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Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

Wednesday, May 22, 2024, 6:00 AM EDT




Graphic

Book a Trip on Line

Jeff's Special Fish

The digital images above were taken on the May 16, 2024 marathon trip. The shot on the right shows Jeff Corey (MA) holding his 18.5 pound halibut, the pool winning fish on that trip and the first halibut caught on the Bunny Clark this season. This is the second halibut that he has caught, the first on the Bunny Clark with Captain Ian Keniston. That previous fish weighed 28 pounds. Both halibut, unfortunately, were sub-legal and had to be released alive. The shot on the left is a digital image on Jeff holding his 7.25 pound Maine state trophy haddock. This is the largest haddock that Jeff has ever caught. This season could be our best haddock year ever if the year keeps progressing in the direction it is going. At the time of this writing (May 17, 2024) we have boated forty trophy haddock this season. The record for trophy haddock in a single season is fifty, completed during the 2010 Bunny Clark fishing season. Jeff is one of our best jig fishermen. On this day he fished exclusively with bait, a first for Jeff.




Proposed regulations for the 2024 fishing season starting May 1, 2024. Cod can only be kept in the fall under these regulation changes.

Gulf of Maine cod

  • Open season: September 1 - October 31
  • Minimum size: 23 inches
  • Possession limit: 1 fish per day

    Gulf of Maine haddock

  • Open season: May 1 February 28; April 130
  • Minimum size: 18 inches
  • Possession limit: 15 fish per day

    These regulations for groundfish apply equally to anglers on privately owned recreational boats and party/charter boats as well.

    Thursday, Dos de Mayo, 2024

    Danny DellaMonica and I ran the marathon trip today.

    At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the sky was overcast, the roads were dry, the wind was light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze.

    When I came down to the Cove to get the boat ready, I could see that the sky was wasn't completely overcast. By the time we were ready to head to the fishing grounds, I could see a much diminished moon peeking out around the clouds. It wasn't totally overcast on the ride to the grounds. In fact, it was clear to the east, southwest and south. The wind was out of the southwest for the first few miles. I realized that the wind had backed into the south by about the ten mile mark. We carried a light southerly wind all the way to the fishing grounds. The air temperature never climbed out of the 40s before arrival. The visibility was excellent.

    On the grounds, we had a bank of clouds or overcast conditions marching out toward us. But for the first couple of hours we partly sunny skies and light southerly wind. Seas were chops of less than a foot. The wind increased as the day progressed. By noon, we had ten knots of southerly wind that turned into fifteen knots before we were to head back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature might have reached 51F. But all I saw was 50F as a high. The visibility was over twenty miles. But we also had rain that started to fall around 10:00 AM. It rained a until at least noon, maybe longer. And, oddly, we did hear thunder but I never did see any lightning. Odd, that, for this time of year. With the thunder came a pouring rain that didn't last long and changed to a light rain. The visibility diminished during the rain. Seas rose to two and three feet in chops, three feet by the time we were ready to depart. The tide (current) was moderate and into the wind near the end of the fishing. The surface water temperature reached a high of 46F.

    Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Perkins Cove, Ogunquit, Maine the high air temperature was 60F during the day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 68F (with a low of 47F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 69F (with a low of 44F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 49F (with a low of 45F).

    The fishing, catching and landings were all excellent today. I haven't seen such a great day in many years for numbers of haddock, the size of the haddock and the fishing conditions. There was hardly a tangle with almost everyone fishing in the cockpit. Most legal fish landed were haddock that averaged about 5.5 pounds. I, again, raised the minimum size to nineteen or twenty inches fork length but we never measured a fish. If it looked small, it went back. There weren't many of those fish seen. Legal landings also included thirty-one pollock, eleven redfish and seventeen cusk. Released fish included sixty-one legal haddock (This is purely a guess based on the recent fishing - I was so busy on deck I did not have time to actually keep an accurate count, first this season so far. There was no problem reaching the bag limit for a full boat of anglers.), probably fifteen sub-legal haddock, fifteen sub-legal pollock, six small cod, one cod over twenty-five inches and a porbeagle that broke a bait rig off. We drift fished and anchored. Bait worked best.

    I have no idea who was high hook. It was spread out so evenly around the boat that it could have been anyone. When the rain struck it was an explosion of haddock biting. It was all I could do to get the fish bled, boxed and marked. Chris Willy (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound Maine state trophy haddock. This is the largest haddock of the fishing season to date. It's also the largest haddock we have seen on the Bunny Clark since April 14, 2010, when we boated a 13 pound haddock. On April 12th that year we caught a haddock that weighed 11.1 pounds. We haven't seen a bigger haddock than those three haddock since the 2002 season. It was the third fish in the boat this morning. To me, it looked like a caricature of a haddock, it looked so big. I did take a picture of this fish but I am going to save it for the index page. When I get time, I will post it there. Chris went on the catch some other significant haddock but none that I saw over 6 pounds.

    Bob Kent (ME) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 9 pound cod. This is the largest cod that has been caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. Bob's largest haddock weighed 6.6 pounds. Mark Girard (NH) won the boat pool for the third largest fish with the fifth largest fish, a 8 pound Maine state trophy haddock. He caught two haddock that weighed exactly 8 pounds! This also means that he has caught three haddock of 8 pounds off the Bunny Clark this season. Eight pounds comes in at a tie for the fourth largest haddock of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Mark also caught two other trophy sized haddock. One weighed 7.1 pounds. The other weighed just 7 pounds. I took a particularly good picture of Mark when the sun was out, holding his first 8 pound haddock. This digital image appears on the left. The third largest fish of the trip was an 8.75 pound Maine state trophy haddock caught by Stuart Douglas (NY). This is our second largest haddock of the fishing season to date. He did not get in the boat pool. I took a picture of Stu holding up his massive haddock. This digital image appears on the right. The fourth largest fish was an 8.25 pound Maine state trophy haddock caught by Josh Neptune (ME). This haddock is our third largest haddock of the 2024 Bunny Clark fishing season so far. I also took a picture of him holding his great fish. This digital image appears at the lower left. Josh, too, didn't enter the boat pool.

    Other Angler Highlights: We caught ten trophy haddock today, unprecedented in Bunny Clark history. I think everything combined today to produce an epic day. I felt very lucky to be a part of it. Richard Antanavich (ME), Ron's brother, caught two Maine state trophy haddock of the same size; both haddock weighed 7.75 pounds. Dave Pineo (MA) caught a 7.5 pound Maine state trophy haddock. All the trophies were twenty-seven to thirty inches caliper fork length.

    Jim Feeney (MA) did very well fishing up in the bow. So many did well that I could not pick Jim out as the high hook, like I normally do or he normally is. His largest fish was a 6.75 pound haddock. I also weighed a haddock that weighed 6.1 pounds and another that weighed 6.25 pounds. Chris Cram (ME) caught two haddock of 6 pounds each that I weighed for him. Brian McCormick (VT) also caught a 6 pound haddock. George Willy (VT) caught a 6 pound pollock, the biggest pollock I have seen this year but a couple behind two pollock off Ian's boat with one that weighed 9 pounds. We saw more pollock schools today than I have seen on any other trip this season so far. Bill Appling (NY) boated a 6 pound haddock. Dave Burton (MA) caught a 6 pound haddock that I did not weigh. It wasn't what I suspected was a trophy fish. I just couldn't weigh everything. Dave caught the most sub-legal haddock of any angler. But he also caught a lot of fish. Korey Laliberte (ME) landed a haddock that I thought for sure was a trophy, it was so long. It actually weighed 6.8 pounds - almost! Brian St. Saviour (ME) boated a 6 pound haddock. All the other anglers, I'm sure got 6 pound haddock that I didn't have time to weigh that were not big enough to be trophy fish.

    I gave Stuart Douglas (NY) the hard luck award t-shirt because he didn't get into the boat pool. There was really no hard luck today, our best trip of the year, by far.

