www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

Saturday, September 26, 2020, 6:15 AM EDT




Graphic

Book a Trip on Line

Brother & Sister Team

The two anglers pictured above are probably the most talented young anglers I have had on the Bunny Clark this season so far. I was impressed. The two shots were taken during the Tuesday, September 1, 2020 marathon trip. The individual on the left is fifteen year old Noah Huebner (VT) holding his 5 pound haddock that he caught that day. Noah caught fish after fish all day long, never stopping to relax at any time. He caught the Bunny Clark's biggest double of the year on this day. This catch included a 12.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. His biggest pollock weighed 13 pounds and he caught another haddock that weighed 4.5 pounds. The individual on the right is thirteen year old Karis Huebner (VT) holding the double she caught on this day. Her double included a 6.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. She also caught two other pollock of 10 pounds each, several smaller pollock, haddock and redfish. She too never took a break all day. Sean Devich, my number one on this trip, set both kids up with jig sticks at the very beginning. If you were there that day you would have sworn that they had fished with this equipment many times before! It was a great trip. But it was a very special trip for me to see these young talented anglers in action.






Thursday, September 10, 2020

Sean Devich, Phil Walton and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky appeared overcast with the fog, there was no wind to write about in Perkins Cove and the visibility over the ocean was poor in thick fog.

Heading out of Perkins Cove, I had to navigate solely by electronics in the fog. I could see going under the footbridge but I saw only fog after that. The shore line down the channel was completely obscured. We had a very light southerly wind heading to the fishing grounds. The ocean was calm with little wave action. We had poor visibility as the fog kept us company all the way to our destination. The air temperature was in the high sixties, t-shirt weather.

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light out of the south to start. The ocean was calm. I couldn't tell if it was overcast or clear as we were enveloped in fog.The fog stayed with us all day. The visibility ranged from a couple hundred yards to about two miles. The visibility opened up to three or four miles on the ride home. The wind never blew more than five knots. There was a light chop. By mid afternoon, the wind had backed out of the southwest. After noon, it backed out of the south southwest. The ocean was fairly calm all day. The air temperature reached a high of 72F in the shade. The sky was overcast when we could see the sky. It rained lightly after noon. The rain was light and intermittent after 2:00 PM. The tide was moderate but into the wind all morning, almost neutral in the afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66.5F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 83F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 60F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 66F).

The fishing (conditions) were very good. The only thing that prevented the fishing from being excellent was the tide, into the wind. That made it difficult to drift as it seemed like you were moving much faster than you actually were. Tangles insued. The tangles weren't quite so bad after noon or on anchor. The catching and landings were very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock followed closely by haddock and, then, redfish. We had quite a few of each. We only saw six sub-legal haddock all day, making the haddock cull the best we have seen on any trip this season. Legal landings also included two cod, eight cusk, fifteen white hake and two whiting. Released fish included the six small haddock, six sub-legal redfish, twenty dogfish, three blue sharks and a mud hake. We only saw two cod all day today. Both cod were about 5 pounds. We never saw another cod, legal or sub-legal all day. This is the first marathon in the Bunny Clark's existence where we have seen so few cod. It's been a poor cod year but not as poor as it was today. We alternated between drifting and anchoring. All terminal gear worked well.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook.The team of Rick Gelaznik (MA), Jonathan "Griff" Griffin (MA) and Ray Westermann (MA) caught the most fish or a "mountain of fillets", as Sean called it. Some of Ray's fish included a 15.5 pound white hake and a 9.5 pound pollock. Rick had the largest pollock of the trip at 12 pounds. Of the pollock doubles, Rick also had the best. His biggest double included a 9.5 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Griff's two best fish included a 15 pound white hake and a 19.5 pound white hake.

Bruce Tripp (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 38 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the Bunny Clark's sixth largest hake of the season so far. It's the largest fish that Bruce has ever caught. I took a picture of Bruce holding his trophy. This digital image appears on the left. Rick Wixon (NH) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 32 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the largest hake that Rick has ever caught. And Rick has spent many years fishing for groundfish in Maine waters. It is also the Bunny Clark's eleventh largest hake caught this season so far. I took a picture of Rick with his prize. This digital image appears on the right. David Washburn (NH), a good friend of Rick's, caught the third largest fish, a 23.5 pound white hake. This is David's largest white hake. David also caught a 20 pound white hake.

Other Angler Highlights: Serghei Rojco (NH) caught the largest groundfish of his life and the largest haddock he has ever caught. His big groundfish was a 20 pound white hake. His big haddock weighed 5.5 pounds. Bob Cross (NY) caught the fourth largest fish today, a 22 pound white hake. His largest pollock weighed 11 pounds. Wobbie Barnes (MA) caught the Bunny Clark's second largest double of the season today, both hake. One weighed 20 pounds and the other weighed 11.5 pounds. He caught the bigger fish on the treble hook of his jig and the other hake on the tube hook attached to the top eye of the jig. Wobbie's biggest pollock weighed 11 pounds. Stefan James (NH) caught the Bunny Clark's third largest haddock of the fishing season to date on this trip. Actually, this haddock is in a tie for third place right now. His haddock weighed 6.75 pounds, the largest haddock I have seen since the early spring. Stefan's largest fish was a 17 pound white hake.

