www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

Monday, July 22, 2024, 5:30 AM EDT




Graphic

Book a Trip on Line

First Good Sized White Hake of the 2024 Bunny Clark Season

On July 16, 2024, we completed our longest trip of the season, the Ultra Marathon. It's always the hardest trip and usually the furthest offshore. The advantage of going so far offshore is to find fish, like the hake, that we aren't seeing further inshore yet. We usually start seeing the hake move in during the month of August. Also, during July, we don't see the large numbers of blue sharks offshore. If we were to try this three weeks from that date, we wouldn't be able to fish there. The digital images above were taken after fishing our second spot that day. These hake are some of the biggest we have seen this season. From left to right are Dan Killay (VT) holding his 35 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a tie for our third largest hake of the season at the time it was caught, Mark LaRocca (NY) holding his 26.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake and Dave Burton (MA) holding his 31 pound Maine state trophy white hake, our fifth largest hake of the Bunny Clark season as of this date. Dave's hake is also the largest hake he has ever caught. The Ultra is a very fun trip but it's also very tiring. So far, the extra effort has been worth it, in landings.




Proposed regulations for the 2024 fishing season starting May 1, 2024. Cod can only be kept in the fall under these regulation changes.

Gulf of Maine cod

  • Open season: September 1 - October 31
  • Minimum size: 23 inches
  • Possession limit: 1 fish per day

    Gulf of Maine haddock

  • Open season: May 1 February 28; April 130
  • Minimum size: 18 inches
  • Possession limit: 15 fish per day

    These regulations for groundfish apply equally to anglers on privately owned recreational boats and party/charter boats as well.

    Tim Tuesday, July 9, 2024

    Captain Bryan Lewer, Kai Rosenberg, Karl Day and I ran the Specail Offshore Trip today.

    It was still calm when Captain Bryan Lewer brought us to the fishing grounds (I had a bunk for most of the ride out.) at 4:15 AM. The wind was very light from the south southwest. There was just a light ripple on the ocean surface. The tide (current), however, was strong. It made the fishing almost untenable. We worked through it though and made the best of it. As the day progressed, the wind became established out of the southwest by south southwest. It remained out of that direction from before noon, through the afternoon and on into the night. Winds increased to about twenty knots on the ride in. Seas, at worst, were about three feet in chops without a swell underneath, very manageable. The air temperature stayed at 73F all day. The visibility ranged to twenty miles. The tide ranged from strong to moderate. The sky was mostly sunny with some clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

    Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Perkins Cove, Ogunquit, Maine the high air temperature was 93F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 89F (with a low of 71F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 93F (with a low of 64F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 89F (with a low of 64F).

    The fishing was nearly excellent. The only thing that kept the fishing from being excellent were the few dogfish we caught and the strong tide. Luckily, we didn't find the dogfish everywhere and the tide was only strong in the morning and during the later part of the fishing. The catching was excellent. Landings were very good, excellent for size. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far, followed by pollock. We had so many pollock in the 10 pound range that I stopped weighing them after awhile. Suffice it to say, everyone caught a pollock of at least 10 pounds today. Legal landings also included ten redfish of good size, thirty-four cusk and four white hake. Released fish included thirty-eight dogfish, thirteen cod from 5 to 19.5 pounds, nineteen small cod, twenty-two sub-legal haddock, nine sub-legal pollock, one porbeagle shark of about 200 pounds and a wolffish. We alternated between drifting and anchoring. All terminal gear worked well today. You could catch fish with any gear or method that you wanted.

    I could not tell you whom was high hook but I suspect it was Matt Day (NH). There was just too much going on to know for sure. Lewis Hazelwood (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 28 pound Maine state trophy cusk. This is the Bunny Clark's largest cusk of the 2024 fishing season so far. It's also the largest cusk we have seen in four seasons and Lew's largest cusk. His largest pollock weighed 11.5 pounds. And he caught a lot of haddock. Dennis Reissig (NY) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 22.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest cusk of the fishing season so far. I took a picture of Dennis holding his massive cusk. This digital image appears on the left. [You can see how blessed we were with such a beautiful morning!] Dennis also caught the largest pollock of the trip at 14 pounds, a 9 pound pollock that I weighed early and tied for the second largest haddock of the trip at 4 pounds. Bryan Lewer won the boat pool for the third largest fish with the third largest fish, a 19.5 pound cod. This is the largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Bryan caught this cod as part of a double keeper catch with a pollock of 10 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. At the time of this writing, this is the largest double of the Bunny Clark fishing season. Bryan lost a massive cusk earlier in the trip. We never did get to see it as he lost if at least half way down.

    Jim Wescom (VT) caught a 19 pound Maine state trophy cusk, the largest cusk of his life and the Bunny Clark's third largest cusk of the fishing season to date. He caught lots of pollock up to 10 pounds and many haddock. Chris Albert (ME) caught a 17.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk, his largest ever cusk and the Bunny Clark's fourth largest cusk of the fishing season so far. I took a picture of Chris holding his trophy. This digital image appears on the right. He also caught a 10.5 pound cod, an 11.75 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. He also landed the hard luck award t-shirt for losing four jigs and getting the worst over-wrap in his reel that I have seen this season to date!

