

    The fishing was pretty good. The weather was perfect but there were a few dogfish to keep it from the category of excellent. The catching was good or very good if you included the dogs. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock. Legal landings also included thirty-one pollock, four cusk, one white hake and three whiting. Released fish included forty dogfish, eight sub-legal haddock, two cod of 5 pounds or more, a few small pollock, a couple small cod and one wolffish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked equally well.

    Brian Walsh (NJ) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound cod. Also included in his catch were a 7 pound pollock and a 7.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock caught by Vin Calio (MA). There was a tie for third at 11 pounds for two fish. Kevin Roux (ME) caught one, an 11 pound pollock. Jeff Taylor (ME) caught the other, an 11 pound cod.

    Other Angler Highlights: Jaret Hopkins (ME) caught a 6.5 pound pollock. Chris Calio (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting a hook in his hand.

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg ran the afternoon (4:00 PM to 8:00 PM) half day trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind continued out of the southeast at five knots. Seas were calm over a rolling sea swell of two feet. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was overcast. The visibility ranged from a mile to three miles in fog, closing in on the ride back. The air temperature reached a high of 66F but was still warm because of the humidity. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good and landings were good. Legal fish landed included one redfish, eleven cusk, one cunner and forty mackerel. Released fish included sixty sub-legal pollock, two cod over 5 pounds and a couple mackerel. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait and cod flies.

    Noah Longval (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish. These included a 3.25 pound cusk, a 4 pound cusk and an 8 pound cusk. The 8 pound cusk was the third largest fish of the trip. Dick Hall (ME), a long time ago Bunny Clark angler, won the boat for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound cusk. This fish comes in as a tie for the eighth largest cusk of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. The second largest fish was a 9.5 pound cusk caught by Paul Latourneau (ME).

    Other Angler Highlights: Jen Gregoire (ME) caught a 3 pound cusk right off the bat to start the boat pool Ryder Thibodeau (VT) caught a 7 pound cusk. "Floater Fish" caught a cusk that weighed 6.5 pounds. Don't ask. Joseph Campanella (FL) caught a 7 pound cod that had to be released. Nick Eck (MA) caught a 6 pound healthy cod that was also released alive. Cookie Hall (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting into the most tangled lines.

    I received a $30.00 donation sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge from Brian Walsh today. He's been a very talented fisherman over the years. Always great to see him come down the ramp! Thanks, Brian. Much appreciated.

    Thursday, July 15, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 66F, the sky seemed overcast, it was misty and humid, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was poor in black thick fog. There was no wind to speak of today. The ocean was calm along the shore all day. The wind came up later in the morning but it was more of a land breeze from the south than anything else. Even so, the wind was barely moving the flags. The sky seemed overcast in the morning with the fog. Later, we could see that it was overcast. By 3:00 PM we had a bright sun through the clouds. The air temperature started to soar after noon. The highest air temperature that I saw was 75F. But, when it seemed the warmest, I didn't have a thermometer available. It was humid in the afternoon. The visibility went from poor in the morning (over the ocean) to good in the afternoon, in haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 70F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 64F).

    On the fishing grounds the wind blew out of the northeast at five knots or less. The ocean was smooth over a two foot rolling sea swell. The air temperature reached a high of 68F. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to a mile in fog. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was overcast. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. A very good showing of haddock today. Ten percent of all the haddock caught were sub-legal. Legal landings also included forty-three pollock, fourteen cusk and twenty-five mackerel Released fish included thirty-five dogfish, fourteen cod over 5 pounds, three times the that in sub-legal cod, a lot of sub-legal pollock, two wolffish and a couple mackerel. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked really well.

    Riley Cheever (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish. It was a clear victory for Riley. It was Riley's seventeenth birthday today. And he shone on his birthday! He didn't catch any of the bigger fish, just a lot of fish. Joe Columbus (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17 pound wolffish. Officially, this is the Bunny Clark's fourth largest wolffish of the fishing season to date. I say officially because Steve Selmer (NH) lost one beside the boat on Tuesday that could have been it's equal. It could also have been slightly smaller. Joe also caught one of the bigger cod at 7.5 pounds. The second largest fish was a 10.5 pound pollock caught by Mike Cheever (NH). Brian Walsh (NJ) caught the third largest fish, a 9 pound cod.

    Other Angler Highlights: Brooke Palmer (NH) caught a 7 pound pollock, one of the bigger fish of the trip. Meghan King (MA) landed the hard luck award for being the first hurler of the trip.

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg ran the afternoon (4:00 PM to 8:00 PM) half day trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at five knots. Seas were calm over a rolling sea swell of two feet. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to a mile in fog. It was clear three miles from shore. The air temperature reached a high of 69F but was warmer still because of the humidity. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was good but landings were only fair this evening. Legal landings included two cusk and two cunners. Released fish included one cod of 5 pounds or more, three short cod, twenty-five sub-legal pollock and twenty-five sub-legal redfish. Drifting was the method. Everyone used only bait or cod flies.

    Joe Columbus was the man of the trip. He won the boat pool again as he did in the morning trip. This time he won with an 8 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 6 pound cod caught by Russell Chapman (VT). Sue Orr (NH) landed the third largest fish, a 3.5 pound cusk. Kathy Deaprix (NY) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for being the only angler sea sick this evening.

    I received several donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those donors and their gifts included Dick & Kathy Lyle (NY) for a generous $100.00, Bill Otto (PA) for $25.00 and Dr. Ralph & Eleanor Small (NY) for a generous $100.00. Thank you all so very much for your support. I really do appreciate your thoughtfulness and generosity!