Jeff LaPlante (NH) caught an 11 pound white hake, his best fish. Jim Cross (NH) caught a 15.5 pound white hake, his biggest fish. Jim also caught a pollock double that included two pollock of 10 pounds each. He also caught the third largest haddock of the trip at 5 pounds. Wes Cross caught a 9 pound pollock and a 4 pound haddock. Jimmy Cross (NY) landed a 10 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Ed "Wolf" Blake (MA) landed the hard luck award for being frequently tangled. Wolf also caught a pollock double, slightly smaller than Jim's double.

I received a few donations sponsoring me on my ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today, an event to raise money for cancer research with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Those donors and their donations included Serghei Rojco for a generous $150.00, Bruce Tripp for a generous $90.00, Jeff LaPlante for $40.00 and Stefan James for $10.00. Thank you so very much for your support and generosity. I appreciate your help!!!

Friday, September 11, 2020

Captain Ian Keniston, Phil Walton and Andy Kidd ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the north at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen to twenty knots. The wind speed and direction remained the same for most of the morning. By 10:00 AM, the wind was backing off. By 2:00 PM, it was blowing no more than ten knots out of the northeast. There was no wind along the shore by 5:00 PM. The sky was overcast for most of the morning, clear after 2:00 PM. The visibility was excellent. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 66F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 74F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 47F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 55F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen to twenty knots with seas in chops of about three feet, more or less. The wind started to drop at about mid morning. They had no more than ten knots of wind by 2:00 PM with seas in chops of one to two feet. The high air temperature on the fishing grounds was 63F. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was overcast in the morning and clear after noon. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing was tough to start because of the sea conditions. It was hard to fish because of the seas and because the conditions made some anglers sea sick. Some never recovered. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included ten cod, eight haddock and ten cusk. Released fish included ten small cod, two cod of 5 pounds or more, six sub-legal haddock, twelve dogfish, two blue sharks and a few small pollock. They anchored mostly. Some drifting was employed. All terminal gear worked well but cod flies caught the most fish.

Same as yesterday, either Ray Westerman (MA) or Jonathan "Griff" Griffin (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish. Antonio Grasso (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 22 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's largest pollock of the fishing season so far. Captain Ian took a picture of Antonio holding his good sized pollock with his new iPhone. This digital image appears on the left. Antonio also caught a pollock that weighed 13 pounds. The second largest fish was a 16 pound pollock caught by Griff, who also caught a 9.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. Mike Nolasco (CA) caught the third largest fish, a 14.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Rick Gelaznik (FL) caught a 9.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Rory MacEachern (ME) did one better with a 10 pound pollock. Dan Contois (MA) caught the largest cod at 13 pounds. Alex McElaney (MA) caught a 13 pound pollock, his largest fish. Paul Grasso (MA) caught a 10.5 pound pollock. Troy Boyd (ME) landed an 11 pound pollock. Derrick LaFlamme (ME) boated an 11 pound pollock and another pollock that weighed 12.5 pounds. Ray Westermann (MA) landed two pollock of 10 pounds each. Nine year old Chase Jones (MA) caught his first salt water fish today, a pollock of about 7 pounds. Ray Westermann took a picture of Chase holding this pollock. The digital image appears on the right. Chase is the grandson of the late Chris Porter (MA), one of our best fishermen on the Bunny Clark and one of the nicest guys I have ever met. Chalyse Jones (MA) landed the hard luck award for attaining high hurler status.

Saturday, September 12, 2020

Captain Ian Keniston, Phil Walton and Andy Kidd ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 49F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, it was cool to begin with temperature readings as low as 46F in the surrounding area. The air temperature got to 55F by 8:15 AM. The day slowly increased in air temperature as the day progressed, starting to drop again after 5:00 PM. By 10:00 AM, the northeast wind had dropped to about five knots. The sea along the shore looked ruffled with very little wave action along the beaches. By 2:00 PM, the wind had hauled out of the southeast and was blowing about five knots. The visibility was excellent all day and the sky was cloudless nearly all day. The highest air temperature that I saw was 65F at 1:00 PM. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 67F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 40F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 47F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten to five knots. Seas were chops of a foot at most over a long swell that looked to measure two feet in height. And that was about what I saw for wave action along the beaches. The air temperature reached a high of 65F. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing was very good. There were no complaints about the weather, there were no blue shark attacks, the dogfish were few and the fishing platform called the Bunny Clark was much more stable than it was yesterday. The fishing was very good. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was excellent with only eight percent of all the haddock caught being of sub-legal size. This is just the opposite of what the haddock fish was like at this time last year. Legal landings also included five cod, nine pollock, a redfish, twelve cusk and five white hake. Released fish included eight dogfish, three short cod, the short haddock and a couple pollock. Drifting was the method. Almost everyone used bait today. Only one jig was used. Cod flies worked well today.

There was no way to tell who was high hook. Toby Middleboro (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. There were three anglers who qualified for catching the second largest fish, all at 7 pounds. Lee Kenison (NH) caught a 7 pound cod, Brian Roma (CT) caught a 7 pound pollock and Cliff Audette (ME) caught a 7 pound white hake.

Other Angler Highlights: Emma Roma (CT) caught a 6 pound pollock, her biggest fish. Frank Middlebrook (NY) caught nary a single fish of any kind. For this feat of magic, he landed the hard luck award t-shirt! Captain Ian was duly impressed.