    Matt Day should have won the boat pool for the largest fish with a porbeagle shark that he fought for over thirty minutes. He finally got it right up to the boat when the fish started rolling up in his line. In so doing, the line broke, chaffing on the shark's skin! Matt landed a 14 pound Maine state trophy cusk, the fifth largest cusk of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Some of Matt's other excellent fish included one of the first 10 pound pollock I weighed, a 12.5 pound pollock, another 12.5 pound pollock and another 10 pound pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Darlene Chin (FL) had her best fishing day in a long time. She caught the largest haddock of the trip that didn't get weighed because I told Chris to lift it over the side. Of course, it dropped off the hook. The fish looked to be between 6 and 7.5 pounds. We will never know! I was counting racks at the time and thought it would be easier to just pull it in the boat. Her two best fish that I weighed included a 10 pound cod and a 10 pound pollock. Dave Burton (MA) caught a 10.5 pound cusk, his biggest fish, and a 10 pound pollock. The cusk is tied for the Bunny Clark's seventh largest of the season to date. Tom Lewis' fish of note included a 9.25 pound cusk and the only wolffish of the day at 8.5 pounds. Steve Selmer (NH) tied with Dennis for second largest haddock of the trip with a 4 pounder. The two best fish of his that I weighed included a 10 pound cod and a 10 pound pollock. Dan Wescom (VT) caught a 10 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock that I weighed. Mark Laroche (VT) landed a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Karl Day (ME) caught several pollock in the 10 pound range including several doubles. But he was keeping his fish with Matt so I didn't exactly know which fish were his. The only fish of theirs that I weighed were Matt's.

    I received a couple donations today sponsoring me in my cancer fundraising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge. One was another of the many donations from Dave Burton for $50.00. The other was a check for a generous $100.00 from Don & Rebecca Stedman (TN), giving another donation in honor of brother, Jim Stedman, who would have been 64 years old now. Thank you all so very much for your support and well wishes. It means a great deal to me (and many others) and is very much appreciated!

    Wednesday, July 10, 2024

    Happy Birthday to my sister, Cathy, and my brother, Court!

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 75F, the sky was mostly cloudy, almost a mackerel sky, the wind was light out of the southwest, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was very good in haze.

    Ashore, we light southerly winds all morning and into the early afternoon. By mid-afternoon, the southerly wind started to increase. By 8:00 PM, we had gusts over twenty knots. The wind settled back to about fifteen knots after that. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds but mostly a hazy sun. It was humid today but it wasn't terrible. Or maybe I have just gotten used to it. The visibility along the shore was very good in a thick haze. The highest air temperature that I saw was 91F. This year, already, we have had more than ten days with higher air temperatures than any day last summer. I long for the cooler temperature of last year but the water temperature is lower this year, to date. And the fishing has been much better. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 89F (with a low of 74F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 93F (with a low of 71F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 70F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at five knots, more or less, for the whole trip. The ocean was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 71F. The visibility was held to a quarter of a mile in fog the whole time fishing. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good and landings were good, very good for size today. Most legal fish landed were haddock yet again. Legal landings also included thirteen pollock, a cunner and seventeen cusk. Released fish included a dogfish, four cod over 23", fourteen small cod, sixty-two sub-legal haddock, a couple sculpins and a small pollock. Drifting was the method. No jigs were used today; only bait and cod flies. The cod flies caught the most pollock.

    Hunter Ferland (VT) was the high hook today with the most legal fish. The highlights of his day included the largest haddock at 5 pounds and a double that included a 10 pound pollock and a 7 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The 10 pound pollock was the third largest fish of the trip. Pat Russell (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. This is the largest pollock of the season for a day trip this season. And it comes in at number ten for the ten largest pollock caught on the Bunny Clark this season to date. Pat also caught the largest cusk at 6 pounds and another pollock that weighed 8 pounds. The second largest fish was a 14 pound pollock caught by Harry Gardephe (VT).

    Other Angler Highlights: Eli Pascon (CT) boated a 9 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Shelley Phillips (VT) landed the hard luck award for being the most tangled today.

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip. The wind was out of the south at ten to fifteen knots with higher gusts on the fishing grounds. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The air temperature reached a high of 75F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was hazy sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

    The fishing good, held from the excellent category by the sea conditions. There were too many who were sea sick this evening. The catching and landings were good. Legal landings included a haddock, a pollock, five cusk and two whiting. Released fish included five small cod, four sub-legal haddock, four sub-legal pollock and six sub-legal redfish. They anchored all evening. Everyone used bait. Some also included cod flies on their lines.

    Mike Jones (VT) was high hook with the most legal fish including an 8 pound cusk, a 3 pound cusk and a 3.5 pound cusk. The 8 pound cusk was the second largest fish of the evening. Myrlandy Surprise (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.5 pound cusk. The third largest fish was a 5.5 pound cusk caught by Hazen Tufts (ME). Hazen also caught the only legal haddock, weighing in at 2.75 pounds.

    Other Angler Highlights: Maureen Gainger (CO) landed the hard luck award for attaining high hurler status. I never like to the anglers sea sick.

    Thursday, July 11, 2024

    Horrible weather forecasting put this day away for us, as far as sailing of the high seas with willing anglers goes. The remnants of Hurricane Beryl were supposed to have sparked tornados, give us howling winds and bring us rain. Of course, we know this won't happen. But people live and die on what they hear or read on the internet. So we are in safe harbor today watching the world go by without us in it.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 71F, the sky was mostly cloudy, the wind was out of the south at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good in haze.

    A little before 8:00 AM, it started to rain very lightly. It had been overcast for a hour before. The air temperature got up into the mid 70s but the humidity increased more than any day this season to date. By 10:00 AM, it was sticky, the air thick. The clouds left us by late morning. The sky remained hazy/sunny for the rest of the day. Oddly, the humidity decreased a bit in the afternoon. It was still humid but not as much as it was during the later morning. The wind blew out of south until around sunset. Wind speeds were about fifteen knots, more or less. Seas were three to four feet. By early afternoon, all the scenic tour boats and the sailing charters were tied up for the day. It was just too rough for vacationers. The highest air temperature that I saw was 92F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 90F (with a low of 74F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 92F (with a low of 75F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 68F).