    Friday, July 16, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kyle Nelson ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 69F, the sky was hazy clear, the wind was light out of the south and the visibility over the ocean was good, at least, in some haze. Ashore, the wind was light out of the southwest all morning. The highest wind speed that I saw was ten knots. By 3:30 PM, the wind had died altogether. The sky was mostly sunny all day with high thin clouds in various forms overhead. The air temperature was warm and it was humid but not as humid as I thought it might be. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 91F. The visibility was good to very good in haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 95F with a low of 74F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 90F (with a low of 69F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 90F (with a low of 63F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots the whole time they were there. Seas were chops of one to two feet over the same continual swell of two feet that seems to be maintaining itself on a daily basis. The air temperature reached a high of 71F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged up to ten miles in haze and fog. The sky was sunny all day.

    The fishing was good. There were quite a few dogfish today and the weather, although good, was not exceptional along with the moderate current. The catching was very good. Landings were good to very good. Brian Walsh (NJ) called it "a fish a cast". For some, who weren't as exceptional as an angler, it was not nearly as good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull, again, was about ten percent. In other words, for every ten haddock caught, only one was sub-legal. That is a very good average. Legal landings also included twenty-five pollock, eight cusk and twenty mackerel. Released fish included over sixty dogfish, eleven cod of 5 pounds or more, a handful of small cod and pollock, the short haddock, a mackerel or two and one wolffish. Drifting was the method. Bait worked best. Brian fished with a jig, the exception of the day.

    As you might expect, Brian Walsh was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.25 pound pollock. Brian also caught the two largest cod of the day at 8.5 pounds and 8 pounds. The second largest fish was a 10.5 pound pollock caught by Lee Roberts (ME). Lee also caught a pollock that weighed 6.5 pounds. Ron Vinnacombe (NH) caught the third largest fish, a 10 pound cusk. He is tied with eight other anglers this year for the eighth largest cusk of the Bunny Clark fishing season.

    Other Angler Highlights: Caleb Buck (ME) landed a 6.5 pound pollock, his best fish. Josh Vinnacombe (NH) caught an 8.5 pound pollock. John Lumsden (VT) was the sole hurler of the trip. For this he landed the hard luck award t-shirt.

    Ron Vinnacombe did me a solid today by donating $50.00 to help in the fight to solve the cancer riddle with the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event where a team of forty-eight of us fund a research project in genetic profiling. So far, this research team has been very successful. Thank you very much, Ron, for your gift. I very much appreciate the support.

    Saturday, July 17, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Tyler Carpenter ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 69F, the sky was hazy clear, the wind was light out of the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, the wind stayed out of the northeast all day. Wind speeds never reached ten knots. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The ocean along the shore had a very small chop. The visibility was very good. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 77F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 72F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 66F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 67F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at five knots or less. The ocean was calm with no discernable swell. The air temperature reached a high of 70F under the canopy top. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles. The sky was overcast. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66F.

    The fishing was excellent; the weather was perfect and there were few dogfish. The catching was very good. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was 75/25, favoring the legal sized fish. Legal landings also included thirteen pollock, twenty-two cusk and two whiting. Released fish included the short haddock, twelve dogfish, eight cod of 5 pounds or more and a few small cod and pollock. Drifting was the method. Bait worked best. Only one jig was used.

    Roland Bastien (CT) was high hook with the most legal fish. Amy Finocchiano (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound cod. Amy also caught a 7 pound cusk, the largest cusk of the trip. The second largest fish was an 11 pound cod caught by Brian Thayer (VT). Adam Croteau (NH) caught the third largest fish, an 8 pound cod. He also caught the fourth largest fish of the trip, a 7 pound cod.

    Other Angler Highlights: We haven't seen very many blue sharks this season yet. However, Jeff Marcoux (NH) got one to the rail today, the closest we have seen one so far this season. Hal Flannagan (MA) caught the largest pollock today at 5.5 pounds. Kristi Boliver (NY) landed the hard luck award today for catching nary a single legal fish!

    I received a $25.00 donation from Ron Croteau, a long time regular angler on the Bunny Clark, sponsoring me in my involvement with the Pan-Mass Challenge. I thank you very much, Ron, for your thoughtfulness and patronage. I appreciate the support, so much, in both arenas!

    Sunday, July 18, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Tyler Carpenter ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 67F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was good in precipitation and haze. Ashore, it rained for most of the morning, letting up around 9:30 AM with a bit of drizzle or very light rain afterward. The wind picked up out of the northeast to a sustained seventeen knots with gusts to over twenty knots. Seas looked to be only chops but, from the shore, looked to be about two feet. By later morning, the wind had backed off to about ten knots out of the northeast. There was very little wind, if any, in the afternoon. The visibility was good in the morning, very good in the afternoon. The sky was overcast all day. The highest air temperature that I saw was 68F. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 77F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 74F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 62F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 62F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen to ten to about five knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet that got less as the day progressed. The air temperature reached a high of 65F. The visibility ranged from three to five miles in fog, haze and light rain. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was overcast for the trip. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

    The fishing was fair to good. The tide was a bit of a factor, the wind and chops didn't help but there were quite a few dogfish that prevented anglers for catching the desired species. The catching and landings were good, very good for Mike Hatch (ME). Most legal fish landed were haddock. Twenty percent of the haddock caught were too small to be legal. Legal landings also included thirty-two pollock, four redfish and three cusk. Released fish included four cod of 5 pounds or more, over seventy-five dogfish and a few small pollock and cod. They anchored for every stop. All terminal gear worked well. Jigs caught the most dogfish.