    I received four donations sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. John Baron (MA), who was fishing with Jim Feeney in the bow all day, donated a generous $100.00. John has a personal relationship with the disease. Jim & Angela Feeney donated again for a generous $100.00. This is a also a personal thing with Jim. Brian St. Saviour donated another $30.00. And Mark Girard donated a generous $110.00. Thank you all, again, for so much support. To me this is amazing and so helpful to what I am trying to do. If I can raise another $14,000.00, I will have raised a half million dollars for cancer research. I'm so appreciative of all of your help!

    Friday, Tres de Mayo, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 48F, the sky was clear with a crescent moon hanging over the southern horizon, the wind was light out of the north and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. By 8:00 AM, the sky became mostly overcast with lighter clouds near the sun so we could barely see it shinning through.

    Ashore, the wind blew out of the north to northeast at five or six knots and then out of the south after a calm spell around noon. Southerly winds never blew over eight or nine knots. The sky was mostly clear and sunny all day. The wind off the ocean made it a bit raw. But the air temperature did make it to the 60F degree mark. It could have been higher but I didn't see it. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 53F (with a low of 47F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 65F (with a low of 39F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 41F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten to five knots. Seas were two feet in swells under a one to two foot chop. The air temperature reached a high of 54F. The visibility was over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was mostly sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 46F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were good to very good. Almost all the fish that were caught today were haddock, mostly sub-legal. But there were a lot of legal sized fish as well. Legal landings included one hundred and ninety haddock, three pollock, four redfish, five cusk, four whiting and a cusk. Released fish included just shy of four hundred sub-legal haddock, four small cod, forty-nine sub-legal pollock and a couple of sculpins. They drift fished for the entire time. Bait was the best.

    Either Dana Decormier (NH) or Brian McCormick (VT) were high hook with the most legal fish. It was an excellent day for landings with those two. And after the trip that Brian had yesterday, he had a lot of fillets to sort through. Heinz Koch (NJ) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 5 pound haddock. The second largest fish was a 4 pound haddock caught by Calvin Loven (VT). Everyone caught haddock close to the 4 pound mark.

    Other Angler Highlights: Adam Loven (VT) landed the hard luck award for being the high, and the only, hurler aboard today.

    I received three donations sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Jack Decormier (NH) gave $10.00, Bill & Deb Kelson (MA) gave $50.00 and Harold Peck (NY) gave a very generous $300.00. Thank you all so very much for your support, kindness and generosity. I really do appreciate the help. But there are others who appreciate it even more!

    Saturday, Cuatro de Mayo, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the full day trip today.

    At 4:30 AM EDT the air temperature was 43F, the sky was cloudless, a sliver of a moon was hanging over the eastern horizon, the wind was light out of the east and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

    Today was a nice weather Saturday ashore. But it wasn't perfect. The sky started off cloudless but, by 8:00 AM, the sky was just about overcast with the lume of a sun barely making it's presence known through the clouds. Most of the day we had a similar smurry sun, as my father would say, with soft lighting. So it really wasn't the sunny day that I was expecting. The wind blew out of the east at light speeds all day. I don't believe that we ever saw wind speeds as high as ten knots. The viability was excellent. The highest air temperature that I saw was 56F. After 4:00 PM, the air felt a bit raw. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 53F (with a low of 47F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 43F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 55F (with a low of 41F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at ten to five knots for the entire fishing period. There was a two to three foot swell under a one foot chop. The air temperature reached a high of 53F. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was mostly sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 47F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock. They were small again today. Legal landings also included two pollock, one redfish and a cunner. Released fish included twice as many sub-legal haddock as landed haddock. That's a decrease in the number of small haddock caught. They also released two small cod and thirty sub-legal pollock. Drifting was the method. Bait worked best, by far.

    Hal Flan (MA) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish by far and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4 pound haddock. Samantha Creamer (CT) and Eddie Wison (NY) tied for the second largest fish of the trip, both with haddock of 3.5 pounds each.

    Other Angler Highlights: Stephen Smart (NY) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for catching the most sub-legal fish.

    At 11:00 AM this morning my son, Micah's, first child was born, William R. Tower, V, 8 pounds 7 ounces. I cried. His wife, Stef, is fine.

    Sunday, Cinco de Mayo, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky was mostly cloudy with clear patches, the wind was very light out of the southeast, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was excellent.

    Ashore, it was a bit cool all day. The sky became overcast by mid morning. A periodic light rain started to fall around noon. By 3:00 PM, the rain was light but steady. These conditions remained for the rest of the day and into the night. The wind blew less than ten knots out of the southeast all morning and into the afternoon. By 3:00 PM, the wind was over ten knots but not by much. The closest weather buoy report had almost twenty knots of wind in gusts at 6:00 PM. Unless we have gale force winds out of the southeast, we don't get as much southeast wind as there is even ten miles out. So this didn't surprise me. The air temperature rose to a value of 52F in the late morning and then dropped to 49F for almost the whole rest of the afternoon. This, no doubt, a result of the steady wind off the water. The visibility was excellent for most of the morning but dropped to very good after noon and good in haze (fog?) by 3:00 PM. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 53F (with a low of 45F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 52F (with a low of 45F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 53F (with a low of 44F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at five to ten knots. This wind increased for the trip back to Perkins Cove. They had clear skies all morning, unlike us ashore. The afternoon saw cloud cover, and later, overcast skies. But it didn't even hint of rain until they started to head back at the end of the fishing. Seas were a one to two foot chop over a sea swell of two to three feet. The air temperature reached a high of 52F. The visibility ranged from over twenty miles in the morning to about fifteen miles in the afternoon. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 47.6F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good and landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included two pollock, eleven redfish, three cusk and seven whiting. Released fish included one dogfish, one good sized cod that wasn't weighed, five small cod, one hundred and twenty-five sub-legal haddock (far fewer than previous trips), over one hundred and fifty sub-legal pollock (the most small pollock we have seen this season so far) and a sculpin. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well but bait was, by far, the best.

    Ian could not tell me who was high hook with the most legal fish. Ken Mosher (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 5.5 pound haddock. He was fishing on the bow and caught a 15 pound cod. Ian didn't see it. When Ken told Ian, Ian asked why Ken didn't show him when he brought it over the rail. Ken said that he couldn't keep it and that he already had the biggest fish. Ken, of course, didn't weigh the fish but, even if it was close to his estimated size, it would be the largest cod seen on the Bunny Clark this season so far. The second largest fish was a 5 pound haddock caught by Paul Larose (CT). Rory MacEachern (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 4.5 pound cusk.

    Other Angler Highlights: Scott Graham (NH) caught a 4 pound haddock as his best fish. He caught it early in the trip and led the boat pool for a while. His best fish, in my opinion, was a 2 pound Maine state trophy redfish. Ian took a picture of Scott holding his big fish. This digital image appears on the left in this entry. This is the largest redfish that has been caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far.

    Monday, May 6, 2024

    We didn't have enough warm bodies to make it worthwhile to run the trip today. So the Bunny Clark remains stern to the Barnacle Billy's float with the wooden anchors out.

    At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 48F, the sky was overcast, the wind was out of the south southwest at seven knots, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was excellent.

    Today was a much better day than yesterday. By 8:00 AM, the sky was mostly clear with some clouds. It was eighty percent sunny all day, sometimes sunnier than that. The wind blew out of the southeast at light speeds approaching eight knots but no more than that, for most of the day. At least that was the most salient wind direction. The ocean along the shore was calm but ruffled all day. The visibility was excellent for most of the day, very good in the afternoon, good by 6:00 PM and black thick fog and poor by 7:00 PM, when the wind died. The highest air temperature that I saw at the house was 68F. But I can't believe it was much higher that 60F with the wind coming across the parking lot. I actually didn't check the air temperature in the Cove today. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 77F (with a low of 49F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 46F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 48F).