    For such a nice day, there weren't as many people in town as I thought there might be. But the weather forecast was calling for rain, thunder storms and windy conditions. It was fairly windy, not terrible, but windy enough. And, maybe, this was the reason. At any rate, the figures at the restaurant fell short of the figures we had on the same day last year. The air temperature was twelve degrees cooler on last year's date.

    Last night, after everyone was off the boat and Danny had cleaned the area near the engine box, I got in and changed the engine oil. This took me an hour. Danny always helps me, making it so much quicker. Today I changed the sacrificial anodes (zincs) at either end of the intercooler. Only half the zincs had been eaten away, which is what I expected. Had there been more of the zinc missing this would have been problematic. You never know with engines. Anything and everything happens when you least expect it.

    I received a very generous $300.00 donation from Pam & Herb "Cookie" Cook (NY) sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. They are yearly contributors to my cancer research project. Thank you both so much for your support! Pam is a cancer survivor. They both feel very strongly about what I do. And I so appreciate the support!

    Friday, July 12, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 4:30 AM EDT the air temperature was 74F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was light out of the west, the ocean along the shore was calm with wind patches and the visibility over it was very good in haze.

    Ashore, the wind stayed light out of the south all day. Wind speeds were no more than ten knots in the afternoon, light at earlier times in the day. The ocean along the shore was calm all morning. It was humid. With the high air temperature reaching 90F, today, it seemed warmer than normal. The sky was hazy clear all day. The visibility was very good in haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 88F (with a low of 70F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 92F (with a low of 67F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 68F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at ten knots. Seas were light chops of a foot over a long three foot ocean sea swell. The air temperature reached a high of 70F. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were very good overall. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. It was a big haddock day today. Legal landings also included nine pollock, thirty cusk and a whiting. Released fish included two dogfish, six cod that were 4.5 pounds or more, twenty-five small cod, over one hundred and twenty sub-legal haddock, twelve sub-legal pollock and a couple sculpins. Drifting was the method. Bait was best.

    Gary Hammond, Jr. (NY) was high hook with, far and away, the most legal fish. He caught the third largest fish of the trip, a 5.5 pound cod. He also caught the largest haddock at 5 pounds. His token cusk also weighed 5 pounds. Laura Parker (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound cod. This is the Bunny Clark's fifth largest cod of the fishing season so far. Laura also caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 6.5 pound cusk.

    Other Angler Highlights: Ali LaFlamme (ME), on her maiden voyage deep sea fishing and the Bunny Clark's first shore mate, caught the first keeper haddock of the trip. Later, she caught another 3 pound haddock that Skipper Ian took a picture of on his iPhone and sent to me. This digital image appears on the left in this missive. Anthony Altomer (NY) landed the hard luck award for being soiled by a haddock enough to where he had to change his shirt.

    Laura Parker did me a solid today by donating $50.00 to my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Thank you, Laura. I very much appreciate your help and support.

    Saturday, July 13, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the full day trip today.

    At 3:30 AM EDT the air temperature was 76F, the sky was a mix of clear sky and clouds, the wind was blowing out of the south southwest at eight knots and the visibility over the ocean was good in a thick haze.

    Ashore, by 6:00 AM, clouds had moved in and it was raining. This lasted about ten minutes tops. The rain started again at 7:00 AM. But it didn't really start raining hard until about 8:00 AM. The hard rain continued for more than an hour. This petered out, the clouds parting at 11:00 AM with the sun showing shortly afterward. We had very light southerly winds all morning. Southerly winds started to increase by mid afternoon. By 5:00 PM, southerly wind speeds were thirteen to fifteen knots. The sky was hazy clear all day until clouds started to move in at 6:30 PM. Thunder storms showed up by 7:00 PM. We had pouring rain from then until about 7:45 PM. During this we had westerly wind gusts to twenty-five knots. The sky cleared and the winds abated after 8:00 PM. There wasn't enough wind to write about into the night. The visibility over the ocean was fair to poor for most of the day until after the rain showers, excellent after that. The air temperature reached a high of 89F in Ogunquit. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 83F (with a low of 74F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 90F (with a low of 66F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 85F (with a low of 67F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to less than ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less over a long rolling sea swell of two to three feet. The air temperature reached a high of 69F under the canopy top. The visibility ranged to a quarter of a mile to five miles in haze and fog. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was, or seemed, overcast (fog influence?). The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were nearly excellent. Most legal fish landed were cusk followed by haddock, the most cusk I think I have ever heard of on a day trip. There were eleven more cusk caught than haddock today! Legal landings also included thirteen pollock, one redfish and three whiting. Released fish included three dogfish, one good sized cod, twelve small cod, sixty sub-legal haddock and twelve sub-legal pollock. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait and cod flies. Only one jig was used.

    Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. There was just too much going on. Cam Connell (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 9.5 pound pollock caught by David Schmitt (PA). David also caught a 6.5 pound pollock. Nico Orlando (CT) caught the third largest fish, an 8 pound pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Ryan Ranauro (MA) caught the first fish Ian could weigh, a 5 pound cusk. Darnel Cox (ME) caught the largest cod at 6 pounds. Phil Orlando (CT) caught a 5 pound cusk. Hunter Katon (VT) landed the hard luck award for being most sea sick. There were a few.