Sunday, September 13, 2020

Captain Ian Keniston, Phil Walton and Andy Kidd ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the sky was mostly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the south southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind was light out of the south all morning. After noon, the wind started to freshen. By 3:00 PM, the wind was blowing out of the south at fifteen knots or more. Wind speeds increased to twenty knots after dark. The sky was mostly sunny all day with some cloudy periods in the morning. The visibility was excellent to begin but dropped to very good by mid afternoon. The air temperature was around 63F for most of the morning after 9:00 AM but jumped up a bit, later. The highest air temperature that I saw in Ogunquit was 70F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 42F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 45F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five to ten knots, increasing in strength on the ride back to Perkins Cove. The seas were swells of two to three feet under a one foot chop. The air temperature reached a high of 66F (the highest air temperature that I viewed ashore today). The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was sunny with few clouds. The tide (current) was strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

The fishing was good. The tide made it hard to fish, the dogfish were a bother and the bite was off anyway. Plenty of fish to catch on the sounding machine, a lack of fish taking the hook. The catching and landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock by a margin. Legal landings also included twenty-three haddock, eight cod, thirteen cusk, two monkfish and one cunner. Released fish included over sixty dogfish, four short cod, one sub-legal haddock and a couple of short pollock. Drifting was the method. Jigs & flies worked best today.

Ian couldn't tell who was high hook today as there was a group of three who crushed the fish and pooled their fish together. Katie Foley (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.5 pound monkfish. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest monkfish of the season to date. Captain Ian took a picture of Katie and monk with his iPhone. This digital image appears on the right. The second largest fish was a 12 pound pollock caught by Dale Dilks (NJ). Dale also caught a 10.5 pound pollock. Jim Walker (NJ) caught the third largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock. Jim also caught a 10 pound monkfish, the Bunny Clark's third largest monkfish of the season so far. And he caught a pollock that weighed 10 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Anthony Feldeausch (ME) caught an 11 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Rich Morrell (ME) also caught an 11 pound pollock as his best. Kendall Cobb (VT) landed an 8 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Robert Cobb (VT) caught an 8 pound pollock. Margaret Achcet (NH) landed the hardest luck award for being the hardest hit by the motion of the ocean. There were a couple anglers who felt much like she did.

I received a $50.00 donation helping my quest for a cancer free world with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The donors were Thomas & Noreen Zido (NY). Thank you so very much for your help, thoughtfulness and generosity. I appreciate it anyway but, in times like these, it makes it that much more special.

Monday, September 14, 2020

Captain Ian Keniston and Andy Kidd ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was partially clear with a thin overcast, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good, at least. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northwest at fifteen with gusts to twenty knots at times. We had less wind in the afternoon and little or no wind after 5:00 PM. The sky was mostly sunny with some clouds. The visibility was excellent. The highest air temperature that I saw was 75F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 77F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 60F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 62F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest to ten knots, hauled out of the north and blew five knots and then died out. They found the wind blowing out of the northwest when they got to within five miles of shore, headed back in. Seas were chops of a foot or less over a three foot very long open water sea swell. The air temperature reached a high of 71F in the shade. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was mostly clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing was good. It could have been better but the tide was a bit too strong, the tangles were many because of it and the blue sharks were a bother. The catching was very good and landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was ninety-five percent legal, a huge bonus for anglers today. Legal landings also included twenty-seven pollock, four redfish, fourteen cusk, two white hake, eighteen cod and four butter mullet. Released fish included not a single dogfish, two blue sharks, six small cod, two small pollock, the short haddock and a sculpin. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

The now famous Leo Lamoureux (VT) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was an 11 pound white hake. Brian Hagedorn (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish a 17 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's fifth largest pollock of the fishing season to date. Paul Gaudreau (RI) caught the second and third largest fish of the trip. These fish included a 15 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. Paul also landed two more things, an 11 pound pollock and the hard luck award t-shirt for being the highest of hurlers today. But he still kept fishing!

Other Angler Highlights: Kris Brown (VT) caught a 12 pound pollock, his largest fish. Peter Griffin (NY) caught a 9.5 pound pollock, his best. Fritz Heckel (NH) landed a 12 pound pollock.

Tim Tuesday, September 15, 2020

Sean Devich and I ran the marathon trip today with Timothy "Jack" McLaren auditioning for a deck hand's position.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the north at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

As soon as we left the gate at Perkins Cove behind we had northwest wind that turned into the northerly wind about five miles later. Wind speeds increased to fifteen knots with higher gusts. Seas were two to three feet in chops over a three foot long ocean swell. This wind died out about five miles before the fishing grounds. The wind started blowing out of the northeast as soon as we reached our destination. It was a cool ride out with an air temperature of 54F all the way to the grounds. The sky remained a thin overcast where, at times, we could see a sliver of a moon shining through. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, the wind increased out of the northeast to fifteen knots with higher gusts. Seas were four to six feet, this primarily because of a strong tidal current running right into the wind. These were chops and were steep. So we had a few seas splash over the rail. As the day progressed, the wind diminished and a long sea swell increased in height. By the time we were ready to head home the wind had died completely, had hauled out of the south and the ocean swell had increased to six feet. The wind had quit right around 1:00 PM and remained that way for a couple hours. The air temperature reached a high of 63F in the shade. The sky was overcast all morning, clear for some of the afternoon and thinly overcast for the later part of the afternoon and the ride home. The visibility was excellent with a range of over thirty miles. The tide was strong all day The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 61F with a low of 49F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 35F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 40F).