    Mike Hatch (ME) was high hook by far. There wasn't anyone else close. He made Captain Ian look like the hero that he is. His best fish was a 6 pound haddock, the largest haddock we have seen in weeks and tied for the eighth largest haddock of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. His biggest fish was an 8.25 pound pollock. Craig Wilson (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. Craig also caught an 8 pound pollock that tied for the fifth largest fish of the trip. The second largest fish was a 9 pound pollock, caught by Cody Davis (ME). Cory Bezanson (ME) caught the third largest fish, an 8.5 pound pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Lucas Despre (ME) caught a 4 pound haddock. His largest fish was an 8 pound cod, the largest cod of the trip. Greg Ludington (ME) caught a 4 pound haddock, his best fish. Gary Alexander (ME) landed an 8 pound pollock, his best fish of the day. Christina Dermit (ME) landed the hard luck award for attaining high hurler status during the trip. I never did get a report as to her fishing capabilities today.

    I received four donations today sponsoring me in my ride for a cancer cure with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Carole Aaron (ME) donated a generous $60.00 in the form of an "eGift" through the PMC site. Carole has donated to my ride for quite a few years now. Lynn & Craig Wilson (NY) also donated with a $50.00 gift. Linda Hamel (NH) gave a very generous $150.00 donation. Derek Labbe (ME) donated a $50.00 gift. Thank you all so very much for your support. It really does mean a lot to me and, of course, to those who have the disease or might be destined to become sick.

    Monday, July 19, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Tyler Carpenter are running the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 64F, the sky was overcast, the roads were dry, the wind was very light out of the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northeast at about five knots, more or less. The ocean along the shore was calm for most of the day. The sky was overcast for most of the day as well except for the last three hours where we got a glimpse of the sun here and there. It started raining very lightly at 3:00 PM. It misted and/or rained lightly for an hour or two but hardly got the road wet. Maybe if you were riding your bike in it you might have gotten damp. Otherwise, there was no reason for oil gear. The air temperature was perfect, mostly in the 60s all day. The highest air temperature that I saw was 70F. The visibility was good to very good. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 63F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 64F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at speeds very much like we had along the shore. Ian said it was northeast at five knots or less. The high air temperature was 66F. The visibility ranged from a mile in fog to fifteen miles in haze. The ocean was calm all day with no discernable ground swell. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

    The fishing was good. The dogfish spoiled the party to the extent that I couldn't go up another category from the good designation. The catching was excellent. Landings were very good to excellent. It was a very busy day between the dogfish and the larger than normal number of fish. Most legal fish landed were haddock, our best haddock day for quite some time. The haddock cull was four to one or for every five haddock caught, one was sub-legal. Legal landings also included fifty-five pollock, nine redfish and thirteen cusk. Released fish included twelve cod of 5 pounds or more, a couple small cod, a few small pollock and over one hundred dogfish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well but jigs and cod flies caught the most dogfish.

    Dennis Reissig (NY) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a 10 pound cod, the third largest fish of the trip by a half a pound. Bernie Gage (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with one of two cod, both of which weighed in at 10.5 pounds exactly!

    Other Angler Highlights: Finn McNair (NY) landed a double that included an 8 pound pollock and a 2.5 pound haddock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Justin Gage (VT) caught an 8.5 pound cod, his largest fish. Craig Maloney (ME) landed the largest pollock of the trip at 9 pounds. Nick Tow (ME) landed the hard luck award for being involved in the most tangles and for only landing one legal fish. Sometimes it takes more talent to have so many fish below the boat and only catching one!

    Bernie Gage (and Justin Gage) came through again with a donation to help me in the cancer fight with the Pan-Mass Challenge. As always he donates to the cause. This time it was $50.00. Thank you, Gages, very much for your support. It is always appreciated, almost as much as it is to have you aboard the Bunny Clark!

    Captain Ally Fuehrer, Sean Devich, Bill Harding and I headed out for the Special Offshore Fishing Trip (SOFT) at 11:00 PM. I steered out until the boat pool was collected and everyone was settled in for the ride. After a half hour, Ally took the helm and I went to take a nap.

    Tim Tuesday, July 20, 2021

    I crawled out of the rack 3:30 AM and relieved Sean at the wheel. He and Ally had shared the steering responsibilities. There had been no wind to write about. And, like the Ultra, it was calm as daylight started to arrive. We got in a couple of drifts before sunrise caught some nice fish. But our better fish came an hour later.

    On the fishing grounds, the ocean was calm. The wind was light from the west to start. That died out to be replaced by southwest, then, southerly wind, all less than five knots. A three foot long swell developed from the southeast but it seemed to do nothing to the feeling of tranquility you get when there is no wind. As we were wrapping it up to get back home, the wind died altogether, leaving the ocean's surface glassy. The highest air temperature we saw was 72F.The air temperature was comfortable all day. The visibility ranged to about fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F..

    Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 59F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 62F).

    The fishing was good to very good. There were dogfish but not too many. Most of the time we had very enjoyable fishing. The catching was very good. Landings were good, excellent for size. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was about ten percent sub-legal. So most every haddock we caught we could keep. Legal landings also included thirty-seven pollock, four redfish, sixty-six cusk, one white hake and a monkfish. Released fish included fifty-four dogfish, twenty-eight cod of 5 pounds or better, thirteen short cod, over one hundred sub-legal pollock, twenty-one cusk and one barndoor skate. We alternated between drifting, anchoring and motor drifting. All terminal gear worked well.

    I don't know who was high hook with the most legal fish. Mark Thyng (VT) might have caught the most total fish. He seemed to have a fish a cast for most of the day. Some of his better fish included a 13.25 pound Maine state trophy cusk, a 14.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk and a 21.75 pound Maine state trophy cusk.

    Scott Leavitt (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 32 pound Maine state trophy cusk. This is the Bunny Clark's largest cusk of the fishing season to date, his largest cusk ever and a tie for the second largest cusk that has ever been caught on the Bunny Clark. I took a picture of Scott holding his huge cusk with my iPhone. This digital image appears on the upper left. He also caught the largest cod of the day at 14 pounds, a tie for our fourth largest cod of the fishing season so far. Joe Columbus (MA) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 31 pound Maine state trophy cusk. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest cusk of the fishing season so far and tied for the fifth largest cusk that has ever been caught on the Bunny Clark. It's also Joe's largest cusk by 18 pounds!