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip. The wind was out of the south at ten to fifteen knots with higher gusts on the fishing grounds. Seas were chops of one to two feet over a two to three foot swell. The air temperature reached a high of 71F. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to two miles in fog and haze The tide (current) was moderate The sky was hazy sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

    The fishing was good only because the sea conditions kept some anglers under the weather, health wise, and made it hard to fish for others. The catching was good but landings were fair to good. Legal landings included six cusk. Released fish included two small cod, a sub-legal haddock, twelve sub-legal pollock and a sub-legal redfish. They stayed on anchor tonight. Only bait and some cod flies were used.

    Cameron Hamer (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish, two. His fish included a 6 pound cusk, the second largest fish of the trip, and a 3 pound cusk. Mark Eddows (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8 pound cusk. There was a tie for the third largest fish at 5.5 pounds. Both were cusk. Chris Roux (ME) caught one and Zachary Defilippi (MA) caught the other.

    Other Angler Highlights: Max Hohman (VA) caught the first fish to be weighed, a 4.5 pound cusk. Joe Milardo (VT) landed the hard luck award for being the high hurler of the trip. It wasn't pretty.

    I received two $30.00 donations sponsoring me in this season's Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event to raise money to support cancer research. The two donors were Mark Eddows and Chris Roux. Thank you both so very much for your support in this project. It's something that is close to my heart and is really do some good. Much appreciated!

    Sunday, July 14, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was clear, there wasn't enough wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was very good to excellent.

    The wind was light out of the west or southwest all morning. The ocean was flat calm. After noon, the wind backed out of the south and might have blown as hard at ten knots near sunset. The air temperature in Ogunquit reached a high of 88F. The visibility was very good in some haze. The sky was hazy sunny all day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 85F (with a low of 71F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 90F (with a low of 63F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 89F (with a low of 56F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at five knots or less. The ocean remained calm all day. The air temperature reached a high of 72F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

    The fishing was very good, only dropping to the this level due the larger number of dogfish in the area fished. It wasn't horrible with dogfish but there were certainly more than the last to days of trips. The catching was very good. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included six pollock and forty cusk. Released fish included about eighty dogfish, six good sized cod, fifteen small cod, ninety-one sub-legal haddock, twelve sub-legal pollock, two halibut and a sculpin or two. Drifting was the method. There was only one jig used today. Bait was best. Cod flies were second best.

    Shawn Willey (NH) should have won the boat pool with a halibut that weighed around 25 pounds, more or less. It was sub-legal so they didn't want to gaff it and, potentially, kill it. So they tried to lift it in. The attempt failed, the fish flopped back in the water and quickly swam to bottom. Shawn got the hard luck award t-shirt for his loss. Andrew Mastrorillo (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with largest, briefly, boated fish, an 11 pound halibut. Ian took a picture of Andrew holding this fish just before releasing it. This digital image appears on the left. The second largest fish was a 9 pound cod caught by Joe Maillett (ME). Darlene Chin (FL/VT) caught the third largest fish, a 7.25 pound cod.

    Other Angler Highlights: Ethan Willey (NH) caught the largest cusk at 7 pounds. Robert Ramsey (ME) boated a 6.5 pound cod which was weighed and, quickly, released back to the ocean alive. Doug Schlichting (ME) caught the largest haddock at 4.5 pounds.

    I took a rare afternoon off to watch the final of the Euros (football/soccer), England vs Spain, with some friends and England ex-pats, at the Hurricane restaurant in Kennebunkport, Maine. I did the same four years ago when England made the final against Italy. Unfortunately, the result was the same; England lost the game. England could have won. But Spain was the better side on the pitch. I believe that England had the best players but they certainly weren't managed as well as the Spanish team. The game was won in regulation so, at 5:00 PM, I drove to Crooked Barn Press to pick up the extra Tackle Breaker (hard luck award) shirts before heading home. I was thankful that I didn't have to spend extra time there had the game gone to overtime or penalty kicks. But I would have rather seen England win, regardless.

    Monday, July 15, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was hazy clear with whispy clouds, the wind was light out of the south southwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze.

    The sky stayed hazy sunny all day. The wind stayed light out of the south all day, pretty much. The wind velocity jumped over the ten knot mark at 4:00 PM for the first time. It ranged a little stronger than that later in the evening. The air temperature reached a high of 93F. With the higher than normal humidity, it was perspiration producing for sure. The visibility seemed very good. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 95F (with a low of 71F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 93F (with a low of 62F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 92F (with a low of 64F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest to start and then backed out of the south. Wind speeds were as high as ten knots in the end but started off light. Seas were a one foot chop over a sea swell of two to three feet near the end of the trip. The air temperature reached a high of 71F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was sunny all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

    The fishing was good to very good, excellent if you included the dogfish. The catching was very good, excellent if you included the dogfish. Landings were good. Legal landings included forty haddock, thirty-seven pollock, twenty cusk and a mackerel. Released fish included one hundred and fifty, or so, dogfish, eleven cod of 5 to 19 pounds, fifteen small cod, sixty sub-legal cod, a sculpin or two and ten sub-legal pollock. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well but jigs caught the bigger fish.

    Ian couldn't tell me exactly who was high hook with the most legal fish. But if you included cod that would have been legal had the regulations favored it, then probably Jon Leavitt (MA) would have been the angler. Jon won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19 pound cod. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest cod this season so far. Jon also caught the third largest fish today, an 11 pound pollock. And he caught a 7.5 pound cod and a double that included a 10.5 pound pollock and a 6 pound, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Keith Leavitt (MA) caught the second largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock. Both were fishing with jigs.

    Other Angler Highlights: Adam Sacchetti (FL) caught the first fish to be weighed for the boat pool, a 6.5 pound cod. Abby Rudin (MA) caught an 8.5 pound cod after that. Don Carpenter (NH) caught an 8 pound cod and a cod that weighed 7.5 pounds, his two biggest fish. Mark Bernier (CT) caught a 9 pound pollock. James Jeaser (CT) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for catching the most dogfish or winning in the "High Dog" category.