    I spent the day working at the restaurant and getting the Bunny Clark ready to sail. I had a lot of desk work to catch up on, it being Monday. We weren't that busy so I did talk to all the patrons as well. It gave me extra time to solve problems.

    Deb & I got to see the new baby, Billy. I have to say, it was pretty amazing. And it was pretty hard on Stef, Micah's wife. As it was on Deb.

    Tim Tuesday, May 7, 2024

    Danny DellaMonica and I ran the marathon trip today.

    At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 51F, the sky was hazy clear, there wasn't enough wind along the shore to write about and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

    We had a new moon tide before we left the float to head to the fishing grounds. The middle town floats were aground and I feared that I would have to have the engine in the corner so we could plow our way down the channel as we dragged through the mud. I had visions of making everyone go forward so we could get out to the outer cove. But it turned out to be not so bad. We did drag the keel through the mud in the channel heading out. However, I didn't need any added speed to accomplish my goal. I was relieved when we went through the gate headed to sea.

    We had a very comfortable ride to the fishing grounds. The wind was light from the north. The ocean was calm. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature was 51F the whole way there. The sky stayed clear.

    On the grounds, the wind was still out of the north. The wind was very light. The surface waves were only ripples over a long rolling three or more foot sea swell. The ocean was mirror calm from noon until 2:00 PM. After that the wind started blowing out of the southwest. We carried southwest winds to ten knots all the way back to Perkins Cove. Seas were about a foot in chops on the ride. The high air temperature for the day was 56F. The sky was clear with very few clouds. The tide (current) was moderate to light. The visibility ranged for over thirty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 48F.

    Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Perkins Cove, Ogunquit, Maine the high air temperature was 71F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 67F (with a low of 57F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 44F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 46F).

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was good to very good and landings were just good, no better than that. And much of the angling success was dependent on where you were fishing. After noon, all the fish seemed to lay down. I looked around for a school of haddock to light on but had zero success for about forty-five minutes. I finally found some but there was zero tide, zero wind and zero drift. We picked a few there but the best bite was in the morning. Most legal fish landed were haddock. Today, though, the haddock were much smaller than they have been. Instead of getting a full box of haddock with twenty-three fish, today a full box contained thirty-five fish. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included one pollock, twelve redfish, sixteen cusk, a cunner and eighteen whiting. Released fish included three dogfish, a sea raven, a porbeagle shark, six very small cod, one cod over twenty-four inches, forty-six sub-legal haddock, ten small legal haddock and three sub-legal pollock. We anchored and drift fished. Bait was, by far, the best.

    Fred Kunz (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish. His two biggest fish were a 5.5 pound haddock and a 6 pound haddock. Fred won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, the 6 pound haddock. He also won the boat pool for the third largest fish with the fourth largest fish, the 5.5 pound haddock. Kevin Murphy (ME) caught the third largest fish with a 5.9 pound haddock but he didn't enter the boat pool for the third largest fish. There were also two other 5.5 pound fish. One was a haddock caught by Sandy Cilly (SC) while the other was our biggest cod caught by Mattie Clark (MA). Neither angler entered the boat pool for the third largest fish!

    Tod Benjamin (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.5 pound haddock. He also caught a 5 pound haddock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Don Johnson (MA) caught a lot of haddock, just not as many as Fred. His daughter, Bethanie Johnson (MA), an excellent fisherman as well, caught a 5 pound haddock, her biggest fish. She caught a double that included a 2.5 pound haddock and a 4 pound haddock. I took a picture of Bethanie holding the double up for me. This digital image appears on the right. Dave Burton (MA) caught a 5.25 pound haddock and a 5 pound haddock, his two biggest fish. Patrick Jukiel (NY) landed the hard luck award for getting tangled a few times and for losing his leader in the propeller.

    I received several donations sponsoring me in my cancer fundraising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those anglers and their donations included: Chuck Barto (ME) for $30.00, Rich Callahan (CT) for $50.00, Fred Kunz for another generous $100.00 donation, Patrick Jukiel for $20.00, Don Johnson & Bethanie Johnson for $50.00 and Tod Benjamin for $50.00. Thank you all so very much for your thoughtfulness and generosity. This helps our researchers so very much. And it just reminds me how lucky I am to have such wonderful people sailing with us every day.

    When I popped the engine hatch to look over the engine room for discrepancies, I noticed that the pivot bolt under the Gresen pump for the pot hauler was sticking out. The pump, belted off the front of the engine, was vibrating badly. I was tired and I didn't feel like working on this at that time. I went to see my son, Micah, who was managing Barnacle Billy's, Etc. He told me he would help me. Upon inspection, we saw that the bolt had sheared off at the thread side and was about to pop out. We are so lucky that this didn't drop out on the way in or, even, out on the fishing grounds. Luckily, I have a spare bracket at the house that I could steal the pivot bolt from to get it fixed right away. But I had forgotten I had one until I called Ian Keniston and mentioned the problem to him. Before that, I did find a bolt of the correct diameter & length that we could have used in a pinch. But it's always best to have the right piece for the project. I watched as Micah dissembled the bracket, installed the bolt and tightened up the belts again. Problem solved and no vibration! We were done by 9:00 PM.

    Wednesday, May 8, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 48F, the sky was cloudless, there wasn't enough wind along the shore to write about, the ocean along the shore was flat calm and the visibility over it was excellent.

    Ashore, the air temperature warmed more quickly than it did on the ride offshore yesterday. But, of course, that's a given. By 8:00 AM, we had lost our clear cloudless sky. We could still see the sun but it was shinning through a thin piece of cloud. Otherwise, the sky was completely overcast. By 9:00 AM, the sky became completely overcast. By 10:00 AM it had started to rain. By 9:00 AM, the wind was blowing across the parking lot at Barnacle Billy's a steady ten knots out of the northeast. The northeast wind direction had been established at 7:00 AM. But it hadn't been blowing very hard until later. The highest wind that I saw was fifteen knots at 11:00 AM. It rained fairly hard and steady until about 1:00 PM. We had a steady light rain after that. But the rain was all done by 2:30 PM. With the rain stopping, the wind died away as well. Light northerly wind ended the day with clearing skies. The visibility over the ocean was good in haze and, what looked like, fog. I couldn't see Boon Island for most of the day but it seemed clear enough along the shore. The highest air temperature that I saw as 56F 9:00 AM. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 59F (with a low of 50F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 56F (with a low of 43F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 54F (with a low of 43F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of about a foot or two over long three foot (more or less) swells. The air temperature reached a high of 53F. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to three miles in haze, precipitation and fog. It rained for the whole time fishing. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was overcast. The surface water temperature reached a high of 50F. This is the latest we have seen the surface water temperature reach 50F in a few years. Normally it gets there just before May.

    The fishing was nearly excellent; the strong current took the excellent out of the fishing. The catching was excellent. Landings were very good, better than yesterday. Most legal fish landed were haddock, again, by far. Legal landings also included ten pollock and one redfish. Released fish included fifteen cod from 4 to 11 pounds, twenty-five small cod, ninety sub-legal haddock (there were more legal haddock today) and about a hundred sub-legal pollock. They drifted fished and anchored. Bait worked better than anything.

    Todd Mallory (NY) was high hook with the most legal fish. True to form, Todd got the largest haddock of the trip at 6.5 pounds, a half pound shy of a Maine state trophy. He also caught a 5 pound haddock that Ian weighed. Steve Shugars (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound cod. This is our largest cod of the 2024 Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Steve also caught a 6.25 pound cod. Steve's largest haddock weighed 4 pounds. Earl McDuff (NY) caught the second largest fish, a 9.5 pound cod, the Bunny Clark's second largest cod of the fishing season to date. Earl also caught a 6 pound cod. The third largest fish was a 7 pound cod caught by Bill LaFond (ME). Bill also caught a 6 pound haddock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Cindy Underwood (ME) started the boat pool off by catching a 5 pound cod. Jeff Cragin (ME) landed the hard luck award for a lack of communication between his equilibrium and the motion of the ocean. I'm not sure if he actually hurled.

