www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

Tuesday, June 18, 2024, 3:00 AM EDT




Graphic

Book a Trip on Line

Our Two Biggest Redfish

The digital image on the left is a shot of Nikki Szczepanski (NY/VA) holding her 2.5 pound Maine state trophy redfish (ocean perch) while, the digital image on the right, shows Paul Glowacki (NY) holding his 2.5 pound Maine state trophy redfish. Both fish were caught on the marathon trip of June 11, 2024. Both redfish are the largest that either angler has ever caught. They are also the two largest redfish landed from the Bunny Clark this season so far. At sixteen inches caliper fork length, these fish are probably seventy-five years old. Redfish bear their young alive. It's the only teleost, that I know of, that reproduces in this manner. We are starting to find the bigger redfish in deeper water now. Hopefully, we will see more of these large redfish before the season ends. They are a very delicious fish to eat.




Proposed regulations for the 2024 fishing season starting May 1, 2024. Cod can only be kept in the fall under these regulation changes.

Gulf of Maine cod

  • Open season: September 1 - October 31
  • Minimum size: 23 inches
  • Possession limit: 1 fish per day

    Gulf of Maine haddock

  • Open season: May 1 February 28; April 130
  • Minimum size: 18 inches
  • Possession limit: 15 fish per day

    These regulations for groundfish apply equally to anglers on privately owned recreational boats and party/charter boats as well.

    Thursday, May 30, 2024

    Danny DellaMonica and I ran the marathon trip today.

    At 2:30 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at five knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

    As we headed down the channel to the open ocean, the half moon was hanging above the southwestern horizon. And for most of the ride to the fishing grounds, the sky was mostly clear and blue. We saw a nice sunrise. The visibility was excellent. Behind us, we saw the dark clouds on the horizon that, I knew, would be overhead before the morning was out. We carried 63F at the helm for more than half the ride. The wind was out of the north for more than half the ride. Wind speeds were ten knots or so with seas in chops of a couple feet.

    As soon as we got to the fishing grounds, the wind hauled out of the northeast. Before two hours was up, the wind had increased to fifteen and twenty knots. Seas increased to four and five feet in chops. The sky clouded over. It started to rain during the later morning. It rained for the rest of the time fishing, stopping at the same time that I called the day. The air temperature reached a high of 56F. The tide (current) was light or lightly into the wind. The visibility ranged to over thirty miles after the rain. The surface water temperature reached a high of 54.4F.

    Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Perkins Cove, Ogunquit, Maine the high air temperature was 63F as we left to head for the grounds. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 60F (with a low of 52F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 45F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 61F (with a low of 49F).

    The fishing was good to very good. It was so choppy that the anglers on the bow had a hard time hanging on. It was tough fishing up there. The confused seas put several anglers under the weather. The angler count was down from the start. The catching was very good. Landings were good overall. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included nine pollock, eight redfish, twenty-five cusk and six whiting. Released fish included fifty-five dogfish, one sea raven, eleven small cod, four cod from 5 to over 10 pounds, a sculpin, twenty-nine sub-legal haddock, one legal haddock, eleven sub-legal pollock, a red hake, two wolffish, three porbeagle sharks and one small halibut. We anchored for every stop; it was just too choppy and rainy to drift. Bait and cod flies caught the most fish. We still had a fair number of anglers who kept fishing with a jig anyway. Our landings suffered because of this, the difference between good and very good.

    Dave Burton (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish. His best fish was a 6.25 pound haddock. The largest fish of the trip was a 15 pound halibut caught by Chris Tankred (OH). This is only the second halibut we have caught this season. He did not enter the boat pool. This is the first Atlantic halibut that he has ever seen caught and, of course, his first Atlantic halibut. Chris was pumped. I took a picture of Chris holding his halibut. This digital image appears on the left. He also caught a 6 pound cod and a 7 pound pollock, that I weighed. The second largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Jeff Tankred (PA). This is the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the fishing season so far. He too didn't enter the boat pool. Stefan James (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the third largest fish, an 11 pound wolffish. This is the largest wolffish that has been caught on the Bunny Clark this season to date. His largest haddock weighed 5.25 pounds.

    Dean Stevens (VT) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the fourth largest fish, a 9.5 pound wolffish, the Bunny Clark's second largest wolffish of the season to date. He also won the boat pool for the third largest fish with the seventh largest fish, a 7.1 pound Maine state trophy haddock. This is the largest haddock that Dean has ever caught. He has been fishing with me for over twenty years. I took a picture of Dean at the fillet table holding his prize haddock. This digital image appears on the right. Dean also caught a 7 pound pollock. Charles Suelke (PA) landed a 9 pound Maine state trophy haddock, the fifth largest fish of the trip. This is his largest ever haddock. It's also the Bunny Clark's second largest haddock of the fishing season so far. At 31.5 inches caliper fork length, it's our longest haddock caught this season to date. He also caught a 7.75 pound Maine state trophy haddock, the sixth largest fish of the trip. Charles didn't enter any of the boat pools. He also caught a 6 pound cod.

    Other Angler Highlights: Brandon Stevens (VT), who was in all the boat pools brought a cod to the surface that was over 10 pounds. It was lip hooked. He lost it while trying to lift it into the boat. It would have won the boat pool for the second largest fish. His largest haddock weighed 6.25 pounds. He also caught a 6 pound pollock. Mark Coleman (NY) caught the most haddock today. His largest weighed 5 pounds. Ronald Covey (VT) caught two haddock of 5 pounds each. Tony Atchinson lost a pollock that probably would have won one of the pools today. I had given him a white fly to try as white had seemed to work very well on my last trip. Sure enough he caught a pollock of about 8 or more pounds and a haddock of 5 pounds or more, both lost on the surface when I tried to pull them over the rail. Thanks but no thanks? Jordan Linton (OH) started out with the first fish that I could weigh for the boat pool, a 6.5 pound haddock. This was his largest fish today. He also landed the hard luck award t-shirt for being today's high hurler. He was also the first hurler, by far the most vocal and had the best projection!

    I received three donations sponsoring me in my cancer fundraising project with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those anglers and their donations included Charlie Tankred (OH) for a generous $100.00, Andrew Sullivan (PA) for $60.00 and Mark Coleman for $50.00. Charlie and Mark have been supporting me for years but any donation of any size is greatly appreciated. Cancer bothers everyone, either directly or indirectly. I am very glad to be associated with a research crew who is on the cutting edge of genetic research. Thank you Charlie, Drew and Mark for your help in all this. Very thoughtful.