    I received three donations today sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, an event to raise money for cancer research with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Those sponsors included Matt Rudin (MA) for a generous $145.00, Steve LaPlante for $30.00 and Bob Munroe & Linda Burgess (MA) for $40.00. Thank you all so very much for your support, generosity and, most of all, thoughtfulness in your help. I know it's hard to not be able to see where the money is going or how it's being used. But I do know, first hand. And I also know that those who are doing the research are not much different from you. And being at the DFCI is a wonderful experience with people who care. Your help is so very much appreciated!

    Danny DellaMonica and his dory mate, Ali, provisioned the Bunny Clark so I could get some sleep before we left at 9:00 PM to do the Ultra Marathon, our biggest trip of the season. I was grateful to Danny and Ali. All the anglers were aboard when I got down there before 8:00 PM. It took me less than a half hour to check all systems, collect parking, one more fare and get the passenger manifest completed. One quick trip back home to drop all this stuff off and say goodbye to Deb and we were off.

    We left the float right on time at 9:00 PM. The air temperature at that time was 81F. There was a half moon high in the sky you could see as I steered the Bunny down the channel headed for the gate. The visibility was very good. The wind was out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots. I didn't get to see much more as Captain Ian took the helm from me even before we got to the bell buoy. I always sleep like a baby with Ian at the helm. So that's what I did.

    Tim Tuesday, July 16, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston, Anthony Palumbo, Captain Bryan Lewer and I ran the Ultra Marathon trip today.

    We still had five miles to go when I took back the helm. The weather had changed. The visibility was poor in black thick fog. The wind was blowing out of the south southwest at fifteen knots or more. Seas were three to four feet in chops over a long ground swell. The air temperature was in the low 70s.

    On the fishing grounds, the wind and sea conditions were much the same. The seas were three to four feet in chops chased by a wind out of the south southwest at fifteen to twenty knots. This fog, wind and seas remained for most of the morning. Sometime around 10:00 AM, the wind hauled out of the west southwest, the wind dropped to a steady fifteen knots and the fog left us, giving us a visibility over ten miles. The wind and chops diminished as the day progressed. There was also a discernable ground swell. I noticed this at 2:00 PM. It was six feet but so long that there seemed no swell at all. We had five knots of wind at that time with a chop of less than a foot. Afterward, the wind struck out of the southwest and blew up to ten knots, a little bit more than this on the ride home.

    The tide (current) was light in the morning, moderate in the afternoon. From mid afternoon on, the visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The highest air temperature that I saw was 73F. The sky was sunny with some clouds even in the fog. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68F, the highest surface water temperature we have seen so far. .

    When we got back to Perkins Cove, I could see thunder storms headed our way. These struck around 9:00 PM. I had just enough time to take the scooter to the house, get Ian's truck, load all my stuff in the Bunny Clark truck and Ian/Anthony to put the Bunny Clark to bed for the night. The thunder storms and rain lasted until at least 10:00 PM. I was just as glad that we were ashore.

    Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Perkins Cove, Ogunquit, Maine the high air temperature was 94F. And they said it was humid and still, tough to take. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 95F (with a low of 74F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 94F (with a low of 70F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 91F (with a low of 68F).

    The fishing was nearly excellent. Even the seas didn't hinder these angling heroes of mine. The catching was excellent. Landings were very good, excellent for size. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included forty-five haddock, one redfish, twenty-nine cusk and forty-one white hake. Released fish included twelve dogfish, our first blue shark of the season, seven good sized cod, seventeen small cod, twenty-three sub-legal haddock and eleven sub-legal pollock. We drift fished for every stop; but one. We anchored once. All terminal gear worked well but flies were best for the pollock and bait did best with the haddock.

    I took a picture before sunrise of some of the fish we caught with the three anglers who caught them. This digital image appears on the left. From left to right are Steve LaPlante (CT) holding his 22.5 pound white hake, Steve Selmer (NH) holding his 22.5 pound white hake and Bryan Lewer (ME) holding his 15 pound Maine state trophy cusk. I had the foredeck lights on to illuminate the scene.

    I could not tell you whom was high hook. Everyone did so well. But I suspect that it was either Todd Mallory (NY) or Jonathan "Griff" Griffin (MA). Todd Mallory won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 41.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the largest white hake of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Todd also caught an 18.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk, the Bunny Clark's fifth largest cusk of the fishing season to date. Some of his other good fish included a 20.5 pound white hake, a 22.5 pound white hake and a 24.5 pound white hake.

    Jonathan "Griff" Griffin (MA) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 38.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest white hake of the fishing season so far. Griff also caught an 18.75 pound Maine state trophy cusk. This is the Bunny Clark's fourth largest cusk of the fishing season to date. Griff also caught a 23 pound cod, our largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. I took a picture of Griff holding his nice cod before he released back to the ocean alive. This digital image appears on the right. He also caught a lot of pollock.

    Dave Miller (MA) and Dan Killay (VT) tied for the third largest fish at 35 pounds each. Both fish were Maine state trophy white hake. They split the boat pool. Some of Dave's fish included a 24 pound white hake, a 27 pound Maine state trophy white hake and a 27.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Dan also caught a 13.75 pound Maine state trophy cusk and a lot of pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Dave Burton (MA) caught the first fish I could weigh, a 27 pound Maine state trophy white hake. His largest fish was a 31 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the largest white hake that he has ever caught. It's also the fifth largest hake caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. Some of his other great fish included a 28 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 16.5 pound white hake and a 13 pound cod. Bryan Lewer lost two really big fish. One was a white hake that got off the hook and floated away. The other was a massive fish we never got to see. It was either a big hake or a huge cusk. It was not a halibut. Some of the fish of note that he did land included a 15 pound Maine state trophy cusk, a 26.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake and a 21.5 pound white hake. Steve Selmer caught a 22.5 pound white hake and a 21pound white hake. He caught the most keeper haddock with a count of eight. Although, Todd could have caught just as many.