    I received a generous $100.00 donation from Steve Shugars sponsoring me in my cancer fundraising project with the Pan-Mass Challenge before the Bunny Clark left the dock this morning. Steve has been very generous to my cause since I started with the PMC in 2007. Thank you very much, Steve. You honor me (an Ian) by fishing with us but you grace the decks of the Bunny Clark with your love for life and your generosity.

    Thursday, May 9, 2024

    Danny DellaMonica and I ran the marathon trip today.

    At 2:45 AM EDT the air temperature was 51F, the sky was suspect as there was too much fog to tell if the sky was clear or overcast, there wasn't enough wind along the shore to write about and the visibility over was poor in fog.

    I had to rely on the electronics to get us down the channel out of Perkins Cove and to open ocean as it was foggy along the shore. After leaving the gate behind, we carried the fog until the half-way mark. We might have lost the fog earlier than that. The visibility was hazy for the rest of the ride. The air temperature hung around 51F the whole way. The wind stayed out of the north northwest at about five knots. Seas were a small chop.

    On the fishing grounds, the wind continued out of the north northwest. Wind speeds increased to nearly ten knots but I don't think it ever got there. Seas were chops of two feet or more but the tide was running into the wind, giving us a higher chop than we would have seen based on wind strength alone. The wind backed off from there. There was no wind when we left to go back to Perkins Cove. The high air temperature for the day was 52F. The sky was mostly overcast with the occasional peek at the sun. The tide (current) was moderate to light. The visibility ranged from ten to twenty-five miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 47.6F.

    Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Perkins Cove, Ogunquit, Maine the high air temperature was 60F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 64F (with a low of 49F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 66F (with a low of 48F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 58F (with a low of 40F).

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far, catching the bag limit for every angler by the time the day was done. We caught more sub-legal haddock than I have seen on a trip this year so far. But it didn't come close to the count of legal haddock. Legal landings also included thirty-four redfish, sixty-three cusk and a whiting. Released fish included a dogfish, thirteen small cod, ninety-one sub-legal haddock, five small legal sized haddock, a 6 pound wolffish and seven sub-legal pollock. We drift fished for every spot. Bait and cod flies caught the most fish but bait was king.

    Mark Girard (NH) was high hook with the most haddock. He caught a similar number of legal haddock as some of the best fishermen. But he caught far more sub-legal haddock than anyone. I didn't weigh any of his fish but he had several haddock over 4 pounds. Bill Murphy (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.75 pound cusk. He caught a 4.25 pound haddock right off the bat this morning. But his biggest haddock weighed 6 pounds. The second largest fish weighed 8 pounds. There were two. One was an 8 pound Maine state trophy haddock caught by Samuel Hoff (ME). This is the largest haddock that he has ever caught, it ties for the Bunny Clark's fourth largest haddock of the fishing season so far and it was the pool winning fish for the second largest fish of the trip. I took a picture of Sam holding his prize haddock. This digital image appears on the left. The other 8 pound fish was a cusk caught by Mike Kinney (ME). Mike did not enter the boat pool for the second largest fish. Dave Symes (ME) won the boat pool for the third largest fish with the fourth largest fish, a 7.1 pound Maine state trophy haddock. This is Dave's first Maine state trophy haddock and the largest haddock that he has ever caught. I took a picture of Dave sitting, holding his fish. This digital image appears on the right.

    Other Angler Highlights: Bryan Martins (MA) started off the boat pool with the first fish in the boat, a 4.75 pound haddock. Two other haddock of Bryan's that I weighed included a 5 pound haddock and a 5.5 pound haddock. I weighed a 4.75 pound haddock for Karen Rybka (ME) but I know that she caught bigger haddock that I saw but didn't weigh. David Hudrow (ME) caught a 7 pound cusk, the fifth largest fish landed today. Kirby Williams (MA) caught only the second wolffish that I have seen this season. It weighed 6 pounds. Quentin Mack (ME) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for being the sole hurler of the trip and for the few bad tangles he got into.

    I received several donations sponsoring me in my cancer fundraising with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those anglers and their donations included Dave & Rebecca Symes for $50.00, Bill Murphy for $40.00 and Kirby Williams for $40.00. Thank you all so very much for the support and generosity. I so appreciate your help but not so much as those with the disease who truly benefit!

    Friday, May 10, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky was overcast to a degree with clear sky over the ocean to the east, the wind was a whisper out of the north and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

    Ashore, we had overcast skies for most of the morning. Late morning saw clearing skies and a clear sunny sky all afternoon. The wind blew off the water all day. In the morning it blew out of the east or east northeast up to ten knots. Later in the afternoon, it hauled out of the southeast to eight or ten knots. The visibility stayed excellent all day. The wind off the water toned the air temperature down to a high of 56F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 54F (with a low of 45F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 63F (with a low of 42F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 56F (with a low of 39F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east northeast at ten knots or less. Seas were a foot in chops over a rolling sea swell from the southeast of two to three feet. The air temperature reached a high of 56F. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The tide (current) was strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 49F.

    The fishing was very good, only because of the current. However, it was excellent for those who knew how to handle it by casting. The catching was excellent. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far, again. Legal landings also included eleven pollock, six redfish and two cusk. Released fish included two dogfish, four cod of twenty-two inches or more, fifteen small cod, one hundred and ninety-eight sub-legal haddock, ninety-two sub-legal pollock, three wolffish and a sea raven. They drift fished and anchored. Bait was by far the best over jigs. In fact, if you used jigs you didn't catch much. That has been the story all spring so far. Shows you where the herring aren't! Thank you, National Marine Fisheries Service!

    The Allegany County Boys, Todd Mallory (NY) and Earl MacDuff (NY) were high hook with the most legal fish. Todd didn't have a fish big enough to write about (most of the fish were small today anyway, as they have been, on average). Earl caught some of the bigger haddock of the trip at 4.75 pounds and 5.25 pounds. The bigger haddock was the third largest fish of the trip. Lynette Silver (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound wolffish. The second largest fish was a 6.25 pound haddock caught by Ron Antanavich (ME), who lost a bigger haddock right next to the boat!

    Other Angler Highlights: Steve Laflam (NH) started off the pool with a 4 pound haddock. Chris Silver (NH) caught a 5 pound haddock, his best fish. Tina Robitaille (NH) landed the hardest luck of the trip award by being involved in the most tangles. Yes, a strong tide doesn't help!

    I received three donations sponsoring me in my cancer research project with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Earl MacDuff gave $30.00, Dave Robitaille gave $50.00 and Scott & Nancy Simpson (ME) gave $50.00. Thank you all so very much for your support and thoughtfulness. I really do appreciate the help!

    Saturday, May 11, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 39F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was light out of the east northeast and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

    The weather ashore turned out to be very nice. We had mostly cloudy skies in the first half of the morning daylight hours and mostly sunny skies in later part of the morning. The afternoon was sunny. The wind blew out of the northeast up to fifteen knots at 9:00 AM. By noon, the northeast wind was a steady ten knots blowing across the parking lot. This kept the air temperature down lower than I expected it would be. The wind hauled more easterly and dropped into the afternoon. By 5:00 PM, there was little or no wind and certainly no wind after that. We had zero wind on into the night. The highest air temperature that I saw was 54F. The visibility was excellent all day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 54F (with a low of 43F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 36F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 55F (with a low of 34F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at eight to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot over a two foot swell from the southeast. The air temperature reached a high of 53F. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The sky was overcast for the whole time fishing. The surface water temperature reached a high of 49F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were good. There were a lot of small sub-legal haddock that could not be kept today. The majority of these fish were seventeen to seventeen and a half inches long, overall length. These would have been legal under the previous regulations. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included two pollock, seven whiting and one cunner. Released fish included three dogfish, four small cod, over a hundred and fifty sub-legal haddock, too many small pollock to count and a few sculpins. They drift fished and anchored. Bait worked best.