    Friday, May 31, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica are hosting the Gary Hammond, all New York, extreme day trip charter today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 51F, the sky was mostly clear with a half moon in the southeast sky hanging high over the ocean, the wind was blowing out of the north northwest at five knots or more and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

    It was the best weather day we have had this season so far, ashore. The sky cleared and was cloudless for the morning, nearly cloudless in the afternoon. The wind blew out of the north or north northwest up to ten knots right close to shore while, offshore just a mile, the ocean was flat calm. After noon, the wind was light out of the west southwest but backed out of the northwest, light, by mid afternoon, on. The visibility was excellent. The highest air temperature that I saw was 76F with, what seemed, zero humidity. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 77F (with a low of 54F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 40F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 47F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest, barely, in the morning, let go altogether and then hauled out of the southwest between five and ten knots. The ocean was calm all morning with a light chop after the wind shift. The air temperature reached a high of 62F. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate in the morning and strong in the afternoon. [The tide has been stronger this year, abnormally so. We always have some strong tides around the moon. But this year we have had more strong tide currents that many I can remember except for 1987, which was an abnormally strong tide year as well.] The sky was clear and sunny from start to finish. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55F, low for this time of year on such a calm day. Hopefully, I'm hoping, it will stay colder than normal to keep the blue sharks away for a bit longer this summer.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were very good overall. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far, yet again. [Thank God for the haddock and the increased size of the haddock this season!] Legal landings also included two pollock, four redfish, nineteen cusk and three whiting. Released fish included eight dogfish, seven small cod, one hundred and fifty-one sub-legal haddock, which was a much lesser number than legal haddock today, and a couple of small sub-legal pollock. They drift fished all morning and anchored in the afternoon when the tide was the strongest. Bait worked best; no jigs were used today - which is unusual for this group.

    Ryan Groat and Gary Hammond, Jr. tied for high hook today with the most legal fish. Ryan caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 5.5 pound haddock. John Mulica won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.75 pound haddock. This fish was just a quarter of a pound shy of a Maine state trophy. By the way, we need three more trophy haddock to tie our record trophy haddock count of fifty for a single season! Pretty amazing after not seeing many trophy haddock last season. John also caught the third largest fish of the trip, a 5 pound haddock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Vasyl Yevko caught the first fish to be weighed for the boat pool, a 4.5 pound cusk. Joe Scali caught the next fish to be weighed, a 4 pound haddock. Vern Doyle also caught a 4 pound haddock. Vern landed the hard luck award for getting into the most tangles.

    Saturday, June 1, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg hosted the Jeff Breton, all Maine, full day trip charter today.

    At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 51F, the sky was cloudless with a crescent moon hanging in the east, the wind was blowing out of the north northwest at five knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

    Ashore, we had very light northwest winds in the morning, no wind at all with a flat calm ocean along the shore, and light southerly wind in the afternoon, dropping the air temperature down ten degrees from 5 to 6 PM. The visibility was excellent. The sky was cloudless or clear at any period of the day. The highest air temperature that I saw was 82F. There was no humidity. So it was very comfortable. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 82F (with a low of 56F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 42F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 47F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at less than five knots, or there was no wind, for the trip.The ocean was calm all day. The air temperature reached a high of 67F. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was very strong today. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55F or very cold for this time of year with such a calm ocean surface.

    The fishing was fair to good. The tide ran a river (1.5 knots on the drift) and the dogfish were way too many. The catching was very good, excellent if you included the dogfish. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock. Legal landings also included just two pollock. Released fish included over one hundred and fifty dogfish, over a hundred sub-legal haddock, ten small cod and two cod that would have been legal to take had they been able to keep cod. They anchored for almost every stop and drift fished at the end. Bait was best.

    Ian could not discern whom was high hook with the most legal fish. Travis Works won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound cod. He also caught the second largest fish, a 5 pound cod. The third largest fish was a 4 pound haddock caught by Jeff Breton.

    Other Angler Highlights: Bill Perkins (NH) caught a 3.5 pound haddock early in the trip. George Batchelder had issues with his back that placed him at odds with the fishing. So George got the shirt for the hardest luck today. There really was no bad luck today except for picking a day with a lot of fishing challenges along with perfect weather for humans on the high seas.

    I received two donations sponsoring my bike ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge for improved cancer research today. One was for $10.00 from a person who never volunteered their identity. The other was a $50.00 gift from Jeff Breton himself. Thank you both so very much for your support and thoughtfulness. I very much appreciate your help.

    Sunday, June 2, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was a cool 47F, the sky was cloudless with a sliver of a moon hanging in the east, there wasn't enough wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze.

    Ashore, it was the most beautiful day of the year. There was no wind along the shore until a southerly wind started to flow before noon. All morning the ocean was flat glassy calm. As the afternoon progressed the southerly wind got stronger but in never got as strong as ten knots. I did see eight knots around 5:00 PM, just enough to pick up a flag. The visibility was excellent all day. We had some high clouds but not enough clouds to mar a bright clear sunny day. The air temperature reached a high of 84F, the highest air temperature that I have seen this season so far. The air was dry today with zero humidity so it was very comfortable sitting on the deck at Barnacle Billy's restaurant. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 82F (with a low of 53F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 45F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 45F).

    On the fishing grounds, the ocean was calm all day. The wind blew out of the southwest at five knots or less at the most. The air temperature reached a high of 63F. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was fierce, very strong. It was so strong that they couldn't anchor. The sky was sunny all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56F.

    The fishing was good, at best. The tide was just to strong to give any more credit than "good" to the fishing. The catching was very good despite. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included five pollock, two redfish, seven cusk and seven whiting. Released fish included fifteen small cod, about one hundred and fifty sub-legal haddock and one dogfish. They drift fished and anchored but didn't anchor but once. Bait was by far the best way to catch fish today, like it has been.

    Ian couldn't tell me whom was high hook. Buzz Leonard (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6 pound haddock. Buzz also caught the second largest fish, a haddock that weighed 5.25 pounds. The third largest fish was a 4.75 pound haddock caught by Tony Hart (NY).

    Other Angler Highlights: Dale Jackson (ME) caught the first fish to weigh, a 4 pound haddock. Karen Atwood (VT) caught a 4.25 pound haddock. Kenny Bowman (ME) caught the only dogfish. Rob Hamilton (VT) became reacquainted with his breakfast today and landed the hard luck award t-shirt for his efforts. He was the only one who was seasick.

    Monday, June 3, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was a very warm 68F, the sky was mostly clear with evenly spaced flat clouds, there wasn't enough wind to write about, the ocean along the shore was mirror calm and the visibility over it seemed very good in some haze.