    There was a tie for the boat pool for the third largest fish of the trip at 27 pounds. Bill Harding (ME) caught one, a 27 pound Maine state trophy cusk. This is the Bunny Clark's third largest cusk of the fishing season so far. Dennis Reissig (NY) caught the other, a 27 pound barndoor skate, our first one of the fishing season. Dennis' 27 pound barndoor comes in at a tie for sixth all time largest in Bunny Clark history. Hauling it over the rail I thought it was going to be bigger. I must have been tired! I took a picture of Dennis with my iPhone holding his big skate before releasing it back to the ocean alive. This digital image appears on the right.Bill also caught a 26 pound Maine state trophy cusk and the largest haddock of the day at 5 pounds. Dennis also caught a 26 pound Maine state trophy cusk. Dennis' largest pollock weighed 11 pounds. Dennis and Bill's 26 pound cusk tie for the Bunny Clark's fourth largest cusk of the fishing season so far.

    Other Angler Highlights: Marty Buskey (NY) caught the first fish of the trip, a 7 pound cusk. Later, he also caught the Bunny Clark's third largest double keeper of the season to date. His double included an 11 pound pollock and a 9 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Adam Towle (NH) caught the second legal fish this morning, a 14 pound Maine state trophy cusk. Adam has caught bigger cusk with me before. In 2019, Adam landed a 29 pound Maine state trophy cusk, a tie for the twelfth largest cusk ever caught on the Bunny Clark. Jim Wescom (VT) caught the largest double of the season, so far, today. Jim's double included a 15 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. This is our biggest double of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far.

    Marie Harding (ME) landed a 25 pound Maine state trophy cusk, her best fish and the Bunny Clark's sixth largest cusk of the season. She also caught a 17 pound Maine state trophy cusk and a cod that weighed 12.5 pounds. Donna Moran (NY) caught a 19 pound Maine state trophy cusk. I believe that this is the largest cusk that she has ever caught. Dan Wescom (VT) caught a 14.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Dan also caught a 10 pound monkfish. However, it weighed 10 pounds because it had already eaten a 2.5 pound haddock! Still, the monkfish is the Bunny Clark's largest of the fishing season so far. I took a picture of Dan with his fat monkfish, the digital image appearing in the missive on the lower left. Mark Laroche (VT) caught a 12 pound cod, his biggest fish of the trip. Bob Mayer (ME) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for not catching a single fish worth writing about.

    I received three donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge from anglers on the trip today. Scott Leavitt was one with an $80.00 gift, Dennis Reissig was another with a $50.00 donation and, again, Marty & Elise Buskey donated for $50.00. Marty & Elise donate several times every year. Thank you all so very much for helping me with cancer research. It means very much to me.

    Wednesday, July 21, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 65F, the sky was mostly clear with various cloud types, everything was wet from last night's thunder showers, the wind was very light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was good or very good in haze. The wind blew out of the southwest to west at ten knots or less all day. The sky was mostly overcast in the morning, clear in the afternoon. The visibility was good to very good in some haze. The highest air temperature that I saw was 77F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 61F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 63F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at five to ten knots. Seas were chop/swells of one to two feet. The sky was overcast all morning, mostly clear in the afternoon. The highest air temperature was 70F. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze, maybe some of it caused by the fires out west? The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66F.

    The fishing was very good with a few dogfish to keep it below the category of excellent. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock. The haddock cull was 60/40, favoring the legal sized fish. Legal landings also included twenty-seven pollock and eight cusk. Released fish included five cod of 5 pounds or more, a very few small cod, some small pollock, the sub-legal haddock, forty dogfish and a wolffish. Drifting was the method. Jigs and flies caught the most fish today.

    Keith Leavitt (MA) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish caught. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound pollock. He caught this pollock as part of a double that also included a 5.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Keith also caught the second largest fish, an 8 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 7 pound cod caught by Bradley Labombard (VT).

    Other Angler Highlights: Isaac Geffre (MI) landed a 4.5 pound haddock, the largest haddock of the trip. Cam Duszak (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting into the most tangles.

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg ran the afternoon (4:00 PM to 8:00 PM) half day trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind continued out of the west at five to ten knots. The ocean was calm. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was sunny and fairly devoid of clouds. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze, as it did during the day. The air temperature reached a high of 71F and seemed warm. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good but landings were fair. Legal fish landed included four cusk and twenty mackerel. Released fish included a cod of 5 pounds, four short cod, forty-five small pollock, a cusk that might have been the biggest fish and twenty small redfish. Drifting was the method. Anglers used only bait and cod flies.

    Brett Smith (VT) was high hook with the most legal fish, two, and he caught the second largest fish, a 7 pound cusk. His smaller keeper was a 3 pound cusk. However, the largest fish, a cusk, was lost as he was trying to get the fish over the rail. This was probably the pool fish but could not be retrieved. For this, Brett won the hard luck award t-shirt! Andre Mercier (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8 pound cusk. The third largest fish was a 6 pound cusk caught by J. J. Smith (NH).

    Other Angler Highlights: Chloe Jablonski (VT) caught the largest cod of the evening. It weighed 5 pounds.

    I received several donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event to raise money for cancer research. Those donors and their gifts included a very generous $200.00 from Mark & Donna Robinson (MA) in the form of an "eGift" through the PMC site, a generous $100.00 from the Labombard Family (VT), a $25.00 gift from Keith Leavitt and a $20.00 donation from Pat. Thank you all so very very much for the support you all give to me in this project. I appreciate the help so much!