    Ian couldn't tell whom was high hook with the most legal fish. The largest fish of the trip came in at 4 pounds. There were two, both haddock. Both Matt Cardente (ME) and Andy Doucette (ME) tied for the boat pool with the two largest fish of the trip, both with the 4 pound haddock. The third largest fish came in at 3.75 pounds. There were two of those fish as well, both haddock again. One was caught by Zack Miller (VT) and the other was caught by Robert Sparda (ME).

    Other Angler Highlights: Nick Naylor (NH) landed the hard luck award for being the most sea sick and for not catching a single legal (or non-legal?) fish. Ouch!

    We had to put our cat (Jigg) of eighteen years down a few weeks ago. Today, Deb brought back two female cats from Salisbury, Massachusetts that looked like they had a mix of Maine coon. These will be our new house mates. They are very shy at this point and hid under the bed in our daughter's bedroom overnight. Just another challenge in my life!

    Mother's Day, Sunday, May 12, 2024

    We traditionally have blocked off Mother's Day as a day away from the boat. This season we left it open with the same results. So the Bunny Clark is spending Mother's Day in Perkins Cove at the Barnacle Billy's float.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 37F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was excellent. The air temperature rose to 57F by 11:00 AM. The sky was mostly overcast but started to break up as the morning progressed. The air temperature didn't get much higher. The highest value that I saw was 61F by noon at the house before going to the Cove. The wind started blowing out of the south before noon and increased to ten or more knots by 1:00 PM. The dropped the air temperature down to the mid 50s by 2:00 PM. The southerly wind continued to blow about ten knots or more until 8:00 PM. The clouds cleared for a bit, came back around 2:00 PM. By 2:20 PM, it was pouring rain. This lasted for about fifteen minutes. The sky cleared and stayed clear after 3:30 PM. The visibility, except for the rain, was very good to excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 57F (with a low of 44F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 61F (with a low of 39F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 61F (with a low of 36F).

    With the Bunny Clark at the float for the day, I had nothing I needed to do with it. I changed the oil after yesterday's fishing trip. So I didn't need to do that. And it was Mother's Day, one of the busiest, if not "the" busiest, day at the restaurant all season.

    For many different seasons Mother's Day has been Barnacle Billy's busiest day of the year. This weekend was marred by a poor weather forecast that was very believable from a layman's view. Although the weather was good and we didn't get the rain or the wind that was predicted, it wasn't a particularly warm day. So we didn't even come close to filling the outside eating areas, like the patio, deck and upper patio. It was still a busy day but I'm hoping it will be busier on one of the other holiday weekend days in the future.

    I received a generous $100.00 donation from Rick & Pat, regular patrons of Barnacle Billy's restaurant, sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thank you both very much for support and thoughtfulness. I do really appreciate your help and generosity.

    Monday, May 13, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 4:15 AM EDT the air temperature was 43F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was light out of the west and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least.

    Ashore, the ocean was flat calm all morning. There was zero wind. The sky was cloudless all morning as well. It was a beautiful day. The air temperature at 9:30 AM was 57F. By 11:30 AM, the air temperature had risen to 64F. That was the highest air temperature I saw today. The wind showed up around noon, out of the south. Probably five knots at that time. By 3:00 PM, the southerly wind speeds were gusting to fifteen knots. These winds off the water brought the air temperature, at that time, down to 57F again. If you were sitting in the sun on the deck at Barnacle Billy's, it felt warmer than that. I only saw one small cloud in the sky all day. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 63F (with a low of 49F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 72F (with a low of 37F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 62F (with a low of 43F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at five to ten knots, more on the ride back to Perkins Cove. Seas were calm to a foot over a long swell from the south of two to three feet. The air temperature reached a high of 58F, the highest air temperature we have seen on the fishing grounds this season so far. But it has been cold this spring, colder than normal. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was strong - it seems to have been strong all season. The sky was bright sun all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 51F, also the highest temperature we have seen on the fishing grounds this season.

    The fishing was excellent. The catching was nearly so and landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included two pollock, ten redfish and five whiting. Released fish included quite a few sub-legal haddock, six small cod, over a hundred sub-legal pollock, a porbeagle shark and a sculpin. They anchored and drift fished. Bait worked best.

    Joe Gauta (FL) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 5 pound haddock. The second largest fish weighed 4.5 pounds. There were three, all haddock and all caught by three individual anglers. Those anglers included Jake Bjornlie (MN), Dan Klemp (ID) and Spencer Gauta (FL). Jake also caught a 4 pound haddock and a 4.25 pound haddock that Ian weighed.

    Other Angler Highlights: Branden Lee (PA) caught a 4.25 pound haddock. Dan Klemp landed the hard luck award t-shirt for getting into the worst tangle of the day. Well, that's better than winning it for being sea sick!

    Tim Tuesday, May 14, 2024

    Danny DellaMonica and I ran the marathon trip today.

    At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 51F, the sky was hazy clear, the wind was blowing out of the south at ten knots along the shore but at fifteen knots at the closest weather buoy and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze.

    It was a choppy ride to the fishing grounds. Not knowing how hard out of the south it was going to blow, I wanted to travel into the seas and stay closer to shore today. The wind was out of the south at fifteen knots or so with seas in chops of two to three feet. Not horrible but just enough to keep you on your toes. The air temperature hung around 53F for the ride. The sky was hazy clear. The visibility was very good the whole ride.

    On the fishing grounds, the wind hauled out of the south southwest and backed off a bit. Then the wind backed out of the south. Wind speeds were about ten knots on average. Seas dropped to about two feet or less in chops. Near the end of the fishing, the wind hauled out of the south southwest again and increased. We left the grounds for the ride home with fifteen to twenty knots of wind and seas of three to four feet. The high air temperature for the day was a balmy 56F. The sky was mostly was hazy clear with a few high thin clouds which added to the haziness. The tide (current) started out light but was strong by the end of the trip. The visibility ranged to about twenty miles or so.. The surface water temperature reached a high of 50F.

    Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Perkins Cove, Ogunquit, Maine the high air temperature was 77F, the warmest day of 2024 so far. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 77F (with a low of 51F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 53F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 51F).

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were excellent overall. It didn't start out that way. Landings were a little light on the first spot with mostly sub-legal haddock. But that changed dramatically as the day went on. On the last two stops we very rarely saw a small haddock. In fact, even raising the minimum size didn't keep us from attaining the boat bag limit well before we were finished. Of course, most legal fish landed were haddock. Legal landings also included five pollock, one redfish, eleven cusk and five whiting. Released fish included thirty legal haddock, twenty-seven sub-legal haddock, six dogfish, seven small cod, one cod of twenty-four inches, thirty-two sub-legal pollock, two whiting and a sculpin. We drift fished and anchored. Bait was by far the best. Only one legal haddock was caught on a jig.

    I truly believe that Lewis Hazelwood (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish. Dave Burton (MA), though, was just a fish or two behind him. The biggest fish of Dave's that I weighed was a 5.5 pound haddock. On the other hand Lewis won all three boat pools for the biggest, second biggest and third biggest fish. Lewis won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.75 pound pollock. Lewis won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the ninth largest fish, a 6 pound haddock. He also won the boat pool for the third largest fish with the tenth largest fish, another 6 pound haddock. It was a good day to be Lewis Hazelwood!