    It was another excellent day ashore today. The sky was sunny and clear with only a few high thin clouds to taint an otherwise perfectly sunny day. The visibility was very good in some haze. The wind blew out of the northeast up to ten knots in the morning and then just died out and hauled out of the southeast. I really never did see wind speeds over ten knots. Mostly it was about five to seven knots. There was no humidity today. The highest air temperature that I saw was 75F, a perfect air temperature. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 76F (with a low of 59F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 86F (with a low of 57F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 55F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten to five knots. Then the wind hauled out of the east and dropped to five knots or less. They had a one foot chop in the morning and calm seas from later morning until it was time to boot home. The air temperature reached a high of 65F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was strong again today. But, as luck would have it, the wind in the morning was opposing the current so it made drifting perfect. The sky was hazy clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55F.

    The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were very good. They caught a pile of haddock today. It was non stop, one of the best days of the season. Most legal fish caught, of course, were haddock. Legal landings also included five pollock, three cusk and four whiting. Released fish included a porbeagle shark, no dogfish, three cod from 5 to 7 pounds, fourteen small cod, two hundred and sixty sub-legal haddock and a sculpin. Drifting was the method. Bait worked best.

    Former deck hand, Anthony Palumbo (MA), was high hook with the most legal fish by far. He didn't even fish all the time. He also didn't have a fish big enough to weigh. Rene Sanchez (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.5 pound Maine state trophy haddock. It was the only fish that he caught today on the first day of his life deep sea fishing! Captain Ian took a picture of Rene holding his big haddock. This digital image appears on the left. The second largest fish was a 7 pound cod caught by Ed Scott (MA). Jack Doherty (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 6 pound cod.

    Other Angler Highlights: Ronaldo (Christiano?) (MA) caught a 4.5 pound haddock, his best fish. Dan Killay (VT) caught a 4.5 pound haddock and a 5 pound haddock, his two biggest fish. Bryan Griggs (NH) also caught a 5 pound haddock. Joel Gath (NH) was the only angler to personally feel that the motion of the ocean fell counter to his equilibrium. He landed the hard luck award t-shirt for his body's reaction to this feeling.

    I received a very generous $250.00 donation from Peter Voorheis (NY) sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. As you must know by now, this is a cycling event to raise money for cancer research. I may or may not ride in this event this season, depending on the revaluation of my spine from the accident that took place on June 5, 2023. Peter has been a great friend of the Tower family for many years. His father used to come watch me run cross country when I attended Alfred University in western New York state in the early '70s. I tuna fished with his brother, Tim, who was a great friend to my brother, Court. And Peter's other two brothers, Brian and Mark; I had wonderful times with them growing up. All are very intelligent caring individuals. Thank you, Peter. Very thoughtful and much appreciated!

    As for me today, I had two posts drilled into my upper jaw at tooth slot number 3 and number 13 for implants and, future, new teeth. I thought I was going to be in pain, having to take pain killers and, thus, not be able to take the marathon trip tomorrow. The procedure created no blood in my mouth. After the novocaine wore off, I had no pain and no swelling. But I did take the doctor's advice and laid low for the day. Even when I went to bed at 8:00 PM, I didn't even feel the slightest twinge in that area of my mouth. As it turned out we couldn't garner enough interest to run tomorrow's trip anyway, despite the fact that Ian was going to take the trip for me! I have some catching up to do tomorrow. I will have time to do so.

    A Not So Tim Tuesday, June 4, 2024

    We did not have enough interest to run today's marathon trip. Alas, the old BC resides under the deck of Barnacle Billy's where it's patrons wonder what the boat with the gray hull and the green trim does. I used to pride myself in the fact that the Bunny Clark never appeared in postcards of Perkins Cove because she was always out fishing!

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was very light from the north, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was excellent.

    Ashore, the wind stayed light out of the northeast until about 8:30 AM but was rolling to the east. By noon, the wind had moved to blow out of the southeast and south southeast. By 6:00 PM, the wind was out of the south. The wind kept blowing out of the south on into the night. Wind speeds were light. At one point after noon, mid afternoon probably, the wind could have been blowing ten knots. Most of the time the wind was light, the ocean along the shore was calm. The visibility ranged from very good to excellent all day. There was a small bit of haze. The sky was mostly sunny all day with some high cirrus clouds. The highest air temperature that I saw was 71F. That was shortly after noon before the wind came off the ocean from the south. Also, this air temperature was taken at the house, not in the Cove where the wind off the water had kept the air temperature in the 60s all day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 67F (with a low of 57F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 51F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 51F).

    By staying ashore, I got to work in the restaurant all day. It was a beautiful day there wind most comfortable sitting out on the deck at the original Barnacle Billy's. At Barnacle Billy's, Etc., it was a bit cooler with no protection from the wind with the locust trees above offering too much shade. It felt like a beautiful spring day there while it felt more like a beautiful summer day on the deck at "Original".

    I started off the day by bringing two lobster cooker tanks from B.B., Etc. up to DSM Fabrication in Biddeford, Maine. We needed some work done on one and a duplicate of the other made with heavier gauge stainless steel. I was back before 9:00 AM.

    June 1 marked the beginning of the tuna fishing season. There have been several tuna landed in Perkins Cove since then. I'm sure there were a few caught today as well. But I didn't stay around past 6:30 PM to find out, preferring to leave early so I could eat and get to bed in good season.

    Tomorrow will be the anniversary of my bike crash where I broke seven vertebrae in my back among other broken bones. I'll be on my trainer in honor of that day watching a movie on TV.

    Wednesday, June 5, 2024

    Again, not enough interest in deep sea fishing on the Bunny Clark to move her off the float to the east and on to the grounds. The wooden anchors are out for a second day. She will be sailing tomorrow for a marathon trip.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was clear with whisps of high cirrus clouds, the wind was light out of the southwest, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was excellent.

    The sky stayed sunny and hazy clear, with high clouds, for most of the morning. The sky stayed mostly sunny with only high clouds making it a hazier sun than normal. The air temperature rose into the 60s before 8:00 AM. After noon, the air temperature rose to 85F. It was humid as well making it feel a bit warmer. The wind blew out of the southwest for most of the day, maybe more westerly in the afternoon. We saw almost ten knots of wind which cooled us down to reasonable temperature levels. It was a beautiful summer day. At 4:30 PM, we had a light thunder shower. There was very little rain, just enough to get the roads wet. The thunder and lightning were distant. The visibility was very good in some haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 86F (with a low of 59F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 55F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 56F).

    I had a meeting with my accountant at 10:00 AM. That lasted for more than an hour. The rest of the day I worked at both restaurants.

    Thursday, June 6, 2024

    Danny DellaMonica and I ran the marathon trip today.

    At 2:30 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was partly cloudy, there wasn't enough wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze.