    Thursday, July 22, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Tyler Carpenter are running the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 61F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was very light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good, at least. Ashore, the wind blew lightly out of the northeast, died out and then hauled out of the south and southwest. The ocean along the shore was calm all day. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 77F. It was a very pleasant day with sunny cloudless skies for most of the morning and only a few clouds in the afternoon. The visibility was very good all day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 55F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 60F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten knots to start but dropped down to nothing by the end of the fishing. It was a very calm ride home. Seas were two feet in chops to start. The air temperature reached a high of 70F. The visibility ranged from ten to twenty miles, at least. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was sunny and clear. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

    The fishing was very good, the catching was very good and landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, yet again. The haddock cull was seventy-five percent legal. Legal landings also included twenty-four pollock, four cusk and two whiting. Released fish included fifteen dogfish, the short haddock and a couple of sub-legal sized cod. They drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked equally well.

    Joe Columbus (MA) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 6.5 pound pollock, landed by Alex Pakulski (ME). Mike Pakulski (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 6 pound pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Brian Daniell (MA) landed the hard luck award for being the sole angler not to catch a single legal sized fish.

    Captain Ian Keniston and Tyler Carpenter ran the afternoon (4:00 PM to 8:00 PM) half day trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. The ocean was calm. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles. The air temperature reached a high of 69F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

    The fishing was excellent. The catching was good. Landings were poor for groundfish, good for mackerel. The only legal fish landed were mackerel, over fifty. Released fish included ten small cod, over one hundred and fifty sub-legal pollock and a couple mackerel. Drifting was the method. Only bait and flies were used.

    Mike Orr (IL) was high hook with the most groundfish, all cod. He led the boat pool multiple times only to lose the boat pool to Joe Columbus in the end. Mike caught the second and third largest fish of the evening, a 3.75 pound cod and a 3.5 pound cod. He also caught a cod that weighed 1.5 pounds. Joe won the boat pool for the largest fish with a 4 pound cod. Mike ended up winning the hard luck award t-shirt for failing to lock the boat pool up in the end!

    Other Angler Highlights: Tapu Silvennoinen (MI) caught a 3 pound cod. Bailey Barber (NY) also caught a 3 pound cod.

    Scott & Nancy Simpson (ME) did me a solid today with a $50.00 donation toward my cancer project with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Thank you both so much for your help and support. I very much appreciate your thoughtfulness!

    Friday, July 23, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kyle Nelson ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 61F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the sky was cloudless for the first part of the daylight morning and partly cloudy during the later part. The afternoon, began with more clouds than expected and, then, rain from isolated cells that lasted from 2:00 PM until 4:00 PM. We had a little more rain around 7:00 PM as well. The highest air temperature reading that I saw was 78F. The wind was light all day, northeast in the morning, calm and southwest in the afternoon. The visibility ranged from excellent to very good in some afternoon haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 80F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 53F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 57F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north in the morning and then no wind in the afternoon. Wind speeds were very light when there was wind. The ocean remained calm for the whole fishing period. The air temperature reached a high of 76F, influenced by the lack of wind. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67.

    The fishing was good to very good. The weather was perfect but the dogfish spoiled the party somewhat. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. The haddock cull was about eighty percent legal. Legal landings also included twenty-seven pollock, thirteen cusk and a whiting. Released fish included two cod of 5 pounds or more, a handful of small cod and pollock, the sub-legal haddock and a wolffish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

    Corey Lehmuth (NY) was high hook with the most legal fish. Kyle McNamara (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound wolffish, the seventh largest wolffish of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. The second largest fish was an 11 pound cusk caught by Jay Haggett (VT). Antoine Thurston (NY) caught the third largest fish, a 7 pound cod.

    Other Angler Highlights: Pat Dean (ME) landed the hard luck award for breaking his reel and for not having his normal great catching day.

    Joe Columbus (MA) gave another donation to help me with cancer research with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. This time his donation was for $40.00. He had donated many times to help in the cancer cause. Thanks again, Joe! It's so very much appreciated!

    Saturday, July 24, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 59F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was light out of the north, the ocean along the shore was ruffled but calm and the visibility over it was excellent. The sky was cloudless all day. In fact, I expected clouds to roll in during the afternoon. But that never happened. The wind blew out of the northeast up to eight knots for the start of the morning. There was no wind by noon. The air was perfect today with very little humidity and a high of 75F in Perkins Cove. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 77F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 54F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 55F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten knots, dropping to five knots and then calm for the ride home. Seas were chops of a foot or less. The air temperature high under the canopy top was 68F. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was clear and sunny. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

    The fishing was good, at best. The bite was not on, there were too many dogfish and the tide was strong. With the full moon on top of all this, it was not the best fishing day, despite the nice weather. The catching was good. Landings were fair to good. Legal landings included thirty-four haddock, fourteen pollock, nine redfish, ten cusk, two white hake and two whiting. Released fish included a handful of small pollock, eight sub-legal haddock, one cod of 5 pounds or more, a couple small cod and a sculpin. They anchored and drift fished; nothing turned the fish on until the very end of the trip. And then it was time to go home. Ian admitted that he was a little disappointed that he couldn't stay until the bite slowed. But we did have an afternoon trip he had to get back for.

    Ian didn't volunteer information on the angler who was high hook with the most legal fish. And I didn't ask, unfortunately. Chris Dunham (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound wolffish. Chris also caught the second largest fish, a 7 pound cusk. The third largest fish was a 6 pound pollock, caught by Kendall Cobb (VT).

    Other Angler Highlights: Jeff Rounds (VT) landed the hard luck award for losing a jig.

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg ran the afternoon (4:00 PM to 8:00 PM) half day trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots. The ocean was calm. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was sunny The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The air temperature reached a high of 69F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was good to very good and landings were fairly good. Legal landings included one haddock, three redfish, two cusk, one white hake, four squirrel hake and two whiting. Released fish included one dogfish, three small cod, thirty sub-legal pollock and four redfish. Drifting was the method. Only bait was used tonight to eliminate the dogfish catch.