    Steve LaPlante boated a 21.5 pound white hake, his first fish of the day. His largest fish was a 29 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Some of his other good fish included a 22.25 pound white hake, a two 27 pound Maine state trophy white hakes, the largest haddock of the trip at 5.25 pounds, a 15.25 pound cod and the largest pollock of the trip at 12 pounds. His bigger cod is the Bunny Clark's fifth largest cod of the fishing season to date. Mark Girard's (NH) biggest fish was also a 29 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Mark also caught a 9.5 pound pollock, a 10 pound cod and an 11 pound pollock. Mark LaRocca (NY) boated a 26.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake, his largest fish. Two other fish of his that I weighed included a 16.5 pound white hake and a 19 pound white hake. Buzz Leonard (ME) did not catch any big hake. He did, however, catch a 12 pound cod and a 10 pound pollock that I weighed for him. Ray Westermann (MA) caught a 20.5 pound white hake, his biggest fish. He also landed the hard luck award t-shirt for getting sick. Sea sick? I'm not exactly sure!

    I received two donations today sponsoring me in my project for cancer research with the Pan-Mass Challenge. One was another donation from Dave Burton of $50.00 - He has reached or has almost reached the $1,000.00 mark for total donations this season so far. I haven't taken the time to do the tally but, suffice it to write, it's a huge help! The other was a traditional donation of $30.00 from Dave Miller (MA). Dave (and his wife, Joanne) has been a regular donor to my project since I started in 2007. Dave also meets me at the start of every season's PMC ride, the first August Saturday of every year. Thank you both very much for your continued support. It wouldn't be nearly the same or as fun without your involvement!

    Wednesday, July 17, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 71F, the sky was mostly clear with some high thin clouds, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean seemed excellent.

    The wind blew lightly out of the southwest in the morning. Wind speeds were nearly ten knots at times. After noon, the wind backed out of the south and blew up to fifteen knots. The wind stayed out of the south but backed off in velocity after sunset. The visibility was very good in haze. It was sunny for most the day, clouding up after 6:00 PM and raining after 7:00 PM. We never got much rain but it was light and continuous. It was humid again today but there wasn't the high humidity we have seen on previous days (yesterday was one). The air temperature reached a high of 91F in Ogunquit, that I saw. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 90F (with a low of 74F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 91F (with a low of 67F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 71F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots, increasing to ten knots before the ride back to Perkins Cove. The ocean surface was calm to start with chops of one to two feet after the wind increase. The air temperature reached a high of 70F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was hazy sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

    The fishing was nearly excellent. Unfortunately, out of the thirteen anglers aboard, four were kids who didn't fish and we had some anglers who were sea sick. So, even though it was a good day to fish, most didn't take advantage of it. So the catching wasn't as good as it could have been and landings suffered. For the situations today, Ian called the landings good to very good. Legal landings included twenty-four haddock, ten pollock and twenty-eight cusk. Released fish included forty-nine dogfish, one legal sized cod that got off the hook on the surface, four small cod and twenty-five sub-legal haddock. Drifting was the method. Only bait and cod flies were used today.

    Jay LaBarre (MA) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 8 pound pollock caught by Mark Mathieu (VT). Tim Greene (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 5 pound pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Isabella Andonian (MA) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for being the most sea sick.

    We were supposed to have an evening trip but Deb had canceled it because she thought Ian would be too tired after yesterday's trip. I would have taken the trip in a heartbeat. But it was just as well that I didn't. Sometime around 4:30 PM, a transformer blew near Jonathan's Restaurant on Bourne Avenue, shutting down power from the edge of town down shore road and including all of Perkins Cove. Generators were brought in to keep product cold and lobsters alive. And I was there to make the decision to stay open or close for the night. We stayed open. This was definitely the right move as the power came back on at 5:45 PM and we were very busy. The rain put a damper on outside eating but we could accommodate the extra diners inside at Barnacle Billy's, Etc.

    Thursday, July 18, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica hosted the Theresa Burke (PA) full day trip charter today.

    At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 68F, the sky was overcast, the roads were wet from (what looked like) a recent shower, the wind was light out of the south southwest and the visibility over the ocean was suspect since I could not see the light on Boon Island.

    A hour or so later, I realized that the reason I couldn't see Boon Island light was because there was a fog bank offshore. We didn't have fog along the shore. It was a couple miles out. The wind stayed out of the west in the morning and southwest during the later morning and in the afternoon. Wind speeds were less than ten knots or hardly any wind at all at times. The sky cleared by 8:00 AM. The sky remained clear and sunny for the rest of the day. The visibility cleared up to very good. The highest air temperature that I saw was 87F. It was still humid. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 89F (with a low of 71F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 65F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 88F (with a low of 67F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to five knots and then westerly five knots or less. Seas were chops of a foot over a two foot sea swell to start and then calm after that. They carried fog almost all the way to the fishing grounds. There was no fog at their destination. The air temperature reached a high of 74F. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

    The fishing was very good. The sea state was perfect but there were a few dogfish. The catching was very good as were the landings. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twelve haddock, eight cusk and a monkfish. Released fish included seventy-five dogfish, three cod of 5 pounds, eight small cod, twenty sub-legal haddock, twenty-five sub-legal pollock and a couple sculpins. Drifting was the fishing method. All terminal gear worked equally well.