The fishing (conditions) were not good. The sea conditions rendered some of the anglers incapable of fishing, the current was counter to the wind with a mind of it's own, it was much stronger than I would have liked and the combination of a swell out of the southeast with a northeast chop made it hard to tend bottom. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock. But the cull wasn't nearly as good as we have seen it. Forty percent of all the haddock caught were too small to keep. Legal landings also included twenty-one cod (our limit), forty-nine pollock, ten cusk, one white hake and one butter mullet. Released fish included twelve dogfish, the short haddock, seven blue sharks (they were a pain for a while), nine short cod, thirty-three cod of 5 pounds or better, eleven small pollock and a short redfish. We drift fished and anchored. Drifting caught the most fish. Very little bait was used so jigs and flies caught the most fish.

The high hook (most legal fish caught) was either Andrew Gaudio (MD) or Jason Ridolfi (NY). I didn't count fish and, even if we did, there were a lot of legal cod involved that were released. Suffice it to say, it was between just those two anglers. Andrew caught an 11 pound cod and would have tied for the boat pool for the second largest fish with a 12 pound pollock had he entered the boat pool - which he didn't. Andrew caught the bigger pollock as part of a double keeper catch that also included a 9 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. This is a tie for the Bunny Clark's fourth largest double of the fishing season so far. I took a picture of Andrew holding is double up for my iPhone. This digital image appears on the left. Jason Ridolfi caught an 8 pound cod, a 10.5 pound, a 10 pound cod and a 9 pound pollock, his four largest fish.

Terry Middleton (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.25 pound pollock. Shawn Lafferty (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with a 12 pound cod, the same weight as Andrew's pollock. Shawn also caught a 9 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Zack Middleton (NY) caught an 8 pound pollock, a 10 pound pollock, an 8 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, his four largest fish. Leroy Fortcher (NJ) caught a 10 pound cod, his biggest fish. Todd Mallory (NY) caught a 9 pound cod, his best fish. Andy Bolya (NY) landed the hard luck award for being the most vociferous hurler. If one didn't know, you would have thought someone was cutting his arm off with a rusty dull saw, to hear the sound emanating from the forecastle.

I received two donations sponsoring me on my ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those two donors and donations included Andrew Gaudio for $25.00 and Todd Mallory for a generous $50.00. Thank you both so very much for thinking of me and my fund raiser. I do so appreciate the support!

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

Captain Ian Keniston, Sean Devich and Andy Kidd ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 48F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the air temperature warmed up faster than expected. It was already 60F by 9:00 AM, the wind off the water helping to warm things up a bit. The highest air temperature that I saw was 75F. The salient weather feature of the day though was the wind. The wind blew out of the west or west southwest at twenty to thirty knots at times. The scenic boat tour business (Finestkind Scenic Tours) that uses our dock has a ticket booth at the head of the ramp with an umbrella. The wind grabbed that umbrella and ticket booth and flipped it over on to a pedestrian's leg, enough so that the ambulance had to be call. The man had a gash on his leg. I'm not sure if it needed stiches but it certainly needed attention. The sky was clear in a hazy sort of way. There was never a clear blue sky. The visibility was limited to good in haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 36F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 47F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at fifteen to thirty knots. Seas were chops of four to six feet that never really stopped, like it did yesterday. There was no calm water today. The tide ran a river and it was tough to hold bottom, even on anchor. The air temperature reached a high of 64F. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze. The sky was smurry sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

The fishing was just fair. The sea conditions, the strong current, the dogfish and the wave action all contributed to a tough day of fishing. The catching was good. Landings were fair to good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far, as good as we did on the marathon trip yesterday. But the haddock cull was way better with ninety-two percent of all the fish caught being of legal size. Legal landings also included four cod, twenty-eight pollock, one redfish, four cusk and two butter mullet. Released fish included over a hundred dogfish, three short cod and two blue sharks. They anchored mostly but tried drifting; it was tough either way. All terminal gear worked about the same.

Dick Grimm (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was an 11.5 pound pollock which he caught as a double with another pollock that weighed 8 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. He started off the day with an 11 pound pollock. Jason Kenyon (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 15 pound pollock caught by Max Grimm (ME). Shawn Lafferty (NY) caught the third largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. He also caught a pollock that weighed 10 pounds. Matt Kennedy (PA) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single legal fish! Ouch! That has got to hurt!

I received a couple donations today sponsoring me in my cancer reserach project with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Jason Ridolfi (NY) was one with a gift of $25.00. Cynthia Duncan (CT) was another with a $35.00 donation in memory of Eileen Morello (NY), who passed just a little while ago. A wonderful individual, Eileen never let on that she was have problems - at least to me. She had been a long standing customer of Barnacle Billy's. And I so looked forward to seeing her every year. Thank you both so very much for your kindness and just being the wonderful people you are. I so appreciate the support!

Thursday, September 17, 2020

Sean Devich, Phillip Walton and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was hazy clear, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at eighteen knots with higher gusts and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good as near as I could tell. Southwest wind normally makes the air a bit "smokey". And I'm sure the wild fires out west weren't helping anything.