    It was 65F when we left the dock to head to the fishing grounds. And it remained within a degree of that temperature for the whole ride out. The visibility was very good until about twenty-eight miles from our destination. Then the fog closed in. It remained foggy until we stopped. Because of the fog, we couldn't see the sky. So I couldn't have told you if the sky was clear or cloudy. The wind blew lightly out of the south southeast the whole ride.

    On the grounds, we remained in fog for most of the fishing. Half way through, the fog left us, the visibility opened up to five or more miles, the sky was clear and sunny and the air temperature went from 63F to 66F. A half hour later we were back in the fog again with, at most, a eighth of a mile of mile visibility. The high air temperature was the 66F reading we got when the fog cleared. The tide (current) was strong all day, with the wind in the beginning, into the wind in the afternoon. The wind blew out of the south southeast for the whole time fishing. Wind speeds were about ten knots more or less. Seas showed about three feet in seas that were slow swells under chops of, mostly, two feet. The seas seemed to be related to the tide because, as soon as we got off the bank and into the deeper water, the chops lessened and the seas dropped. The most visibility we had was probably fifteen miles on the ride out, ten miles max at some other time on the ride back to Perkins Cove. The sky seemed cloudy for the ride home. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

    Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Perkins Cove, Ogunquit, Maine the high air temperature was 70F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 73F (with a low of 61F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 75F (with a low of 59F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 57F).

    The fishing was very good, at best, with the tide. The catching was good. Landings were fair, our worst marathon trip of the season to date. Most legal fish landed were pollock. We saw very few haddock today which really surprised me. Besides pollock, we only caught nine legal haddock, eleven cusk and a sculpin. Released fish included thirteen dogfish, eight cod from 4.5 pounds to 10 pounds, six small cod, eleven sub-legal haddock and forty-one small pollock. We anchored mostly and drift fished some. Cod flies caught the lion's share of the legal fish today. Bait came next while jigs were the least effective.

    I really couldn't tell you whom was high hook today with the most legal fish, it was so evenly balanced. Bruce Randall (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the fishing season to date. Bruce also caught a 9 pound cod and a 9.25 pollock. Ray Westermann (MA) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. This pollock ties our third largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Fred Kunz (NH) won the boat pool for the third largest fish with the third largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. Fred also caught a 10 pound cod and an 11.25 pound pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Captain Ian Keniston, on a bus man's holiday, caught the most legal haddock, three. He also caught the largest haddock at 4 pounds. His largest cod weighed 10 pounds. I didn't weigh his largest pollock but it looked to be about 8 pounds. Steve LaFlam (NH) caught a 10.25 pound pollock, his biggest fish. He also caught two pollock of 9 pounds each. Dave Burton (MA) caught a 10 pound pollock, his biggest fish. His second biggest fish was a pollock that weighed 9 pounds. Bill Donnelly (MA) caught a 9 pound pollock, his biggest fish. He also landed the hardest luck of the trip award when got an overwrap in his reel. It wasn't a very bad one but it was the worst thing that happened today, aside from everyone picking the wrong boat to go out on a marathon trip!

    I received three donations today sponsoring me in my cancer fundraising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Fred Kunz donated $20.00, Steve LaFlam gave $30.00 and Bill Donnelly gave $50.00. Thank you all so very much for your support. I appreciate it very much but there are others who appreciate it much more including the researchers who I support and the people affected by this disease. Thanks again!

    Friday, June 7, 2024

    Another day on the beach; we had no interest in today's trip. The Bunny Clark resided in Perkins Cove for the day.

    At 5:30 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was overcast, it was drizzling light rain, the wind was blowing lightly out of the north and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in haze. A couple of hours previously, it was foggy along the shore, the wind was light out of the east, it was raining lightly and the visibility was poor.

    The rain stayed away all day except for a tropical type rain shower that happened after 7:00 PM. That lasted about fifteen minutes. They sky seemed overcast all day but it might have just been the fog that we experienced along the shore. The fog never really got thick along the shore but it was evident offshore so that the visibility over the ocean was fair at best. At times there would be more clearing than we expected. Other times it looked like the fog was going to roll in and envelope us. The fog never rolled in. After the rain fall, around 7:30 PM, the sky cleared and the fog started to leave us for good. The wind blew out of the northeast up to ten knots and, maybe, a little over ten knots in the morning. After noon, the wind transitioned out of the east and kept blowing out of the east until sunset. Winds speeds stayed under ten knots during the afternoon. From 5:30 PM to 6:40 PM, we had a mist come in that was unpleasant to walk in. This was before we had the rain. And you could see from the clouds to west that it looked like rain was coming. The air temperature reached a high of 72F, that I saw, but was mostly in the mid to high 60s from 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM, influenced by onshore breeze along the coast. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 70F (with a low of 62F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 59F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 56F).

    I open up the restaurants on Friday mornings. So I was down in the Cove at 4:15 AM this morning turning lights on and opening doors. We have prep cooks that show up at 5 to 6:00 AM so I had to get prepared for them. And we have a bread delivery at 4:30 AM. We also have other deliveries throughout the morning. All deliveries on Friday are completed before Matt Pedersen, our head manager at Barnacle Billy's, shows up at 9:00 AM to take my place. I had a few things to run around and get done after that, all associated with the restaurant. By the time I got a shower/shave, I was back in the Cove at 11:30 AM.

    This is the beginning of BonAire Weekend in Ogunquit which celebrates Ogunquit's history, culture, restaurants, contributions in art and everything that Ogunquit stands for. As part of this weekend, Barnacle Billy's took part in a chowder tasting walk-up. Each restaurant down Shore Road and Perkins Cove Road had covered tables with chowder pots and small cups handing out chowder samples. This event took place between 5 PM to 7 PM. It went very well. And it was certainly a chowder day today.

    I worked at the restaurants until 8:00 PM and, then, went home.

    Saturday, June 8, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica hosted the Christi Holmes extreme day trip charter today. Christi was no aboard today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was cloudless, there wasn't enough wind to write about, the ocean along the shore was flat calm and the visibility over it was excellent, a perfect morning to start the day.

    Ashore, the day just got better. The air temperature had warmed to 65F by 9:15 AM, the sun was brilliant overhead, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was excellent. The sky was a mix of clouds and sun, the bigger clouds giving us about fifteen seconds of rain every now and again. There wasn't enough rain in these clouds to make people move off the deck to the inside dinning room of Barnacle Billy's but enough to be annoying in some sprinkles. The wind came and went with these local minor low pressure cells. It seemed, from looking at the sky, that more rain was falling around Ogunquit than on Ogunquit. The wind blew out of the west all day. Occasionally, we got a lot of wind briefly around these cells, anywhere from out of the west to the north and northwest. Mostly the wind was out of the west at ten knots. The visibility remained excellent. The highest air temperature that I saw was 73F. Mostly, the air temperature hung around 70F, a perfectly pleasant day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 75F (with a low of 60F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 73F (with a low of 52F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 56F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or two over a long two foot swell. The air temperature reached a high of 66F. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The sky was sunny all day with few clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58F. Slowly but surely, the water temperature is rising up. Strange year so far for weather and associated temperatures.