    Other Angler Highlights: Antonino "Nino" Pierdipino (NY) caught the second largest fish of the trip, an 8.5 pound Maine state trophy haddock. This is the largest haddock he has ever seen and it's the Bunny Clark's third largest haddock of the fishing season so far. He caught this fish as a double with another haddock weighing 5.5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Believe it or not, this is the Bunny Clark's largest double of the fishing season so far. I took a picture of Nino holding his bigger trophy haddock. This digital image appears on the left in this blog entry. He also caught the third and fourth largest fish, a 7 pound Maine state trophy haddock and a 7 pound cusk. He did not enter the boat pool for the second and third largest fish. He also caught the fifth largest fish, a 6.75 pound haddock, and tied for the sixth largest fish with a 6.5 pound haddock. Some of his other good fish included the largest cod at 4.75 pounds and a 5.25 pound haddock.

    Steve Luzzi (CT) might have won the boat pool for the second and third largest fish but he didn't get in the last two pools either. The two fish that would won it for him were two haddock of 6.5 pounds each. Mark Lewis (CT) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for being the only angler who felt ill. I just think he was over-tired. He never did hurl today. His largest fish was a 5 pound haddock.

    Wednesday, May 15, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky mostly clear with some clouds, the wind was barely blowing out of the west, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was very good in some haze.

    Ashore, the clouds moved in by 6:30 AM and threatened rain. We didn't see any rain. The sky remained overcast but so thin that the you could see the sun shining through the clouds for most of the day. And even if you couldn't, you could tell where the sun was in the sky for most of the day. The visibility was very good in some haze. The wind blew lightly out of the southwest. The highest air temperature that I saw was 73F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 70F (with a low of 55F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 56F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 47F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at fifteen to ten knots and then ten to five knots. Seas were chops of two feet to one foot over a rolling sea swell of two to three feet. The air temperature reached a high of 59F. The visibility ranged to fifteen and twenty miles in some haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 50F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were good. There were a lot of small that would have been kept under the previous regulations. But, in general, the haddock were small overall. Most legal fish landed were haddock. Legal landings also included four pollock, three cusk and four whiting. Released fish included a lot of small haddock, ten cod that would have been legal if we were able to keep cod at this time, twenty small cod, thirty-five sub-legal pollock and a dogfish. They drift fished and anchored. Bait worked best but both jigs, bait and cod flies were used.

    Jared Lavers (ME) and Chopper Sawyer (ME) were high hook with the most legal fish. Jared was the fisherman of the day as he also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound pollock. Jared also tied for the largest haddock of the trip with a 4.25 pounder. Randy Morse (ME) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with second largest fish, a 7 pound cod. The third largest fish was a 6.5 pound cod caught by Doug McIntosh (ME).

    Other Angler Highlights: Matt Luce (ME) caught a 5 pound cod. Pito Vazquez (ME) caught the other 4.25 pound haddock. Lukas Thiboutot-Edmondson (ME) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for getting a touch of the dreaded mal de mer.

    Thursday, May 16, 2024

    Danny DellaMonica and I ran the marathon trip today.

    At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, there was no wind in Ogunquit, the wind was light and variable in direction around the rest of the Gulf of Maine and the visibility over the ocean was very good, even in the precipitation.

    It stopped raining as soon as we left the float and headed to the fishing grounds. We had no rain all the way to the grounds. We carried 60F as the air temperature for the first ten miles out. I lost track after that. The sky was overcast. The visibility was very good. The wind blew lightly out of the northeast for the whole ride. The ocean was calm on the surface with a two foot roll from the southeast underneath.

    On the fishing grounds, the wind was out of the northeast at two knots when we arrived. The wind stayed out of the northeast and slowly increased. By the time we were ready to head her for the barn, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots or so. Seas were a foot or two in chops. The high air temperature for the day 58F. The sky remained overcast in the morning and mostly cloudy in the afternoon. We didn't see much sun. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The visibility ranged to about twenty miles or so.. The surface water temperature reached a high of 51F.

    Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Perkins Cove, Ogunquit, Maine the high air temperature was 67F, so I was told. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 60F (with a low of 53F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 49F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 48F).

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were excellent overall. Almost every fish we caught was a haddock. Most legal fish caught were, far and away, haddock. I kept the minimum keeper size at twenty inches fork length and we still reached the boat's bag limit before it was time to go home. Legal landings also included seven pollock, thirty-six cusk and six butter mullet. Released fish included thirty-one dogfish, eleven small cod, seventy-six legal haddock, sixty sub-legal haddock and a couple of mud hake. We anchored mostly, drifted a short time. Bait worked best. If you weren't using bait you weren't bringing fish home.

    Fred Kunz (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish. He won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, an 8 pound cusk. I never did weigh any of his haddock but several of them were 5 pounds or more. Jeff Corey (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.5 pound sub-legal halibut. This is the first halibut of the Bunny Clark fishing season. It's the second sub-legal halibut that Jeff has caught on my boat. He caught a 28 pounder with Ian Keniston a couple of years ago. His second largest fish was a 7.25 pound Maine state trophy haddock. This is Jeff's largest ever haddock and his first trophy haddock. I also weighed a 6.25 pound haddock for Jeff. Mark Girard (NH) won the boat pool for the third largest fish with the third largest fish, a 7.5 pound pollock. The largest haddock of Mark's that I weighed was 6 pounds.

    Other Angler Highlights: Roger Gavin (MA) caught the first fish that I could weigh for the boat pool, a 6.5 pound haddock. I also weighed a 6 pound haddock and a 5.5 pound haddock for Roger. Mark LaRocca (NY) caught a 7.1 pound Maine state trophy haddock. This is the largest haddock that Mark has ever caught and his first Maine state trophy. I took a picture of Mark holding his fish. This digital image appears on the right. I also weighed a 6.5 pound haddock for Mark. Dan Wescom (VT) caught two "almost trophy haddock". Oddly enough, they both weighed exactly 6.9 pounds each! Just shy! Ray Westermann (MA) caught a 6.25 pound haddock, his biggest fish. Fred Ostrander (MA) caught a 6 pound haddock, the largest of the many haddock that he caught. Jon Tesnakis (NY) boated a 5 pound haddock. He boated other haddock that were probably 6 pounds but I didn't weigh them. Antonino "Nino" Pierdipino (NY) won the hard luck award t-shirt for getting into the worst tangle of the day.

    I received three donations sponsoring me in my cancer fundraising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those wonderful people and their donations included Fred Kunz for another donation, this one for $50.00, Mark Girard for another generous $100.00 donation and Jeff Corey for $50.00. Thank you all for all the support you are giving me in this project. I appreciate the help so much.

    Friday, May 17, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 51F, the sky was partially overcast and partially clear, the wind was blowing out of the north at five knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

    It was a beautiful day ashore. At times the sky was nearly overcast. But, mostly, it was sunny and warm. It was sunny most of the morning with clouds, through noon and mostly overcast after 2:00 PM with peeks at the sun. The visibility was very good to excellent. The wind was mostly out of the east northeast at speeds up to ten knots or maybe more at times. Mostly the wind was less than ten knots. The air temperature in Ogunquit reached a high of 70F. With the sun, on the back side of the deck on Barnacle Billy's, out of the wind and with the air temperature, it was heaven, particularly if you were sipping on a rum punch! In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 65F (with a low of 52F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 46F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 47F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east northeast at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two feet over a rolling swell of two to three feet. The air temperature reached a high of 60F. The visibility ranged to ten and twelve miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky remained sunny and clear for the fishing. The surface water temperature reached a high of 52F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were excellent, the best extreme day trip of the season to date. Most legal fish landed (and most fish caught, by far) were haddock. Legal landings also included four pollock, four cusk and four whiting. The haddock bite was so ferocious that it was hard to catch any other species. When have I ever written that before? They were just shy of the total boat bag limit but almost everyone had the personal bag limit. Released fish included two hundred and twenty-five sub-legal haddock, twenty-five sub-legal pollock, fifteen small cod, five cod that would have been of legal size had the season been on and one porbeagle shark. They drift fished and anchored. Bait was by far the best but some were caught on jigs. Not many but some.