We had smokey clear skies, and very good visibility as we headed down the channel to the gate and out into the open ocean. Surprisingly, the seas weren't as bad as I thought they would be, after blowing hard all night. We had ten knots of southwest wind to start and up to fifteen half way to the fishing grounds. The air temperature was a mild 62F and the seas were two to three feet in chops.

On the grounds, the wind increased to fifteen and eighteen knots, not quite getting to the twenty knots I expected. Seas were mostly two feet in chops with the occasion three or more footer. With that strong a wind you would have thought the seas would have been bigger but the tide and the wind were both coming out of the southwest so the seas were down and the drift was perfect. The air temperature today reached a high of 66F in the shade but it was humid and felt warmer than that.. The sky was overcast or hazy clear all day. It was never overcast enough to look like rain was eminent. The tide (current) was strong in the morning tapering down to light in the afternoon. In fact, the wind started dropping a noon. By 3:00 PM, we had no wind and just a little tide. The visibility ranged to twenty miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 50F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 58F).

The fishing (conditions) were so much better than expected. The only fly in the ointment was the preponderance of blue sharks. We had to move a couple of times because of them. We also had to move because of the dogfish on one spot only. And the sea conditions made a couple of anglers sea sick. So I would rate fishing as good. The catching and landings were excellent, the best trip of the year for shear poundage. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-six haddock, ten cod, five redfish, six cusk, a whiting, a squirrel hake and two white hake. Released fish included five legal cod, three sub-legal cod, three sub-legal haddock, eight sub-legal pollock, thirty-two dogfish, ten (or more) blue sharks and five redfish. We drift fished for almost every stop. We anchored once and caught too many dogfish to remain in that mode. Cod flies caught the most fish.

Joe Columbus (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish, the most fish out of any of the other ten deep sea fishing trips he has taken this season. Some of his better fish included two pollock of 12 pounds each, a 12.5 pound cod and a 14 pound pollock. John Kilmer (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19 pound pollock. This is a tie for the third largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. I took a picture of John with his nice sized pollock.This digital image appears on the left. He also caught the largest double of the day. This catch included a 13.5 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! This is the Bunny Clark's third largest double of the fishing season so far. Some of John's other good fish included a 10 pound pollock, a 13.5 pound pollock, a 12.75 pound cod and another pollock of 14.5 pounds.

The second largest fish was an 18 pound cod caught by Nate Beachy (ME). He did not enter the boat pool. Some of his other good fish included an 11 pound pollock, a 14 pound cod, a 14 pound pollock, a 10 pound cod and a pollock that weighed 14.5 pounds. Mark Randis (PA) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the third largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. The only other fish that I weighed for Mark was a 10.5 pound pollock but he caught several others larger than that.

Other Angler Highlights: Kevin Zimmerman (ME) caught an 11.5 pound pollock, one of his larger fish. Some of Nathan Zimmerman's (ME) fish included a 10 pound pollock, a 10.5 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Neil Hickey (VT) caught three pollock of 12 pounds each. One of these 12 pounders was caught with another pollock of 11.75 pounds, the fourth largest double of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Anthony Kilmer (TN) caught two pollock of 13 pounds each and another pollock that weighed 11.5 pounds. Maryanne Kilmer (ME) caught an 11 pound pollock. Jess Grover (NH) boated the Bunny Clark's fifth largest double of the season. Her catch included a 13 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. David Kilmer (MD) landed a 13 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. Henry "Junior" King (NH) landed the hard luck award for losing what might have been the biggest fish of the day (we didn't see it) and for losing four jigs. Turns out he was using 25 pound test line! Ouch!

I received two donations sponsoring me on my ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge, an event that only took place virtually but that I have been heavily involved with, fund raising wise, for fourteen years. Besides, it isn't the event, the event is just a gift to those cyclists who spend much time fund raising. It's solving the cancer riddle that is most important to me. Those donors and their donations included Mark & Gail Randis for a generous $100.00 Joe Columbus for yet another of his many $40.00 donations this years. Thank you all so very much for this support over the years. It really means a lot to me and I appreciate it so much.

Friday, September 18, 2020

Captain Ian Keniston, Phil Walton and Andy Kidd ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the north or north northeast at ten to fifteen knots, dying out after noon. It was cool all day with the air temperature only topping out at 65F in Perkins Cove. The sky was partially overcast or thinly overcast with an available sun most of the day. There were more clouds in the morning than in the afternoon. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 66F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 69F (with a low of 45F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen to twenty knots. Seas were chops of three to six feet. It's hard to denote a ground swell with a chop that large. The highest air temperature that Ian saw was 56F under the shade top. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide was moderate. The sky was overcast for the whole time fishing. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61F.

The fishing was good at best. The surface water conditions were too much for some, it was hard to hold a line still enough for effective bait fishing or jigging. The catching was very good. Landings were good or a little better than that. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-seven haddock, eighteen cod and five cusk. Released fish included one blue shark, thirty dogfish, six small cod, three sub-legal haddock, a few small pollock and a sculpin. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked equally well but cod flies caught the most pollock.