    The fishing was very good to excellent. The tide and the few dogfish were the only factors to keep the fishing out of the excellent category all day. The catching was excellent. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included seven pollock, a redfish, six cusk and a cunner. Released fish included about fifty dogfish, twelve small cod, one 7.5 pound cod, a hundred and forty-eight sub-legal haddock, a sculpin and a small pollock. Drifting was the method. Bait and cod flies worked the best.

    Julie Mahoney (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. Julianna Grindle (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound pollock. She also caught the 7.5 pound cod, the third largest fish of the trip. Her largest haddock weighed 4 pounds. Christine Hyland (ME) landed the second largest fish, an 8.25 pound pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Andrea Kelley (ME) caught the largest haddock of the trip weighing in at 4.5 pounds. Megan Lowell (ME) reached high hurler status and landed the hard luck award t-shirt. Ouch!

    Ralph Trotto (MA) did me a solid today by donating $30.00 to my cancer reseach project with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Ralph has made some kind of donation every year since I became involved. Thank you so much, Ralph. Always much appreciated!

    Sunday, June 9, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 4:30 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was mostly cloudy with lateral breaks in the clouds here and there, the wind was blowing out of the west at eight knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

    Ashore, it started to rain a little before 7:00 AM. A light rain continued and turned into a heavier, more steady rain by 10:00 AM. The steady rain kept up until 2:00 PM, when it started to taper off. By 2:30 PM, there was only the occasional bit of rain. By 3:00 PM, the clouds were clearing out and a clear sky could be seen almost overhead and all to the west. The sky remained sunny for the rest of the day. Right around 7:00 PM, clouds started to show up from the north and west, threatening rain. We had a few drips is all. The wind was light from the west in the morning and early afternoon, backing out of the southwest and south and, then, back out of the west by 9:00 PM. The visibility was very good to excellent even through the rain. The highest air temperature, that I saw, was 68F around 4:00 PM. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 70F (with a low of 57F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 69F (with a low of 51F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 53F).

    On the fishing grounds, it rained for most of the trip, clearing before it was time to head back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature reached a high of 59F. The wind blew out of the west at ten to five knots, hauled out of the northwest at five knots and, then, went calm. The visibility was fair to poor in fog and rain. The fog lightened up as the day progressed giving them three to five miles of visibility. By 2:00 PM, the visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57F.

    The fishing was very good, knocked down a peg by the stronger than normal tide and our third best trip for numbers of dogfish. The catching was excellent. Landings were very good, despite the dogs. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. It's been a hell of a great start for haddock landings this season. This may be the best start for haddock in a season that we have ever seen. Legal landings also included eleven pollock, one cusk, a whiting and two mackerel. Released fish included an estimated one hundred and fifty dogfish, four good sized cod, eight small cod, an estimated two hundred sub-legal haddock, a handful of small pollock and a sculpin. They dirft fished an anchored. Both methods worked well. Bait was the best.

    Either Ed Martin (ME) or Dan Payne (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. They were very close in numbers of haddock. Ed is a noted haddock killer from way back. He caught the largest haddock of the trip at 4 pounds. Dan has always been very good as well. Dan won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.5 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's largest pollock of the fishing season so far. The second largest fish was a 13.5 pound cod caught by Roger Hopkins (RI). Roger fished with a jig for most of the day. So he didn't catch the numbers of fish that Dan or Ed caught. But he did remarkably well with the jig, as he always does. I would never enter the boat pool if I knew I was going to be fishing against Roger in the process! Leo Lamoureux (VT) caught the third largest fish, a 7 pound cod.

    Other Angler Highlights: Karen Atwood (VT), oddly enough, landed the hard luck award t-shirt for catching the most sub-legal haddock and, because of this, taking home the least number of fillets for a person of her fishing stature.

    After the boat unloaded and Danny had cleaned the boat to a point where I could do my thing, I started the process of changing the oil. I had a hundred and fifty hours on the engine. I try to change it with that many hours every time. But sometimes I can't get to it until as many as one hundred and eighty hours. I am supposed to be able to wait as long as two hundred hours and still be safe. I don't like to wait that long. Danny helped me with this while also finishing up on the cleaning. With everything involved it usually takes less than an hour which is what it took today.

    Monday, June 10, 2024

    Again, the Bunny Clark resides on the float at Barnacle Billy's dock; only a couple anglers displayed an interest in sailing with us today.

    At 5:30 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west southwest at ten knots or more and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

    It was a beautiful day ashore today. The sky was clear all morning, nearly cloudless to begin and throughout the early part of the morning. Clouds formed in the afternoon, as they did yesterday. Some of these clouds carried rain. We only experienced a little bit of rain here and there. It wasn't even enough rain to get the roads wet. The visibility was excellent all day. The wind blew out of the west in the morning. Wind speeds weren't much. Five to ten knots, maybe? The afternoon saw a wind shift out of the south. Wind speeds got up to twelve knots, that I saw. But the wind died out at 6:00 PM. At least it died out along the shore. The ocean along the shore was calm. The highest air temperature 4that I saw was 75F. There was zero humidity, a perfect day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 78F (with a low of 58F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 47F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 52F).

    I had a battery of doctors I had to see (one) or discuss my health with (two). Aside from spending a limited time at the restaurants, this took up most of my day.

    I can't wait to go fishing tomorrow.

    Tim Tuesday, June 11, 2024

    Danny DellaMonica and I hosted the Greg Szczepanski (NY) marathon trip charter today.

    At 2:30 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F on the Bunny Clark, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

    We had a very calm ride to the fishing grounds. The wind was light out of the northwest. The visibility was excellent. The sky was clear the whole way with a beautiful unhindered sunrise. The air temperature at the helm stayed at 63F to 66F.

    On the fishing grounds, the wind stayed out of the northwest for all but the last fifteen minutes of fishing. Wind speeds were light with just ripples on the water in between calm patches. The wind hauled out of the southwest just before we headed home. Wind speeds were light from that periods and the whole ride back. The air temperature reached a high of 63F. The visibility ranged to over thirty miles. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The sky was nearly cloudless overhead with clouds on the horizon from the south to the northeast. The horizon was clear looking offshore. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61.6F, the highest surface water temperature I have seen to date.

    Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Perkins Cove, Ogunquit, Maine the high air temperature was 70F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 71F (with a low of 59F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 72F (with a low of 47F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 49F).