    Jason Pappas (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish, four. His fish included a small cusk, a 3 pound cusk, a 2 pound whiting, our third largest whiting of the season so far, and a white hake that weighed 1.5 pounds. The 3 pound cusk was the second largest fish of the evening white the 2 pound whiting tied for the third largest fish of the trip. Jack Winters (NH) caught a 2 pound haddock to tie with Jason for the third largest fish. Sam Cuellar (IL) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4.25 pound cod.

    Other Angler Highlights: Brad Seggie (NH) caught a 1.5 pound whiting. Jake Pappas (MA) landed the hard luck award for being hungry because mom didn't pack any snacks! Hey, captain's choice. Apparently, there was really no hard luck. And there were almost zero tangles.

    I received a generous donation of $250.00 from Charlie & Linda Nickerson (ME) sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Charlie & Linda have donated the same amount every year for the last fifteen years. Thank you so very much for all the support you have given me over the years. To say I very much appreciate your help would be an understatement!

    Sunday, July 25, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Tyler Carpenter ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 65F, the sky was partly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at eight knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, It rained all morning, starting at 7:00 AM, hardest at 11:00 AM. By noon, the rain was over for the day. It misted a bit for the very early part of the afternoon. By 3:00 PM, the sun was out and it looked like it had been that way all day. The wind blew out of the south southwest in the morning to twenty knots, along with the rain. By noon, the wind had backed off somewhat, between ten and fifteen knots. The highest air temperature that I saw was 73F, late in the afternoon. The visibility, except when it was raining, was very good. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 76F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 62F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 59F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to twenty knots. Seas were chops of two feet or more. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile in rain to ten miles in haze. The air temperature reached a high of 68F. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was overcast. It rained most of the day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

    The fishing was good, kept firmly in the "good" category by the weather and the dogfish. The catching was good. Landings were fair to good, depending on the angler. Legal landings included forty-four haddock, five cusk and three whiting. Released fish included forty dogfish, ten small cod, a handful of sub-legal pollock and fourteen sub-legal haddock. Drifting was the method. The balance was tilted toward bait due to Jeff Goebel's (ME) lack of success with his new jig.

    Ian didn't volunteer information on high hook status today and I forgot to ask about it yet again. Anthony Cicale (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound cod. Oddly enough, this cod comes in at the top twenty of the largest cod we have seen this season so far. To me, this is a sad statement about the state of the cod stocks in New England. But it's certainly a high five for Anthony. Peter Grant (ME) caught a 10 pound cod, the second largest fish of the trip. Ted Cinchette, Jr. (ME) caught the third largest fish, also a cod, weighing 7 pounds.

    Other Angler Highlights: Jeff Goebel landed the hard luck award for trying out and fishing with his new $30.00 jig with depressing results. Obviously, Ian felt bad for him and thought he might need some compensation in the form of the Bunny Clark's most coveted article of clothing, the hardest luck of the day award t-shirt!

    On a happy note, Jeff Goebel took $50.00 of the money that Anthony Cicale won for winning the boat pool today and applied it in sponsorship for my part in cancer research with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Anthony was on board with this move and I was thrilled with the prospect. Thank you both for bringing so much fun to the Bunny Clark every time you fish with us. And, of course, thank you so much for your support in my cancer project. I appreciate this but not as much as the people who really need this who will never know the individuals responsible for their good fortune. All the best to you both.

    Monday, July 26, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Tyler Carpenter ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 67F, the sky was hazy cloudless, the wind was very light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean seemed good in a thick haze or light fog. The sky was sunny all day with few clouds and no thunder showers. The sky was hazy from the wild fires out west. It's been a bigger year than normal for those fires. The air was humid but not so bad that it was oppressive. The air temperature reached a high of 86F. The visibility was good in a thick haze. The wind blew lightly out of the southwest until about 2:00 PM. From then on there was no wind and the ocean was flat calm along the shore. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 93F with a low of 70F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 61F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 61F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots or less. The ocean was calm all day. The air temperature reached a high of 74F under the shade top but it was hot out in the sun with the calm weather. The visibility ranged from a mile to three miles in thick haze and fog. The sky was sunny all day. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

    The fishing was excellent, no two ways about it. There were very few dogfish, the current was perfect and the weather was perfect, a great day to be out there. The catching was very good as were the landings. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Ten percent of the haddock caught were sub-legal. Legal landings also included nineteen pollock, seven redfish, twenty-one cusk and five white hake. Released fish included twelve dogfish, one cod of 5 pounds or better, five small cod, two sub-legal pollock, the sub-legal haddock and a sculpin. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked equally well.

    We had the Maine Department of Marine Resources aboard today. So it was tough to know who was high hook. Don't misunderstand me, we love having the DMR aboard. I am proud of what our state does as opposed to other states in New England. I can't trust the information coming out of Massachusetts for instance. But I do know that Maine does a great job. We do sacrifice our service somewhat when they are on the boat, as Ian agrees. But I think that it's worth it in the long run.

    Caleb Sparks (CA) should have won the boat pool for the biggest fish with the biggest fish but he didn't get into the boat pool! His fish was a 9 pound cusk, the largest fish of the trip. Matthew Jenison (NY) won the boat pool for the biggest fish with the second biggest fish, an 8 pound pollock. He also caught a 6.5 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 7.5 pound pollock caught by Mike Wicks (NY).

    Other Angler Highlights: Simon McAllister (VT) caught a 7 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Silas McAllister (VT) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for attaining, you guessed it, high hurler status, at least according to Captain Ian Keniston.