    Ian couldn't tell me whom was high hook. There was just too much going on. Matt Fitting (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound pollock. He caught two pollock of 10 pounds. The third largest fish was an 8.5 pound pollock, caught by Rhonda Ziegler (ID).

    Other Angler Highlights: Duddy Brown (PA) started off the boat pool with a 7.5 pound pollock. Scott Bonacci (ID) caught an 8 pound pollock. Eric Earls (NY) caught a 7.5 pound pollock and an 8 pound pollock, his two best fish. Ryan Nicolson (ID) landed the hard luck award for getting a little green around the gills.

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind was out of the southwest at five knots or less. The ocean was calm for the evening. The air temperature reached a high of 73F. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze The tide (current) was moderate The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was good and landings were fair to good. Legal landings included a redfish, three cusk, eight whiting, a butter mullet and a mackerel. Released fish included two small cod, seven sub-legal haddock, fifteen sub-legal pollock, four small whiting and three small squirrel hake. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait; no jigs were used.

    Abby Laskowski (CT) was the fisherman of the evening. She was high hook with two legal fish and she won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8 pound cusk. Her second largest fish, a 5 pound cusk, was the second largest fish of the trip. Michael Cattabriga (NH) caught the third largest fish, a 4 pound cusk.

    Other Angler Highlights: Joey Cattabriga (NH) caught the only legal redfish, weighing in at 1.5 pounds. Alex Hill (NH) caught a 2.25 pound whiting, the Bunny Clark's fifth largest whiting of the fishing season to date. Sebestien Faucher (QC) landed a 3 pound Maine state trophy whiting. This is the Bunny Clark's fourth largest whiting of the season so far. Captain Ian took a picture of Sebestien holding his prize fish. This digital image appears on the left.

    Matt Fountain (NJ) donated $50.00 to help with my cancer research fundraising project with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thank you so very much, Matt. I really appreciate the support!!

    Friday, July 19, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was cloudless except on the horizon well to the southeast, there wasn't enough wind to write about, the ocean along the shore was flat calm and the visibility over it was excellent.

    Ashore, it was a very pleasant day. The sky was clear with few clouds. The visibility was excellent. There was no humidity. The wind blew lightly out of the west for almost the whole morning. During the afternoon, the wind backed out of the south but never blew up to ten knots. I saw the air temperature reach a high of 82F today during the mid afternoon. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 78F (with a low of 67F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 57F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 60F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at five knots, to no wind to westerly about five knots. The ocean was calm all day. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The air temperature reached a high of 69F. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67F.

    The fishing was good to very good. The sea state was great but there were enough dogfish to push the fishing down a notch or two from excellent. The catching was very good. Landings were good or very good for size. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty haddock, eight redfish, ten cusk and a mackerel. Released fish included over one hundred and twenty-five dogfish (estimate), ten good sized cod, sixteen small cod, sixty sub-legal haddock, seventy-five sub-legal pollock and a small halibut. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked equally well.

    Art Kemler, Jr. (PA) was high hook with the most legal fish. Art didn't get any fish worth weighing. But part of this was because Dina Palaeios (TX) caught a 12 pound pollock right off the bat to start the boat pool going. Art did have some pollock under 10 pounds. Dina's fish tied for third place in fish weight. Bruce Randall (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 12.5 pound halibut caught by Charles Wallace (NY) that Ian weighed and released right back to the ocean alive without a picture. As mentioned, third place came in at 12 pounds. Dina, of course, had one as did Charles, John Kurucz (ME) and Mike DAngelico (NY). Mike's 12 pounder was a cod. He also caught twenty count of dogfish. This count was probably the most caught by an angler today. John's and Charles' fish were both pollock. John also caught an 8 pound pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Drew DAngelico (NY) caught the largest haddock at 6 pounds. Drew's largest fish was a 9 pound pollock. Eric Shurtleff (ME) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for losing two jigs.

    At Barnacle Billy's, Etc. restaurant today, I was told that a couple people wanted to talk to me. They were outside in front of the building. Julia, one of our managers there, pointed two gentlemen out to me. Neither one looked familiar. Indeed, I didn't know them. But, Steve and Barry, said that they wanted to introduce themselves and tell me how much they appreciated reading my daily updates. They also were aboard with my cancer project and wanted to donate $200.00, which they gave me, to support my fundraising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge. I was impressed! I was also very very appreciative. You never know how many you touch by what you write and how your feelings come through in the process. Most people tell me that I write like I talk which, to me, is a complement. It also means to me that my feelings are expressed in my writing. So thank you so very much, Steve and Barry. I enjoyed meeting you today and I certainly appreciate the support!

    Saturday, July 20, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the full day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was cloudless, there was zero wind, the ocean along the shore was mirror calm and the visibility over it was excellent.

    There was zero wind along the shore for another hour until a light southwest breeze started to blow. Wind speeds got up as high as eight knots before noon. After noon, the wind backed out of the south with speeds up over ten knots. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The visibility was very good in haze. The air temperature got up as high as 85F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 87F (with a low of 65F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 54F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 85F (with a low of 58F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots after a flat calm ride to their destination. The ocean was fairly calm all day with a ripple that turned into a one foot chop at most. The air temperature reached a high of 71F. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in some haze. The tide was moderate. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61F.