    The fishing was excellent. The catching was nearly so. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The majority of anglers reached the bag limit today. Legal landings also included sixty-five cusk, eight pollock, sixteen big redfish and a wrymouth. Released fish included sixty-seven dogfish, six small cod, forty-six sub-legal haddock, four sub-legal pollock and a porbeagle shark. We drift fished and anchored. Bait worked best. I never did find any fish on the sounding machine that I thought would take a jig. Although we did have one halibut chasing rigs as we were drifting but was never interested enough to take a hook. Maybe a jig would have worked better there?

    Bryan Conte (NY) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a 9 pound pollock which tied for the second largest fish of the trip. He split the boat pool for the second largest fish with his father-in-law, Paul Glowacki (NY). Paul caught a 9 pound cusk. This cusk ties for the Bunny Clark's second largest cusk this season so far. Paul caught the first haddock that I could weigh at 3.5 pounds. He also landed a 2.5 pound Maine state trophy redfish, the largest redfish that he has ever caught. It also ties for the largest redfish of the Bunny Clark fishing season (with Nikki; see the next paragraph). Some of Bryan's other great fish included two cusk of 8 pounds each, a 7.25 pound Maine state trophy haddock, a 5 pound haddock and a haddock that weighed 5.5 pounds, the last fish in the boat. I took a picture of Bryan holding his big haddock. This digital image appears on the left.

    Nikki Szczepanski (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.5 pound cusk. This is the Bunny Clark's largest cusk of the fishing season so far. I took a picture of Nikki holding up her big cusk. This digital image appears on the right. She also caught the first decent pollock of the day weighing in at 6.5 pounds. And she also caught a lot of legal haddock. But her best fish, she will come to realize, was her 2.5 pound Maine state trophy redfish. Nikki tied with Paul for the largest redfish of the Bunny Clark fishing season.

    Other Angler Highlights: Greg Szczepanski (NY) caught a 6.5 pound cusk, his biggest fish. His largest haddock looked to be 4 pounds. I didn't weigh it. Paul Manzari (NY) caught an 8.5 pound cusk, his biggest fish. Andre Yeomans (CT) landed a 5.5 pound haddock, his best of the many haddock he caught. Mike Bennett (NY) boated an 8 pound cusk, his biggest fish. Tim Blowers (NY) caught a 5 pound haddock and a 5.5 pound haddock, his two best fish. Richard Lyon (ME) landed the hard luck award for blowing the chance to win the boat pool by pulling his fish away from a boatable porbeagle shark!

    Today was the best weather day of the season for me. This makes things so much easier on the boat, very few anglers get sea sick in this kind of weather (there were none today) and everyone enjoys themselves so much more. To have the fishing as good as it was today is just a bonus.

    Wednesday, June 12, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica hosted the Richard Mallott (all New York) marathon trip charter today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the sky was mostly cloudy with clear patches and an isolated rain showers three miles or so offshore, there was no wind, the ocean along the shore was mirror calm and the visibility over it was excellent.

    Ashore, the sky was a mix of sun and clouds today. At 1:00 PM, the clouds looked so black that I figured, for sure, that we would get rain. We didn't. The wind blew out of the southwest at very light speeds for all morning and into the afternoon before dying out and backing out of the east. The east winds were, at most, eight knots. The morning wind was so light that it was barely a wind. The ocean along the shore was calm. The highest air temperature that I saw was 72F. The visibility was good to very good in the morning and early afternoon. Then the fog rolled in along the coast. The fog had disappeared by 5:30 PM. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 74F (with a low of 59F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 55F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 54F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable all day. The ocean was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 70F. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to five miles in fog and haze. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds, cloudless for the last hour of fishing. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

    The fishing was very good; the stronger than normal tide and the dogfish kept it out of the excellent category. The catching was very good. Landings were good to very good. Again, most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Thank God for the haddock! Legal landings also included seven pollock, twelve redfish, thirteen cusk, four mackerel, a halibut and three cunners. Released fish included ninety-eight dogfish, four cod over 5 pounds, seven small cod and a wolffish. They drift fished and anchored. Bait worked best. Even the halibut was caught on bait.

    Ian couldn't determine who was high hook. There was too much going on. Greg Mallott won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 33 pound halibut. This is the Bunny Clark's first legal halibut of the season. Ian took a picture of Greg's prize fish. This digital image appears on the left. Greg also caught an 8.5 pound cod, the third largest fish of the trip. Jim Flood caught the second largest fish, a 10.5 pound cod. This cod is tied for the fifth largest of the Bunny Clark season so far.

    Other Angler Highlights: John Gardner caught the largest pollock at 7 pounds. His largest haddock weighed 4 pounds. Rod Langevin caught the largest haddock at 5 pounds. Mark Tolman won the hard luck award for getting the worst tangle of the day.

    I received a very nice $50.00 donation from Gary Vincze & Mary Ann Donovan (CT) sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. They gave me a check personally when they showed up to see the Bunny Clark come in. They have been supporting me in this cancer project since I started in 2007. Thank you both so very much for all the help and your constant thoughtfulness. I appreciate it so very much!

    Thursday, June 13, 2024

    Danny DellaMonica and I ran the marathon trip today.

    At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was mostly overcast, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was nearly excellent.

    It was another smooth ride to the fishing grounds. We had very light northwest wind all the way to our destination. The ocean was calm. The sky was mostly clear with another beautiful sunrise at 5:00 AM. The air temperature increased to 66F at the helm. But it could have been because we were closed in. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles.

    On the fishing grounds, the wind died out and backed out of the southwest. Very light at first, the wind velocity gradually increased as the day progressed. The wind speed was almost ten knots by the time we were ready to go home. Seas were chops of about a foot with no discernable swell. [The wind increased to fifteen knots out of the southwest on the ride home with chops of about two feet.] The air temperature reached a high of 68F. The visibility ranged to over twenty-five miles. The tide (current) was moderate to light. The sky was mostly clear and very bright. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

    Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Perkins Cove, Ogunquit, Maine the high air temperature was 79F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 83F (with a low of 61F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 50F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 57F).

    The fishing was nearly excellent. It would have been excellent had we not had to contend with a few dogfish. The catching was excellent. Landings were nearly so. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. In fact, I set the minimum size at nineteen to twenty inches from the start. So we released legal fish all day long. Still, we attained the boat's bag limit by noon. Legal landings also included four pollock, forty-two cusk and a small porbeagle shark. Released fish included exactly one hundred dogfish, four small cod, forty-six good sized haddock, thirty-eight mostly small legal haddock, fifteen sub-legal pollock and two tiny cusk. We drift fished and anchored. Everyone used bait except for Fred Kunz (NH). He went back and forth between bait fishing and jigging. He used a jig and fly, exclusively, for the last two stops and did very well, the best anyone has done with a jig while I was captain this season.