    Jonathan Griffin (MA) would have been high hook had he paid attention to the task and hand and was bent on landing the most legal fish. He wasn't. He tried the jig every now and then as he did on yesterday's trip. His largest fish, a 7 pound pollock, was the third largest fish of the trip. The same could be said for Art Kemler, Jr. (PA). Art stayed with the jig for most of it. Art's largest fish, an 8 pound cod, was the second largest fish of the trip. Art also caught a 5 pound haddock that Ian weighed. It was, pretty much, impossible to tell who walked off the boat with the most legal fish for the trip today.

    John Herring (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.75 pound Maine state trophy haddock. This is a tie for the Bunny Clark's second largest haddock of the fishing season so far, John's largest haddock ever and the Bunny Clark's fortieth Maine state trophy haddock this season. Amazing (to me)! Captain Ian took a picture of John holding his trophy haddock. This digital image appears on the left. John also caught a haddock that weighed 5.75 pounds.

    Other Angler Highlights: Matt Curtiss (NY) caught a 5 pound haddock right off the bat this morning to start the boat pool rolling along. The pool changed hands quite frequently today. Kris Brown (VT) caught a string of good sized haddock weighing 5.25 pounds, 6.25 pounds, 5 pounds and 5 pounds. Jane Brown (VT) landed a 6.5 pound haddock, her largest fish of the trip. She also caught a haddock that weighed 6 pounds. Gary Golden (NY) caught the second largest pollock at 6 pounds. Steve Bemis (NY) caught a 6 pound haddock, his biggest fish. Jarrett Kowalski (NY) boated a 5 pound haddock. Former deck hand and good excellent fisherman, Keith Weber (NY), caught a 5 pound haddock, one of his best fish of the trip. Joshua Pilon (NY) caught a haddock that weighed 6.75 pounds, a quarter of a pound shy of the minimum acceptance weight for a Maine state trophy. Josh also caught a 5.5 pound haddock. Leo Lamoureux (VT), who finally got talked out of using a jig, caught haddock that weighed 6 pounds, 5.5 pounds and 5 pounds. Cassadra Pickering (NY) landed the hard luck award today for being the sole hurler of the trip. There always seems to be one!

    Jonathan "Griff" Griffin did me a solid today by donation a generous $100.00 to my fundraising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Griff has supported me since I got involved in this cancer project in 2007. Thank you so much, Griff, for your thoughtfulness and generosity. It's typical of you but I appreciate it so much!

    Saturday, May 18, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the full day trip today.

    At 4:30 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light out of the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

    Ashore, it started to rain at 5:30 AM. It was a light rain. We had the occasional sprinkle until about 8:00 AM. The rain stopped for the day after that. The wind picked up from the northeast to about twelve knots by 8:00 AM. The wind stayed out of the northeast at ten to fifteen knots for the rest of the day. The visibility was very good. The sky stayed overcast with the hint of rain all day. The rain remained to the west of us until after 5:00 PM when it started to rain lightly and continuously on into the night. The highest air temperature that I saw was 60F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 60F (with a low of 53F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 64F (with a low of 55F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 58F (with a low of 53F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were swells of three to six feet under a two foot, or more, chop. It wasn't the best of conditions for the anglers as most were sea sick at one point. The air temperature reached a high of 59F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was overcast all day. They had no rain. The surface water temperature reached a high of 52F.

    The fishing was good; the wind, seas and tide combined to make it uncomfortable, too uncomfortable for some to fish. The catching and landings were excellent. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Again, the haddock were bigger. Legal landings also included two pollock and a cusk. Released fish included far fewer sub-legal haddock. Less than a hundred. And even some of those were technically legal. Four good sized cod were releases as well as eight small cod, eight sub-legal pollock, a porbeagle shark and twenty-six dogfish. The fact that over half the anglers weren't fishing decreased the landings substantially. Those who did fish made out famously indeed! They anchored for every stop. Bait worked best.

    Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook with most legal fish. Despite the down and out anglers, there was still so much action from those who were fishing that it was impossible to tell. It was a fish a drop all day long for everyone. And bait fishing tends to put everyone on a level playing field. Our own Jim Talvy (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.5 pound cod. This is our second largest cod of the season to date. The second largest fish was an 8.5 pound cod caught by Jorge Tirado (VT). Jeff Bauman (NY) caught the third largest fish, a 7.25 pound Maine state trophy haddock. Captain Ian took a picture of Jeff holding his big haddock. This digital image appears on the right. Jeff also caught a 5 pound haddock that Ian weighed.

    Other Angler Highlights: Hal Flan (MA) caught the first fish to be weighed for the boat pool, a 6 pound haddock. Some of his other fish of note included another 6 pound haddock, a 6.5 pound haddock and a 5 pound haddock. Brad Baker (OR) caught a 5 pound haddock, his best fish. Amy Fino (MA) caught a 6 pound haddock and two haddock of 5 pounds each. Sam Yang (ME) caught the fourth largest fish, a 6.9 pound haddock, just a skosch too small to be a trophy. Sam also caught a 5 pound haddock and a 6.5 pound haddock. Jacob Hanson (VT) landed the hard luck award today for losing his wedding ring over the side! I lost my wedding ring in the ocean one time. It wasn't fun as it was a special one that my wife, Deb, had made for me. And Donna Moran (NY) lost the fanciest wedding ring I have ever seen on Fippennies Ledge a few years ago. You are in good company, Jacob!

    I received a $25.00 donation from Stephen Guilmet (MA) sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event across the state of Massachusetts to raise money for cancer research. Steve has been helping me with this project from the very beginning and donates every year. Thank you very much, Steve. Always very much appreciated and always nice to know you still care!

    Sunday, May 19, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was overcast, the roads were wet, it was misty, the wind was out of the northeast at five knots and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in haze.

    Ashore, we had a light misty rain all morning. This light rain was, largely, gone by noon. But we did have one brief spell where we saw the tiniest bit of rain in the afternoon. The sky remained overcast for the day. The visibility went from good to fair/poor, in fog, and very good to excellent in the evening. The wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen knots, more or less, all day. The wind had died out by 6:00 PM. The highest air temperature that I saw was 57F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 57F (with a low of 51F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 66F (with a low of 53F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 56F (with a low of 52F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were swells of six feet under a two foot chop. It was choppy poke to get to the grounds. The air temperature reached a high of 58F. The visibility ranged to ten and twelve miles in haze. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was overcast all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 52F.

    The fishing was not really good; the swells made it hard to keep your line on the bottom, the tide was strong promoting a few more tangles than expected and it was misty for a while in the morning. The catching was excellent. Landings were very good, only diminished because of the large number of small haddock that had to be released. Most legal fish landed were haddock. Legal landings also included four pollock, two cusk, a whiting and a mackerel. Released fish included one porbeagle shark (that was lost), twelve small cod, over two hundred sub-legal haddock and a few sub-legal pollock. Anchoring was the method today. Bait was, by far, the way to catch fish.

    The brothers Grimm (Zack, Dick & Max) were high hook, one of them, with the most legal fish. Ron Sadlon (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.5 pound haddock. He also caught the second largest fish of the trip with another haddock that weighed 6.5 pounds. Ian also weighed a 5 pound haddock and a 6 pound haddock for Ron. Alan Buchanan (VT) caught the third largest fish, a 6.25 pound haddock. Art Kemler, Jr. (PA) caught the most haddock but, for him, it was six to one short haddock to keepers. Had the haddock all been keepers, he would have been, far and away, the high hook of the trip.

    Other Angler Highlights: Max Grimm (ME) caught a 6 pound haddock, his best fish. Jon Mathesius (ME) boated a 5 pound haddock. Jeff Dvorak (NH) caught a haddock that weighed 5.25 pounds. J. J. Lumsden (VT) landed the hard luck award for attaining high hurler status. There were a few today.