    The fishing was very good, nearly excellent. The only thing to keep the fishing from being excellent were the few dogfish that were caught in place of the legal fish. But that didn't matter as the catching was nothing short of excellent. In fact, I think there were less dogfish caught because the fish were biting so well the dogs didn't get much of a chance. Landings were very good but almost all the fish were smaller today. Most legal fish landed were cusk, by far; the most cusk I have seen caught on a full day trip in a long time. Legal landings also included fifty haddock and twenty-four pollock. Released fish included about eighty dogfish, one cod of about five pounds or so, eight small cod, forty-nine sub-legal haddock, twenty sub-legal pollock, three porbeagle sharks and a small halibut. Drifting was the method. Not a single angler used a jig today. So bait and cod flies ruled the day.

    Luke Gessler (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. Dan Harrison (ME) would have won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound sub-legal halibut. However, Dan did not enter the boat pool. The fish was quickly weighed and released back to the ocean alive. Zac Pheneuf (MA) and Luc Gessler tied for the boat pool for the largest fish with the two second largest fish at 8 pounds each. Zac's fish was an 8 pound cusk while Luke's fish was an 8 pound pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Dan Cote (ME) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for attaining high hurler status today. There were a few who were sea sick today in this nice weather. Who knew?

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind was out of the southwest at five knots to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot. The air temperature reached a high of 72F. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze The tide (current) was moderate The sky was sunny and clear. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

    The fishing was excellent; the sea state was perfect, there were no dogfish and the tide was just right for drifting. The catching was fair to good. Landings were poor. Legal landings included a small haddock, six whiting and a mackerel. Released fish included two small cod, three sub-legal haddock, a small porbeagle shark and twenty-two sub-legal pollock. Drifting was the method. No jigs were used, only bait and cod flies.

    There wasn't an angler designated as high hook tonight as only one angler caught a legal sized fish. Gage Berlin (NH) should have won the boat with the largest fish, a two foot long porbeagle shark pup. But it was lost right next to the boat before Ian or Danny could get the fish out of the water. It was illegal to keep anyway so they didn't want to gaff it and kill it just to get a weight on it. Leroy Little (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 2 pound haddock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Darrien Murrey (ME) was the only angler sea sick this evening. For this poor state of health he landed the official Bunny Clark hard luck award t-shirt!

    I received two donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a $30.00 gift from Luke Gessler (ME). The other was an anonymous $10.00 gift. Thank you both very much for extending your thoughtfulness to this cancer project of mine. The donations are very much appreciated by all, including me!

    Sunday, July 21, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was a mix of clouds and clear patches, the wind was light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good, at least.

    Ashore, it was another perfect day. There was very little humidity, if any. The visibility was excellent all day. The sky was clear and sunny. The wind was light out of the northwest to begin, flat calm with zero wind and, then, very light and variable in the afternoon and into the night. The highest air temperature that I saw was 82F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 88F (with a low of 67F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 58F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 60F).

    On the fishing grounds, there was no wind all day. The ocean was flat calm. The air temperature reached a new high for a trip this year at 75F, no doubt influenced by sitting on a mirror all day. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was sunny and clear. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68F. This equals the highest surface water temperature that we have seen this season to date.

    The fishing was very good to excellent, depending on the angler. There were some dogfish but not a lot of dogfish and the weather was perfect. The catching was very good. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were cusk, by far. And this is strange to me that so many cusk would be available to bite. Maybe it's because the dogfish count is down this season? Legal landings also included fifty-one haddock, forty-five pollock, two redfish and a cunner. Released fish included fifty or so dogfish, four cod of decent size up to 10.5 pounds, twelve small cod, fifty or so sub-legal haddock, twenty-five sub-legal pollock and twelve sub-legal redfish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well today.

    Art Kemler, Jr. (PA) surely had to be high hook with the most legal fish today. I did not get confirmation from Captain Ian about this but he certainly had the most bags of fillets coming off the boat. And Art is no stranger to the high hook category. Art also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. This makes him the fisherman of the day as well. His 13 pound pollock was caught as a double with another pollock of 12.5 pounds, the second largest fish of the trip, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest double of the fishing season to date. Art had caught a 9 pound pollock as his largest fish until the very end of the trip when he caught the double.

    John Cadorette (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. He had the largest fish of the trip before Art caught his double. Some of John's other fish included an 11 pound pollock and the largest cod at 10.5 pounds.

    Other Angler Highlights: Adam Tozian (MA) caught the first fish that Ian could weigh for the boat pool, a 7 pound pollock. Patrick Wallace (QC) also landed a 7 pound pollock today. Leo Tozian (MA) caught an 11 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Corie Treemont (MA) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for being the only angler to get sea sick.

    John Cadorette helped in my cancer research project with the Pan-Mass Challenge by donating $40.00 today. Thank you, John, so very much for your support. I really do appreciate it every time you donate. And John has donated every time I have seen him on the boat since I started this project.

    Monday, July 22, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica are running the extreme day trip today.

    At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was nearly cloudless, there was no wind, the ocean was mirror calm and the visibility over it was excellent. More later.

    We have room on some upcoming trips: The Friday, July 26, extreme day trip has one fishing spot available, the extreme day trip on Monday, June 29, has nine fishing places available and we have many spots available on most of the trips moving forward. We are still catching haddock. We are starting to see pollock filtering into the fishing grounds, including fish in the low to mid teens (for weight) and we caught our fifth halibut on the extreme day trip on July 1st. Ian is definitely closing in on the halibut. Don't miss a day of good fishing at a time when groundfish are still active and the water is still cold!










    Graphic

    Book a Trip on Line


    Download Our Newest Guestletter

    Graphic Click the icon to view a complimentary copy of the 2023 Guestletter.

    www.bunnyclark.com






    Back To Home Page, Deep Sea Fishing Maine