    Art Fitts (VT) was high hook with the most legal fish, by far. He caught mostly haddock. Some of the haddock of his that I weighed included two of 5 pounds each and two of 5.5 pounds each. Dave Burton (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 78.5 pound porbeagle shark. He hooked the shark when he was bringing a cusk to the surface. The shark made a couple of darting runs on the surface. On the second pass, I gaffed it in the tail while it was still green. I held it in place until Danny was able to get another gaff into it. Then we swung it aboard. I took a picture of Dave holding up the tail on his shark. This digital image appears on the right. Dave's two largest haddock weighed 6.5 pounds and 6.9 pounds, just shy of a Maine state trophy.

    Rick Turner (NY) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 9 pound Maine state trophy haddock. This is a tie for the Bunny Clark's second largest haddock of the fishing season so far. Some of Rick's other good fish included included two haddock of 5 pounds each and one that weighed 6.75 pounds.

    There was a tie for the third largest fish (pool) of the trip at 8 pounds each. Both fish were pollock. Jonathan "Griff" Griffin caught caught one while Peter "Pizza" Koffler (ME) caught the other. Griff also caught a 7 pound pollock, a 6.1 pound haddock and a haddock that weighed 5.5 pounds. Pizza also caught a 7.5 pound Maine state trophy haddock, his last haddock of the day. This is Pete's largest haddock ever. It's also the Bunny Clark's fifty-second trophy haddock this season to date. That makes this the fourth best Bunny Clark season for trophy haddock in forty-two seasons.

    Other Angler Highlights: Jon Tesnakis (NY) caught a 4.5 pound haddock this morning early. It might have been his largest fish today. Fred Kunz caught a 5.1 pound haddock, his biggest haddock and, probably, fish of the trip. Fred caught the most dogfish of the trip with a full count of thirty of the green eyed devils! Emily Lovejoy (ME) caught a 7.1 pound Maine state trophy haddock. This is her first trophy fish and her biggest haddock ever. I took a picture of Emily holding her prize fish. This digital image appears on the left. She also landed the hard luck award for being late to the boat because of Peter. Thank God Peter had a cell phone as I would have left them ashore, had I not been able to get in touch with them.

    I received two donations today sponsoring me in my cancer fundraising project with the Pan-Mass Challenge. The first was from Dave Burton, who has been so generous over the years and is always so will to help. His donation was $60.00 which means that he is closing in on $1000.00 this season so far. The other was from Rick Turner for $40.00. Thank you both so very much for your support and thoughtfulness. You humble me!

    Friday, June 14, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was mostly cloudless, the wind was blowing out of the south southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze.

    Ashore, by 6:00 AM, the sky was overcast. And it looked like it was going to rain. It did rain by later morning. It kept raining lightly, and intermittently, throughout the morning and through most of the afternoon. By 5:00 PM, it had stopped raining for the day. The sun was out by 6:00 PM. The visibility was very good in some haze. The wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots, at most. The air temperature reached a high of 77F by mid morning. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 86F (with a low of 66F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 60F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 60F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots and then ten to fifteen knots. They had a long slog into the wind and two to three foot chops to get there. There were a few who didn't make it to the grounds in a healthy condition. Seas on the grounds were about the same; two to three foot chops over a swell about the same size. The air temperature reached a high of 64F. The visibility ranged to one and three miles in fog. They had intermittent light rain showers. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The sky was overcast all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

    The fishing was good at best. The sea conditions conspired with the dogfish and the strong current to make it a challenging day for some. The catching was good to very good as were the landings. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings included six pollock, two cusk and four whiting. Released fish included ninety-one dogfish, eleven small cod, around a hundred sub-legal haddock and a couple of sub-legal pollock. They drift fished and anchored. Bait worked best, although Jonathan "Griff" Griffin (MA) had some success with the jig.

    Griff was high hook with the most legal fish. He also caught the second and third largest fish, a 6 pound pollock and a 4.5 pound haddock. His haddock was the largest haddock for the trip. Brain Tufts (NH/FL) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.25 pound pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Ellen Gonnella (FL) caught a 4 pound haddock, the second largest haddock of the trip and her largest fish among the many haddock that she caught. Walter Grabowski (NY) landed the hard luck award for attaining high hurler status. He got a lead on everybody on the way to the grounds. I talked to him when they got back to the dock. He was laughing about it on the dock but it did affect his fishing performance. In fact, those who were fishing brought a lot more haddock home because of those who were not fishing.

    Bill Powers (NY) did me a solid today by donating $30.00 to my cancer funding research project with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. I saw him in Barnacle Billy's restaurant as I was waiting for the Bunny Clark to show up. Thanks so much, Bill. It was great talking to you. This is much appreciated. And best of luck!!

    Saturday, June 15, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the full day trip today.

    At 4:30 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly (and had been raining since 2:00 AM), the wind was blowing out of the north at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

    Ashore, it was a beautiful day once the clouds cleared out by 8:00 AM. The sky was clear for the rest of the day. The visibility was excellent. The wind was very light from the north and a variation of northeast to southeast. The ocean along the shore was calm. The highest air temperature that I saw was 76F. There was zero humidity today. It was a perfect day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 77F (with a low of 62F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 47F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 54F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at five knots, at most. Seas were chops of less than a foot. Way less. The air temperature reached a high of 69F. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was strong all day. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

    The fishing was very good. There were a few dogfish and the tide was strong, keeping the fishing out of the excellent category but very manageable just the same. The catching was nearly excellent. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included eight pollock, a cusk and a mackerel. Released fish included over a hundred sub-legal haddock, seven small cod, one decent sized cod, about a hundred dogfish and eight sub-legal pollock. They anchored and drift fished. Both jigs and bait were used. Bait ruled the day.

    Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. It was just too busy. Rachel Kuklinski (FL) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 6.5 pound pollock caught by Gardner Murphy (ME). Jonathan Hood (NY) landed the third largest fish, a 5.5 pound haddock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Bob Nunamacher (NY) caught a 5 pound haddock, the third largest fish of the trip. Katie Del Rio (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting into the worst tangle of the trip.

    Today I received two donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event to raise money for cancer research. My back revaluation might not come in time to get me on the bike to do the ride. But the fundraising is the part I most want to continue. One gift was for $100.00 from Michael & Sally Sanders (CT). The donation was made in the form of an "eGift" through the PMC site. They left a message with the donation that read: "Keep it going, Tim." The other donation was from Dawn Beckwith (ME) (and Sally). Dawn is a peach of a person who's mother passed in 2021 from the disease. Michael, Sally, Dawn and Sally have been supporting me in my cancer cure quest for many years. I do so appreciate their support. Thank you all so very much for your thoughtfulness and generosity.