    I received a very generous $500.00 donation sponsoring my cancer funding raising project with the Pan-Mass Challenge from Andy & Susan Tapparo (MA) in the form of a "eGift" through the PMC website today. Andy & Susan have been very generous donors since I started trying to raise money for research in 2007. Thank you both so much for going out of your way to support me in this project. I never expect it but I certainly appreciate it! So very thoughtful.

    Tim Tuesday, July 27, 2021

    Kai Rosenberg and I ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 66F, the sky was hazy clear with few clouds, if any, the wind was very light out of the west and the visibility over the ocean was good in a thick haze.

    We had a following half foot chop after we left the gate in front of Perkins Cove. The wind was blowing out of the northwest at five knots or a little more. The sky was milky clear, the visibility was good in haze, the ocean was fairly calm and the air temperature was in the mid 70s.

    On the fishing grounds, the ocean was calm, the wind light from the southwest. This wind died during the trip, went calm and then hauled out of the west. The wind remained out of the west until we got back to Perkins Cove. The ocean was calm all day. The highest air temperature we saw was 75F.The air temperature was on the warm side but it would have been warmer had there not been the light breeze we enjoyed. . The visibility ranged to about ten miles in haze. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66F..

    Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 87F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 59F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 63F).

    The fishing would have been excellent except for the dogfish, which were many. I have never had the collection of anglers who were on the boat today but, I can tell you, I have never seen so few tangles for so many dogfish. The anglers handled it remarkably well. The cod flies caught the least number of dogfish, bait and jigs came in about even in that regard. The catching was very good, particularly if you included the dogfish. Landings were good. Legal landings included haddock mostly. The haddock cull was about ten percent sub-legal. Legal landings also included thirty-eight pollock, and thirteen cusk. Released fish included well over one hundred dogfish, two sub-legal cod (less than 2 pounds each), forty-two sub-legal pollock and a sculpin. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

    Al Severson (NJ) was high hook with the most legal fish. His biggest fish was probably a 6 pound pollock. He had two about that size. I didn't weigh them. We had a tie for the largest fish of the trip and the boat pool for the largest fish at 12 pounds, both pollock. Arny Knight (ME) caught one and Don Carpenter (NH) caught the other. Arny also caught a 10 pound pollock. I also weighed an 8 pound pollock for Don. Jackie Mauer (TX) caught the third largest fish, an 11 pound pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Abby Doku (MA) landed the largest cusk at 10 pounds. Dennis Buckley (NY) caught the second largest cusk at 7 pounds. The third largest cusk came in at 5 pounds, caught by Jade Smith (MA). Jen Hennessy (MA) caught the largest haddock at 3.5 pounds. However. Dave Walden (CT) lost a bigger haddock on the surface because I thought I could haul it over the side by the line. Not! It looked to be about 5 pounds. I suck! Greg Karpowicz (MA) caught a 7 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Emmie Spagna (NH) caught a 10 pound pollock, her biggest fish. I thought it was bigger or even a halibut but it was hooked directly in the middle of the back! Andrew Lamere (NY) caught a 10.25 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Jackie Mauer landed the hardest luck of the day award t-shirt for losing a jig, the only lost jig of the trip.

    Kai Rosenberg and I ran the afternoon (4 PM to 8 PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots, mostly less. Seas were about a half a foot or less in chops over a calm ocean. The air temperature reached a high of 72F in the shade. The tide (current) was light. The sky was mostly overcast or hazy and it started to rain about a half hour before heading home. The visibility was, at most, ten miles but decreased in the rain. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

    It rained fairly hard for the ride home as we went by thunder showers coming off the land, headed to sea. We never received any of the thunder or lightning but we got the rain along with a northeast wind that reached fifteen knots with a 1.5 foot chop. We were traveling pretty close to shore so there was not enough reach to make a larger sea. Still, it was a comfortable ride home.

    The fishing was excellent. The weather conditions were good, there were no dogfish, there was very little current and no tangles to speak of. The catching was very good. Landings were fair. Legal landings included three redfish, seven herring, twenty-five mackerel, three cusk, six whiting and eleven red hake. Released fish included five redfish, a couple herring, seven mackerel, three small cod, one cod of 5 pounds, a sculpin and a couple small whiting. Drifting was the method. No jigs were used, only bait and cod flies.

    Steve Luneberg (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish, two. His fish included a 1 pound redfish and a 5.1 pound cusk. The cusk was the second largest fish of the evening. Mark Latulippe (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound cusk. The third largest fish was a 5 pound cod caught by Cheyenne Russell (MA).

    Other Angler Highlights: Carl Palm (OH) landed the largest redfish at 1.25 pounds. Jordan D'Amico (VT) caught a redfish that weighed .9 pounds. Melanie D'Amico (VT) caught and released a 3 pound cod. Rochelle Shapland (CT) caught a 3.5 pound cusk. Sierra Russell (MA) landed the hard luck award for losing a bait rig on the bottom.

    I received a few donations sponsoring me on my ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those donors and their donations included Scott Olsen (NJ) for $20.00, Mark Latulippe for $22.00 and an anonymous donation of $27.00. Thank you all so very much for your support and generosity. It is very much appreciated.