Ian couldn't find an individual who was high hook with the most legal fish today. Of the anglers who were not sick, the catch was pretty even. Peter Griffin (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9.5 pound pollock. Wayne Geider (NJ) and Randy Clark (VT) tied for second place, both with pollock of 9 pounds each.

Other Angler Highlights: Joe Trestick (NJ) landed an 8 pound pollock. Pete Musse (NJ) landed the hard luck award for being the most sea sick!

Saturday, September 19, 2020

Captain Ian Keniston, Phil Walton and Andy Kidd ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 45F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the north at eighteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ahore, the wind blew out of the north up to twenty knots. By mid morning the wind was already starting to die out. By noon, we had about ten knots. There was no wind by 2:30 PM. The sky was cloudless all day. The visibility was excellent. The highest air temperature that I saw was 63F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 60F with a low of 46F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 28F). The low of 28F is the new record low for this date in Concord, New Hampshire. The old record low was 30F, set in 1956, tied in 1959 and 1990. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 44F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the Northeast at ten to fifteen knots, hauling out of the north and dropping to ten knots. Seas were two to four feet in chops and two to three feet in chops. There was no wind on the way home. There was a left over two foot slop chop with the departure of the wind. The high air temperature was 54F under the shade top. the visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was sunny and very clear. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

The fishing was good. The weather conditions made some sea sick again today. So this culled out the small herd that we had aboard today. But that was the major factor in the conditions. Other than that, the current wasn't bad, there were few blue sharks and the dogfish were kept at bay . Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was about twelve percent, favoring the legal sized fish. Legal landings also included sixteen cod, eighteen pollock and six cusk. Released fish included one blue shark, the short haddock, five legal cod, a few small pollock and two short cod. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked equally well.

Ray Clark (VT) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a 10 pound pollock, the second largest fish of the trip. Steve LaPlante (CT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound cod. Steve had caught a 9 pound pollock earlier which tied for the third largest fish of the trip with two other anglers, all with 9 pound pollock. The other two anglers were Zach Lajeunesse (MA) and Aaron Graham (NH). Megan Finnell (NH) landed the hard luck award for becoming the high hurler of the trip. There were others who were sea sick.

Steve LaPlante (CT) donated $50.00 to help with my fund raising efforts to fight cancer with the Pan-Mass Challenge, all the money I raise going to cancer research. Steve has been a donor since I started the event/fund raising in 2007. Thank you so much Steve for your continued help and generosity. It means a lot to me but it means more to those who are suffering, not knowing whether they will make it out alive.

Sunday, September 20, 2020

Captain Ian Keniston, Phil Walton and Andy Kidd ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 45F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the north at eighteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northeast most of the day, except for the early morning. Wind speeds were about ten knots. The sky was nearly cloudless all day. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature in Perkins Cove at 2:00 PM was 57F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 60F with a low of 44F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 64F (with a low of 27F). The low of 27F is the new record low for this date in Concord, New Hampshire. The old record low was 28F, set in 1979 and tied in 1993. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 36F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen knots and dropped to ten knots before the ride back to Perkins Cove. Seas were chops of two to four feet, dropping to two to three feet in the afternoon. The air temperature reached a high of 56F in the shade. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

The fishing (conditions) were like they have been the last few days. The sea conditions made the fishing good, at best; no more than that. They did have a few dogfish, more than yesterday. The catching was good to very good. Landings were good or, maybe, better than that. Most legal fish landed were haddock. The haddock cull was about fifteen percent, favoring the legal sized fish. Legal landings also included forty-five pollock, eighteen cod, fourteen cusk, two monkfish and a cunner. Released fish included nine short cod, forty dogfish, one blue shark and a couple of small pollock. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked equally well.

Troy Boyd (ME) and Hal Flanagan (AZ) tied for high hook with the most legal fish. Hal also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. Marc Lambert (NY) landed the second largest fish, a 10 pound pollock and tied for the second largest fish with a 9.5 pound wolffish. Bill Terrio (NY) tied Marc for third with a 9.5 pound pollock. Dave Powell (ME) landed the hard luck award for being the most sea sick. There were a couple!

Monday, September 21, 2020

Captain Ian Keniston and Andy Kidd ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 41F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the north at thirteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten to fifteen knots, strongest in the morning, dying out in the afternoon. By 2:00 PM, the wind was light out of the east. There was no wind at sunset. The visibility was excellent. The sky was cloudless for most of the day. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 63F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 61F with a low of 45F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 64F (with a low of 27F). The low of 27F is the new record low for this date in Concord, New Hampshire. The old record low was 28F, set in 1962. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 34F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen to ten knots or less. Seas were swells of four feet under a wind chop of two feet or more to start ending with a chop of about a foot before they left the grounds to head back in. The air temperature reached a high of 58F in the shade. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was sunny and clear all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

The fishing was very good with few dogfish, a moderate current and surface water conditions that were much better than they have been during the last few fishing trips. The catching and landings were just good today, no better than that. The landings were considered good because the fish were bigger on average than they have been. Had the size been down, the fishing would have been considered fair today. The bite was off, probably because of the same wind direction for day after day. Legal landings included twenty-five haddock, one cod, thirty-three pollock, a cusk and five white hake. Released fish included thirty-nine dogfish, three blue sharks, four short cod and two short haddock. They drift fished and anchored, in an attempt to improve the bite. All terminal gear worked equally well but the cod flies had the edge on the pollock.