    Sunday, June 16, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

    It was an excellent weather day again today ashore. The wind was light from the north in the morning, the ocean was flat calm before and after noon and then the wind shifted out of the south in the early afternoon. The sky was mostly clear all day with high clouds and, at times, a slightly hazy sky. The sun was still pretty bright all day. The visibility was excellent. The highest air temperature that I saw was 68F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 67F (with a low of 57F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 40F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 48F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north from ten to five knots. The ocean went flat calm for a while. After noon, the wind blew out of the south at five knots. The ocean was calm to a one foot chop. The air temperature reached a high of 68F. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

    The fishing was good to very good as the tide was strong and the dogfish were more prevalent. The catching and landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far, yet again. Legal landings also included seven pollock, nine cusk and a whiting. Released fish included one hundred and twenty dogfish, two cod that would have been of legal size under last fall's rules, four small cod, about one hundred sub-legal haddock, a few small pollock and a sculpin. They drift fished and anchored. Bait worked by far the best over jigs. Flies worked well.

    Barry Ano (NY) was high hook with nineteen legal fish. His largest fish was probably a 4 pound haddock. Ryan Keniston (ME), Ian's son, was second hook, behind Barry by a fish. Ryan was helping his (not quite) five year old son, Matthew, to fish so he couldn't spend the time he would have spent fishing had he been alone. Matthew caught his first ocean fish, a 1.25 pound sub-legal haddock that his grandfather, Ian, took picture of (with Matthew holding it) before it was released back to the ocean alive. This digital image appears on the right.

    Phil Milligan (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6.25 pound haddock. He also tied for the second largest fish with a cod of 6 pounds. Thomas Foster (ME) also caught a 6 pound cod. Both cod were released as we can't keep cod this spring. Thomas also caught a 4.5 pound haddock, the largest haddock at the time that he caught it.

    Other Angler Highlights: Jeremy Proper (NH) caught the second largest haddock of the trip. It weighed in at 5 pounds. Jason Anyan (NH) caught a 4.5 pound haddock. He also caught a 3.5 pound Maine state trophy whiting, the largest whiting the Bunny Clark has seen this season. Ian took a picture of Jason holding his prize fish. This digital image appears on the left. Daisy Chase (VT) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for being the best at being sea sick. There were a couple who had the same malady today.

    Barry Ano donated $40.00 to my cancer research fund raising project with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Barry had supported me very many times over the years with this same project. He is a very generous and thoughtful man. Thank you yet again, Barry. Much appreciated!

    Monday, June 17, 2024

    Captain Ian Keniston and Danny DellaMonica ran the extreme day trip today.

    At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was half clouds/half clear, the wind was light out of the south southwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

    Ashore, the air temperature rose to 76F in Perkins Cove. Or, at least, that was the highest air temperature that I saw. I'm sure it was warmer inland. But we had the wind off the water all day to help keep us cool. The wind blew out of the south southwest at ten knots to start and then backed out of the south and blew up to fifteen knots with higher gusts. By 10:00 AM, the sky was mostly overcast. The sky was fully overcast by noon and throughout the afternoon. The skies cleared by 5:30 PM. There was still some cloudiness but it was mostly clear. The visibility was very good in some haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high air temperature was 81F (with a low of 59F). The Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 55F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 56F).

    On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two feet or so over swells of the same height. The air temperature reached a high of 67F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was sunny in the morning and overcast all afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

    The fishing was good to very good if you feel the same way that I do about dogfish and a strong current. The catching, however, was excellent. The landings were very good to excellent. It was a very very busy day. Most legal fish landed were haddock but of a larger number than we have been seeing and we also landed a significant number of pollock from 4 to 9 pounds, close to our best pollock catch of the season to date. Legal landings also included a mackerel and a cunner. Released fish included one hundred and fifty-five dogfish, eight small cod, over one hundred and fifty sub-legal haddock (more legal haddock than subs today) and forty sub-legal pollock. They drift fished and anchored. Bait and cod flies caught every legal fish today.

    Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. There was just too much going on. Parker Allen (IL) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 8.5 pound pollock caught by Patrick Hunt (ME). Franco Russo (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 7.5 pound pollock.

    Other Angler Highlights: Todd Conant (ME) started the boat pool off with a 6 pound pollock. Mark Hamlin (ME) caught two pollock of 6.5 pounds each, his two best fish. Carlos Salozor (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting involved in the most tangles. Everyone remained healthy today except for Barry Ano (NY) who got a touch of the mal de mer. Ian didn't think he was sick enough for the shirt!

    I received two donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was another $40.00 donation from that most giving individual, Barry Ano. I think he would give you he vehicle if he thought you wanted it! Not only does he support me in my cancer research fundraising project, he supplies my employees at Barnacle Billy's with farm raised vegetables and he gives Ian, myself and Danny all kinds of home made goods. I know that he's too good to me. I also received a $40.00 donation from Jim "Chip" Chiapponi (CT). Chip, too, donates to my cause every year. Thank you both so very much for your thoughtfulness and support. It means a lot to me. But it means more to the researchers whom I support and the patients who suffer with the disease.

    Tim Tuesday, June 18, 2024

    Kai Rosenberg and I are running the marathon trip today.

    At 2:30 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no wind at the Cove but the Portland Lightship Buoy was showing eight knots of south southwest wind and the visibility over the ocean was very good in, what appeared to be, a bit of haze. More later.

    We have room on some upcoming trips: The extreme day trip on Wednesday, June 19, has eleven fishing spots available, the marathon trip of Thursday, June 20, has eleven fishing spots available, the extreme day trip of Friday, June 21, has nine fishing spots available, the full day trip on Saturday, June 22, has seven fishing spots available, the Sunday, June 23, extreme day trip has all twenty fishing places available while the extreme day trip on Monday, June 24th, has seventeen fishing spots available, the Wednesday, June 26, extreme day trip has eleven fishing spots available and the marathon trip of Thursday, June 27, has fourteen fishing places available. The haddock are still plentiful, the likes of which we haven't seen for years. We are starting to see pollock filtering into the fishing grounds and we caught our third halibut, a 33 pounder, on the extreme day trip on June 12th. Ian is definitely closing in on the halibut. Don't miss a day of good fishing at a time when groundfish are most active!

    Also, we are in need of a second deck hand for the upcoming Bunny Clark fishing season. If you are interested, please call 207-646-2214. Tyler Carpenter may be able to work on weekends (a day or two) but he has a full time job and won't be available on a regular basis.










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