    Wednesday, July 28, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 64F, the sky was overcast, it was raining, if any, the wind was light out of the northeast and the visibility over the ocean seemed good in a thick haze or, maybe, even fog. Ashore, the haze seemed to be gone by 8:00 AM. The northeast wind had become well established by then. It wasn't strong, ten knots or so, but the wind stayed out of that direction for most of the morning. By noon, the wind was just about gone. By early afternoon, the wind had started to blow out of the south. Southerly wind had increased to about ten knots by 4:00 PM. That's about as strong as it got. The sky was sunny all day with the occasional cloud. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 73F. The visibility was excellent at noon. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 53F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 57F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten knots or more to start. Seas were two feet in chops. The wind dropped as the day progressed. The ride back to Perkins Cove was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 67F. It was cool in the wind if you were just wearing a t-shirt, as one angler remarked to me after getting off the boat this afternoon. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was sunny and clear all day. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

    The fishing was good today, at best. The choppier seas than expected, the stronger than normal current and the dogfish conspired to make it tougher to catch a legal fish. The catching was very good if you included the dogfish. Landings were fair. Legal landings included twenty-eight haddock, seven pollock, four cusk, one white hake and a whiting. Released fish included one cod of 7 pounds, a couple small cod, a few small pollock, sixty plus dogfish, nine sub-legal haddock and a pee wee monkfish. They anchored and drift fished. All terminal gear worked about the same.

    Paul Dowell (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20 pound pollock. This is the largest fish that Paul has ever caught and it's the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the fishing season to date. Captain Ian took a picture of Paul holding his big pollock. This digital image appears on the left. He did not enter the boat pool. Daniel Curran (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, an 8 pound pollock. Mark Konish (NC) caught the third largest fish, a 7 pound cod.

    Other Angler Highlights: Tyler LaRoche (ME) was the high hurler today. There were a few affected by mal de mer. For the quality of his sea sickness, Tyler landed the hard luck award t-shirt.

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg ran the afternoon (4:00 PM to 8:00 PM) half day trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots. The ocean was calm. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was sunny The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The air temperature reached a high of 67F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66F.

    The fishing, catching and landings were very good this evening. And there were no dogfish to spoil the party. Legal landings included eighteen cusk and over fifty mackerel. Released fish included fifty sub-legal pollock, thirty-six sub-legal redfish and a couple mackerel. As is becoming increasingly common, not a single cod, large or small was seen this evening. They made one anchor stop. Everyone used bait and cod flies.

    Kevin Alicea (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish, three. They included a 3 pound cusk, a 5 pound cusk and a 6.5 pound cusk. Eric Brinwall (MN) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9.5 pound cusk. He also caught a cusk that weighed 2 pounds. The second largest fish was a cusk that weighed 9 pounds, caught by Max Alicea (MA). Mike White caught the third largest fish, an 8.5 pound cusk.

    Other Angler Highlights: Kevin Briggs (MA) caught a 7.5 pound cusk, his best fish. Mason White (NY) landed a 2.75 pound cusk. Colin Thompson (NY) caught a 6 pound cusk. Jared Stern (MA) caught the smallest cusk of the evening at 1.5 pounds. Ashlyn Seliski (MN) landed a 3 pound cusk. Brady Whalen (NY) caught the first cusk of the evening to start off the boat pool. It weighed 3.75 pounds. Max Alicea landed the hard luck award for leading the boat pool for the whole evening until Kevin won on the very last fish of the trip!

    I received a very generous $105.00 donation from Daniel Curran who gave all his winnings from the morning's pool to sponsor my ride in the Pan-Mass Challenge. Alayn & Larry Ingham (MA) also donated $50.00 in the form of an "eGift" through the PMC site towards my cancer project. The cancer fight goes on! Thank you so much, Daniel, Alayn & Larry for helping me in the endeavor. I so very much appreciate your support!

    Thursday, July 29, 2021

    Captain Ian Keniston and Tyler Carpenter ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 57F, the sky was clear, there was no wind to write about, the ocean along the shore was mirror calm and the visibility over it was very good to excellent. The visibility remained clear for at least half the morning but started to lose clarity during the last two hours of the morning. There was no wind all morning, the ocean along the shore remained calm. After noon, the wind started to blow from the southwest or even south southwest. By 4:00 PM, the wind velocity had increased to twenty knots, more or less. Big white caps could be seen from the shore. The sky, mostly clear in the early part of the morning, started to cloud over around noon and was totally overcast after that. Our first rain came down around 1:30 PM. It rained on and off at times into the night. The highest air temperature that I saw was 76F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 52F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 52F).

    On the fishing grounds, there was no wind in the morning. The ocean was calm. After noon, the wind came up out of the southwest. Five knots was the most they had on the fishing grounds but the wind increased in speed during the trip back to Perkins Cove. Although calm on the grounds, they had a one foot chop building as they headed. The sky was sunny for most of the day out there and only clouded up on the ride back. The air temperature was in the 70s. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles. The tide (current) was strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

    The fishing was good, yet again. The current was a factor as were the dogfish. Plus, my feeling is that the bite was off with the stronger than normal current. So, not only was it hard to deal with the current (tangles & holding bottom), it was preventing the catch. The catching was good and landings were fair to good. Legal landings included fifty-five haddock, eleven pollock, one redfish and five cusk. Released fish included sixty dogfish, six sub-legal haddock and a few small pollock. There was not a single cod seen today, of size or otherwise. they drift fished and anchored. Everyone used bait today.

    Ryan Hunter (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 5.5 pound pollock, caught by Jamie Miller (IL). Kip Miller (OH) caught the third largest fish, a 5 pound pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Lucas Dukette (NY) landed the hard luck award for being the most tangled.

    Today's afternoon half day trip was canceled due to the increasing south southwest wind and the associated seas. It turned out to be a good call.

    I received two generous donations sponsoring me in the upcoming (weekend after this coming) Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event to fund cancer research with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. One was a $100.00 donation from Peter & Patti Vangsness (MA). They support me every year in this event. The other was a $500.00 matching gift from Susan Tapparo (MA) through State Street Corporation. Thank you all so very much for being so involved in the support I really need to do something significant for cancer research. I appreciate it very much. But I truly feel that this goes a long way to solving the cancer riddle.

    H3>Friday, July 30, 2021 Captain Ian Keniston and Kyle Nelson are running the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT/AST the air temperature was 63F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the west at eight knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. More later.










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