Adam Tagriault (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. Some of his more significant fish included a two pollock of 10 pounds each, a 9 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. His biggest pollock tied for the third largest fish of the trip. Jim Miller (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 22.5 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's largest pollock of the fishing season to date. Captain Ian took a picture of Jim holding his fish with his iPhone. This digital image appears on the right. the second largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Nermeen Tahoun (MA). This was caught as a double with another pollock weighing 5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Nermeen also tied with Adam for the third largest fish of the trip, with another pollock of 11.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Gary Beesmer (NY) started off the boat pool with the first fish to weigh, a 9.5 pound pollock. Peter Griffin (NY) caught an 11 pound pollock. Brian Hagerdorn (NY) caught an 11.25 pound pollock. Morgan Tagriault (NH) landed an 11 pound pollock. Tina Blow (ME) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single fish and for getting a bit "green around the gills".

Jim Miller helped me in a $25.00 donation towards my cancer research funding with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thanks so much, Jim. I appreciate your thoughtfulness and generosity! All the best!

Not so Tim Tuesday, September 22, 2020

Sean Devich and I were supposed to be running the marathon trip today. I canceled this trip yesterday due to a tropical storm warning prediction from the National Weather Service in the area we were going to be fishing. The Bunny Clark remains in Perkins Cove with the wooden anchors out.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky was clear the with the constellation, Orion, showing prominently high over the southeastern sky, the wind was blowing out of the north at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Seas at the closest weather buoy were showing a height of six feet every eleven seconds.

The weather ashore was as expected. The wind blew out of the north all day at twenty to twenty-five knots. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. At times it was overcast. At times there were clear blue breaks in the clouds. But it never looked like it was going to rain. The seas built during the day but were the largest close to midnight at fifteen feet every fifteen seconds - this according to the weather buoy reports. And there was a heck of a surge in Perkins Cove. The air temperature was cold in the morning, dropping to almost 40F, even colder inland. The high air temperature, that I saw, was 65F. The visibility was excellent all day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 66F with a low of 45F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 27F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 39F).

As the day progressed, the sea height increased. During the evening, the surge in the Cove increased to a point were we had to keep tightening storm lines. The water level in the Cove came to within a foot of the dining room floor in Barnacle Billy's restaurant. And water flooded the lower part of the dock at Barnacle Billy's. The surge was even wilder at a time inside of midnight. It was a wonderful thing that Hurricane Teddy stayed so far off shore. It could have really caused some damage and a lot of time and money in repairs.

Wednesday, September 23, 2020

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich were supposed to be running the extreme day trip today.This trip was canceled previously. And it's a good thing. With all the storm lines from boat to boat, we couldn't leave Perkins Cove if we wanted to.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at fifteen knots (on average) and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

The wind blew out of the northwest up to twenty knots this early morning and then backed off. By 6:00 AM, the wind was started to back out of the west. The wind blew out of the west for the rest of the day. Wind speeds were ten to fifteen knots at the most. There was less wind later. The sky was cloudless all morning and nearly so after noon. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature, higher than it has been the last four day, reached a high of at least 79F. Out of the wind, it was actually hot! In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 80F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 50F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 55F).

I spent the day working in Barnacle Billy's restaurant. I took a break to take down some storm lines and get the Bunny Clark ready for tomorrow's marathon trip. But it was really a day of work ashore for me.

I received a very generous $500.00 donation from Betsy McLaughlin (NY) sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. By donating, she is funding a project with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts, specifically Dr. Kate Janeway who specializes in genetic profiling. She finds the gene that creates the cancer and shuts is off with drug therapy, bypassing chemo and radiation. She is someone who I have supported for the last couple of years because of the positive results and the lives she has saved in so doing. But, more than that, the system that she is creating can be applied to any gene. The gene that creates the problem has to be isolated first. And, I was told, that they just isolated the gene that creates melanoma, one of the worst cancers. I really feel that this is the road we need to travel if we are going to stop some of these cancers, as Dr. Janeway already has. Thank you so much, Betsy. It means so much to me, your support. And the support of so many years and donations. But it means a lot more to the science of solving these cancers.

Thursday, September 24, 2020

Sean Devich and I hosted the Bethlehem Rod & Gun Club & Dennis Reissig (all New York) marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at eight knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

Clear skies led us out through the gate, leaving Perkins Cove this morning. The wind was light out of the northwest to begin but stronger once we got out a few miles. The visibility was very good. The air temperature was a mild 62F and the seas were less than two feet in chops.

On the fishing grounds, the wind increased to ten knots or more out of the northwest. Seas were mostly two feet in chops. The wind hauled out of the west shortly after we got there, holding ten knots and two foot chops. This didn't last. After a couple of hours we had about five knots with a one foot chop. With that strong a wind you would have thought the seas would have been bigger but the tide and the wind were both coming out of the southwest so the seas were down and the drift was perfect. The wind died before noon and hauled out of the south southwest. The wind picked up to about ten knots or more and the seas built back to almost two feet. The air temperature today reached a high of 65F in the shade. The air temperature was perfect. The sky went from clear to hazy overcast to overcast. It never rained. The tide (current) was moderate all day. The visibility ranged to twenty miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 43F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 85F (with a low of 51F).