    Jason Ridolfi (NY) donated $70.00 toward my efforts to find a cure for cancers in humans with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. He stopped by to sign the clipboard for a fishing spot on tomorrow's trip. He fishes with us every spring and fall and has been supporting cause for as many years as he has been sailing with us. Thanks, Jason! I appreciate your help very much!

    Monday, May 20, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the sky was overcast, the roads were dry, the wind was out of the north and the visibility over the ocean seemed very good to excellent.

    Ashore, the sky continued overcast for the early part of the daylight morning. By 9:00 AM, the sky above was clear and sunny. There were clouds on the eastern horizon and well to the west. Those finally cleared away by noon. But it remained sunny and beautiful all day. The wind blew out of the northeast up to almost ten knots in the morning, died out and then blew out of the south in the afternoon. Wind speeds were about five knots or so. By 8:00 PM, the wind was out of the south at twelve knots. The visibility over the ocean was very good in the morning, good in the early afternoon in haze and poor in fog by 5:15 PM and on into the night. The highest air temperature that I saw was 66F but only for a half hour around noon. Most of the afternoon the air temperature was 64F. I kept looking at the thermometer because it seemed so much warmer than that without the wind. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 60F (with a low of 52F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 53F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 52F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at five knots or less, died out to nothing and then hauled out of the southeast. They rode in southeast wind most of the way home. The ocean was calm over long rolling sea swells of six feet to start that diminished to four feet by the end of the fishing. The air temperature reached a high of 60F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from eight to ten miles in haze, bordering on fog. The sky was a bright overcast or overcast with thin clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 52F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were excellent. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far - the same as it has been every day (and I'm sooo glad!). Legal landings also included one pollock, two redfish, seventeen cusk and seven whiting. Released fish included at least five porbeagle sharks, six dogfish, fifteen small cod, four cod of 5 pounds or more, one hundred and twenty-one sub-legal haddock, a few sub-legal pollock and a sculpin. Drifting was the method today. Bait was by far the best. Jigs did not work at all.

    Neil Graham (MA) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. This is the largest pollock that the Bunny Clark has seen this season so far. Ian took a picture of Neil holding his pollock. This digital image appears on the upper right. Some of Neil's other good fish included a 5 pound haddock, an 8.5 pound cod and two other haddock of 5 pounds each. The 8.5 pound cod was the third largest fish of the trip. Jason Ridolfi (NY) caught the second largest fish, an 11.25 pound cod. This is the largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Jay also caught a 7 pound Maine state trophy haddock. Ian took a picture of Jay holding this fish. The digital image appears on the left.

    Other Angler Highlights: Aaron Fox (NY) caught the second largest haddock of the trip at 6.5 pounds. Pete Lussier (NY) caught the largest cusk at 8 pounds. This is also our third largest cusk of the season so far. Pete's largest haddock weighed 5 pounds. Jack Judge (CT) caught a 7 pound cusk, his biggest fish. Michael Graham (MA) caught a 5.5 pound haddock, the third largest haddock of the trip. He was also the only angler to get a bit green and landed the hard luck award t-shirt for his efforts.

    Bruce Fortier (NH/ME) did me a great favor by donating $20.00 to my cancer fund raising program with the Pan-Mass Challenge when he got off the boat at the end of the trip. Thanks for your support and thoughtfulness, Bruce. Much appreciated.

    Tim Tuesday, May 21, 2024

    Danny DellaMonica and I ran the marathon trip today.

    At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the sky was clear with a nearly full moon sinking in the west, the wind was out of the south at ten knots along the shore and the visibility over the ocean was suspect as I couldn't see Boon Island light.

    I realized why we couldn't see Boon Island after we left Perkins Cove behind to head to the fishing grounds. Although we didn't have fog in Perkins Cove, we did have fog for the first few miles on the way. Somewhere around the ten mile mark we lost the fog. The visibility was good in haze after that. We carried 58F the whole way out. Winds were out of the south southwest at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of a foot or two over a swell that averaged six feet. The sky was clear with some clouds.

    On the fishing grounds, the wind and seas were the same at first. By mid morning, the wind blew out of the southwest and, then, west southwest. It never blew more than fifteen knots. The swells were as much as seven or eight feet at times. Seas dropped to about four feet by the time we were ready to go home. Chops were one to two feet all day. The tide (current) was strong, so strong we really couldn't anchor. The high air temperature for the day was 58F. The sky was hazy clear with clouds here and there. The visibility ranged to about fifteen miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 52F.

    Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Perkins Cove, Ogunquit, Maine the high air temperature was 78F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 84F (with a low of 53F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 52F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 51F).

    Coming home, we saw thunder showers go over parts of Wells and Kennebunkport while we were still ten miles out. The sky was dark in cloud cover over that part of the coast. I could see the showers on the Bunny Clark's radar. Ogunquit experienced thunder showers after 7:30 PM.

    The fishing was good overall, the tide wouldn't let the fishing get any better than that. The last stop of the day, however, was excellent. The catching was very good overall. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included four pollock, two redfish, forty cusk and a whiting. Released fish included twenty dogfish, six weighable cod, seven small cod, eighteen sub-legal pollock and forty-seven sub-legal haddock. We anchored several times but we had most of our success while drifting. Bait worked best.

    I couldn't tell you exactly who was high hook. I believe it was between Fred Kunz (NH), Dave Burton (MA) and Jason Ridolfi (NY). The only fish I weighed for Dave Burton was a 4.75 pound haddock. Pete Lussier (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound cod. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest cod of the fishing season so far. Pete also lost a trophy sized haddock (8 pounds, from the looks of it, as he was trying to pull it over the rail?) Shawn Lafferty (NY) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, an 8.25 pound cod. He also won the boat pool for the third largest fish with the third largest fish, an 8 pound cod. There was another 8 pound cod caught by Gary Warren (NH) but he didn't enter the boat pool for the third largest fish.

    Other Angler Highlights: John Russell (ME) caught the largest haddock of the trip at 5.5 pounds. He was also the only angler to land two doubles of good sized haddock, four legal haddock in two drops. Aaron Fox (NY) caught a 5 pound cusk. Andy Morris (NH) caught the largest cusk at 7 pounds. Josh Cattan (VT) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for getting into the worst tangles. It was easy to get tangled today.

    I received two donations sponsoring me in my cancer fundraising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today, an 192 mile cycling event to raise money for cancer researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. With $12,000 more in donations, I will have raised $500,000.00 since 2007. Those anglers and their donations included Andrew Gaudio (MD) for $40.00 and Shawn Lafferty for $30.00. Thank you both so much for your contributions to the cause. I appreciate this very much.

    Wednesday, May 22, 2024

    There wasn't enough interest in fishing on the Bunny Clark today so the wooden anchors are out, Danny DellaMonica gets a chance to breath and Captain Ian (and I) are disappointed. Alas, such is life!

    At 4:15 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was cloudless, there was just a little bit of wind from the south, the ocean was calm along the shore and the visibility over it was very good in haze. More later.

    We have room on some upcoming trips: The extreme day trip on Friday, May 24, has fourteen fishing spots available, the full day trip on Saturday, May 25, has four fishing spots available, the extreme day trip on Sunday, May 26, has fifteen fishing spots available, the extreme day trip of Monday, May 27, has thirteen fishing spots available, the Tim Tuesday marathon trip on May 28 has eight fishing places for sale, the extreme day trip on Wednesday, May 29, has six fishing spots available and the marathon trip of Thursday, May 30, has nine fishing places ready for an angler. The haddock are even more plentiful than they were last week with consistent big haddock, the likes of which we haven't seen for years. We are starting to see pollock filtering into the fishing grounds and chances are getting better for seeing a halibut. Be there or be square!

    Also, we are in need of a second deck hand for the upcoming Bunny Clark fishing season. If you are interested, please call 207-646-2214. Tyler Carpenter may be able to work on weekends (a day or two) but he has a full time job and won't be available on a regular basis.










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