The fishing (conditions) were good, no better than that. For some reason, we were inundated with tangles today. I don't know if there was a strong undercurrent, the fish were swimming harder or the drift and current was off or all three. But I can tell you that I haven't tied so many leaders and jigs on lines in many years. We also had many blue shark attacks. Twenty lost jigs were attributed to blue sharks.The catching and landings (when anglers were untangled) were very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. This was planned as all the anglers (minus one) were putting on a fish fry when they got home. They needed a lot of fillets. They didn't care what species. They wanted the pounds. Legal landings also included nineteen haddock, eight cod, sixteen redfish, three cusk, three white hake, a butter mullet, a whiting and a monkfish. Released fish included two dogfish, twenty-three blue sharks, four sub-legal haddock, two sub-legal cod, one legal cod, two sub-legal redfish, one sunfish and one sub-legal pollock. We drift fished and anchored. Only jigs and cod flies were used. Flies caught the most fish.

Dennis Reissig (NY) was high hook with the most legal fish by far. He landed over twenty percent of all the legal fish boated today. Some of the fish that I weighed for him included a 10.5 pound pollock, three pollock of 12 pounds each, an 11.5 pound pollock and two pollock of 13 pounds each. His 13 pound pollock was the third largest fish of the trip and he caught the most haddock with a legal count of nine and three sub-legal haddock. It was a great day to be Dennis Reissig!

Christopher Schetter (NY) won the pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17 pound pollock. That was his biggest fish, by far. He caught several fish over 10 pounds that I did not weigh. His brother, Anthony Schetter (NY) caught the second largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. Anthony caught the largest haddock of the day, weighing 4.75 pounds. Some of his bigger fish included a 10.5 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Ed Merhige (NY) was on his first deep sea fishing trip today. He caught at least twelve legal fish, one of which weighed in at 10 pounds, a pollock. Dave DeGraw (NY) landed a 12 pound pollock, an 11.25 pound pollock and a 9 pound monkfish. The monkfish is the Bunny Clark's fourth largest of the fishing season so far. Mike Hall, Sr. (NY) landed an 11.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. John Spignardo (NY) started off the day with a 10.5 pound pollock. His largest fish was a 12 pound pollock. George Delahay (NY) caught two legal cod. The largest fish of his that I weighed was a 10 pound pollock. He might have caught some bigger pollock but none were as heavy as 12 pounds. Frank Spignardo (NY) landed a 12.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Bob Vogel (NY) also caught a 12.5 pound pollock as his biggest fish. Mike Schetter (NY) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for losing the most jigs to blue sharks, a count of seven! He also lost several fish to blue sharks and another jig to a sunfish!

Friday, September 25, 2020

Captain Ian Keniston, Phil Walton and Andy Kidd ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind to write about, the ocean outside of Oarweed Cove was flat calm and the visibility over it was excellent. The ocean stayed calm until sunrise when the wind struck lightly out of the northeast. Wind speeds by 8:00 AM were over twelve knots. But that was the strongest it ever got. During the rest of the day the wind was ten knots or less with just about no wind at sunset. the wind direction was easterly by noon. This was the direction it stayed out of for the rest of the day. From the restaurant, we had a light chop of a foot or less all afternoon. The sky was nearly cloudless all day, the visibility was excellent and the highest air temperature that I saw was 67F, the wind off the water influencing the air temperature on shore. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 72F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 47F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 55F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at ten knots to start and about five knots to end. Seas were a foot in chops over a long ocean swell of about two feet in height. The air temperature reached a high of 62F under the shade top. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was very clear and sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

The fishing was very good, the catching was very good and landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock culls was ninety percent, favoring the legal sized fish. Legal landings also included nineteen pollock, eighteen cod, one redfish, thirty cusk, a white hake, a monkfish and a whiting. Released fish included twenty-five cod of 5 pounds or more, eight dogfish, ten short cod, two sub-legal pollock and a sculpin. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked equally well.

Dennis Reissig (NY) and Dimitar Pavlov (ME) shared high hook status with the most legal fish. That would make Dimitar the fisherman of the day as he also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 13.5 pound cod caught by Erik Travis (NH). Joe Karnik (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 9 pound pollock. Jane Mokasim (VT) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch sea sick.

Saturday, September 26, 2020

Captain Ian Keniston, Phil Walton and Andy Kidd are hosting the John Ericksen full day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was overcast (or maybe it just looked that way with the fog overhead), there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog. More later.

On September 8, 2020 the cod season opened. This is a week early as compared to last year. Anglers will have a bag limit of one cod each during a month long period that ends on October 7th.

And we are back in the hunt for a deck hand. Sean Devich, who did an absolutely perfect job for me Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, ran into a problem he needed to take care of. He lives two and half hours away. So we were putting him up in one of our favorite motels here in Moody, Maine. So if anyone is interested, I am interested in finding a place for you behind the knife on the deck of the Bunny Clark. You will have to bring your own lunch but the patrons who sail with us are some of the nicest people in the world. You can take my word on this. Inquiring minds can call 207-646-2214. Thanks for reading.










Graphic

Book a Trip on Line


Download Our Newest Guestletter

Graphic Click the icon to view a complimentary copy of the 2020 Guestletter.

www.bunnyclark.com






Back To Home Page, Deep Sea Fishing Maine